The Similars (The Similars, #1)
When six clones join Emmaline’s prestigious boarding school, she must confront the heartbreak of seeing her dead best friend’s face each day in class.The Similars are all anyone can talk about at the elite Darkwood Academy. Who are these six clones? What are the odds that all of them would be Darkwood students? Who is the madman who broke the law to create them? Emma couldn't care less. Her best friend, Oliver, died over the summer and all she can think about is how to get through her junior year without him. Then she comes face-to-heartbreaking-face with Levi—Oliver's exact DNA replica and one of the Similars.Emma wants nothing to do with the Similars, but she keeps getting pulled deeper and deeper into their clique, uncovering dark truths about the clones and her prestigious school along the way. But no one can be trusted…not even the boy she is falling for who has Oliver's face.

The Similars (The Similars, #1) Details

TitleThe Similars (The Similars, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2019
PublisherSourcebooks Fire
ISBN-139781492665106
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction

The Similars (The Similars, #1) Review

  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    I've been having a problem with the newer YA fantasy books lately, so it was nice to get a breather from that business. I've read clone type books before, so this was a pretty fun take on it. Kind of The Islandish mixed with a soap opera, I'd say.At first, at the beginning, I didn't like the political type feel, so I had to zone that out. But once we get past that it really gets flowing. The romance aspect was the best part—I really adored Levi. There were a lot of times when I was questioning w I've been having a problem with the newer YA fantasy books lately, so it was nice to get a breather from that business. I've read clone type books before, so this was a pretty fun take on it. Kind of The Islandish mixed with a soap opera, I'd say.At first, at the beginning, I didn't like the political type feel, so I had to zone that out. But once we get past that it really gets flowing. The romance aspect was the best part—I really adored Levi. There were a lot of times when I was questioning what was going on with him—never quite sure what was behind that persona.Emma was a great character, thank goodness not annoying! I've been getting too many boring or uninteresting female characters on my radar lately! She was smart and always seemed to ask the right questions. I will say, I guessed the twists pretty early on, but I've read so many books and seen so many movies, I'm rarely surprised these days. The author's writing was right up my alley. She had a good way of pulling me in without me getting bored with pointless descriptions. Yes, it does end on a cliffhanger, and yes, I want to read the next book!
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  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    What an intriguing premise.... 6 human clones attending a prestigious boarding school, Darkwood Academy. I was excited to read this YA fantasy themed novel, BUT it failed to capture my attention or "wow" me.I think my expectations were too high and I was craving more of a Stepford Wives type of scenario (full of suspense with a touch of horror). This one had some of the ingredients, but just fell flat for me.Darkwood Academy has accepted six clones that are referred to as "the similars" and they What an intriguing premise.... 6 human clones attending a prestigious boarding school, Darkwood Academy. I was excited to read this YA fantasy themed novel, BUT it failed to capture my attention or "wow" me.I think my expectations were too high and I was craving more of a Stepford Wives type of scenario (full of suspense with a touch of horror). This one had some of the ingredients, but just fell flat for me.Darkwood Academy has accepted six clones that are referred to as "the similars" and they are all clones of existing students. Creepy huh? When the original students see their clones, they are quite stunned.There is a back story to the clones creation and we get the POV from one of the students, Emma who is mourning the death of a friend, Oliver.  She learns that he has a clone, Levi and this is devastating news.I enjoyed some parts and wanted to see how the story would play out, but in the end it felt a bit one dimensional and lacking suspense.Recommend for fans that are just looking for a fantasy read with a bit of a dystopian flavor.Thanks to NG for my advanced Arc to read/review. Book is out in January 2019.
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  • Kristy K
    January 1, 1970
    The premise of this story sounded unique and I was eager to get my hands on it. And for the first half or so of the book I was thoroughly enjoying it. With the sci-fi, mystery mix and a dash of romance, this seemed the beginning of a good YA series. But then things began to turn and I found myself rolling my eyes as The Similars fell into familiar YA traps: predictable twists and teens who can outsmart adults. I really struggled with the last 10-15% of the book. I think teens will enjoy this but The premise of this story sounded unique and I was eager to get my hands on it. And for the first half or so of the book I was thoroughly enjoying it. With the sci-fi, mystery mix and a dash of romance, this seemed the beginning of a good YA series. But then things began to turn and I found myself rolling my eyes as The Similars fell into familiar YA traps: predictable twists and teens who can outsmart adults. I really struggled with the last 10-15% of the book. I think teens will enjoy this but I feel adults will share my sentiments more.
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  • Jennifer Gaarder
    January 1, 1970
    Read my reviews at jenchaosreviews.comThe Similars By Rebecca Hanover.Sourcebooks Fire, January 1, 2019352 Pages, Hardcover EditionGoodreads Rating: 3.75/ My Rating: 4.00From Goodreads: "The Similars are all anyone can talk about at the elite Darkwood Academy. Who are these six clones? What are the odds that all of them would be Darkwood students? Who is the madman who broke the law to create them? Emma couldn't care less. Her best friend, Oliver, died over the summer and all she can think about Read my reviews at jenchaosreviews.comThe Similars By Rebecca Hanover.Sourcebooks Fire, January 1, 2019352 Pages, Hardcover EditionGoodreads Rating: 3.75/ My Rating: 4.00From Goodreads: "The Similars are all anyone can talk about at the elite Darkwood Academy. Who are these six clones? What are the odds that all of them would be Darkwood students? Who is the madman who broke the law to create them? Emma couldn't care less. Her best friend, Oliver, died over the summer and all she can think about is how to get through her junior year without him. Then she comes face-to-heartbreaking-face with Levi—Oliver's exact DNA replica and one of the Similars.Emma wants nothing to do with the Similars, but she keeps getting pulled deeper and deeper into their clique, uncovering dark truths about the clones and her prestigious school along the way. But no one can be trusted…not even the boy she is falling for who has Oliver's face."Review:A cloning operation that should have been successful, but, had some problems. One, not everyone wants to be cloned; and, two, not everyone thinks clones should be treated like human beings-even though that is precisely what they are.A young girl just lost her best friend to suicide over the summer and was reeling over it when she started her new year at Darkwood Academy. A boarding school, she found she would be spending her days confronted by six clones of students in her school. More disturbing than that, is one clone is that of her best friend who died over the summer. Taking a stance as the enemy was the first thing she does towards Levi. She felt threatened, even offended that someone would clone a dead person; but at this point, she had no clue what the larger picture was.She and her other best friend and roommate Prudence, who has also been cloned, have just been initiated in a gifted club of sorts in the school based on their test scores. However, that's not all who are going to be in the club. She is angry, hurt but also challenging.  Over the past weeks, she has slowly been watching the clones from a distance, seeing what makes them so different from everyone else. She has also become close to Levi and, while she knows he is not her best friend, she cannot help but feel drawn to him.The first half of the book explores the development of the relationship between Levi and Emma, the protagonist. Also, there is a tragedy of sorts that occurs where Emma's friend Prudence is sent away to be with her family. The relationship with Levi helps Emma discover a darker and more sinister plot.More importantly, they discover who the guardian and scientist are that is behind the clones in the first place. There is an even darker agenda that he has.The story was not as fragmented as I thought it might be, based on some of the reviews that I read on Goodreads. I thought the story was excellent and very action packed. The thrill of the suspense and what the heck the school was doing was also of great interest.Writing:The writing was smooth and not dull. I was fully immersed in the book into the wee hours of the night. The simple writing makes this a story suitable for anyone 14 and up. This was not a cheapened book; it had class.Plot:With the entrance of the six similars came the plots, the main plot and the many other plots to discover. However, the author made sure to leave something open for a sequel. As I saw on Goodreads, this is book 1 of a series. I am interested to see how this story goes. The plots are consistent and well thought out. I thought they were done well and tied up nicely in the end.What I Liked About This Book:I was thrilled that she made the clones have similarities in their specialties ( which you will learn about in the book), but also, made sure to make them all different from each other. This gave them individuality, and that is something that I look for in a book.What I Didn't Like In This Book:The utter madness and bigotry towards clones bothered me. However, I am not sure if that was the point. I think it could have been toned down, but I am not sure. There was talk about the nation passing legislation against ALL clones. Very strange.Overall Impression:This was a very different story than I am used to. However, I did indeed like it. The writing was smooth and enjoyable, and I was able to read the book nonstop for two days. This is a great story for someone who is into cloning and science fiction. I rated this a 4.00.
