Avatar (Imbalance, #1)
When Aang, Katara, Sokka, and Toph return to Earthen Fire Industries--the factory owned by Toph's father--Team Avatar finds that the once small town is now booming. Expecting a warm welcome, Aang is surprised when their arrival is met with unimpressed, cold-shouldered spectators. As soon as the team is asked for help at a business council meeting, the reason for the slight becomes clear--a massive bender versus non-bender conflict has gripped the town and is threatening to turn violent.

Avatar (Imbalance, #1) Details

TitleAvatar (Imbalance, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 18th, 2018
PublisherDark Horse Books
ISBN-139781506704890
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fantasy, Fiction, Young Adult, Childrens

Avatar (Imbalance, #1) Review

  • Alexandra Elend Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    "And I’m the guy who’s gonna take you down!No, I don’t think you are. But I respect your ambition! It’s good to have goals." It's so interesting to continue seeing how things evolved and how it came to be as we know it. Following a minor detour, Team Avatar encounters a web of deceit and lies under a lot of tension generated from personal differences and they must find a way to make balance. I continue to be astounded as to how trouble follows the gang. They really just wanted to get to Yu D "And I’m the guy who’s gonna take you down!No, I don’t think you are. But I respect your ambition! It’s good to have goals." It's so interesting to continue seeing how things evolved and how it came to be as we know it. Following a minor detour, Team Avatar encounters a web of deceit and lies under a lot of tension generated from personal differences and they must find a way to make balance. I continue to be astounded as to how trouble follows the gang. They really just wanted to get to Yu Dao and now they're mixed in the chaos that's rising in this rapidly growing city. At least the prospect of seeing Suki is strong and a ray of sunshine. As I was fearing this new art style was throwing me a curve and making me uncomfortable, but, I believe, after having read 80 pages like this, that I can actually get accustomed to it. Yes, I don't think I'll ever like it as much as I did the previous one, but it's not the worst we could get.Small victories people. It's all about the small victories.____________________This is my last catch-up read in this series, since Imbalance Part 1 is the last issue out, right now anyway.We have a change in illustrator and writer I believe and I don't know how I feel about that because the art of the previous ones has always been one of my favorite styles. All in all, it shouldn't be that bad, the cover certainly doesn't look terrible. I mean, I'm not in love with it, but I don't hate it either.I suppose the only way to actually find out how I like it is by reading it. So, here I go.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Faith Erin Hicks does a wonderful job continuing the series. The art looks like the next season you haven't watched yet. If you're a fan of the cartoon, you'll dig this.Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • milou ☁️
    January 1, 1970
    First off I want to say that I still think that the illustrations are absolutely breathtaking, even though the art style has changed. It still has that same familiar feel to it, one that I love to return to.I have read all of the Avatar related graphic novels that have been released so far and I honestly cannot remember how many of them that have been. That's why I'm going to continue reading every new graphic novel that will be released, just like I did with this one. It's just that after havin First off I want to say that I still think that the illustrations are absolutely breathtaking, even though the art style has changed. It still has that same familiar feel to it, one that I love to return to.I have read all of the Avatar related graphic novels that have been released so far and I honestly cannot remember how many of them that have been. That's why I'm going to continue reading every new graphic novel that will be released, just like I did with this one. It's just that after having read that many of them the plot of them doesn't exactly surprise me anymore. It's very easy for me to pinpoint what's going to happen very early on. That doesn't mean that I don't enjoy reading them.In fact I love to find out about this world, the nations and all of its citizens as I possibly can and to see how much the world is developing after the war has ended. Technology is making huge progress. But of course with each development chaos is not far away, as we all know by now.↠ 3,25 starsImbalance, Part One ★★★ Imbalance, Part Two To be releasedTwitter | Instagram | Youtube | Last.fm
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  • Jono
    January 1, 1970
    Not enough Zuko.
  • Emily // Mixed Margins
    January 1, 1970
    So interesting to see the seeds of Republic City!
  • jessica ☾
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like we keep seeing this same pattern of events happen in all of them mini comics, but it was a nice lead into some of the main conflicts we see in the Legend of Korea series.Also I’m seeing a ton of hate on the new art style, but I honestly kinda like it.
