The Truth About Keeping Secrets
Sydney's dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio town.He is also unexpectedly dead.Is Sydney crazy, or is it kind of weird that her dad-a guy whose entire job revolved around other peoples' secrets-crashed alone, with no explanation?And why is June Copeland, homecoming queen and the town's golden child, at his funeral?As the two girls grow closer in the wake of the accident, it's clear that not everyone is happy about their new friendship.But what is picture perfect June still hiding? And does Sydney even want to know? THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS is a page-turning, voice led, high school thriller.

The Truth About Keeping Secrets Details

TitleThe Truth About Keeping Secrets
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 7th, 2019
PublisherPenguin Books Ltd
ISBN-139780241346303
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Mystery, Contemporary, Lgbt, Fiction

The Truth About Keeping Secrets Review

  • Savannah Brown
    January 1, 1970
    With the pub date less than four months(!) away and ARCs soon to be released into the wild, I thought it was a good time to mention that there are content warnings on my website if you need them, as well as links to a bunch of resources (which are also included in the back of the UK edition).That's all! Hope you all enjoy! Back into my hole I go!
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Sydney's dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio hometown. He has died unexpectedly. Is Sydney crazy, or is it just weird that her dad, a man whose job revolved around other people's secrets, died alone. And why is June Copeland, homecoming Queen and the towns golden child, at his funeral?What an incredible debut this is. The book covers some intense topics: abuse, grief and sexuality. The writing just flows beautifully across the pages, drawing you in. I simply adored Syd Sydney's dad is the only psychiatrist for miles around their small Ohio hometown. He has died unexpectedly. Is Sydney crazy, or is it just weird that her dad, a man whose job revolved around other people's secrets, died alone. And why is June Copeland, homecoming Queen and the towns golden child, at his funeral?What an incredible debut this is. The book covers some intense topics: abuse, grief and sexuality. The writing just flows beautifully across the pages, drawing you in. I simply adored Sydney, my heart went out to her. This book covers many emotions life can throw at us: confusion, anger, and homophobia to mention a few. Although this book has been put in the YA genre, I do think it can be read by any age.I would like to thank NetGalley, Penguin Random House UK, Children's and the author Savannah Brown for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    sounds very intriguing
  • Lex
    January 1, 1970
    Devoured this in a day. The characters feel so real, the explorations of grief and fear were so good they hit a little too close to home, and every few pages you come across an exquisite paragraph or turn of phrase that knocks you out. If this isn't a prize-winning bestseller I'll eat my own face.
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  • Melanie Murphy
    January 1, 1970
    Prompt: 'What did you think?' Ans: I think I want to tell every girl who has ever fancied or felt for another girl to read this when it comes out. I think I discovered things about myself and my separation anxiety from reading about Sydney's journey with grief. I think I'll re-read this book any time I lose somebody very dear to me. I think the climax was well executed and the Big Discovery isn't something I saw coming (often I see these things coming from a mile away because I watch so many mov Prompt: 'What did you think?' Ans: I think I want to tell every girl who has ever fancied or felt for another girl to read this when it comes out. I think I discovered things about myself and my separation anxiety from reading about Sydney's journey with grief. I think I'll re-read this book any time I lose somebody very dear to me. I think the climax was well executed and the Big Discovery isn't something I saw coming (often I see these things coming from a mile away because I watch so many movies and have read so many books, but Sav PROPER surprised me in her delivery/plotting). I think I want, no, I NEED to see this as a Netflix mini series. Ugh, it would be fucking awesome. I think Savannah's writing is delicious and poetic and that her metaphors are sensory, caressing, and I loved how smoothly the words ran through my brain. I think I'm very satisfied with the ending and that this girl has a bright career ahead of her. Okay, I'll stop now.