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  • Chrissie
    January 1, 1970
    This was a book of halves for me. The first half was insightful, poignant, and extraordinarily enjoyable. An easy four stars. But the second half was disjointed, campy, and pedestrian. Two stars. So, the math wizard that I am, decided to average those two ratings and just call it even with the three stars.The first half. Emmeline Chance is a young woman headed back to school following the death of her best friend. A death that was an apparent suicide. Wracked with feelings of guilt, remorse, los This was a book of halves for me. The first half was insightful, poignant, and extraordinarily enjoyable. An easy four stars. But the second half was disjointed, campy, and pedestrian. Two stars. So, the math wizard that I am, decided to average those two ratings and just call it even with the three stars.The first half. Emmeline Chance is a young woman headed back to school following the death of her best friend. A death that was an apparent suicide. Wracked with feelings of guilt, remorse, loss, and that empty forward motion that can afflict the still-living, Emma is trying to just get through this first part of returning to a new year of school. I felt the depth of Emma's emotions, the complexity with which Hanover approached this girl's recovery process. There was a thoughtful angle by the author which serves to immediately endear the reader to Emma. She was a likable person, too—as we soon learn about her attitude to the incoming clones who have dubbed themselves the Similars. She's accepting without it seeming to be simply feeding the plot, and she questions the clones without it appearing to be out of character.Emma's interactions with Levi and the other Similars, her other classmates, and her inner dialogue were well-written and easily displayed Emma as a fully-fleshed out and unique individual. As the introduction to the Similars themselves progressed, and the story opened up more, I found myself completely immersed in this school and the world beyond. Emma's situation and how she tries to handle it evoked so much sympathy from me that I was connected to her from the get-go. I could not read that first half fast enough.However. The second half. As the book's plot started to come together, filling in the missing or unknown information, and the larger conflict was explained, revealing the story's villain, the plausibility of this book's plot fell apart. The second half of the book felt off and disconnected from the first. I don't know which idea served as the springboard for the entire book, but they felt distinctly separate. There were moments in the second half of the book that made me feel that we were perhaps headed back in the right direction, but then something else would come up that was flat and lifeless. The villain was of a type. He wanted revenge from some past where he felt wronged, and this act and plan must've stunted his maturity and emotional growth, because he came off about as one-dimensional as you can get. He was villainous and almost let loose a maniacal, hand-wringing laugh by the time he came into the spotlight. Deus ex machina. The technology in the first half is one thing . . . there are givens which you just accept. Like clones or the easy-to-follow personal electronic devices surrounding the people...no problem. Even when the mystery opens up, and what is old technology to Emma helps set the stage for just how technologically advanced her society is—all this is easy to accept. But once the villain comes on the scene, it appears to be no holds barred for highly improbable technology. I don't want to give away anything, which limits my ability to dissect, but it just felt as if there were suddenly limitless possibilities and these were being pelted at Emma without much explanation or reaction to fully impress the reader of the gravity of the situation. Plunk, here comes another out of this world technology!The twists and turns. The first half didn't have much by way of revealing, just pacing alone wouldn't have allowed it, and I'm thankful that the course didn't vary from giving me a stellar first half. But what I assume were twists, turns, and reveals in the second half offered me no surprises and were predictable down to the end.All in all, this was a fairly enjoyable book—with the understanding that the ending was predictable and the villain and his cackling monologuing did not impress me. As it stands, I have the slated sequel on my Someday list, but we'll see how it pans out before I go diving right into it. I may just still be curious enough about the overall plot to warrant a perusal. It remains to be seen.I received this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This affected neither my opinion of the book, nor the content of my review.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I got sent this book in exchange for a honest review, all my opinions are my own and thank you so much to the publishers for sending me this book!So this is set in a world where clones of people exist. We follow Emma who is starting to get friendly with a group of clones aka "Similars" until she is shocked to see that Levi is a clone of her best friend Oliver who died recently.I really enjoyed this book and I'm really grateful I was sent it because it was a very unique read.The one thing that I I got sent this book in exchange for a honest review, all my opinions are my own and thank you so much to the publishers for sending me this book!So this is set in a world where clones of people exist. We follow Emma who is starting to get friendly with a group of clones aka "Similars" until she is shocked to see that Levi is a clone of her best friend Oliver who died recently.I really enjoyed this book and I'm really grateful I was sent it because it was a very unique read.The one thing that I really liked was the romance it was the strongest hate-to-love relationship and it was funny to watch the interactions between Levi and Emma.My only criticism is that I would love to learn more about the world and how clones came to be and how this effects society and what else is different in this world that ours.So I highly recommend you pick this up when it comes out and if you're interested in this then you're gonna have to wait awhile because this releases on January 1st 2019.