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  • Katrina
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first ATLA book with the new writer/illustrator team. It's hard for me to tell how I feel about the new creators, since the storyline returned to what was my least favorite of the series thus far - Earthen Fire Industries. Let's start with what I liked. Aang looks older in Wartman's style, or perhaps it's a conscious attempt to start aging the characters up to show the passage of time. Hicks, as the new writer, thankfully tosses out the sickening "sweetie" interactions between Aang a This is the first ATLA book with the new writer/illustrator team. It's hard for me to tell how I feel about the new creators, since the storyline returned to what was my least favorite of the series thus far - Earthen Fire Industries. Let's start with what I liked. Aang looks older in Wartman's style, or perhaps it's a conscious attempt to start aging the characters up to show the passage of time. Hicks, as the new writer, thankfully tosses out the sickening "sweetie" interactions between Aang and Katara. (Perhaps she was as irritated by this dynamic as I was.) They have a few genuinely nice moments together that focus more on their friendship and actual conversations, which makes the romance element far more natural and believable.Unfortunately, there was a lot more that I didn't like, starting with the kind of confusing (and boring) storyline, with too much text per panel. Hicks is a graphic novelist, which makes it odd that she's attempting to cram too much story into too few pages...but I actually had the same issue with her The Nameless City series as I do with this. She's not good at big plotty political writing. While I think she's got a good overall grasp of the characters and I'd like to see more of what she does with them, I'm not sure she was the right person to helm the shift from the ATLA world to the more modern, cluttered, machine-focused, politically complex setting that had taken over by the time Korra became the Avatar.Then again, maybe I just don't like that setting as much, and I'd find fault with anyone struggling to write within those constraints. (While I like Korra as a series and books, I do find them much less interesting and well-written than ATLA.)At one point, Aang says, "What's happening here doesn't feel like progress, it feels like chaos." He means the city's rapid growth, leading to bender and non-bender fighting, increased crime rates, rampant unemployment, housing crises, and a number of other issues that accompany unplanned urbanization. It's also how I felt about the plot. There's a lot thrown on the page, but nothing much actually happens by the end. I know these are always three-part series, so there's going to be some sort of big dramatic showdown in the third volume, but honestly...I'm not that invested in finding out what it is.It makes me want to rewatch the show instead, honestly. I miss the story being about the characters. They largely feel like props here; the story's not really about them, and no one other than Aang has much to do. I guess that's what happens when you expand your world and find out there's a lot left to do after you save it. But maybe some of those stories just. Aren't as interesting to tell.
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  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book as an eARC from Dark Horse Books in exchange for an honest review* I love that the world of the Avatar has continued via comic. This is the first part of the newest story of Aang and his friends. The bender vs non-bender conflict appears in this graphic novel. Toph's father's company's city is booming. It's a city full of industry. It has the vibes of Republic City from The Legend of Korra. One of the topics of this story is how progress can leave some individuals behind. T *I received this book as an eARC from Dark Horse Books in exchange for an honest review* I love that the world of the Avatar has continued via comic. This is the first part of the newest story of Aang and his friends. The bender vs non-bender conflict appears in this graphic novel. Toph's father's company's city is booming. It's a city full of industry. It has the vibes of Republic City from The Legend of Korra. One of the topics of this story is how progress can leave some individuals behind. This is a good start to this arc in Aang's continuing story. I give this volume a 4/5. Definitely a must-read for Avatar friends.
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  • Hind
    January 1, 1970
    "What's happening here doesn't feel like progress, it feels like chaos." — Avatar Aang
  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    will I ever not read any ATLA graphic novel? Unlikely
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    With a new writer and artist team, Avatar's ongoing adventures are in good hands as the world of Aang and co. slowly begins to become the world of Korra.
