In Another Time
A sweeping historical novel that spans Germany, England, and the United States and follows a young couple torn apart by circumstance leading up to World War II—and the family secret that may prove to be the means for survival.Love brought them together. But only time can save them…1931, Germany. Bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist, and immediately he feels a powerful chemistry between them. It isn’t long before they fall in love and begin making plans for the future. As their love affair unfolds over the next five years, the climate drastically changes in Germany as Hitler comes to power. Their love is tested with the new landscape and the realities of war, not the least of which is that Hanna is Jewish and Max is not. But unbeknownst to Hanna is the fact that Max has a secret, which causes him to leave for months at a time—a secret that Max is convinced will help him save Hanna if Germany becomes too dangerous for her because of her religion. In 1946, Hanna Ginsberg awakens in a field outside of Berlin. Disoriented and afraid, she has no memory of the past ten years and no idea what has happened to Max. With no information as to Max’s whereabouts—or if he is even still alive—she decides to move to London to live with her sister while she gets her bearings. Even without an orchestra to play in, she throws herself completely into her music to keep alive her lifelong dream of becoming a concert violinist. But the music also serves as a balm to heal her deeply wounded heart and she eventually gets the opening she long hoped for. Even so, as the days, months, and years pass, taking her from London to Paris to Vienna to America, she continues to be haunted by her forgotten past, and the fate of the only man she has ever loved and cannot forget.Told in alternating viewpoints—Max in the years leading up to WWII, and Hanna in the ten years after—In Another Time is a beautiful novel about love and survival, passion and music, across time and continents.

In Another Time Details

TitleIn Another Time
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 5th, 2019
PublisherHarper Perennial
ISBN-139780062863331
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II, Adult

In Another Time Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up.I’m drawn to Holocaust stories because I believe it is so important that we don’t forget what happened. While I was reading this book, I happened to read an article about how Anne Frank’s stepsister recently spoke to a group of students who at a party made a swastika out of plastic cups and posted it on social media. ( https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/08/us/cal...) Their response was that they didn’t know, didn’t understand and this is why it becomes even more important to educat 3.5 stars rounded up.I’m drawn to Holocaust stories because I believe it is so important that we don’t forget what happened. While I was reading this book, I happened to read an article about how Anne Frank’s stepsister recently spoke to a group of students who at a party made a swastika out of plastic cups and posted it on social media. ( https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/08/us/cal...) Their response was that they didn’t know, didn’t understand and this is why it becomes even more important to educate the younger generation and remind the rest of us, so it doesn’t happen again. If I were to recommend a book to these students, it wouldn’t be this one. I would suggest they read The Diary of a Young Girl and Night by Ellie Wiesel. While this book didn’t have the gut punch effect on me that those two books did, it does reflect what was happening in Germany before and after the war, and it beautifully depicts the effect on two people who are deeply in love. While the Holocaust hovers over this story, Cantor spares the reader of the horrific details of the camps, except for one memory. I loved Cantor’s book The Lost Letter which weaves a beautiful love story into the story of the courageous resistance during WWII and I have to admit I was touched by that story more than this one, but I was still compelled to keep reading it. There are mainly two alternating narratives here - that of Hanna Ginsberg, a young Jewish woman, a passionate musician and Max Beissinger, a book shop owner. These narratives span the years 1931 - 1958 and go back and forth in time filling in details of what happened before 1946 when Hanna wakes up in a field clutching her violin without any idea of where she has been. There are hints as to what happened to a Hanna during the war through snippets of her dreams, but I wanted to know more than we end up finding out.I missed something in the book description so I was surprised to find that this was a time travel story in part. When I read “across time” I took it to mean alternating time frames, but since I enjoy time travel, it was an interesting addition to the story. Max travels in time to save his neighbors and attempts to save Hanna from what she has endured and to find a time and place where they can be together. While this doesn’t have that gut punch effect I mentioned at the beginning, it’s an important book in its own right , poignantly reflecting how lives of some that survived the Holocaust were affected. Cantor explains that these characters are fiction, but has done a terrific job of presenting real events that took place in history. A commendable book of historical fiction. I received an advanced copy of this book from Harper Perennial through Edelweiss..