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  • Fabi
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis is a YA Dystopian novel. A rather lite dystopian as there isn't much world building and it's very near future.The setting is a prestigious high school where our group of characters are the elite of the elite. The main protagonist, Emmaline Chase, is starting her Junior year without much enthusiasm. She lost her BFF to suicide over the summer and she is still reeling from the pain of that loss. So the fact that six new students at her school turn out to be clones of some other stude 3.5 starsThis is a YA Dystopian novel. A rather lite dystopian as there isn't much world building and it's very near future.The setting is a prestigious high school where our group of characters are the elite of the elite. The main protagonist, Emmaline Chase, is starting her Junior year without much enthusiasm. She lost her BFF to suicide over the summer and she is still reeling from the pain of that loss. So the fact that six new students at her school turn out to be clones of some other students, she doesn't much care... until she sees that one of them is a clone of her lost best friend. Her initial rage slowly becomes friendship and later a budding romance.The romance is very much a back burner to the plot. There is mystery, suspense, and danger. In fact, the secrets tend to overwhelm the story-line. Some of the reveals were a surprise, but some of them were a bit predictable. I had a hard time engaging with the characters who seemed mostly one-dimensional to me. Even the romance felt stilted and stale. However, I was captivated by the ongoing action and eagerly made my way to the end of this story --- only to end up hanging off a cliff without a solid ending.I'm curious enough to want to read the sequel. The must be a sequel because this book ends rather abruptly. But I'm not entirely sure. It sounds like it may head into a love triangle which I don't enjoy in my reading. I suppose it depends on how long it takes for the second installment to be published. This first one is due out in January of 2019.A huge thanks to the publisher via NetGalley for this review ARC
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  • Alja Katuin
    January 1, 1970
    Pretty sure this is one of my favourite reads of this year so far.. I absolutely loved Emmaline and her dedication to find her friend.. and that plot twist!
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Review can also be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to Sourcebooks Fire and Netgalley for the eARC copy of this book. I was thrilled to have received a copy.This book! Wow! The Similars had me hooked from the very first page. It was a gripping, thrilling, and entertaining read from beginning to end. I love to read YA novels of this type, and this book certainly did not disappoint!Imagine going to school, or anywhere for the matter, and seeing exact look-al Review can also be found on my blog here: https://booksonthebookshelf.wordpress...Thank you to Sourcebooks Fire and Netgalley for the eARC copy of this book. I was thrilled to have received a copy.This book! Wow! The Similars had me hooked from the very first page. It was a gripping, thrilling, and entertaining read from beginning to end. I love to read YA novels of this type, and this book certainly did not disappoint!Imagine going to school, or anywhere for the matter, and seeing exact look-alikes of people that you know… imagine ever further if you had a look-alike of yourself? Such an intriguing concept for sure! Would you be able to tell the original person apart from the exact look-alike? I enjoyed reading about Emmaline’s experiences with the 6 similars that attended her school and the whole idea surrounding why there were 6 similars to begin with. What was their purpose in the world? Would they have the opportunity to be welcomed in society like every other human being, or would they be shunned from society for being “clones” and treated as such? I felt bad for Emmaline, especially after the tragic loss of her best friend Oliver and then coming face to face with his exact look-alike similar named Levi. It was like seeing Oliver all over again, except it wasn’t. Not really. Levi might look like Oliver, but he wouldn’t have Oliver’s memories, personality traits, mannerisms, etc that made Oliver…well, Oliver.Overall I really enjoyed this book and would highly recommend it!
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  • Xandra (StarrySkyBooks)
    January 1, 1970
    After SEVERAL plot twists and what ultimately felt like a long but satisfying book, I’m finally finished! RATING: 3.62 stars Based off of what I knew about this book’s plot, I knew that several things could have happened along the way which I may not have liked. Cloning research is a touchy subject, but since I had recently done a research paper about similar experiments, I figured I knew what I was getting into. And yet, I still ended up surprised. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of After SEVERAL plot twists and what ultimately felt like a long but satisfying book, I’m finally finished! RATING: 3.62 stars Based off of what I knew about this book’s plot, I knew that several things could have happened along the way which I may not have liked. Cloning research is a touchy subject, but since I had recently done a research paper about similar experiments, I figured I knew what I was getting into. And yet, I still ended up surprised. I was pleasantly surprised by the amount of twists I did not see coming. Usually, I’m the kind of reader who figures out the plot twist way before it happens, so I am glad this book offered multiple twists which kept me guessing. However, not all of these surprises were good. There were a few additions to the plot (which would be spoilers if I mentioned them now) that I didn’t enjoy very much, mainly having to so with the clones. There were a few details about the main characters which seemed a bit off throughout the book, but once I got through half of it, most of these problematic details were solved. That being said, there were also a few plot points which seemed to be a bit of a stretch, mainly having to do with the characters’ actions.I will also point out that the novel itself seemed to last a long time, despite being an average length book. I’m not sure if this was just my fault, but they probably fixed this issue for the official release. Overall, I liked The Similars more than I expected! It wasn’t mind-blowing or anything, but it was good. I will most likely be reading the next book when it hits shelves! I recieved an eARC from Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kaya
    January 1, 1970
    3.5!Thank you to Sourcebooks Fire for sending me a copy via Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review.I was totally drawn in by the premise because um clones? Do we really need one hundred more me’s walking around (the answer is always yes). That’s super unique and more people should write books about this subject. I felt that the author truly did an incredible job of showing the prejudice around clones, and by doing that showed just how messed-up our society actually is. Especially when it co 3.5!Thank you to Sourcebooks Fire for sending me a copy via Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review.I was totally drawn in by the premise because um clones? Do we really need one hundred more me’s walking around (the answer is always yes). That’s super unique and more people should write books about this subject. I felt that the author truly did an incredible job of showing the prejudice around clones, and by doing that showed just how messed-up our society actually is. Especially when it comes to people who are different.This book was REALLY addicting (not quite popcorn level but up there with cookies) and I adore Rebecca Hanover’s writing style! It’s simplistic and gets the point across without feeling too overdone. I was always easily pulled into the story, and could picture everything effortlessly.And hey! Her plot twists were actually amazing! She sets things up for some great reveals. I didn’t full-on gasp or die (as I often do) but I was surprised and sometimes that’s all you can ask for.NOW FOR THE PROBLEMS. If you know me, you know that my least-favorite-thing-of-ever (besides chicken pot pie and forced socializing) is insta-love. And I’m sorry to say that I didn’t see any sparks between the main character and the love interest. I mean, they would go literal weeks without talking to each other! I can’t really say much more because #spoilers but I felt that it wasn’t great.I think my other issue with the romance stems from the fact that I still don’t really know the love interest. We’re told about his personality and sometimes we see flickers of it but in the end, I feel like I don’t really know him. Maybe it’s just me???I felt that the plot was a bit convenient sometimes too. I HAVE SO MANY MIXED FEELINGS AHHHHHHHHH.SummaryI don’t know if this review was helpful at all but I’ll say that I enjoyed my time reading it yet at the same time, there was a lot of issues. I think I’ll definitely pick up the sequel, because I’m actually quite excited to see where the story goes, and how everything plays out! Tell me your feelings on this book if you’ve read it, or if you want to read it, or if you’ve ever read a book with clones!