  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Re-read 1/6/19I had to re-read this lovely Graphic Novel, because I am trash for this series. Whenever something new is put out by the Avatar team I must read it. But Now here is the spoilers, so if you haven't read it; please do so we can discuss it. Main Plot:Team Avatar goes to visit Toph's Father in Cranefish Town ( Soon to be Republic City), which was Fire Nation territory until the war ended. Which the town had boomed with rapid growth. Upon Toph's Fathers request he asked Aang to stay for Re-read 1/6/19I had to re-read this lovely Graphic Novel, because I am trash for this series. Whenever something new is put out by the Avatar team I must read it. But Now here is the spoilers, so if you haven't read it; please do so we can discuss it. Main Plot:Team Avatar goes to visit Toph's Father in Cranefish Town ( Soon to be Republic City), which was Fire Nation territory until the war ended. Which the town had boomed with rapid growth. Upon Toph's Fathers request he asked Aang to stay for guidance in a government less and criminal stricken town. With also non-benders being suppressed. Many non-benders feeling unsafe to walk home due to benders targeting them to loot them. A huge battle between Firebenders and Earthbenders in the middle of a heavily populated pocket of the town. The non-bending citizens get caught in the crossfires and their homes are destroyed. Aang and Toph offer to rebuild the crumbled homes. But the non-benders refuse help from benders since it is was caused their homes to crumble. All while this is going on the benders who started the battle had disappeared. So the group of Aang, Katara, Toph and Sokka disband to go to the council meeting and factory respectfully. Aang and Sokka come to the divided council with non-benders and benders sitting on opposite sides of the room. Lao (Toph's Father) proposes that he will ban bending on the streets to keep crime down. Which causes an argument among the council both sides of the council speaking of their concerns. But they come to a solution that they will create a police force of benders to keep the non-benders safe and to stop crime. One of the council members proposed that they could use her private security team (which is a bad idea, but I am getting ahead of myself). But all is agreed. Toph and Katara go to Lao's factory which Toph owns a share of. Even the factory underwent some huge changes, no benders worked in the facility anymore. Also the hired guards out front were non-benders. There is a huge demand for refined metal now because of the rapid growth in the city. In the middle of the night, the factory is compromised. Toph and Aang hunt down the two people who caused the explosion. We then soon find out that the coucil member who offered her security team to become the police force was behind the attack on the factory. She also seems to have plans to take over Cranefish Town. Side stories: Sokka is complaining he hasn't been able to see Suki. Sokka finds an awesome water tribe helmet that he wants to buy. With all the turmoil going on Aang takes Katara to an unpopulated island (which is building to become air temple island). I loved how this comic is becoming the bridge to both of my beloved TV series. This is definitely a must read if you are a huge fan of this series.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I was concerned that this book was going to completely retcon or ignore the previous five volumes. Thankfully I was completely mistaken. It builds upon those stories and characters as well as expanding upon the gap between "The Last Airbender" and "The Legend of Korra".In fact I'd suggest that anyone who is interested in continuing the Avatar journey to read the previous five arcs before jumping into this one because of how interconnected it is to those stories.My main issue is that it's such a I was concerned that this book was going to completely retcon or ignore the previous five volumes. Thankfully I was completely mistaken. It builds upon those stories and characters as well as expanding upon the gap between "The Last Airbender" and "The Legend of Korra".In fact I'd suggest that anyone who is interested in continuing the Avatar journey to read the previous five arcs before jumping into this one because of how interconnected it is to those stories.My main issue is that it's such a short book that it feels incomplete. Previously I read the library editions that were combinations of three shorter books which gave the arc a more complete feel. I think I will hold off reading volume two of "Imbalance" until the third volume has been released. At this point it's too early for me to form a view of this story.I miss the artwork from the previous volumes. Each page looked like it was a screenshot straight from the show, it was beautiful. This time around the art has more of the artist's own style while still being recognisably Avatar... but I prefer the previous style if I'm being entirely honest. But don't get me wrong, it is a really nice take on the art.Previous volumes reviewed here:Volume One: The PromiseVolume Two: The SearchVolume Three: The RiftVolume Four: Smoke And ShadowVolume Five: North And South
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  • Vicki