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  • Julie Parks
    January 1, 1970
    Sad, honest and brilliant. So much more than a YA thriller, this book tells a story from a very emotional perspective.If you read the synopsis, you'd assume it's a YA mystery. But it's not really. It's more about what grief feels like than why the narrator is grieving.It's a sticky book that will glue it's addictive tiny details to your mind and walk with you to your next grocery trip, or sit along with you in your next class. Or sing along with you the last lullaby to your son at night, lingeri Sad, honest and brilliant. So much more than a YA thriller, this book tells a story from a very emotional perspective.If you read the synopsis, you'd assume it's a YA mystery. But it's not really. It's more about what grief feels like than why the narrator is grieving.It's a sticky book that will glue it's addictive tiny details to your mind and walk with you to your next grocery trip, or sit along with you in your next class. Or sing along with you the last lullaby to your son at night, lingering in the air long after the last syllable. All the while making you think and wonder about all the what-ifs...THAT's how real it feels. THAT's how good the writing is.Well done, Savannah Brown. Something new and beautiful where only miserable and typically high school used to lay. A fabulously promising new author to follow.Thank you Penguin Random House for the chance to read this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThe Truth About Keeping Secrets is a quiet, slow-paced contemporary novel following a girl who has lost her dad in a car accident - but was it really?I'm seeing that this is being marketed as an f/f thriller, but while it does have a mystery element, I'd recommend it more to those who loved Nina LaCour's We Are Okay than to fans of Far From You or People Like Us.That's because to me this book felt more like an exploration of grief than a thriller, at least for its first half. The second 3.5 starsThe Truth About Keeping Secrets is a quiet, slow-paced contemporary novel following a girl who has lost her dad in a car accident - but was it really?I'm seeing that this is being marketed as an f/f thriller, but while it does have a mystery element, I'd recommend it more to those who loved Nina LaCour's We Are Okay than to fans of Far From You or People Like Us.That's because to me this book felt more like an exploration of grief than a thriller, at least for its first half. The second half did feel more like a thriller, but I also thought it was the weakest part of the book. While the first half was an atmospheric, vaguely creepy story about grief and associated unhealthy coping mechanisms that also talked about what it's like to be the only girl who is out as a lesbian in your high school, the second half was about the main character trying to piece together a mystery whose resolution seemed - at least to me - obvious from the beginning. I guess I just like introspective character driven stories more?And as a character-driven story, The Truth About Keeping Secrets is really good, since it succeeds where many other supposedly character-driven books fail: the main character's voice was perfect. Sydney is a teenage girl who is grieving, who is dealing with her father's death in an unhealthy way, and she's sad and angry and using sarcasm as a coping mechanism, and she felt real in a way very few characters do. Even other people's reaction to her felt very realistic (I have seen something very similar to the Dylan Thomas poem scene happen. Some teachers really are that insensitive). I loved reading about her, and when the focus shifted from grief to the actual mystery, I wasn't as interested.This is also a story that talks about imperfect friendships, abusive relationships and that "liminal" space queer girls often find themselves in when they have a maybe-unrequited crush on a girl - the "does she like me or am I just misreading everything" space. The Truth About Keeping Secrets is an f/f book, and there's a romance between Sydney and June, the seemingly "perfect" girl Sydney becomes close with after the death of her father - but for most of the book, Sydney doesn't even know whether June likes her back. There's a scene in which the two girls talk about liminal spaces and I was thinking that "liminal" is exactly how their relationship felt at the moment. I really liked how it developed after that.Also, the writing was gorgeous. I can't share any quotes because I read an ARC, but I highlighted a lot of things while reading this.One more thing: you can find trigger warnings for this book here. As this book deals with some heavy themes, I recommend reading them before going into it.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    The Truth About Keeping Secrets is a beautifully plotted novel with mystery elements but mostly focusing on a portrayal of grief – one young girl and her journey through the loss of her Dad, as such it is an emotional, compelling story that will have you hooked.I loved Sydney and engaged with her fully – her distinct sense of loss, her reaching for connections and in doing so her developing friendship with June, the golden girl, who is hiding behind a facade. But why and what does this have to d The Truth About Keeping Secrets is a beautifully plotted novel with mystery elements but mostly focusing on a portrayal of grief – one young girl and her journey through the loss of her Dad, as such it is an emotional, compelling story that will have you hooked.I loved Sydney and engaged with her fully – her distinct sense of loss, her reaching for connections and in doing so her developing friendship with June, the golden girl, who is hiding behind a facade. But why and what does this have to do with Sydney’s loss?Intriguing and nuanced, The Truth About Keeping Secrets is enduringly spirited and often unexpected- a page turner with real heart and soul that digs deep into human reality.Loved it. Recommended.