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  • Carrie (brightbeautifulthings)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley from the publishers at Sourcebooks Fire, which is rapidly turning into one of my favorite YA publishers. They seem to have more hits than not, and a lot of their books have made their way onto my TBR. Trigger warning: suicide.Three months after her best friend, Oliver, commits suicide, Emmaline Chance returns to Darkwood Academy, an elite preparatory school for children of some of the richest and most influential people in the country. It’s also one of t I received a free e-ARC through NetGalley from the publishers at Sourcebooks Fire, which is rapidly turning into one of my favorite YA publishers. They seem to have more hits than not, and a lot of their books have made their way onto my TBR. Trigger warning: suicide.Three months after her best friend, Oliver, commits suicide, Emmaline Chance returns to Darkwood Academy, an elite preparatory school for children of some of the richest and most influential people in the country. It’s also one of the most progressive, and for the first time, Darkwood is accepting six clones into its halls. The clones were made illegally and without their DNA parents’ consent, but controversy is still flying about whether or not clones should have the same rights as everyone else. But the Similars aren’t just any clones– they’re clones of other Darkwood students, and Emma has to face the agony of someone else wearing Oliver’s face. When she receives a mysterious message that Oliver left for her, she’s pulled even further into the Similars’ group and learns that no one can be trusted.I teetered on the edge of 3 and 4 stars for this book because I did like it, and I think it’s a well-done bit of YA science fiction. The beginning is stronger than the end though, as the threads of conspiracy end up spiraling a little. It’s also difficult to keep track of all the characters and which sides they’re on. There are the six originals, the six clones, and a number of parent characters, both when they’re at school and not, plus some people lying about who they are. It ends up being a lot to keep track of, and I could have used a few more signals or maybe some family trees that include cloned counterparts.Emmaline is a fairly standard heroine. Given that her best friend just died, her father is distant, and she’s faced with seeing not-Oliver every day, there’s a lot of angst in the novel. While merited, it’s a little overwhelming, and we don’t get to see a lot of other sides of her character. She’s impulsive and has a tendency to talk back, but while we’re told she’s one of the smartest kids in the school, we don’t really get to see her working through problems. (Also, what are the Ten for? They don’t actually do anything besides haze each other.) The romance with Levi is also a little heavy-handed, with some dramatic but obvious conflicts, but I’m rarely a fan of romances.On the whole, it’s an enjoyable novel. The writing is good, and the plot is interesting and well-paced. I enjoyed the world Hanover sets up where the technology is advanced enough to make cloning a possibility, but the ethics of it haven’t quite caught up. There’s a morality thread in there about who counts as a human and whether or not clones deserve the same rights that could easily run parallel to some of the issues we’re having in the real world. The end has a few twists, at least one of which is ridiculous and another that genuinely surprised me (in a good way), and I’m interested enough to continue with the series.I review regularly at brightbeautifulthings.tumblr.com.
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  • Meigan
    January 1, 1970
    First in a compelling and exciting new series, The Similars takes the familiar boarding school aspect to the next level by introducing clones and asking the very important question: what if you were no longer the only you? How would you react? Not only was this book quite a lot of fun, but I absolutely LOVED the heavy dose of science that runs throughout coupled with some themes that certainly made me think. And it’s definitely something I’m still thinking about. I don’t know how I’d react if I First in a compelling and exciting new series, The Similars takes the familiar boarding school aspect to the next level by introducing clones and asking the very important question: what if you were no longer the only you? How would you react? Not only was this book quite a lot of fun, but I absolutely LOVED the heavy dose of science that runs throughout coupled with some themes that certainly made me think. And it’s definitely something I’m still thinking about. I don’t know how I’d react if I found out I had a clone, but I’d like to think I’d be as accepting and open-minded as the majority of the students at Darkwood. Though I can’t promise that. The story starts with circumstances shrouded in mystery and continues that way until the many reveals at the end. Nothing in this book is clear-cut. Motives and machinations are as shady as many of the characters and everything — from the creation of the clones to the history of the school — is a puzzle that needs solving. Secrets, deceit, and conspiracies abound and all of them have ties to the clones. Add to that the many plot twists thrown in and I couldn’t put this book down. Readers are given as many answers as deemed necessary, and by the end, the number of questions readers are left with far exceed the number of answers given. I adore slow reveals and The Similars delivered beautifully in that regard. Everything about The Similars hit so many high notes for me, from the scientific aspects to the boarding school, but I especially loved the characters and the attitudes toward the clones. Most were accepting, but a fair number of them were most assuredly anti-clone and it was an interesting approach to weaving in similar attitudes and prejudices that many people experience in our world, even in the here and now. Aside from that, each and every character had such depth and emotion, each one was truly dimensional, even down to the shallow jerks. All told, The Similars was a fantastic first installment in a mysterious new series that asks some heavy questions, which I’m still left thinking about. I really enjoyed this first installment and I can’t wait to see what the next book brings. 4.5 stars.*eARC received via NetGalley.
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  • Larosenoire299
    January 1, 1970
    The Similars is one of my most anticipated books in 2019. I was always interested in clone concept, but the only book I read about it was Never let me go. The similars is a mix of everything: Twilight vibe, bullying trope, mystery, dystropian, none of which was on point, but it was a comfortable read. The story took place in Darkwood - a preeminent school for elite students. The main protagonist of The Similars was Emma Chance, who had a difficult time adjusting to her best friend’s suicide. One The Similars is one of my most anticipated books in 2019. I was always interested in clone concept, but the only book I read about it was Never let me go. The similars is a mix of everything: Twilight vibe, bullying trope, mystery, dystropian, none of which was on point, but it was a comfortable read. The story took place in Darkwood - a preeminent school for elite students. The main protagonist of The Similars was Emma Chance, who had a difficult time adjusting to her best friend’s suicide. One day, Darkwood accepted six new students—“the Similars”—who were clones of existing students. However, one of them bore Emma's best friend's face. Levi’s presence made it difficult for Emma to move on because he was a reminder of what she lost. They shared the same DNA and appearance, but different characteristics. The romance of Emma and Levi was a slow burn, love hate relationship. Ah, but it's not the main plot of the story. The mysterious disapperance of Pru after being attacked makes Emma determine on figuring out the truth. There were some good twists and turns. The only thing I felt uncomfortable in this book was Emma eavesdropped and uncovered so many secrets without getting caught. And I didn't understand why clones were willing to help her easily, although they didn't take to each other. There is so much potential for the future of this series, although I don't think the author will pull it through.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    You can also read my review here:https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress....3.5 StarsI have had a review copy of this novel for months and have been waiting for it to be closer to publication, so I finally picked it up. I love the idea behind this novel, clones going to the same school as their originals. It seemed like the perfect set up for a kill-your-double story. While that wasn't really how this story went, it was still very interesting. It was a bit of a sci-fi mixed with a bit of mystery. T You can also read my review here:https://devouringbooks2017.wordpress....3.5 StarsI have had a review copy of this novel for months and have been waiting for it to be closer to publication, so I finally picked it up. I love the idea behind this novel, clones going to the same school as their originals. It seemed like the perfect set up for a kill-your-double story. While that wasn't really how this story went, it was still very interesting. It was a bit of a sci-fi mixed with a bit of mystery. This was a knockout debut for Rebecca Hanover.The Similars had an interesting plot with a few really great twists thrown in that totally caught me off guard. It kept me reading with a decent pace for most of the novel. I love novels set at elite boarding schools, but with the clones thrown in I was immediately drawn to pick this one up. The idea behind this novel was strong and had great groundwork for this novel to go in many different directions. While I did really like where it went, I felt like it could have been stronger. I guess I am still pulling for a kill-your-double story.There were things that I really liked about this story. I really liked that there was a secret society for the top ten best students complete with hazing rituals in the middle of the night. I also found it to be an interesting idea to have Emmaline's dead best friend have a clone. It brings up some really difficult issues with grief that I wanted to see confronted in this novel. As someone who has lost some friends, I expected this novel to be emotional when it came to dealing with her best friend's death, but it wasn't at all.The character development is where I felt like this novel was lacking. I didn't feel much of an emotional connection with these characters. While it wasn't entirely necessary , as there was a lot of action, it would have made the story stronger. While I did really enjoy reading The Similars, I didn't feel super connected to the characters, so I don't think I will continue on with the series.Overall The Similars was a fun read where science fiction met a bit of mystery. The pacing was done pretty well and it kept me reading the whole time. The character development was lacking a bit and I feel like some important issues about grief were left unexplored . For a first novel it is impressive, and while I might not follow the rest of the series, I would be interested to see what else Rebecca Hanover can come up with. This was a fast read, but it didn't have much depth to it.