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    Jillian Cantor is a favorite author of mine. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I've read and loved all her books. If you are a hist fic fan like me, her books are must-reads. In Another Time is the most beautiful historical love story. Not a romance, but an authentic, emotional love story.It's also a story about the love for music. Hanna is a violinist and her violin is what gets her through some horrific times. Survival is another theme. How does one continue through the motions when your reality is WWII, you are Jewish Jillian Cantor is a favorite author of mine. ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ I've read and loved all her books. If you are a hist fic fan like me, her books are must-reads. In Another Time is the most beautiful historical love story. Not a romance, but an authentic, emotional love story.It's also a story about the love for music. Hanna is a violinist and her violin is what gets her through some horrific times. Survival is another theme. How does one continue through the motions when your reality is WWII, you are Jewish, and your dearest love is lost?Overall, I was completely wrapped up in this story and its characters. In Another Time is a stunning and memorable tale of love and war. I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    November 6, 1958: present time.....Hanna pencils in the date at the top of her sheet music. She writes the days date every day on the sheet music. She doesn’t want to forget. I immediately had a hunch of what Hanna didn’t want to forget - but without the specific details yet, I was naturally curious. I wanted to know more -and enjoyed the way the book started.But my interest didn’t hold consistently. Music, had ‘always ‘ been Hanna’s greatest constant companion. She started violin lessons at age November 6, 1958: present time.....Hanna pencils in the date at the top of her sheet music. She writes the days date every day on the sheet music. She doesn’t want to forget. I immediately had a hunch of what Hanna didn’t want to forget - but without the specific details yet, I was naturally curious. I wanted to know more -and enjoyed the way the book started.But my interest didn’t hold consistently. Music, had ‘always ‘ been Hanna’s greatest constant companion. She started violin lessons at age 6. When the book opens - in 1958, Hannah tells us that she is practicing at the Conservatory as she does every day after her group rehearsal. The orchestra will tour again in the spring. They will be touring around in Europe, - including ‘Berlin’ - playing Bach and Vivaldi and Holst. Hanna was the first chair violinist. Then we step back to 1931 ... And move forward to 1946...I think I just read another ‘fusion’ type novel. ....Life just before Hitler’s rise to power...prewar Berlin....A powerful love story....History during two time periods. ....magical realism....Time travel....Secrets and tragedyMixing genres seem to be popular lately. I’m still not sure how I feel about it. I don’t think I’m the best person to review this book - I have a few pet peeves...that are personal and not logical.My dad was named Max.He died young ....There are things about the character ‘Max’ in this novel that was just hard for me to read - without thinking of my own father’s young life. And Hanna... well, I didn’t ‘feel’ much for her. PLEASE READ OTHER REVIEWS... READERS ARE LOVING THIS NOVEL! ( more than me). If you liked the book “The Nightingale” by Kirsten Hannah...( which many readers loved more than me, too)...then you’ll probably love this book.But me... fiction love stories mixed with WWII historical facts - sometimes just feels too over-dramatic. The ‘music’ was my favorite character. 3 stars
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  • Jennifer Blankfein
    January 1, 1970
    Follow Book Nation by Jen for all reviews.Memories of the Past, a Vision to the Future, and the Power of Music Join Together in this Magical Wartime Love Story.In Another Time by Jillian Cantor is a wonderful historical fiction novel with deep characters who love books, music and each other.In 1930s Berlin, Max, a German bookshop owner sees Hanna playing what she loves most, the violin. He is enchanted and in an attempt to get her attention, he brings her what he loves most, a book. After his de Follow Book Nation by Jen for all reviews.Memories of the Past, a Vision to the Future, and the Power of Music Join Together in this Magical Wartime Love Story.In Another Time by Jillian Cantor is a wonderful historical fiction novel with deep characters who love books, music and each other.In 1930s Berlin, Max, a German bookshop owner sees Hanna playing what she loves most, the violin. He is enchanted and in an attempt to get her attention, he brings her what he loves most, a book. After his dedicated pursuit, he wins her over, and the relationship between the two blossoms. German life during the rise of Hitler is not easy and to make matters worse, because Max is not a Jew, Hanna’s family is not supportive. Then Max has an unexplained disappearance which causes Hanna to be worried, angry and confused. She steps back from their relationship for a time, but the love between them is powerful and eventually it draws them back together. Antisemitism is increasing in Germany and although Hanna, so focused on her violin playing, does not take much notice, Max worries about her and his Jewish friends. Hitler and the Nazis are taking over, panic is starting to set in and his longtime Jewish neighbors are in terrible danger. When Max sees them in distress he reaches out to offer help. Max has a huge secret that he believes can save those in danger, but when his beloved Hanna is looking the Nazis in the eyes, can he bring her to safety?In 1946 Hanna finds herself in an open field with her less than pristine violin and no memory of the recent past. Hitler is dead, the train station has been bombed, she has no idea what happened to Max, and she has lost her memory of the last 10 years of her life. Hanna’s sister comes to get her and bring her back to her home in London where she searches for opportunities to play her trusted violin in an orchestra. Her love for music and Max are the only things she remembers and without him she focuses on playing violin to bring peace and joy to her life, and to give her a purpose. Will Hanna and Max cross paths again? In Another Time is a heartbreaking story of love, and survival in difficult times, and the ability to learn the truth.I enjoy narration by two characters alternating chapters as it is easy to read and it compels me to read just one more chapter, and then just one more, always wanting to know what is going to happen next…Jillian Cantor created interesting characters and I get immersed in her writing with the World War ll setting, appreciative for the research involved in historical fiction. I adored The Lost Letter published 2017, and I highly recommend In Another Time too!Q & A With Jillian CantorTell us a little bit about In Another Time.In Another Time is the story of Max, a German bookshop owner, and Hanna, a Jewish violin prodigy, who fall in love in the 1930s outside of Berlin as Hitler is rising to power. Max narrates the story in the 1930s, before the war, and Hanna narrates beginning in 1946, after the war, when she wakes up in a field with only her violin, no memory of the past ten years, and no idea what happened to Max. Max’s story moves through the 1930s as Hanna’s moves through the 1940s and 50s. I wanted it to be a love story between Max and Hanna but also a love song to books and music in our most trying times.When I learned about Max’s huge secret, the special closet door in his bookshop, it first made me think of the novel Exit West where Mohsin Hamid wrote about doors people went through to get to other countries. He mostly used it as a metaphor for immigration, allowing him not to have to focus on the physical journey. In In Another Time, I was unprepared for the magical time travel that happened in the closet but was pleasantly surprised. Unexplainable, supernatural