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  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    > 4 stars! I hadn’t actually heard of Savannah Brown before this, but I fell in love with the proof cover for TTAKS with its little keyhole and then was pretty delighted when I found out this was f/f. I didn’t know she was a YouTuber (?), and had written a book of poetry already. The first thing you have to do when reading this is let go of the assumption that this is a thriller/mystery, because it’s not. It was only when this clicked for me that I was able to enjoy TTAKS a lot more. It’s a > 4 stars! I hadn’t actually heard of Savannah Brown before this, but I fell in love with the proof cover for TTAKS with its little keyhole and then was pretty delighted when I found out this was f/f. I didn’t know she was a YouTuber (?), and had written a book of poetry already. The first thing you have to do when reading this is let go of the assumption that this is a thriller/mystery, because it’s not. It was only when this clicked for me that I was able to enjoy TTAKS a lot more. It’s a really thoughtful consideration of many things, mostly grief, but also depression, mental health, male privilege, friendship and abuse. It’s not heavily plot-focused, with most of the dramatics happening in the last 60 pages, and a large majority of the book is Sydney learning to cope after her father’s death, and how falling in love amongst other things helps her with that. The writing style is really lovely, colloquial but not overly chatty (it reminded me of Laure Eve’s in The Graces just a little for some odd reason) and the cast of characters is really well-drawn. Sydney is an awesome heroine, and though I disagreed with how she chose to handle her friendship with Olivia at times, I do think it was depicted in a way that made me think and I liked how it was resolved. Leo is similarly awesome, as was June. I did really like the diversity in the cast, with both June, Olivia and Leo being PoCs, and then Sydney, Leo and June being LGBTQ. I loved the friendship dynamics between Leo and Sydney, and then the romantic dynamic between June and Sydney. A really lovely addition to UKYA, and I look forward to seeing what Savannah Brown does in future.Read for #fffebruaryreads ‘18, and a full review will be up on my blog soon
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    THE GOOD:* I read this book back in January and I still think about it constantly, something that doesn’t usually happen that often* it’s probably the best book I’ve ever read that deals with grief and how we cope with it* so poignant, so soooo beautiful, I honestly have no words to properly describe how much I loved this story* the writing is phenomenal and the main character’s dark humour is something that I really appreciated and related to* this is a f/f story so yaaaassss we honestly NEED m THE GOOD:* I read this book back in January and I still think about it constantly, something that doesn’t usually happen that often* it’s probably the best book I’ve ever read that deals with grief and how we cope with it* so poignant, so soooo beautiful, I honestly have no words to properly describe how much I loved this story* the writing is phenomenal and the main character’s dark humour is something that I really appreciated and related to* this is a f/f story so yaaaassss we honestly NEED more of those out there* I mentioned grief, but there’s also the exploration of fear and I honestly truly cannot explain to you how brilliant it is done* sad, honest, raw, gripping, addictive, with a touch of mystery, but ultimately a portrayal of a journey towards acceptance * it’s definitely one of my favourite books of 2019 so far, I cannot recommend it enough THE BAD:* there… isn’t… anything? idk? *shrug*Special mentions: emotional and physical abuse (off page), forced coming out and verbal abuse related to sexual orientation, suicideYAY or NAY: PICK UP THIS BOOK - it releases on March 7th (in 2 days! 🎉)Favourite quotes:* i’m so mad at myself that I didn’t write them down *sobs*★★★★★To everyone who got this far, thank you for reading and have a wonderful day! Also, feel free to share your thoughts, comment or tell me anything :)
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  • Meghan Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    ALRIGHT FOLKS! Here is a YA novel that is now up there with Jandy Nelson’s “I’ll Give You the Sun” for me... This is absolute magic from youtuber turned author Savannah Brown 💛 It is so wonderful to see someone like her write something like this & I truly don’t want that to sound minimizing. It is just personally SO encouraging to read a body of work like this from someone I know. I was enveloped in this story from the START. What a beautiful way she wrote on queer romance, death, grief, emo ALRIGHT FOLKS! Here is a YA novel that is now up there with Jandy Nelson’s “I’ll Give You the Sun” for me... This is absolute magic from youtuber turned author Savannah Brown 💛 It is so wonderful to see someone like her write something like this & I truly don’t want that to sound minimizing. It is just personally SO encouraging to read a body of work like this from someone I know. I was enveloped in this story from the START. What a beautiful way she wrote on queer romance, death, grief, emotionally & physically abusive relationships, & moving on. I bookmarked so many pages in here just like I do with Jandy’s work solely because of the way she DESCRIBES THINGS!!! Some of my favorite parts being how she described nature reclaiming a living but lifeless body with branches growing through guts, navigating space & time when you feel like you’re just floating through the ether after you lose a grounding figure in your life, sitting in presence in the face of pain, & ugh just SO much more! I HIGHLY recommend reading this if you obsess over YA novels like me. I grew attached to Sydney & Jude & goddamnit even Heath at times. I wanted everything to work out in the best way possible & grew in frustration, but held onto my damn pants for it all to wrap up like I knew it would! UGH I JUST FUCKING LOVED IT! YEP! TOO AWESOME TO EVEN DESCRIBE!