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  • Claire (bookscoffeeandrepeat)
    January 1, 1970
    RTC ;)(and yes, I will be reading the sequel)**Huge thanks to the publisher for approving my request to read this book in exchange for an honest review!
  • Namera [The Literary Invertebrate]
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received in exchange for an honest review - thank you! I’ve been desperate to read this one since I saw the blurb months ago. The premise sounds brilliant – I mean, the heroine comes face-to-face with a clone of her dead best friend, who committed suicide. The potential for angst and philosophy was through the roof.While this book did deliver on the angst, it was somewhat lacking in philosophy, and anyway everything was ruined by how absolutely moronic the heroine is. Warning: slightly spo ARC received in exchange for an honest review - thank you! I’ve been desperate to read this one since I saw the blurb months ago. The premise sounds brilliant – I mean, the heroine comes face-to-face with a clone of her dead best friend, who committed suicide. The potential for angst and philosophy was through the roof.While this book did deliver on the angst, it was somewhat lacking in philosophy, and anyway everything was ruined by how absolutely moronic the heroine is. Warning: slightly spoilerish. In this vaguely futuristic timeline, 16-year-old Emmaline Chance is about to return to the elite Darkwood Academy after a very difficult summer. Her best friend Oliver committed suicide, and they hadn’t been speaking for months prior to that. But nothing is as bad as the discovery that Oliver has a Similar.The ‘Similars’ are a group of six clones who are all genetically identical copies of current Darkwood students. (Yes, at first I also found this unbelievable, but it turns out it’s a core plot piece). Sixteen years ago, they were accidentally grown in a lab, then whisked away and raised on a private island by a mysterious and reclusive billionaire. Now, however, they’ve decided to contact their genetic families and take their places at Darkwood. In the book clone technology is a lot more advanced than it is today, and different countries have different attitudes towards clones. The US’s attitude is to basically treat clones the way they currently treat Hispanic migrants from the south. Walls, border checks, enhanced ID checks, family separation… this part of the book was lifted straight out of the modern-day Trumpian administration.One of the clones, Levi, belongs to Oliver, and Emma understandably finds it very difficult to deal with him – especially because his snarky personality is nothing like Oliver’s gentle one. I liked that Hanover wasn’t afraid to show Emma’s internal conflict here. While she supports clone rights, she is (initially) very prejudiced against Levi, and that flaw really helped her come to life as a character.When Levi and Emma are serving detention together one day, they hear a scream and rush in to find that someone has attacked Emma’s roommate Pru. PLOT HOLE ALERT. She screams, they run to her – this whole thing is described as taking place within the course of over about ten seconds. Yet when they get to her, her body is so ‘ice cold’ that they doubt whether she’s even alive? Um, no. I don’t need to be a bloody doctor to know that even dead people don’t cool down that quickly.Thus begins a criminal investigation which seems to unfairly focus on the Similars. It doesn’t help that many of Darkwood’s most prominent students – including those who have Similars themselves – are actively campaigning for the clones’ expulsion. Things got a bit tricky here. While I obviously oppose baseless racism (cloneism?), the question of eugenics and designer babies is a very good one, and Emma never even tries to consider an answer to it. Hence why the book was disappointingly low on philosophy – I never got the nuanced debate on cloning I was expecting.She also demonstrates her stupidity in other baffling ways. Pru’s father sneaks her a note which he’s clearly gone to some pains to hide, giving it to her hidden inside a book. So what’s Emma’s first action? To go up to him, in front of everyone, the next time she sees him, and LOUDLY ASK HIM WHAT HE MEANT IN HIS SECRET NOTE. Like, what the hell.Emma’s also dumb because she KNOWS the Similars have some kind of evil plot, that they were given tasks to do which are harmful to everyone else, yet she gave not one crap about finding out what they were up to. It was like, ‘Oh, you’re up to something nefarious? Cool.’ It also began to become ridiculous how many times she was able to discover their secret plans because they happened to be holding a meeting right as she was passing by.Another plot hole. There are a ton more pharmaceutical drugs in this world than there are in real life, and one of them is a literal truth drug – everyone who takes it answers questions honestly. They also become extremely susceptible to suggestion. Yet this drug is readily available in the nurse’s office (despite having no medical benefits). Just, how??? Emma also gives this drug to another girl to force her to help Emma get into a locked location containing highly top-secret information. The drug doesn’t affect your memory, so this girl definitely remembers all the shocking things held in the locked location, yet it’s never mentioned what her reaction is. And she’d definitely have a reaction, considering the stuff that’s in the location is literally the point of the whole novel.Plot hole number whatever-the-hell-number-we’re-up-to. Levi and Emma run off to confront the villain of the story, because he’s keeping Pru hostage. You know who sends them there? Pru’s father. Yeah, he thinks, let me send a couple of ignorant teenagers to rescue MY ONLY CHILD from a fully-grown, intelligent, wealthy, criminal adult with every possible advantage over them. What could possibly go wrong? This was just absolutely unbelievable, that he’d send Levi and Emma of all people after Pru. He’s a wealthy, famous journalist with tons of connection, and this was the best he could do? Yeah, right.I’ll be reading the sequel because I am quite curious about what happens next. The book was fast-paced and not boring – all positives. Levi was pretty cute. Emma was really the only fly in the ointment, so hopefully that’ll be dealt with next time.[Blog] - [Bookstagram]
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  • - ̗̀ DANY ̖́- (danyreads)
    January 1, 1970
    . : ☾⋆ — 2 ★ READ THIS REVIEW ON MY BLOG!!!https://bit.ly/2TpApldARC provided from the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review (thank you Sourcebooks Fire!!)I’m sad to say this, but, alas. incredible concept, sloppy execution. The Similars is set in a futuristic universe where people’s DNA can be very easily and efficiently cloned, producing an exact replica of somebody, down to the very marrow of their bones. this becomes a subject of strong political and ethical discourse (à . : ☾⋆ — 2 ★ READ THIS REVIEW ON MY BLOG!!!https://bit.ly/2TpApldARC provided from the publisher via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review (thank you Sourcebooks Fire!!)I’m sad to say this, but, alas. incredible concept, sloppy execution. The Similars is set in a futuristic universe where people’s DNA can be very easily and efficiently cloned, producing an exact replica of somebody, down to the very marrow of their bones. this becomes a subject of strong political and ethical discourse (à la pro-life vs pro-choice: people are either pro-clone or anti-clone, and adhere very strongly to their beliefs). We follow our main character Emma, who recently lost her best friend, Oliver, to suicide. Emma attends Darkwood Academy, a distinguished, “inclusive” high school where six clones have just been