elements like this are not often used in historical fiction. How did you come up with the idea?I really wanted to explore the question of what made people leave, or not leave, Germany during Hitler’s rise to power in the lead up to WWII. I spoke with a Holocaust survivor who’d been a young Jewish girl in Berlin at the time. She said her parents refused to leave, saying it was their country too. They were Germans too. So I thought a lot about what it means to love your country, and feel allegiance to your country even if terrible things start happening. And how hard it would’ve been to fathom how horrible everything would eventually get if you were living there in those years. The question I set out to answer before I even sat down to write the book was, what if you had every way and means possible to leave, even a magical escape, would you still want to stay? I just accepted the magic and immersed myself in the lives of the wonderful characters, Hanna and Max. Did you ever consider explaining more of the details regarding time traveling through the closet? How did you decide what to explain and what to leave unsaid?I definitely don’t see this a science fiction novel in any way, even though time travel does play a small role, like you said. So I never wanted to get bogged down in the details of how it worked. And Max is a bookshop owner, a reader, not a scientist, so I didn’t believe as a character he would get bogged down in these details either. My goal was to explain enough to make the plot and Max’s actions make sense, but not too much where the book became more science fiction than historical fiction. Your novel has Max’s story and Hanna’s story each from their own perspective. Did you write them alternating chapters like we read them, or did you create each character’s narrative separately? I wrote them exactly in the order that you read them, as they appear in the book now, alternating chapters. It did get a little confusing, and at a certain point as I was drafting (about 100 pages in) I stopped, and made a giant chart on the wall of my office to keep track of where each character was in each year, how old each was, etc.! But I felt I needed to write the book the way it would eventually read so I could get the pacing and the story arc right in the first draft. When I went back and revised, however, I did pull each story out and revise each one separately to make sure it was all coherent and made sense in order. All the chapters are narrated by Max or Hanna except for one. Why did Elsa have her own chapter?Elsa is married to Max’s best friend, Johann, and she has a small but important role in the novel. The chapter she narrates allowed me to give the reader information that neither Max nor Hanna could’ve known.What are you reading now (if you even have time) and what do you recommend?I’m reading a lot of research for the next novel I’m writing right now! But I have a giant to-read pile sitting on my desk that I plan to get to once I finish drafting my next book: The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff, The Things We Cannot Say by Kelly Rimmer, Blood Orange by Harriet Tyce, and The Age of Light by Whitney Scharer, just to name a few. One upcoming historical novel that I got to read early, and that I highly recommend, is The Flight Girls by Noelle Salazar. It’s out in July – look out for it!Unknown.pngMusic did actually keep people safe during World War ll; here is a video that tells a story of a woman who survived Auschwitz.IMG_5890.jpgIf you would like to hear some orchestra music, here is a clip from my teenage son’s most recent concert with the NORWALK YOUTH SYMPHONY .According to Google: Listening to music can help reduce stress according to many studies. It can help relieve a person from anxiety, depression, and other emotional and mental problems. Music is also capable of eliminating physical exhaustion as it allows the body and mind to relax.
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  • Mary Kubica
    January 1, 1970
    I am so happy to have received an advanced copy of IN ANOTHER TIME. Mark your calendar for March 2019; this book is not to be missed! Such a beautiful and haunting love story, with an intriguing mystery. Cantor's writing is elegant and evocative, transporting readers to World War II Europe - and the aftermath of the war - with an unforgettable story and wonderful characters who readers won't forget anytime soon.
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Hanna and Max found each other by accident or was there a reason they found each other? Whether it was an accident or for a reason, their love for each other was never ending.Max walked in on Hanna practicing her violin, and much to his surprise, she wasn't too happy to have him there. It did take a lot to get her attention, but once he did, he couldn't stay away.We travel back and forth in time and learn of Hanna’s passion for music, her violin, and Max.IN ANOTHER TIME tells the story of Max an Hanna and Max found each other by accident or was there a reason they found each other? Whether it was an accident or for a reason, their love for each other was never ending.Max walked in on Hanna practicing her violin, and much to his surprise, she wasn't too happy to have him there. It did take a lot to get her attention, but once he did, he couldn't stay away.We travel back and forth in time and learn of Hanna’s passion for music, her violin, and Max.IN ANOTHER TIME tells the story of Max and Hanna before and after the war. Hanna is the main focus after the war because something happened to her that caused her to lose the memory of ten years, but not the memory of Max and her marvelous talent of playing the violin.Max isn’t mentioned after the war except in Hanna’s memories. It is heartbreaking.We see Max before the war and more interestingly we are introduced to the mystery of what could be behind the door in the bookshop that Max’s father had always forbidden him to enter.The love between Max and Hanna was the main focus as well as the love of books and music. You will keep hoping Hanna and Max find each other.IN ANOTHER TIME is beautifully and smoothly written with characters you will want to know better.Ms. Cantor immediately pulls you into the story line and into the lives of the characters with her marvelous tale and her well-researched story line. Readers will get a glimpse into a personal side of WWII.IN ANOTHER TIME is a beautiful, beautiful tale of love, heartbreak, and an outstanding history lesson. 5/5This book was given to me as ARC by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful book, beautiful writing, beautiful characters, heartbreaking time in history. No one tugs at my heartstrings more than Jillian Cantor when she writes her WWII novels. Last year, The Lost Letter was on my list of top books of 2017 and I was really looking forward to seeing what she came up with next. I'm happy to say, the story of Hanna and Max is certainly different than any WWII story you've seen before and still has the emotional resonance of Cantor's prior books as well as the signa Beautiful book, beautiful writing, beautiful characters, heartbreaking time in history. No one tugs at my heartstrings more than Jillian Cantor when she writes her WWII novels. Last year, The Lost Letter was on my list of top books of 2017 and I was really looking forward to seeing what she came up with next. I'm happy to say, the story of Hanna and Max is certainly different than any WWII story you've seen before and still has the emotional resonance of Cantor's prior books as well as the signature trademark of a well researched historical fiction novelist. There were moments where I wanted to scream, I wanted to cry and I wanted to hug everyone involved. For an author to elicit those emotions in me, I know a book has been a job well done. Thank you to HarperCollins for an advance copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Ingrid
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis book was about WWII and the time in Germany leading up to it, a romance, music and time travel. I liked it, but didn't love it.