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  • Zoë ☆
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was ‘just’ going to be a murder-mystery going in, but it was about so much more: grief, mental illness, love, friendship. I couldn’t stop reading it once I started! I quite liked the writing as well.
  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    The Truth About Keeping Secrets by Savannah Brown was not exactly the book that I expected. I do like Young Adult books and I did enjoy this but it wasn't the thriller I was expecting. The characters were great, but a little predictable - as was the ending. It was a good quick read that didn't require too much thinking.Sydney is still grieving the death of her father in a car accident. He was the local Psychiatrist and knew the towns secrets. But did she know his? And why does she think that the The Truth About Keeping Secrets by Savannah Brown was not exactly the book that I expected. I do like Young Adult books and I did enjoy this but it wasn't the thriller I was expecting. The characters were great, but a little predictable - as was the ending. It was a good quick read that didn't require too much thinking.Sydney is still grieving the death of her father in a car accident. He was the local Psychiatrist and knew the towns secrets. But did she know his? And why does she think that there is more to it than an accident. She can't accept that he is dead. Then the most popular girl at school turns up at his funeral - why? The 2 become friends and the mystery deepens. Playing detective is a dangerous game.Thanks to Penguin Random House UK Children's for my advanced copy of this book to read. All opinions are my own and are in no way biased.
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  • Dorine
    January 1, 1970
    I was so excited when I saw that Savannah is coming with a debut YA book, I can't wait to pick it up!The blurb gives me a bit of a Riverdale vibe, and I'm all for it tbh.
  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    Sydney, convinced the crash they killed her father is actually murder, refuses to accept his death could be an accident. When she sees June, the homecoming queen, at her father’s funeral and gravesite, Sydney becomes suspicious. What does June know and why would a popular girl like her want to befriend an outcast like Sydney?I wasn’t surprised to learn that debut ya writer Savannah Brown is also a poet. Her word building slows seamlessly, often dancing off the pages.THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRE Sydney, convinced the crash they killed her father is actually murder, refuses to accept his death could be an accident. When she sees June, the homecoming queen, at her father’s funeral and gravesite, Sydney becomes suspicious. What does June know and why would a popular girl like her want to befriend an outcast like Sydney?I wasn’t surprised to learn that debut ya writer Savannah Brown is also a poet. Her word building slows seamlessly, often dancing off the pages.THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS is primarily an ode to love and grief with Sydney struggling at the acceptance stage, unwilling to believe her loving father could have died in a random accident. Ten percent of the book reads like a fast paced thriller, the rest is mostly inside Sydney’s head, processing her relationships and her father’s death with scenes with friends interspersed in between. Though there are thrilling aspects near the end of THE TRUTH ABOUT KEEPING SECRETS, it isn’t a thriller.
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  • Anna Luce
    January 1, 1970
    ★★★★✰ 4.25 stars (rounded up because...why not)“The terror of it all was almost funny. Truly. The pain was ludicrous, completely unreasonable, completely alien; I found it impossible to believe that this sort of feeling could even exist, that the boundaries of human suffering extended this far.”And I thought that I was 'over' YA novels...I ended up liking this so much that I bought it in paperback too... (hopefully Savannah Brown can write another amazing book).“I was afraid of myself when left ★★★★✰ 4.25 stars (rounded up because...why not)“The terror of it all was almost funny. Truly. The pain was ludicrous, completely unreasonable, completely alien; I found it impossible to believe that this sort of feeling could even exist, that the boundaries of human suffering extended this far.”And I thought that I was 'over' YA novels...I ended up liking this so much that I bought it in paperback too... (hopefully Savannah Brown can write another amazing book).“I was afraid of myself when left to my own devices. I didn't like that person much in the fleeting moments I encountered her, and I certainly wasn't interested in being handcuffed to her.” I actually think that the title, cover and summary undersell this novel. Yes, there is a mystery underlining this story (something that has do with secrets) but the focus is on Sydney's grief. Unable to reconcile herself with her father's death she becomes disconnected from her life. She can't believe that an accident caused his death and becomes increasingly convinced that he was killed by one of his patients. As Sydney struggles to get through each day (and we see just how her existence has become irrevocably changed) she finds comfort in June Copeland, the school's homecoming queen and 'golden' girl. “So I kept it quiet, kept it selfish, and just absentmindedly basked in her presence, bathed in it, lived in it. I was happy just being with her, living on the same planet, breathing the same air.”As Sydney starts to develop feelings towards June (who has a boyfriend) she begins to suspect that her new friend is hiding something. As if that wasn't enough, since her father's funeral Sydney has started to receive a series of anonymous texts which threaten her safety.