Incognegro
A page-turning thriller of racial divide, Incognegro: Renaissance explores segregation, secrets and self-image as our race-bending protagonist penetrates a world where he feels stranger than ever before.When a black writer is found dead at a scandalous interracial party in 1920s' New York, Harlem's cub reporter Zane Pinchback is the only one determined to solve the murder. Zane must go "Incognegro" for the first time, using his light appearance to pass as a white man to find the true killer, in this prequel miniseries to the critically acclaimed Vertigo graphic novel, now available in a special new 10th Anniversary Edition.With a cryptic manuscript as his only clue, and a mysterious and beautiful woman as the murder's only witness, Zane finds himself on the hunt through the dark and dangerous streets of "roaring twenties" Harlem in search for justice. In a time when looks could kill . . . Zane's skin is the only thing keeping him alive.

Incognegro Details

TitleIncognegro
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 23rd, 2018
PublisherBerger Books
ISBN-139781506705637
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Mystery, Historical, Historical Fiction

Incognegro Review

  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    Review- https://youtu.be/fo6wlTSexa0
  • Diz
    January 1, 1970
    The graphic novel presents a murder mystery that takes place during the Harlem Renaissance. It's a fascinating period of history, and this book has motivated me to look into it more. The main theme is black identity, and this story is successful in revealing that black identity is much more complex than most people assume. This is well worth reading.
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  • Arlene
    January 1, 1970
    The only thing that I can say that takes away from this book for me the the transition from one setting to another. It’s so jarring, you would think that you skipped a page or two. I enjoyed the mystery of it all, but it was kinda obvious to me, but at the same time the message was received and still very relevant to today. I liked this comic, and definitely continue to read and support.
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  • Michael Kitchen
    January 1, 1970
    Engaging story and characters with excellent art.
  • Jamie Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    Johnson and Pleece have done it again. This prequel to their original graphic novel — Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery — takes us back to when Zane Pinchback was a cub reporter getting no respect from anyone. Once again we get amazing grayscale drawing and excellent writing, along with a thrilling mystery.Whereas the original book dealt largely with the state of the South during this period, Renaissance stays in New York during the height of the Harlem Renaissance. This story provides a view into t Johnson and Pleece have done it again. This prequel to their original graphic novel — Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery — takes us back to when Zane Pinchback was a cub reporter getting no respect from anyone. Once again we get amazing grayscale drawing and excellent writing, along with a thrilling mystery.Whereas the original book dealt largely with the state of the South during this period, Renaissance stays in New York during the height of the Harlem Renaissance. This story provides a view into the racism and systemic oppression in the “better” North. It also tells the story of how Zane learned to pass as a white person and how he wrestles with the morality and contradictory feelings of partaking in privileges denied to his friends and neighbors, even for a good cause.But, the book does not forget that it is a thriller and the mystery at the heart of the plot delivers. I am not sure how Mat Johnson keeps writing books that are so honest about so many dark topics, and don’t feel cluttered when it comes to story telling, and still manage to have happy endings that feel satisfying; but I hope he keeps doing it.Meanwhile, I’m looking to see if Pleece has done more I should read. His consistent and careful style just sucks you in. He has a subtlety in how he uses setting — what is included, what is not — and framing that adds layers to the story while not taking the reader out of it.
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  • Dakota Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    Incognegro: Renaissance is a fine book, well worth reading for its exploration of the Harlem renaissance and the concept of "passing". However, the mystery portion is pretty tepid with a clear villain and a notable lack of red herrings or femme fatales. This is no edge-of-your seat thriller. Mat Johnson spices conversations with some delightful humor, but he also offers pages and pages of dialogue with little action - a sign that he might be more suited to novels than graphic novels. Warren Plee Incognegro: Renaissance is a fine book, well worth reading for its exploration of the Harlem renaissance and the concept of "passing". However, the mystery portion is pretty tepid with a clear villain and a notable lack of red herrings or femme fatales. This is no edge-of-your seat thriller. Mat Johnson spices conversations with some delightful humor, but he also offers pages and pages of dialogue with little action - a sign that he might be more suited to novels than graphic novels. Warren Pleece's black-and-white art is serviceable. Incognegro: Renaissance won't blow your socks off, but you're probably not going to find another mystery set in the Harlem renaissance soon, so it's worth reading for that fact alone.
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  • Fraser Sherman
    January 1, 1970
    This prequel to Incognegro is set in the Harlem Renaissance with the previous graphic novel's hero, Zane, just a cub reporter. Dragged to a fancy mixed race party, he stumbles over a black writer's corpse with a sodden manuscript next to it. Everyone writes it off as suicide except a rising actress who convinces Zane to investigate. Fortunately he's very light-skinned so with a little walk, he can go where no black man would normally dare.A good story and the details about life, skin color, Harl This prequel to Incognegro is set in the Harlem Renaissance with the previous graphic novel's hero, Zane, just a cub reporter. Dragged to a fancy mixed race party, he stumbles over a black writer's corpse with a sodden manuscript next to it. Everyone writes it off as suicide except a rising actress who convinces Zane to investigate. Fortunately he's very light-skinned so with a little walk, he can go where no black man would normally dare.A good story and the details about life, skin color, Harlem and passing give it some added power.
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  • Tiffani
    January 1, 1970
    Journalist Zane Pinchback goes to a party where a Black writer is found dead. The police brush it off as suicide, not at all interested in what happened to a Black man. Zane suspect the dead man was a victim of murder, not suicide and sets out to find the truth. I love mysteries and the Harlem Renaissance is one my favorite literary & artistic periods so this was pretty much written for me.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    A subtler affair than the original, and perhaps a more traditional noir story, but no poorer for either. The lack of colour is perhaps thematicaly appropriate and does highlight the ambiguity Zane lives in, but it also flattens the world and is possibly why I don't quite feel like it's earned the final star.
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  • Leontyne
    January 1, 1970
    How it All BeganThis is a good story that lets readers know why Zane decides to Incognegro. I did enjoy reading this prequel.
  • LALa
    January 1, 1970
    As usual, thoroughly enjoyed it! May say more later...
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