  • ABookwormWithWine
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐ / 5In Another Time by Jillian Cantor is an incredibly moving story about 2 people during Hitler's rise to power and beyond.What it's about: Max is a Christian bookshop owner and Hanna a Jewish violinist hoping to join an orchestra. They fall in love right before Hitler comes into power and everything changes. The story follows their relationship during Hitler's rise to power and after when Hanna wakes up in a field without Max and no memory of the past 10 years of her life. When she wakes u ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ / 5In Another Time by Jillian Cantor is an incredibly moving story about 2 people during Hitler's rise to power and beyond.What it's about: Max is a Christian bookshop owner and Hanna a Jewish violinist hoping to join an orchestra. They fall in love right before Hitler comes into power and everything changes. The story follows their relationship during Hitler's rise to power and after when Hanna wakes up in a field without Max and no memory of the past 10 years of her life. When she wakes up the war is over and Max has seemingly disappeared. Little does she know Max had a secret that would cause him to disappear for days or even months at a time, and they will eventually be reunited once again. In Another Time is such a beautiful story, and I really liked how Jillian Cantor tells us about Hitler's rise to power without going into a ton of gory details. We all (and if you don't you really should) know what happened to Jews during World War II and none of it was good. The story is still moving, but it is really more about Hanna and Max's relationship and how Hitler coming into office affected their life in Germany. This is a love story, but also a story about music and the war. I was also very intrigued by the fact that Cantor chooses to use time travel as an aspect of this book. I didn't actually know anything about Einstein and Rosen's wormhole theory before reading this, but it is quite fascinating and I love how she incorporated it into In Another Time.This novel is also a very quick read coming in at just under 5 hours of reading time for me (4 hours 45 minutes to be exact), and the pacing was so good that I found myself not wanting to put it down. In Another Time alternates between Hanna and Max's POVs plus past and present which made things very interesting. This book is full of mostly short chapters as well which I always love. Final Thought: If you want a story about World War II that incorporates love, time travel, and music then this is the book for you! Hanna and Max's story broke my heart, but I really enjoyed the love story and the musical aspect. Hanna is very passionate about her violin and while not being musical myself, it was still interesting to read about. I may not have given this a 5, but this book is worth every moment you take to read it.
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  • Bkwmlee
    January 1, 1970
    Back in 2017, I had read Jillian Cantor’s The Lost Letter and it quickly became one of my favorite reads that year -- one of the few books that I had actually rated 5 stars due to how much the story had moved me emotionally (plus the book was truly well-written of course). Given how much I liked Cantor’s previous novel, when I heard that she would have a new book coming out this month – another work of historical fiction entitled In Another Time which, similar to her previous novel, is also Back in 2017, I had read Jillian Cantor’s The Lost Letter and it quickly became one of my favorite reads that year -- one of the few books that I had actually rated 5 stars due to how much the story had moved me emotionally (plus the book was truly well-written of course). Given how much I liked Cantor’s previous novel, when I heard that she would have a new book coming out this month – another work of historical fiction entitled In Another Time which, similar to her previous novel, is also set during World War II and, from the summary, sounded like it would be in a similar vein as The Lost Letter -- I quickly secured an advance copy to read. While there are certain aspects of Cantor’s newest work that parallel her previous one – dual timelines, backdrop of World War II and the persecution of Jews during Hitler’s reign, setting in multiple countries in Europe and also in the United States, the discovery of a hidden family secret, a Jewish woman with a strong, feisty personality falling in love with a non-Jewish man who is willing to risk his life to save the woman he loves at all costs, etc. – the story itself is actually quite different. This time around, music plays an integral role in the story, specifically the music from a violin, to the point that I felt the violin itself became a central character of the same level of importance as the main characters Hanna and Max. I don’t want to give away too much of the plot so I won’t go into much detail here other than to say that Hanna and Max share a love relationship that truly transcends time – one that is enduring and passionate yet at the same time heartbreaking and tragic. Their story is also one of survival and resilience amidst the horrors of a devastating war, with the characters striving to rise above the circumstances while fighting against the bonds of fate and destiny. Format-wise, the narrative alternated between both Hanna and Max’s perspectives, though from a character development standpoint, it was in reality much more Hanna’s story than Max’s. Perhaps this was one reason why this story and its characters didn’t resonate with me as much as the ones in Cantor’s previous novel did. To be honest, I actually found Hanna to be a bit annoying, with her actions frustrating me more times than I really cared for. To me, Hanna wasn’t an easy character to root for -- on the one hand, her tenacity and steadfastness in holding firm to what she believed in were admirable, but I felt that she oftentimes went overboard in her steadfastness, to the point that it defied all logic and reason. I had no problems with the way she immersed herself so completely into playing the violin, as most consummate musicians have a level of dedication to their craft that many non-artists probably won’t understand. Rather, the part that actually frustrated me about Hanna was how little sense of self-preservation she had – when everyone around her kept telling her how bad things were getting in Germany after Hitler rose to power and “the proof” was