“Something about the way we spoke reminded me of dancing, one foot moving to match the other, a quiet swapping of dominance.”The beautiful prose describes with sharp accuracy Sydney's pain. There is numbness, fear, anxiety, and paranoia. Brown doesn't shy away from portraying just how disturbing and consuming Sydney's obsession with death is. Or how her small community treated her after she was outed by another girl. “Eventually, 'Dad is dead' turned into 'I will die', which was my introduction to the fear. The fear of gone. The fear of nothing at all, of what happens to me, of I am the main character and the story will crumble if I'm not there to see it through. This wasn't fair. It wasn't fair. I didn't ask to be born; I didn't ask to be hurt; I didn't ask to feel anything at all!”I loved this book. A taut storyline that gives a heart-rendering picture of grief and love. There is beautiful rhythm to Brown's writing style and I could easily read this again (and again and again and again).The 'weakest' part was the person behind those texts. It sort of made sense (it was clear for the reader) but I wished for something less...obvious? Again, this is a minor thing so it didn't detract me from the story.“Grief and guilt came hand in hand. Guilt that followed smiling or laughing or getting any kind of mild enjoyment out of anything. Indulging in earthly pleasures seemed grossly hedonistic, somehow, after having experienced A Great Loss, so I learned to compartmentalize. ”Read more reviews on my blog
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  • Lizor
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly, I was kind of afraid that I would be disappointed, because even though I didn't want to, I had quite expectations, especially because I had been waiting for this book since the day it was announced and pre-ordered it ages ago. I wasn't disappointed. I loved this book. First of all, the characters were amazingly done, just the writing style and the way they were set up was very strong and believable. And just the writing style, in general, worked so well and just hooked me into the stor Honestly, I was kind of afraid that I would be disappointed, because even though I didn't want to, I had quite expectations, especially because I had been waiting for this book since the day it was announced and pre-ordered it ages ago. I wasn't disappointed. I loved this book. First of all, the characters were amazingly done, just the writing style and the way they were set up was very strong and believable. And just the writing style, in general, worked so well and just hooked me into the story. I laughed out loud a few times - kind of awkward, but quite remarkable - and the last 100 pages just completely sucked me into the book, so much so that it took me a while to come back to the real world after I'd finished. Plotwise, I must say that I had figured out the twist already, but honestly, I didn't mind, because the fact that the author gave you a chance to solve it for yourself, gave me validation as a reader and I quite like that. All with all, a great novel and if you like the kind of John Green vibe books, this is definitely something you should read.
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  • Alannah Clarke
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to netgalley.co.uk for providing me with a free copy of this book. With this book, I thought I was getting another thriller but I thought the author made it slightly different by exploring the process which would be something I would see in a women's fiction novel rather than a mystery/thriller novel. I have to admit that it took a while to really get into the novel, it didn't feel like what I normally read but that's a good thing. Once I got about halfway through the book, I was hooke Thank you to netgalley.co.uk for providing me with a free copy of this book. With this book, I thought I was getting another thriller but I thought the author made it slightly different by exploring the process which would be something I would see in a women's fiction novel rather than a mystery/thriller novel. I have to admit that it took a while to really get into the novel, it didn't feel like what I normally read but that's a good thing. Once I got about halfway through the book, I was hooked and needed to know more. I really like the author's writing style and can't wait to read more of Brown's work.
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  • charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    Rep: lesbian mc, biracial (black) bi li with depression/anxiety/PTSD, black gay side character, bi side character, East Asian side characterCWs: full list
  • London Shah
    January 1, 1970
    I consider myself very lucky to have read an arc of this YA thriller, due to the main character's utterly believable, natural, and realistic voice. I loveeee Sydney, loved being in her head, and enjoyed this story. The emotional truth throughout is on another level, and I really appreciated it. The voice! Oh gosh, I could go on forever about the voice––it's unlike anything I've read in YA; it's bold, engrossing, and oh so perfect <3 Brown's writing is incredibly confident, skilful, and engagi I consider myself very lucky to have read an arc of this YA thriller, due to the main character's utterly believable, natural, and realistic voice. I loveeee Sydney, loved being in her head, and enjoyed this story. The emotional truth throughout is on another level, and I really appreciated it. The voice! Oh gosh, I could go on forever about the voice––it's unlike anything I've read in YA; it's bold, engrossing, and oh so perfect <3 Brown's writing is incredibly confident, skilful, and engaging, and I truly look forward to whatever they write next. The Truth About Keeping Secrets is a brilliant debut.