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to get this out of the way now: I am so distracted by how much Aang has grown up. In a good way! But in every other panel Aang is in, the first thing I think is, "Damn, this kid is growing up so fast *proudtear*"New A:TLA sequel story, this time focusing on the bender vs. non-bender conflict we see prominent in the first season of Legend of Korra. Some things are predictable; like this new villain, 100% called it the instant she showed up in her first panel. And I know how the police f I'm going to get this out of the way now: I am so distracted by how much Aang has grown up. In a good way! But in every other panel Aang is in, the first thing I think is, "Damn, this kid is growing up so fast *proudtear*"New A:TLA sequel story, this time focusing on the bender vs. non-bender conflict we see prominent in the first season of Legend of Korra. Some things are predictable; like this new villain, 100% called it the instant she showed up in her first panel. And I know how the police force is going to go down in future installments just based on the themes being explored in this new story and, sadly, how it relates to the real world. We're back to the themes relating to progress, but this time how developing technology and an industrial revolution can put people out of work, and how the displaced workers, their skills no longer needed and with no other ways to survive, resort to criminal activities. So in the spirit of the A:TLA graphic novels, I'm prepared and excited for another trilogy of an extremely nuanced argument. Is it March yet?(view spoiler)[(Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but is Cranefish Town going to be the future Republic City? I thought it was going to be Yu Dao, but the geographical features here are way more familiar to Republic City than Yu Dao's. Either way... looks like we're seeing the makings of the council that Sokka will become of (and looks like the council he's going to play a big role in shaping) and the police force that Toph will run! YASSS.) (hide spoiler)]
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  • Marc *Dark Reader of the Woods*
    January 1, 1970
    The high-quality series of graphic novels that follow the television series continue, with new writers and artists but maintaining a consistent storyline, with authentic characterization and plotting. The characters seem to have aged up a bit as depicted here; Aang is getting taller and more muscular, and all the characters visually appear more mature. The themes bridging the gap between the end of the Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra TV series continue to develop here. Cranefi The high-quality series of graphic novels that follow the television series continue, with new writers and artists but maintaining a consistent storyline, with authentic characterization and plotting. The characters seem to have aged up a bit as depicted here; Aang is getting taller and more muscular, and all the characters visually appear more mature. The themes bridging the gap between the end of the Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra TV series continue to develop here. Cranefish town is clearly revealed to be the foundation of Republic City, both geographically and culturally. It is not necessary to tell these stories. We don't have to know all of the events taking place in between the two TV series. I hope that the graphic novels do not continue forever; they would have to cover another 40 years of history at least to fully bridge the gap, and the television stories stand on their own. In fact, I often think of the original series as perfect storytelling. But though they are not necessary, they are nice. The art, characters, stories and pacing are incredibly faithful to the source material. My daughter likes reading these graphic novels. So, I don't mind if they continue for just a little while longer, as long as they don't keep pushing them too far and end up beating a dead horse.
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  • Mitali
    January 1, 1970
    This was better than I expected. Or maybe my standards for the Avatar comics have gotten really low since the North and South trilogy (which was terrible). Anyway, I was sceptical of how bender vs. non-bender hostility would be developed in this story – especially as considering that there was never any such hostility seen in the world of Avatar: The Last Airbender (which made season 1 of The Legend of Korra all the more absurd), and the hostilities in the immediate aftermath of the 100-Year War This was better than I expected. Or maybe my standards for the Avatar comics have gotten really low since the North and South trilogy (which was terrible). Anyway, I was sceptical of how bender vs. non-bender hostility would be developed in this story – especially as considering that there was never any such hostility seen in the world of Avatar: The Last Airbender (which made season 1 of The Legend of Korra all the more absurd), and the hostilities in the immediate aftermath of the 100-Year War would in any case be along national lines (to be more precise, Fire Nation vs. everyone else). But Imbalance Part 1 did a good job of developing bender vs. non-bender hostility organically, while making it clear that the nation-based hostilities have far from vanished. It also does a good job of tying the new divide to technological changes, which makes for a logical step towards the world of The Legend of Korra. And we see the beginnings of Republic City – cool!On the negative front – the story is still far from subtle, and like several of the Avatar comics, has an apparent ‘well-intentioned extremist’ as its villain (view spoiler)[(the quotation marks denote my scepticism about Liling’s intentions – my guess is that she’ll have turned into a moustache-twirling villain by the third part) (hide spoiler)]. It feels very been-there-done-that. As seems to be the norm among these comics, Katara is turned into Aang’s supportive girlfriend with no story, ideas or agency of her own. It's a really annoying sidelining of a character who was the most active one on the show.Nonetheless, I’m cautiously optimistic about the rest of this story. Faith Erin Hicks seems to be a better writer than Gene Yuen Lang. At the very least, she has toned down Toph’s abrasiveness – Toph was seriously edging into insufferable territory in the previous comics. (I just hope she manages to keep Toph’s metal-bending students out of the story – they are utterly tiresome, one-note characters.) While I preferred the art style of the previous comics, the new artist is not bad either.Bring on Imbalance Part 2! (Well, not until April.)