accepted into the junior class, despite heavy backlash from the anti-clone crowd. these six clones, nicknamed “The Similars”, are all exact replicas of current Darkwood students. Emma, still grieving Oliver’s death, soon comes face to face with Levi, one of the six Similars, and Oliver’s DNA carbon copy. so, like I said, incredible concept. sloppy execution. I’ll elaborate, and I mean, don’t get me wrong, I was genuinely really into the general storyline here, I think this book was quite unique and mostly successful in that aspect. but there were definitely a few things that didn’t work for me in The Similars, starting off with the characters. everything having to do with any of the main characters was just extremely convenient. all 10-12 main characters are conveniently top of their class so they can all conveniently join the “Ten” (same 10-12 main characters who are, respectively, clones and cloned. conveniently). Emma and Levi conveniently get thrown into their community service thing together. they conveniently find Pru after she’s been attacked, conveniently triggering most of the relevant plot points in the book. honestly, I could go on forever but I’m not about to spoil the entire book here. I’m almost sure, though, that if your plot moves forward by the sheer force of a series of things and events that just conveniently and coincidentally, with no explanation, happened to your characters for no reason at all, then something might just be wrong with your book, structurally speaking. I’m not a professional writer or a published author by any means, Rebecca Hanover definitely has that on me. but if your entire book is just one huge convenient Deus Ex Machina, then something’s probably not working. I also didn’t find the romance appealing at all. the chemistry between the main couple was practically non-existent. I’m a big believer that if your characters need to kiss in order for your readers to realize they are into each other, then your characters probably shouldn’t be together in the first place. it means the chemistry and tension weren’t there at all during the lead up to the first kiss. it means your audience will have failed to create any sort of attachment to your characters as a couple, which definitely happened to me. I’m also sad to say that I correctly guessed the plot twist quite early on in the book. I don’t want to say that this book is predictable, because I don’t think it is, but I did fit all the pieces together LONG before I was even a third of the way into the book. in general, I think The Similars had a great deal of potential, and I’m not going to completely shove it away just yet. I think the following installments in this series will probably improve greatly because I genuinely did like the world building, and the concept behind this book was absolutely intriguing. the characters were an unfortunate disadvantage to The Similars, but I’m not gonna let that take away from the fact that I did actually enjoy some parts of this book, and that I’m most likely going to be looking out for the sequel when it eventually comes out in 2020. The Similars is not a terrible book but it definitely needs a little bit more work, especially as a debut novel. thanks again to Edelweiss+ and Sourcebooks Fire!!
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  • Camila Roy ••RoyIsReading••
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 3/5e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewThe Similars are all anyone can talk about at the elite Darkwood Academy. Who are these six clones? What are the odds that all of them would be Darkwood students? Who is the madman who broke the law to create them? Emma couldn't care less. Her best friend, Oliver, died over the summer and all she can think about is how to get through her junior year without him. Then she comes face-to-heartbreaking-face with Levi—Oliver's exa RATING: 3/5e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewThe Similars are all anyone can talk about at the elite Darkwood Academy. Who are these six clones? What are the odds that all of them would be Darkwood students? Who is the madman who broke the law to create them? Emma couldn't care less. Her best friend, Oliver, died over the summer and all she can think about is how to get through her junior year without him. Then she comes face-to-heartbreaking-face with Levi—Oliver's exact DNA replica and one of the Similars.The concept of this book is unlike anything I’ve read before, so naturally, I was very excited to discover this futuristic world and its characters. Human cloning might seem impossible to most people, but if you consider the way technology has evolved in the last two decades, it doesn’t sound that far-fetched. There is still a lot we don’t know about the world. Imagine where we could be another 20 years from now...Anyways, The first installment in this series falls into the “okay” category, BUT it does have potential. The events that took place were somewhat entertaining and I wasn’t bored while reading, yet I didn’t become attach to any of the characters or even liked their personalities much. I also wish the author had dedicated more time to world-building and describing the setting. The storyline was gripping enough to keep me interested but I never found its true depth or purpose. In the end there’s only one word that comes to mind to describe this: average.Most of these issues are likely be solved in the sequel, so I am willing to give this series a chance out of mere curiosity. As for recommending it, I’ll let other readers decide for themselves if it’s worth their time.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Overall I enjoyed this. A bit futuristic with transportation, clones, plums and keys but not so far out there to be a major sci-fi. Just elements of. Possibly even near-futurish. I liked Emma as a character but I didn't feel she was too smart in how she went about certain things. One of the 'ten' top students at the school yet she makes some naive moves. Never let that girl be a detective! She tries but goes about things wrong and has little real sense where she needs to be focusing. I liked the Overall I enjoyed this. A bit futuristic with transportation, clones, plums and keys but not so far out there to be a major sci-fi. Just elements of. Possibly even near-futurish. I liked Emma as a character but I didn't feel she was too smart in how she went about certain things. One of the 'ten' top students at the school yet she makes some naive moves. Never let that girl be a detective! She tries but goes about things wrong and has little real sense where she needs to be focusing. I liked the twists and turns and motive guessing of the characters. Although some was predictable it was still an enjoyable journey watching her piece things together.