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  • Evie Braithwaite
    January 1, 1970
    The Truth About Keeping Secrets is a slow-paced novel and an exquisite portrayal of grief following the sudden death of Sydney’s father in a car accident.I have mixed feelings about this book. The first half is an atmospheric exploration of grief and the unique coping mechanisms one can develop. Sydney is reeling from the sudden death of her father and her coping mechanism? Scrolling through a website which posts surveillance footage of deadly road accidents. We delve into her mind and see how s The Truth About Keeping Secrets is a slow-paced novel and an exquisite portrayal of grief following the sudden death of Sydney’s father in a car accident.I have mixed feelings about this book. The first half is an atmospheric exploration of grief and the unique coping mechanisms one can develop. Sydney is reeling from the sudden death of her father and her coping mechanism? Scrolling through a website which posts surveillance footage of deadly road accidents. We delve into her mind and see how she struggles. She’s sad, angry and she uses sarcasm and jokes as her way of brushing off serious conversations. Moreover, a large portion of the book is dedicated to establishing the relationship between Sydney and June; the golden girl who Sydney is fascinated by. We watch her feelings develop for her, picking flower petals in her mind while she is stuck in the liminal space of ‘does she love me back?’. The 20 minutes she spends in the car rides to school with her are her only moments of joy. Although I empathised with June's story, I struggled to take a shine to her. I wish what we learned about her wasn’t confined to the climax, but rather explored further over the course of the novel.The second half of the story was weak. It is centred around the mystery behind Sydney’s ominous texts and peculiar incidents following her father’s death. However, I thought the answer was predictable from the get-go. Various red herrings emerge throughout which only made me more certain of the foreboding outcome. The Truth About Keeping Secrets touches upon not only grief but other poignant relationship issues; manipulative friends and abusive relationships. This isn’t a story for the faint of heart. It is predictable, the mystery isn’t too compelling. Nonetheless, there is an abundance of beautiful paragraphs and turns of phrase which made this a pleasure to read.Thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK Children’s for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Abbie (boneseasonofglass)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Georgia
    January 1, 1970
    !!!!! AHH
  • Patrick Sproull
    January 1, 1970
    Sooooooo... due to some weird circumstances I was very fortunate to read this book in an early form and with the knowledge that books evolve as they're edited, I'm gonna try and tell you why this book is special.It's a testament to Savannah Brown that I couldn't stop thinking about this book for a long while after I put it down. It's weird, it refuses to budge from your mind, it made me question a lot that I previously held as the norm. It's one of the most atmospheric contemporaries I've read, Sooooooo... due to some weird circumstances I was very fortunate to read this book in an early form and with the knowledge that books evolve as they're edited, I'm gonna try and tell you why this book is special.It's a testament to Savannah Brown that I couldn't stop thinking about this book for a long while after I put it down. It's weird, it refuses to budge from your mind, it made me question a lot that I previously held as the norm. It's one of the most atmospheric contemporaries I've read, to the point where it doesn't feel like it exists within the confines of the 'contemporary' novel. TTAKS has a touch of the Gothic to it - I could almost see it working in a historical setting - there's a lot of scenes of isolation, a lot of restraint in the gorgeous way Brown writes.. and it all works. God, does it work - it's a thriller heavy on emotions, and I was gripped. It's about lost girls, about angry kids, about finding a kindred soul, and a lot of it feels very pertinent to today. There's graveyards and flowers and deaths and a plethora of gays. If Stevie Nicks wrote a YA novel, this would be it - and it's going to make a lot of people very happy.