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  • Stephan van Velzen
    January 1, 1970
    So far, I've just given these Avatar graphic novels one short line of review each time. This one, however, deserves a few more words. All the previous comics were created by the same artistic team. The art was perfect and looked like it came straight from the cartoon. The stories felt like a series of Avatar films. Each character's voice was spot on. I loved it.In this new comic, the characters don't feel quite spot on anymore. The story is still great and again deals with some great, deep theme So far, I've just given these Avatar graphic novels one short line of review each time. This one, however, deserves a few more words. All the previous comics were created by the same artistic team. The art was perfect and looked like it came straight from the cartoon. The stories felt like a series of Avatar films. Each character's voice was spot on. I loved it.In this new comic, the characters don't feel quite spot on anymore. The story is still great and again deals with some great, deep themes. This story, like a few before, also feels very much like it's bridging the gap between Last Airbender and Korra, and I appreciate that a lot. The art, though. The art. Well, to be honest... I think it's BUTT UGLY. This doesn't feel like Avatar anymore, but rather some kind of perverse caricature of it. And it makes me so sad, because all the potential is there. I really hope this isn't the end of good, high quality Avatar comics.
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  • Theodore Andrzejczyk
    January 1, 1970
    I have read all of the other ATLA and enjoyed them very much. However, although I enjoyed this one, it is very repetitive of old plots - in fact, it incorporate scentral plot points from all of them. A town is having trouble keeping peace (the promise), so a secret society establishes to gain power (New Ozai society / taking over Hakoda group), along with themes of progress / industry vs. Tradition (the rift / north and south). It just seems like not much is unique with this one and was fairly p I have read all of the other ATLA and enjoyed them very much. However, although I enjoyed this one, it is very repetitive of old plots - in fact, it incorporate scentral plot points from all of them. A town is having trouble keeping peace (the promise), so a secret society establishes to gain power (New Ozai society / taking over Hakoda group), along with themes of progress / industry vs. Tradition (the rift / north and south). It just seems like not much is unique with this one and was fairly predictable / familiar if you have read the others. Overall, I would say that i dont dislike the new art style or even the writing style, but i do have trouble with the seemingly lack of creativity with this plot and a problem with originality that none of the other comics or tv show seemed to have. It does not seem very daring or an attempt at a thrilling story but “playing it safe” with familiarity as they are the new creators in the ATLA comic continuation.
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  • Y.S. Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    Imbalance (Part One) is the latest instalment of Avatar: The Last Airbender comics. Reading it feels familiar - it mirrors a lot of what is happening in our present world. Much of the book is devoted to the theme of unfettered and unconscious progress. It examines how such "progress" tends to leave the poorest behind while the wealthy take undue advantage to accumulate more.For Avatar fans, it is important to note that Imbalance events occur way before any of the four main characters (Aang, Kata Imbalance (Part One) is the latest instalment of Avatar: The Last Airbender comics. Reading it feels familiar - it mirrors a lot of what is happening in our present world. Much of the book is devoted to the theme of unfettered and unconscious progress. It examines how such "progress" tends to leave the poorest behind while the wealthy take undue advantage to accumulate more.For Avatar fans, it is important to note that Imbalance events occur way before any of the four main characters (Aang, Katara, Toph, and Sokka) had children. It focuses on the technological and economic advancement that came after the war.As usual in an Avatar series, this story has the four companions helping folks, solving complex problems, and busting skulls.
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  • João Calafate
    January 1, 1970
    Solid 4 stars.What better way than to end the year with some Avatar: The Last Airbender? This is a first part, so nothing too important happens and it is short... But the characters are amazing as always, the world is still the inspired world I grew up with, the art is gorgeous, so not much to complain really. And the antagonists have a lot of potential, I was surprised. Can't wait to read the rest of the arc and the comics before this one. Need to catch up.All in all, I love A:TLA (what a surpr Solid 4 stars.What better way than to end the year with some Avatar: The Last Airbender? This is a first part, so nothing too important happens and it is short... But the characters are amazing as always, the world is still the inspired world I grew up with, the art is gorgeous, so not much to complain really. And the antagonists have a lot of potential, I was surprised. Can't wait to read the rest of the arc and the comics before this one. Need to catch up.All in all, I love A:TLA (what a surprise) and I'm happy this comic completed my goal to read 35 books. A good, nostalgic way to end this year's challenge.