practically staring her in the face almost daily with Jews getting arrested or “disappearing” left and right, yet she would always purposely ignore the danger signs and repeatedly took a “as long as I have my violin everything will be ok” attitude. I hate to say it, but the way Hanna’s character was written, there were points in the story where I actually felt sorry for Max and couldn’t help wondering whether the risk was truly worth taking (I’m being deliberately vague here so as not to spoil the story for those who haven’t read the book).Despite the fact that I wasn’t able to connect on an emotional level with the characters, and in all honesty, didn’t find Hanna and Max’s relationship “moving” like most other readers did (probably due to my frustrations with the way some of the characters were developed as mentioned above), I did find this to be a well-crafted story, one that is well-researched, well-written, and definitely worth reading. With that said, I did feel at times that there should’ve been a better balance between the various elements of the story, such as the historical aspects versus the romance / love story portion – this one leaned a little more toward the latter than I would have preferred at some parts, but luckily it didn’t overpower the story completely.Overall, this was a good read and one that I would definitely recommend. Though I personally liked the story in The Lost Letter more than this one, I still feel that Cantor did a fine job with this book and I look forward to what she will come out with next!Received ARC from Harper Perennial via Edelweiss.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    From the moment Max walked into the auditorium and heard Hanna playing the violin, he was infatuated by her. Determined to win her heart, Max persues Hanna until she agrees to to a date. It's the early 1930s in Austria, and Hitler is beginning to rise to power. Max is not Jewish, but Hanna is and though Max worries for her safety as more and more restrictions are placed on those who are Jewish, Hanna is determined to stay and secure a position as a concert violinist. Hanna's sister and her husba From the moment Max walked into the auditorium and heard Hanna playing the violin, he was infatuated by her. Determined to win her heart, Max persues Hanna until she agrees to to a date. It's the early 1930s in Austria, and Hitler is beginning to rise to power. Max is not Jewish, but Hanna is and though Max worries for her safety as more and more restrictions are placed on those who are Jewish, Hanna is determined to stay and secure a position as a concert violinist. Hanna's sister and her husband moved to London as the danger escalated, but Hanna remained to care for their ailing mother. Can Max keep her safe? He believes he can with the secret he keeps hidden from everyone.It's now 1946 and Hanna wakes in a field with no memory of the last ten years. What had happened to her in those lost years? She moves in with her sister and her family trying to move forward and find Max. Her passion for her violin is what sustains her and gives her hope for the future.Told through the alternating voices of Hanna and Max, their story is revealed.As much a story of star crossed lovers as it is a story of the Holocaust and beyond.If you enjoyed"The Time Traveler's Wife" you will love this book.
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  • Heather~ Nature.books.and.coffee
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher for this copy for a review! All opinions are my own! This was a such a great story. It tells about Max and Hanna. As they are torn apart by the circumstances leading up to WW ll . Hanna is Jewish and Max is not, so let that give you a clue. The story switches narration between Max and Hanna over the span of 10 years. There was a beautiful love story, music, mystery, and a TWIST that I absolutely LOVED!! The history in this book was definitely well researched and spot o Thank you to the publisher for this copy for a review! All opinions are my own! This was a such a great story. It tells about Max and Hanna. As they are torn apart by the circumstances leading up to WW ll . Hanna is Jewish and Max is not, so let that give you a clue. The story switches narration between Max and Hanna over the span of 10 years. There was a beautiful love story, music, mystery, and a TWIST that I absolutely LOVED!! The history in this book was definitely well researched and spot on!! HIGHLY RECOMMEND
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  • Jessica Jeffers
    January 1, 1970
    This will undoubtedly appeal to a large number of readers, but it was just so-so for me. I saw every twist coming from a mile away, and I felt like I've read a billion variations on these themes.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my heart this was a moving book! While it most definitely falls under the umbrella of historical fiction, this is also an epic love story that transcends time and distance and swept me away to a foreign land.This alternates between Max and Hanna’s perspectives and spans across the years before and after WW2. I was equally drawn to both of their characters but I was head over heels for sweet, dear Max. He captured my heart almost instantly, he’s the type of character that will remain with me f Oh my heart this was a moving book! While it most definitely falls under the umbrella of historical fiction, this is also an epic love story that transcends time and distance and swept me away to a foreign land.This alternates between Max and Hanna’s perspectives and spans across the years before and after WW2. I was equally drawn to both of their characters but I was head over heels for sweet, dear Max. He captured my heart almost instantly, he’s the type of character that will remain with me forever. I was also invested in Hanna, she’s just a bit more distant than Max, she’s so focused and passionate about her music career, her violin is her lifeline during a depressing time in history, that’s it hard to foster a deep connection with her. Both were amazingly well crafted and hearing from both of them throughout the years was truly a special treat.Cantor writes in such a beautiful, evocative manner, even though her books always break my heart in some way, it’s in the best way possible. If you’re like me and you can’t get enough of WW2 fiction this is a must read, there’s a unique spin on the sub genre that I wholeheartedly enjoyed.In Another Time in three words: Poetic, Moving and Emotional.
