The Tiger Flu
In this visionary novel by Larissa Lai--her first in sixteen years--a community of parthenogenic women, sent into exile by the male-dominated Salt Water City, goes to war against disease, technology, and powerful men that threaten them with extinction.Kirilow is a doctor apprentice whose lover Peristrophe is a "starfish," a woman who can regenerate her own limbs and organs, which she uses to help her clone sisters whose organs are failing. When a denizen from Salt Water City suffering from a mysterious flu comes into their midst, Peristrophe becomes infected and dies, prompting Kirilow to travel to Salt Water City, where the flu is now a pandemic, to find a new starfish who will help save her sisters. There, Kirilow meets Kora, a girl-woman desperate to save her family from the epidemic. Kora has everything Kirilow is looking for, except the will to abandon her own family. But before Kirilow can convince her, both are kidnapped by a group of powerful men to serve as test subjects for a new technology that can cure the mind of the body.Bold, beautiful, and wildly imaginative, The Tiger Flu is at once a female hero's saga, a cyberpunk thriller, and a convention-breaking cautionary tale--a striking metaphor for our complicated times.

The Tiger Flu Details

TitleThe Tiger Flu
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 23rd, 2018
PublisherArsenal Pulp Press
ISBN-139781551527314
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Speculative Fiction

The Tiger Flu Review

  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Larissa Lai has created a very strange world in The Tiger Flu, a lightning fast eruption of a novel. In this future version of our earth, waves of plagues have killed off many men; Caspian tigers have been restored from extinction; famine is widespread; some women have been genetically engineered to parthogenetically reproduce or regrow parts of their bodies; metallic scales and drugs can create extraordinary, half-real hallucinations; climate change has completely changed the landscape, and mor Larissa Lai has created a very strange world in The Tiger Flu, a lightning fast eruption of a novel. In this future version of our earth, waves of plagues have killed off many men; Caspian tigers have been restored from extinction; famine is widespread; some women have been genetically engineered to parthogenetically reproduce or regrow parts of their bodies; metallic scales and drugs can create extraordinary, half-real hallucinations; climate change has completely changed the landscape, and more. To be honest, I didn’t always understand what was going on because a) it all happened so fast, b) there’s a lot of whatever it was, and c) it’s hard to tell what was happening in reality and what was happening in dreams or visions...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss, for review consideration.
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  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that The Tiger Flu is unlike anything I’ve read before. The depth and range of Larissa Lai’s imagination is truly impressive. There’s a lot going on here: a disease called the "Tiger Flu" that mainly affects men, a group of exiled women called the Grist Sisters who can asexually reproduce, “starfish” women who can regenerate lost limbs and organs, a new technology that separates the mind from the body, major environmental destruction, and that’s not even I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that The Tiger Flu is unlike anything I’ve read before. The depth and range of Larissa Lai’s imagination is truly impressive. There’s a lot going on here: a disease called the "Tiger Flu" that mainly affects men, a group of exiled women called the Grist Sisters who can asexually reproduce, “starfish” women who can regenerate lost limbs and organs, a new technology that separates the mind from the body, major environmental destruction, and that’s not even the half of it. One of the blurbs on this ARC describes it as a “fever dream,” and I think that’s the most appropriate phrase for it. It’s wild, heady, and utterly un-put-down-able, even if I’m not sure I fully grasped what exactly was going on in some parts. I feel like I’ve been swimming around in a psychedelic nightmare world after reading this. In spite of my confusion, I was gripped by both main characters (Kirilow, a Grist Sister and Kora, an inhabitant of an infected town), as they attempt to navigate their fraught landscapes in order to save their loved ones and discover plenty of horrors along the way. This is the first novel I've read by Lai, and I am certainly intrigued.
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  • Jiaqi
    January 1, 1970
    Advance copy provided by Arsenal Press because I am going to be interviewing Prof. Lai for Sine Theta Magazine’s next issue! sinetheta.netthis wouldve normally taken me 2 hours to finish but because it was “for work” it took 3 weeks. why am i like this
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