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    I came into this one with anticipation. I’ve been a fan of Savannah’s poetry going back to her viral What Guys Look For In Girls response and I can’t imagine anyone less than artistically-inclined to be romantically linked to young film auteur Bertie Gilbert. I don’t typically buy books (I’m a library girl at heart) and I went out and preordered this one. And here we are.This is exactly the kind of book I tried to write when I was in tenth grade. Obviously this is much, much better, but the vibe I came into this one with anticipation. I’ve been a fan of Savannah’s poetry going back to her viral What Guys Look For In Girls response and I can’t imagine anyone less than artistically-inclined to be romantically linked to young film auteur Bertie Gilbert. I don’t typically buy books (I’m a library girl at heart) and I went out and preordered this one. And here we are.This is exactly the kind of book I tried to write when I was in tenth grade. Obviously this is much, much better, but the vibe is the same. Even the plot is the same. Dark, depressed teenager’s parent figure suddenly dies and she falls into insanity and love. Sav is out there writing my DREAM and I’m so proud of her.I’ll put it all in point form here because I don’t want this to be too long.Great things: ⁃ the first-person format makes sense because we can hear Sydney’s voice in her narration. A distant narrator wouldn’t tell the same story in the same way ⁃ seeing aspects of Savannah’s real life experience being put on the page with representation without romanticisation! Her poem Skinny Girls Bleed Flowers back in the day touched on this (for a separate issue) but I was thrilled that she put it into practice. ⁃ the British-style formatting and grammar was cute. homegirl has truly moved over to the Queen’s English ⁃ the not-so-now time period where I could imagine that I was seventeen again, doing the same things (it’s clearly based on Savannah’s high school days, and we’re only a few months apart) ⁃ Leo is an ART FORM I LOVE HIM ⁃ being as vague as vague could be, I loved how there’s wasn’t…closure…for a certain plot…yeah, I’ll go with that ⁃ even parts I didn’t care for, it was at least readable. That’s props to the narration and the characters Sav created but you don’t find that in every book ⁃ I finished the book with a sense of like…odd warmth? And I like when a book does that. Very few books do that. Had it not been for the deterrents below I’d consider it a 5-star novel.Ungreat things ⁃ Olivia had purpose to the story but I just didn’t really like her for the first half lol ⁃ sometimes the connection between Sydney and June came off like dialogue of Life Is Strange and…I’m not a particular fan of that franchise ⁃ the obligatory party scene felt obligatory and cliche ⁃ I guess I’m just not a fan of thriller climaxes in general as well as their explanatory fallout ⁃ I don’t know how I feel about a plot thread in the last chapter yet ⁃ this might be totally wrong, but I thiiiink I remember Sav tweeting there would be a sequel…I like this as a one-off, personally. Unless there’s plenty more Leo, in which case, sureAll in all, this was a wonderful debut by a wonderful human. I hope she is proud of her hard work and I’m proud of how her dreams are coming true. She’s a lovely human (I say as if I know her but I obviously don’t) and I wish her the very best in her writing journey.
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  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    This novel has romance, mystery, angst, humour and some thriller all rolled in one. It has a f/f relationship involving the main character and includes other LGBT characters too. I thought it was great!First off, i want to say that story kept me fully engaged. I really wanted to keep reading to find out what happened, although it was only towards the end of the book that it really felt like a thriller. That said, the earlier stages of the book are so interesting in exploring how the characters c This novel has romance, mystery, angst, humour and some thriller all rolled in one. It has a f/f relationship involving the main character and includes other LGBT characters too. I thought it was great!First off, i want to say that story kept me fully engaged. I really wanted to keep reading to find out what happened, although it was only towards the end of the book that it really felt like a thriller. That said, the earlier stages of the book are so interesting in exploring how the characters connect through their grief, and the creepy messages that Sydney keeps receiving keep the mystery and the creepy feeling going through the book.Second of all, the characters in this story have been amazingly written. When the author writes their feelings, especially when it comes to Sydney and June, it feels very real and easy to imagine. A lot of the novel deals with Sydney's anger and grief along with her attraction to June, and It was interesting to see how the characters interacted and became closer as they helped each other.I also loved how this novel showed different relationships and how people can try to use these relationships to manipulate you. Manipulative friendships and abusive relationships are explored in this book well, and it took me by surprise of the extent of what someone can hide. Some of the book is slower-paced, in terms of how it explores the developing relationship between Sydney and June rather than going straight after the mystery - but there's a reason this build up is important and i think it makes you connect to the later events much more. I loved the later parts of the book - it was creepy, darkly obsessive, and i was afraid for the girls.Overall, i thought this was a great read. I loved the relationship in this book and the mystery in the story kept me hooked.I received a free copy of this book via netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Anjana
    January 1, 1970
    The first thing that hits you when you start reading this book is how refreshing the narration is. Although the story begins at a funeral, there is a clear indication of the level of intelligence of our lead character (and a twisted sense of cynical humour).Sydney's father died in an accident and she is mourning him in a completely unhelpful way. The better part of the book consists of different stages of her grief which may not be textbook. Her father would have known how to deal with the situa The first thing that hits you when you start reading this book is how refreshing the narration is. Although the story begins at a funeral, there is a clear indication of the level of intelligence of our lead character (and a twisted sense of cynical humour).Sydney's father died in an accident and she is mourning him in a completely unhelpful way. The better part of the book consists of different stages of her grief which may not be textbook. Her father would have known how to deal with the situation since he was the local psychiatrist, but he is no longer around. The book may be targeted at young adults, but it deals with grief and trauma in a way that would appeal to anyone who can empathize/sympathize with the situation. To make matters worse for Sydney, her suspicions of foul play with regards to her father get compounded by some unexpected things and one of them lead to a new friend (of sorts). I do not want to reveal any more information because each character is introduced in an equally interesting fashion which helps the reading experience. The one thing I would like to mention for when you read the book (or those who already have), is the attitude Sydney has in the beginning of her current 'best friend'. The differences between the two has made their relationship seem a certain way to her and she is sure she is right. The maturity of that thought seemed very realistic to me when push came to shove as well as the dynamics with her mother.There is a bit of suspense which is brought into the forefront every other chapter but for the most part it sticks around like a background score.It may seem slightly slower in parts but it is mostly fast paced and well written.