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  • Chanel Cleeton
    January 1, 1970
    Filled with haunting prose, rich historical detail, and an immersive setting, In Another Time is a spellbinding story about the power of love and the strength of the human spirit. Moving and timely, Cantor’s novel provides an unflinching and nuanced glimpse of life in pre-war Berlin and a stark reminder of the personal cost of war and its aftermath. A stunning, transporting novel.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    When I first read the premise of this novel, I knew it was something I had to read. The story lived up to the synopsis and even exceeded my expectations for how good it would be. It was such an incredible story from start to finish.I felt so attached to both Hanna and Max from the moment I opened the novel. They are memorable characters whom I still think about. I didn't want the story to end, but I also needed to know what would happen for them. The story was haunting and I wish it had been pub When I first read the premise of this novel, I knew it was something I had to read. The story lived up to the synopsis and even exceeded my expectations for how good it would be. It was such an incredible story from start to finish.I felt so attached to both Hanna and Max from the moment I opened the novel. They are memorable characters whom I still think about. I didn't want the story to end, but I also needed to know what would happen for them. The story was haunting and I wish it had been published around this time three years ago. I loved the use of music to guide the story along. I wish I could have heard Hanna play. There are some parts I was not expecting to happen and felt the plot never became predictable. On the last page of the book, the date March 16th is mentioned. I finished the book on that date, so I thought it was a funny coincidence. This novel is great for fans of The Time Traveler's Wife and What Alice Forgot. (Or anyone who wants something amazing to read.) I highly recommend it and have added it to the list of my favorite Holocaust-themed and historical fiction novels. Dream movie cast:Hanna: Shailene WoodleyMax: Emory CohenJulia: Tuppence MiddletonStuart: Jonathan Rhys Meyers
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  • Susan Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    In Another Time is a beautifully written and incredibly moving book. I was completely immersed in the lives of Hanna and Max, a young Jewish violinist and the man she loves who get caught up in the terror that swept through Germany in the 1930’s. Their story is haunting and compelling from beginning to end, transcending time and events that threaten their deep love. This story is unique and original, a seamless meld of historical fiction, romance, and magic.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    This beautiful, well written novel is a look at Berlin before, during and after WWII. I have read many WWII novels and this one looks at the effects of the war on the people of Germany from a completely different perspective. It is well researched and so well written that the words just flow off the page. Even though its a book about war - the main theme is love - love of music, love of family and friends but most importantly the love between two people.Max meets Hanna in 1931 when he hears her This beautiful, well written novel is a look at Berlin before, during and after WWII. I have read many WWII novels and this one looks at the effects of the war on the people of Germany from a completely different perspective. It is well researched and so well written that the words just flow off the page. Even though its a book about war - the main theme is love - love of music, love of family and friends but most importantly the love between two people.Max meets Hanna in 1931 when he hears her playing the violin at university in Berlin and is immediately interested in her. His life has been very lonely since his father died and left him a small bookstore that is barely making ends meet. Hanna is working very hard to become a concert violinist. They fall in love but life in Germany is rapidly changing and it becomes forbidden for them to be a couple because Hanna is Jewish. Max has a secret way that he can save Hanna but is unwilling to share it because he is afraid that she will think he's crazy. Jump ahead 10 years and Hanna wakes up in a field totally unaware of where she is or where she has been for the last 10 years. She wants to go back to the bookstore to find Max but the bookstore is gone and so is Max. As she continues to think about Max in the coming years, will her music be able to keep her memories from destroying her? Will she ever see Max again?Be prepared when you start reading this book as it's a very emotional journey. I loved Max and Hanna and wanted them to be together, I hated what happened to separate them and I cried with them during the good times and the bad. This is another beautiful book by Jillian Cantor and I highly recommend it.Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    Jillian Cantor delivers another beautifully written, emotional story with her latest book IN ANOTHER TIME. Cantor has the ability to take some small detail from the lives of Jews under the reign of Hitler and create a story that tugs at our hearts.Hanna Ginsberg loves nothing more than playing her violin. The music overtakes her and she plays with passion and fire. One day in 1931 Max Beissinger is drawn to the beautiful music coming from the auditorium on campus at the university in Berlin. He Jillian Cantor delivers another beautifully written, emotional story with her latest book IN ANOTHER TIME. Cantor has the ability to take some small detail from the lives of Jews under the reign of Hitler and create a story that tugs at our hearts.Hanna Ginsberg loves nothing more than playing her violin. The music overtakes her and she plays with passion and fire. One day in 1931 Max Beissinger is drawn to the beautiful music coming from the auditorium on campus at the university in Berlin. He is immediately attracted to Hanna. They begin seeing each other and soon are in love. Hanna fills the emptiness Max has felt since the death of his father. Max spends his days operating the small bookshop his father left to him and Hanna joins him in the evenings to play her violin. But over the next few years Germany is changing and hatred for the Jews is bubbling to the surface. While Max is not Jewish, Hanna is and he fears for her. Like many Jews of that life, Hanna and her family refuse to believe that the Germany that has been their home will turn on them. But Max has a secret, a secret that he believes will allow him to save Hanna when her life is endangered. There is a hidden closet in the bookshop – a closet like none other. This closet holds the secret to saving Hanna. But it must