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review.I thought that the concept for The Similars had potential. Unfortunately, it failed to live up to it for me.I think the idea of cloning is very interesting. It brings up so many ethical questions. Some of those issues were brought up in the course of the book, however I didn’t think it was handled well. Instead of actual discussions and honest questions, it was treated like so many hot button topics are these days: with I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review.I thought that the concept for The Similars had potential. Unfortunately, it failed to live up to it for me.I think the idea of cloning is very interesting. It brings up so many ethical questions. Some of those issues were brought up in the course of the book, however I didn’t think it was handled well. Instead of actual discussions and honest questions, it was treated like so many hot button topics are these days: with the two sides yelling their opinions at each other and not having an open mind about it at all. I get enough of this in real life, I don’t really want it in my entertainment. The author also tried to draw parallels between cloning and illegal immigration that I felt was a bit of a stretch.I didn’t really love any of the characters. The story is told through Emma’s first person POV, so I felt like I got to know her pretty well, but character development was really lacking for everyone else. Emma was likable most of the time, though. The Similars are easily the most interesting characters of the book, but only a little bit of time is spent getting to know any of them. I didn’t really get on board the romance. Even though it was obvious what was going to happen, I still felt like it just kind of happened out of the blue.There are two reveals towards the end of the book that I felt were supposed to be twists, but they were both things I suspected pretty early on in the story. Even though they didn’t surprise me at all, I think they have potential to provide some interesting paths in the coming books.Overall, The Similars was just not for me. Despite an intriguing premise, the lack of character development, somewhat messy writing, and forced political overtones made this a book I was just getting through, rather than enjoying. As of right now, I’m not interested in continuing the series. I am by no means the target audience for this book, though, so those that are may find this a much better read than I did.Overall Rating (out of 5): 2 Stars
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  • Vicky Who Reads
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsMixed feelings on this one because although I felt like it met the requirements for a Decent Book, I still wanted more and wasn’t 100% in love with this. I mean–it was pretty good. I think the characters were interesting enough and there was nothing glaringly obviously bad about it. It was all there: boarding school, clones, mystery, secretish societies, rich people. Yet, as much as the concept was good and even the plot, somewhere along the way, the execution kind of lost me. And it’s 3.5 starsMixed feelings on this one because although I felt like it met the requirements for a Decent Book, I still wanted more and wasn’t 100% in love with this. I mean–it was pretty good. I think the characters were interesting enough and there was nothing glaringly obviously bad about it. It was all there: boarding school, clones, mystery, secretish societies, rich people. Yet, as much as the concept was good and even the plot, somewhere along the way, the execution kind of lost me. And it’s not like Hanover is a bad writer. It’s just that this book honestly was just a little . . . drab. There, I said it. I felt like it could have used more spice and atmosphere and world-building. It could have used more, emotion (?) I guess. Investment? Something that really connected the reader with the story, because I honestly felt just vaguely disconnected. I wanted to be absorbed into the almost dark nature of the boarding school–there are so many awesome twisty, dark secret society upper echelon boarding school stories with that dark, almost sinister atmosphere. I wanted that. I didn’t really get it. Yes, there was a hazing scene, but beyond that it didn’t really reach the atmospheric quintessential “boarding school feel” that I was looking for. And the twists were just a little predicatable? Which in general I don’t mind, but I wanted them to still be executed in a way that really felt shocking, you know? I think you can have something predictable and still shocking if you add the right amount of emotional intensity into the scene, and I just didn’t find that. Overall, it felt almost like this book lacked passion. And it’s not to say that Hanover wasn’t passionate about this–it’s just that I didn’t feel that type of intensity that I was hoping to find in this novel. However, there were still a lot of pluses. I still thought the plot was inventive and interesting. We don’t get a lot of stories on clones in YA (not enough, anyways) and I always think it’s a really fun idea to explore. I believe Hanover did a good job in exploring this portion, and I really enjoyed what she did do about the clones. Plus, the backstory was developed pretty well, and I thought that there were clues along the way that helped, although it did kind of feel like Emma–the main character–was doing a lot of waiting. A lot of this book is Emma thinking about stuff, and the middle portion sagged a bit in my opinion, because that’s where the least amount of action. I could tell Hanover was trying to keep it engaging, but it did end up losing me in the middle where weeks passed and not a lot really happened.Overall, I though The Similars had a good concept & plot, but the execution was just kind of lacking and I wanted more from this. If you do like the sound of a not 100% mystery focused mystery (something a little more low key than a full mystery), I might suggest this!Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Kate (beautifulbookland)
    January 1, 1970
    There are few things worse for a reader than when you start a book and love it, but then gradually start to lose interest in the story and the characters. Unfortunately, that’s what happened to me while reading The Similars. I totally thought I was onto a winner when I read the first few chapters, but I started to lose interest as I got further into the book. It ends with a cliffhanger, and honestly? I don’t care. Usually cliffhangers ruin my life, but this one didn’t make me feel anything.What There are few things worse for a reader than when you start a book and love it, but then gradually start to lose interest in the story and the characters. Unfortunately, that’s what happened to me while reading The Similars. I totally thought I was onto a winner when I read the first few chapters, but I started to lose interest as I got further into the book. It ends with a cliffhanger, and honestly? I don’t care. Usually cliffhangers ruin my life, but this one didn’t make me feel anything.What it’s AboutWhile the rest of her fellow Darkwood students are left reeling after the the school’s acceptance of six clones, Emma doesn’t really care. She doesn’t care that a clone of six different Darkwood students exists, and she doesn’t care why; not when her very best friend Oliver killed himself over the summer. She doesn’t see what the big deal is - until she meets Oliver’s clone, Levi, and she needs to see her dead best friend’s face day in, day out, all while knowing that Levi isn’t actually her best friend. Despite swearing that she wants nothing to do with Levi, Emma soon finds herself drawn into his circle, determined to discover the secrets of him and the rest of the clones.The CharactersI can’t really go into depth about the characters, because there wasn’t really very much depth to them. They were okay, don’t get me wrong, but they had none of their unique flare; they were just totally average. There’s also a villain, complete with slightly cringey and typical villain-ish comments. The WritingThe writing itself was pretty decent, I think; the characters and the actual story were what let the book down. I liked Rebecca’s writing style and her settings, so I would definitely be open to reading any future books she writes - maybe just not in this series.*I received an e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*
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  • NerdyBookishBeauty
    January 1, 1970
    This book had me confused at the beginning and I was all in by the last page. This story is your typical dystopian with a whole new twist! If you can overlook the personal plot on politics, the story was amazing and deserves a slot in my four star corner! Amazing job!