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  • Kim Timmermans
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this. It felt so real and the emotions are so real that I can't stop thinking about it. This isn't just a YA mystery/thriller it is SO much more than that. The way in which Sydney holds on to certain moments and how she distracts herself from grieving and the way that is put into words is so beautiful and accurate (I mean the June. June at the River Styx. June in the driver's seat.) It's so strong in depicting her thoughts and I think that's what made me so immersed, but it could also be I loved this. It felt so real and the emotions are so real that I can't stop thinking about it. This isn't just a YA mystery/thriller it is SO much more than that. The way in which Sydney holds on to certain moments and how she distracts herself from grieving and the way that is put into words is so beautiful and accurate (I mean the June. June at the River Styx. June in the driver's seat.) It's so strong in depicting her thoughts and I think that's what made me so immersed, but it could also be the build-up and the little clues that something is wrong, or the compelling dialogues. Also, I was very much intrigued by June's character and I loved the references to Dylan Thomas' Do not go gentle into that good night. TTAKS is a quick and easy read, at times a little bit repetitive / predictive / slow, and I guess the characterization of Sydney is a bit limited (but that made sense to me, because she's so obsessed with death, and everyone else sees her as the gay girl whose dad just died). These are just minor things, I thought it was brilliant and I love Sydney and June and Sydney's dad and I just want to thank Savannah Brown not only for this amazing book but also for being a huge inspiration to young writers.
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  • Jade
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars (Rounded up)Thank You NetGalley, Savannah Brown snf Penguin Random House UK for this book. I'm not 100 percent sure on this book although I did read it all the way through. Yes it had emotion and that mystery element but something made me feel unsure when I'd read it. Don't get me wrong Savannah Brown wrote the story really well and she did manage to keep me reading but I cant help think that the story was a bit drawn out in places and maybe there could of been a few more dark twists a 3.5 stars (Rounded up)Thank You NetGalley, Savannah Brown snf Penguin Random House UK for this book. I'm not 100 percent sure on this book although I did read it all the way through. Yes it had emotion and that mystery element but something made me feel unsure when I'd read it. Don't get me wrong Savannah Brown wrote the story really well and she did manage to keep me reading but I cant help think that the story was a bit drawn out in places and maybe there could of been a few more dark twists and spruced uo in parts. This is one of those books that I think not everyone will enjoy. If you want to read it don't let someone put you off. Read it, Make your own mind uo and see what your own opinions are.
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  • Ashley Lynne
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsAwesome writing, interesting characters and plot, surprising turns, well-written dialogue...what’s not to love about this book?Really the only thing keeping me from giving it 5 stars is that I thought it was a bit unrealistic how easy the feelings fleshed out for Sydney and June after everything that happened. I don’t care how in love with someone I am, if what happened there happened to me, I would at least need a little bit of distance for a while before jumping in like that. But mayb 4.5 starsAwesome writing, interesting characters and plot, surprising turns, well-written dialogue...what’s not to love about this book?Really the only thing keeping me from giving it 5 stars is that I thought it was a bit unrealistic how easy the feelings fleshed out for Sydney and June after everything that happened. I don’t care how in love with someone I am, if what happened there happened to me, I would at least need a little bit of distance for a while before jumping in like that. But maybe that’s just me. And at the end Savannah mentions that she wrote this book as a way of coping with a sudden onset of a deep debilitating fear of death. As someone who struggles with the very same thing, I feel so connected to her now. I hope she writes another novel in the future.
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