remain a secret because – well, no one would believe him if he told them. It is now 1946 and Hanna awakens in a field, clutching her violin. She remembers being in Max’s bookshop playing her violin. She remembers the Nazi SA pounding on the door. Max grabs her and pulls her toward the closet at the rear of the store – and that is the last she remembers. She is missing the memory of the past ten years and she has no idea what happened to Max. All she knew is gone – including the bookshop and Max. She has no memory of the war. How can this be? And where is Max? Life must go on so she relocates to live with her sister who now lives in London. She loses herself in her music; it is the only thing that can soothe the ache of losing Max.The book moves back and forth in time alternating between the perspective of Hannah after the war always missing Max and the perspective of Max before the war always seeking to save Hanna. The love between Max and Hanna endures throughout the years – each searching for the other. The characters were so real that my heart ached for the lovers who were continually torn apart. This is an emotional haunting story of love and self-sacrifice throughout time and across continents. It’s a love that cannot be, yet cannot die. The ending was heart-wrenching and will linger with me for some time.I received an Advance Review Copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    In Another Time is a beautifully written story of love during World War Two but not like any I've ever read before. I was transported back to a time when just surviving was a struggle. I loved the story of Hanna and Max! Jillian Cantor has infused the historical fiction genre with a twist of fresh air. Loved it!!
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    I need a minute. Review coming shortly.Ok I’ve collected myself overnight but this love story set in the beginning of Hitler’s rule will probably never leave me. Max is the ultimate romantic and as soon as he spots Hanna he knows he loves her. Hanna is a bit more reserved and takes a little longer to hand her heart over. You see her first and only love for so long has been the violin and she has to figure out how to converge her new love into her life. What are the complications? Hanna is Jewish I need a minute. Review coming shortly.Ok I’ve collected myself overnight but this love story set in the beginning of Hitler’s rule will probably never leave me. Max is the ultimate romantic and as soon as he spots Hanna he knows he loves her. Hanna is a bit more reserved and takes a little longer to hand her heart over. You see her first and only love for so long has been the violin and she has to figure out how to converge her new love into her life. What are the complications? Hanna is Jewish and Max is a Christian and sooner rather than later they will be forbidden to marry or even be together.This story is so nuanced and well written/researched. I was easily lost in the story of Max and Hanna and you will be too.
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  • Letty
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my. This was so good. The way in which it was written with alternating points of view, Max's from 1931 to right before the beginning of WWII, and Hannah's ten years after, was brilliantly done. I was completely surprised to find out how and why Hannah ended waking up in a field in 1946 and not remembering how she got there or anything from the last ten years. I could feel the deep love Max felt for Hannah, and my heart ached for them both when circumstances just kept tearing them apart. I hav Oh my. This was so good. The way in which it was written with alternating points of view, Max's from 1931 to right before the beginning of WWII, and Hannah's ten years after, was brilliantly done. I was completely surprised to find out how and why Hannah ended waking up in a field in 1946 and not remembering how she got there or anything from the last ten years. I could feel the deep love Max felt for Hannah, and my heart ached for them both when circumstances just kept tearing them apart. I haven't read such a beautiful, epic love story in a long time. It was a moving and emotional read. This one should not be missed.Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for the review copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Yun
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so bitterly disappointed with In Another Time, I'm not sure where to even start. From the book blurb, it's a historical fiction with a little bit of romance and mystery thrown in, which seems interesting enough. But it did nothing for me from pretty much the first page, and it did not get better no matter how much I hung in there and kept reading.A large part of the problem is that there is so much telling and no showing, which is the biggest sin of writing. For example, Hanna is a violinist I'm so bitterly disappointed with In Another Time, I'm not sure where to even start. From the book blurb, it's a historical fiction with a little bit of romance and mystery thrown in, which seems interesting enough. But it did nothing for me from pretty much the first page, and it did not get better no matter how much I hung in there and kept reading.A large part of the problem is that there is so much telling and no showing, which is the biggest sin of writing. For example, Hanna is a violinist who plays with passion and fire. How do we the reader know this? Well, we are explicitly told this, many times. Hanna and Max "make love", which happens more than a dozen times in the book, and we know each time because it says that they "make love." We are told that the two main characters really like each other, but are never shown more than a skin-deep physical attraction.The sentences are so simple, the construction is plain, and when you add them up to paragraphs and chapters, they all come across as basic and uninteresting. The characters are flat, with no self-awareness or growth, and lacking any sort of depth that made them feel alive or real. The dialog is so stilted and cliche. The relationship between Max and Hanna is awkward and a little creepy, with Max badgering Hanna until she relents and goes out with him. There is no spark in the writing, no creativity in the plot, nothing that took a hold of me and surprised me, not even a little. The unfolding of the plot wasn't interesting. It meandered along, with events happening when it was convenient to move the plot along and not because it made sense based on what was going on. Even the mystery that the book blurb alludes to is tackled with so little thought and originality, with no explanation other than some generic words thrown in.In the end, I didn't develop any kind of connection with this story. If I had to use one word to describe my impression of how it was written, it would be: Lazy. That is the honest truth.