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  • Tucker (TuckerTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    I love the cover but it has a big scientific inaccuracy. You see when genes are cloned they are cloned with a strand of DNA (CDNA to be exact.). The staircase in the photo resembles RNA which is not used for cloning. RNA has one helix (or strand) while DNA has two helixes (or helices)
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  • Deborah E Kehoe
    January 1, 1970
    ❤❤❤❤❣Emma is going back to Darkwood Academy for her junior year without her best friend Oliver who committed suicide over the summer. It’s hard to get excited about the current gossip about six clones or “Similars” being enrolled at Darkwood, but when one of them is the clone of Oliver it’s hard to ignore. As she gets to know Levi and the other Similars she realizes that even though they have the same DNA they have individual personalities and aren’t exact copies of the original. As pro and con ❤️❤️❤️❤️❣️Emma is going back to Darkwood Academy for her junior year without her best friend Oliver who committed suicide over the summer. It’s hard to get excited about the current gossip about six clones or “Similars” being enrolled at Darkwood, but when one of them is the clone of Oliver it’s hard to ignore. As she gets to know Levi and the other Similars she realizes that even though they have the same DNA they have individual personalities and aren’t exact copies of the original. As pro and con Cloning groups spring up on campus and around the nation Emma is enmeshed in an investigation into how her friend Oliver’s death was tied to the man who developed and raised the six Similars.The Similars had such a great premise! Can you imagine showing up for school and finding your face on a cloned classmate? It’s not like high school isn’t difficult enough, right? Then there are the political and moral ambiguities of whether cloning should be accepted or not? These are all details that helped create this finely crafted novel that played out as more of a political intrigue then a YA fantasy novel. What struck me the most is that the hate and bigotry in this novel is not necessarily determined by color or societal hierarchy, in this case bigotry comes in the form of originals and copies. A subject that is topical in today’s world as much as in a fantasy novel. Although not quite yet to human copies. At least I don’t think so?Emma was a wonderful heroine. She never sat back and just watched, she was always asking just one more question. That one last question always seemed to be slightly over the line but would give her the answers she’d need to make a decision to move forward in her thinking or to fall back on her upbringing. I really admired her fortitude. She never gave up on her friends, and never stopped looking into the Why’s and Who’s.The Similars, even with all of their mysterious backgrounds and “special powers” seemed more real and fleshed out than their human counterparts. This definitely made it easier to like them but truly the humans were portrayed as pretty awful. You’d be inhuman to like the hateful attributes that were portrayed as “human”.It took me a little while to warm up to Levi’s character. Emma was so distraught over Oliver’s death that you really felt her anguish over seeing his face on another guy. When she gets to know Levi and realizes they are really nothing alike he still keeps his distance until, well, he doesn’t. It’s really hard to talk about these characters without giving away a lot of the plot. I’ll just say that there is a reason that he keeps himself aloof, but Emma’s investigation makes him get involved and he goes all in emotionally at that point too.The Similars was a very fast paced novel. Rebecca Hanover filled the story with enough moral, political, and personal subplots that my mind didn’t stop to chew before swallowing this novel whole. When you get ready to read it have your snacks and a coke at your side because you will NOT want to put it down!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This review was first published on my blog In Between Book Pages.I don’t remember exactly when I requested for this book, but I do remember reading the summary and being instantly hooked. Clones? You got me! Ethically, the issue of cloning is a dubious one, but it was fascinating, the thought of a world where clones existed. Sadly, an interesting premise doesn’t always mean a good story. With the hook of its contem ARC provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This review was first published on my blog In Between Book Pages.I don’t remember exactly when I requested for this book, but I do remember reading the summary and being instantly hooked. Clones? You got me! Ethically, the issue of cloning is a dubious one, but it was fascinating, the thought of a world where clones existed. Sadly, an interesting premise doesn’t always mean a good story. With the hook of its contemporaries and none of the bite, The Similars fails to make good on what could have been a complex and intriguing plot. It wasn’t really the writing that threw me off because that aspect of this book was okay. The execution, however, was a different story.There were just too many things happening all at the same time: there’s Emmaline, the main character, still reeling from grief after her best friend Oliver died from an apparent suicide, then the arrival of the six clones, The Similars as they were collective called, at Emma’s school Darkwood Academy, then there’s also The Ten, the anti-clone movement, dubious school administrators with hidden agendas, a mysterious benefactor, a message from beyond the grave. It was just one subplot after another subplot after another subplot. Of course, it’s possible to tackle all of these in a single book, but it just wasn’t handled well in this one. The storytelling felt disjointed and repetitive, and suspending my disbelief felt harder the deeper I delve into this book.The big cast of characters also didn’t help The Similars' case. An over-the-top, one-track villain, an underdeveloped love pairing, the characters were shallowly drawn and poorly utilized. The characters themselves were, for lack of a better word, forgettable. I didn’t get to know much of the many characters who ran around the pages of this book and because of that, without forming any attachment to anyone, I just didn’t care about what happened to any of them.Overall, though The Similars did have some parts that I enjoyed, this one just didn’t work for me. The fast-paced narrative may draw in readers into this book, and I definitely could see some even sticking through with this series because of that cliffhanger of an ending, which is great, but, just being honest, this is it for me for this series. There are other books, other trilogies and series that worthy of my time.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    However many words there are to describe them: Clones, Copies, Cylons, Doppelgängers, Replicants, Similars, I find this stream of sci-fi to be incredibly fascinating! The very idea that someone, somewhere, even came up with the concept of duplicating DNA is completely mind-boggling, and yet, I find myself inexplicably drawn to stories such as these. While Clone stories have been around for decades, The Similars brings something I haven’t yet come across in this area, and that is: a likeable and However many words there are to describe them: Clones, Copies, Cylons, Doppelgängers, Replicants, Similars, I find this stream of sci-fi to be incredibly fascinating! The very idea that someone, somewhere, even came up with the concept of duplicating DNA is completely mind-boggling, and yet, I find myself inexplicably drawn to stories such as these. While Clone stories have been around for decades, The Similars brings something I haven’t yet come across in this area, and that is: a likeable and relatable young adult story - particularly the use of interesting, strong, and mature teenaged characters, accessible and appealing science, and portraying the interactions and immersion of clones into the community, not just with ‘regular’ people, but also with their originals. There’s also a lot of heart and soul in it, some might call it humanity. Additionally, this book manages to capture real occurrences in current society that can be applied to real-life factions and groups of people...“Have they taught you to fear what you don’t understand?”“I would hate there being a rally to protest my very existence.”...and is so very subtle about sending a message about human rights. I thoroughly enjoyed this enthralling novel, my only negative is that I have to wait what feels an age until the next book in the series is published. Thank you to Rebecca Hanover, Sourcebooks Fire, and NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Meli
    January 1, 1970
    Formula Twilight pero con clones + un maltrato horrendo.En serio, hay TANTAS cosas mal con la forma en la que la protagonista trata al clon de su amigo muerto que opaca lo copado que pueda tener la trama (que lo tiene, pero esta mina de humillarlo a escupirlo hace todo lo que se les ocurra. Imposible sentir empatía por una protagonista así. Ojalá se hayan avivado de que es horrendo y todo esto no haya pasado del arc).
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  • Kiki Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Wow wow wow WOW! I LOVED THIS NOVEL OH MY GOSH! A progressive novel that took concepts of what oversteps something’s right and what we consider to be human or not. The whole concept and twists surprised and excited me. Rebecca Hanover brought futuristic sci-fi and made it modernistic in a harmonious way. I adored the wit and persistence of Emmaline and I am desperately hoping there is a sequel!
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