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  • Sarah May
    January 1, 1970
    You know how much I love this series right? And I'm very happy to read this new graphic novel with new author and new illustrator, and I can't wait for the parts two and three.The graphics are beautiful and as for the story, it has somehow similar or connected or continuation with The Rift series, non-bender versus bender conflict is the center of the story, and the development of the Cranefish town (and I have a hunch that it will renamed as Republic City), that some individuals are being left You know how much I love this series right? And I'm very happy to read this new graphic novel with new author and new illustrator, and I can't wait for the parts two and three.The graphics are beautiful and as for the story, it has somehow similar or connected or continuation with The Rift series, non-bender versus bender conflict is the center of the story, and the development of the Cranefish town (and I have a hunch that it will renamed as Republic City), that some individuals are being left behind. Which gives us a slow introduction to the main arc of season one's Legend of Korra.This is a good start for a new arc of this continuing series. 4/5 stars. :)
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  • Liz H {Redd's Reads}
    January 1, 1970
    The progression and growth of the world that these graphic novels lend to the AtLA and LoK are fantastic! It's almost as good as watching more episodes :) I'm not sure this one was as strong as the previously released mini series, but I might be a bit biased toward Gene Luen Yang's writing. And since we have a new author here, that might have crept into my subconscious a bit. I am now in need of part two now though! And really wished more people were talking about how great all of these graphic The progression and growth of the world that these graphic novels lend to the AtLA and LoK are fantastic! It's almost as good as watching more episodes :) I'm not sure this one was as strong as the previously released mini series, but I might be a bit biased toward Gene Luen Yang's writing. And since we have a new author here, that might have crept into my subconscious a bit. I am now in need of part two now though! And really wished more people were talking about how great all of these graphic novels are!
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  • Caroline Sheppard
    January 1, 1970
    I've loved all of the ATLA graphic novels so far, and I think this arc might turn out to be one of my favorites. I really enjoyed Faith Erin Hicks' writing style and how she wrote all the characters, everything felt very natural and just like watching an episode of the show. Peter Wartman's art is also GORGEOUS.It's really cool getting to see the early stages of Republic City and the rising tensions between benders and non benders. Can't wait to see where the rest of the arc goes!
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Great set up for the story, which I think will fall neatly into place over the next two volumes and have some real gems of wisdom. I'm VERY excited to see how this town develops, bringing some fun nods to Korra along with it. I'm cautiously optimistic, though I am sad to lose Gene Luen Yang's voice, which (apart from North and South) was so insightful and seamlessly integrated into the world established by the TV series.Recommended for existing ATLA fans.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I feel so harsh giving this book a three star rating because I usually love the avatar comic series but this particular one was kinda boring. I’m hoping that it was just because it was setting up for a bigger conflict in the next books.That being said I did still love the art style, I don’t feel like it changed that much. I love this series and I look forward to what they do in the future. I very much still have faith in them, it’s just this one was a little slow.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I was a little bit worried about the team change, but I really like the new art style, though it is differently drawn, the characters faces and bodies are more similar to the show. The writing is incredible, it made me feel as if I was watching the show again, the characters were on point. This part was mostly set up, but it looks like it is going to unfold into a very interesting story (not that it isn’t already interesting). I’m going to say it again, you should read this book.
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  • Holly Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Dark Horse Comics, Random House, and Edelweiss for the e-arc in exchange for an honest review Another wonderful continuation of one of my most beloved series/franchises (and with each new trilogy, it gets closer and closer to completing the bridge between Last Airbender and Legend of Korra.The illustrations - and the colouring, in particular - were beautiful. A must-have addition for any ATLA fan.
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  • anna
    January 1, 1970
    i loooooove the new art style and the colour palettes are gorgeous buttt the plot lines are kinda getting repetitive so i’m not too invested in the newer characters, i guess we’ll see when the next part comes out !!
  • Haileyreads
    January 1, 1970
    This picks up after the events of the TV series. The characters had the same feel of the show and it was interesting to see the avatar and friends deal with problems after the war is over. The art style was colorful and the shading and shadows were very pretty.
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  • Miss
    January 1, 1970
    In March 2019? Oh my, I am not that patient. I should have waited first and then read.Overall, it is a nice spin and a nice new chapter with promising evil plans, Toph being sweet and Sokka trying to came up with new names. Zuko and Suki are welcome to show up in the sequel if it ever reaches me.
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