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  • Blodeuedd Finland
    January 1, 1970
    Going into this one I guessed it could be sad, and because of that I did not want to put it down. I needed to know what would happen to Max and Hanna!It starts in 1931 where Max meets Hanna. He is a Christian (even if he does not care about religion), and she is Jewish. But most of all, this is Germany. This is bad and I kept bracing myself.Because then suddenly it is 1946 and Hanna wakes up without any memories. What happened during the war? Where is Max...WHERE IS MAX!? Did Max get her out?I d Going into this one I guessed it could be sad, and because of that I did not want to put it down. I needed to know what would happen to Max and Hanna!It starts in 1931 where Max meets Hanna. He is a Christian (even if he does not care about religion), and she is Jewish. But most of all, this is Germany. This is bad and I kept bracing myself.Because then suddenly it is 1946 and Hanna wakes up without any memories. What happened during the war? Where is Max...WHERE IS MAX!? Did Max get her out?I did have my suspicions since Max seemed to know things, but the worst thing is that Hanna goes on with her life and what we get is 1932..1933...1936. I just wanted these two to be together. They loved each other so much. Stupid nazis! Stupid Laws!Ok so I did not cry, but my heart did break. Poor Hanna, poor Max.And yes there is a secret in this book, I liked that aspect. It was different and tragic too.I could not put it down. All I knew was, what happened t Max?NarrationI ave listened to Saskia before and I like her narrative style. She does it wellGeorge was new to me, but he did Max well. They took their own chapters.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    I seem to be reading many 5 star books this year. I was once again swept away with Jillian Cantor’s writing. This story had elements I didn’t expect but certainly enjoyed. Hanna is a character that will stay with me for some time. Her love for Max knew no boundaries. Wonderful historical fiction.
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  • Vlorini
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Jillian Cantor for this beautiful and haunting book. I will remember the quote from your Author’s Notes, “No matter what happens in the world, we will still have this beautiful music”.
  • Good Book Fairy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5
  • Kate Vocke
    January 1, 1970
    In the years leading up to World War 2, tension is high and hate is becoming rampant, but in a little town in Germany, two people are falling in love. It’s a tumultuous time, and an equally tumultuous relationship at times, but Hanna - a violinist, and Max - a bookshop owner, seem destined to be together. Spanning countries, against laws, and even defying time.When these two meet, a German and a Jew, their love grows at the same steady rate as Hitler’s power. Their relationship is tested over an In the years leading up to World War 2, tension is high and hate is becoming rampant, but in a little town in Germany, two people are falling in love. It’s a tumultuous time, and an equally tumultuous relationship at times, but Hanna - a violinist, and Max - a bookshop owner, seem destined to be together. Spanning countries, against laws, and even defying time.When these two meet, a German and a Jew, their love grows at the same steady rate as Hitler’s power. Their relationship is tested over and over as Hanna struggles to let Max in when her focus has always been simply playing the violin and taking care of her mother. They struggle to make Hanna’s mother understand that their love is true and real, despite their backgrounds or what religion they are. And then there is Max’s secret. So inconceivable - he struggles to tell her. When it could save them from the fuhrer’s dictatorship, but could also potentially tear them apart forever.I adored this story. The unrequited love of Max and Hanna is so frustrating though at times, I just wish Max would spill his secret and make everything better. But the secret is haunting and heavy, and if he told her- well, it’d be a much different story! There’s a bit of a mystery to it also... We follow Max before the war, learn how these two meet and watch the relationship bloom as the country unravels. But then we follow Hanna - almost 15 years later, when she wakes up in field with no memory of the past 10 years, and has no idea where Max is. The war is over, she’s missed it all. What could have possibly happened, and will she ever remember?The story is stunning, the settings and timelines so real and cleverly written. It’s an epic journey of love and loss in a time of horrible conflict, with a healthy dose of human spirit and a touch of magic. And I may have cried. A lot.Thank you to Jillian Cantor , Get Red PR and Harper Perennial for the advanced copy of this beautiful story!
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  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    Star-crossed lovers separated by time and WWII, Hanna Ginsberg and Max Beissinger are connected by love and music. The story spans 1930 German through 1950s England and Europe and slowly reveals Max's secret of why his story isn't continuous.The story holds your attention as you learn what happens to Max and to Hanna and why their love is so strong. The audio performance was perfect with two narrators, who, while they don't interact, contrast nicely with one another.For a review of the performan Star-crossed lovers separated by time and WWII, Hanna Ginsberg and Max Beissinger are connected by love and music. The story spans 1930 German through 1950s England and Europe and slowly reveals Max's secret of why his story isn't continuous.The story holds your attention as you learn what happens to Max and to Hanna and why their love is so strong. The audio performance was perfect with two narrators, who, while they don't interact, contrast nicely with one another.For a review of the performance, see AudioFile Magazine http://www.audiofilemagazine.com
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  • Christine Blythe
    January 1, 1970
    Star crossed lovers....this story will touch your soul.....written with passion and truth, some factual, mostly fictional......Bravo...!
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