Tell Me Everything
YOUR SECRET’S SAFE … UNTIL IT’S NOTIvy is the shy artist type and keeps a low profile—so low that she’s practically invisible to everyone at Belfry High School except for her best friend, Harold. As sophomore year begins, Harold takes up a hundred activities, leaving Ivy on her own. Luckily she’s found a distraction: the new anonymous art-sharing app, VEIL.Soon Ivy realizes that one of her classmates is the VEIL user who needs new paintbrushes … and another is the one visiting the hospital every week … and another is the one dealing with their parents’ messy divorce. While she’s too scared to put her own creations on the app, Ivy thinks of an even better way to contribute—by making gifts for the artists she’s discovered. The acts of kindness give her such a rush that, when Ivy suspects Harold is keeping a secret, she decides to go all in. Forget gifts—Ivy wants to throw Harold a major party.But when all those good intentions thrust her into the spotlight, Ivy’s carefully curated world is thrown into chaos. Now she has to find the courage to come out of the shadows—about her art, her secrets, and her mistakes—or risk losing everything and everyone she loves the most.

Tell Me Everything Details

TitleTell Me Everything
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Fiction

Tell Me Everything Review

  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    A timely and thought-provoking book about social media, anonymity, art, and being yourself for yourself. Ivy's voice here is fantastic and the perfect blend of funny, snarky, confused, and insecure. This book is absolutely for teens, with dialog that's real and situations that resonate among teens learning how to navigate long-time and newly-budding friendships. At the heart of the story is the VEIL app, which Ivy turns to to better cope with a summer away from her brilliant best friend. VEIL al A timely and thought-provoking book about social media, anonymity, art, and being yourself for yourself. Ivy's voice here is fantastic and the perfect blend of funny, snarky, confused, and insecure. This book is absolutely for teens, with dialog that's real and situations that resonate among teens learning how to navigate long-time and newly-budding friendships. At the heart of the story is the VEIL app, which Ivy turns to to better cope with a summer away from her brilliant best friend. VEIL allows users to share art anonymously and it's seen by only those who are local to them for 24 hours. Ivy takes what should be something straightforward -- art for art's sake -- and uses it to try to connect with people who, by using the app, preferred to be anonymous. This, in the end, bites her when she realizes she makes some terrible assumptions about people and puts others in situations where they're not comfortable. Her heart is there, even if her thinking brain isn't.There's a particularly interesting thread through the story about Vivian Maier, who is an artist that I adore. It's interesting because this is a niggling point only someone obsessed with the Maier story would note: when Harold talks about how she was not the best babysitter, about how she wasn't a great person -- none of these are checked by the fact that Maier's story was, until very recently, coopted by a white dude who created the entire mythos of who she was and what her story was. He profited deeply, including on the documentary mentioned in the book, off the work of a woman who, during her life, CHOSE to create art that wasn't shared. She wasn't a "hidden genius." She simply chose to be anonymous and make art for art's sake (this is from Pamela Bannos's excellent book from 2018 on the topic). It's interesting to think about the way that this parallels the point of VEIL within Enni's story, especially as it appears unintentional, given that Bannos's book came out when Enni's book was likely already finished. Pass this along to readers who love stories of artists, who are curious about social media, and who love a voicey, curious main character.
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  • Gretal
    January 1, 1970
    Tell Me Everything follows sophomore Ivy who is a shy artist except for when she decides to get into everyone’s business, doing “good” deeds for people whose identities she figured out (or thinks she has) from posts to an anonymous art-sharing app similar to Yik Yak or After School. This culminates in her deciding her best friend is gay and throwing a coming out party for him because she thinks he hasn’t felt supported enough by her to tell her so obviously the solution is to kind of out him. Sh Tell Me Everything follows sophomore Ivy who is a shy artist except for when she decides to get into everyone’s business, doing “good” deeds for people whose identities she figured out (or thinks she has) from posts to an anonymous art-sharing app similar to Yik Yak or After School. This culminates in her deciding her best friend is gay and throwing a coming out party for him because she thinks he hasn’t felt supported enough by her to tell her so obviously the solution is to kind of out him. She realizes this was wrong, of course, but is this, a book with a straight main character learning it’s really awful to out someone, the sort of book we need in 2019? I don’t think so.
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  • Chloe
    January 1, 1970
    This book was amazing. It had a main plot about exploring friendships and loves, but also about finding your own creativity. And that plot was amazing. I absolutely loved it. But, I think a lot of books have an amazing main plot. What made this book special and truly beautiful was its subplots. One of the best things about this book was the subplots of what each character and person was going through. It showed that everyone is dealing with stuff and going through it. One of my favorite parts o This book was amazing. It had a main plot about exploring friendships and loves, but also about finding your own creativity. And that plot was amazing. I absolutely loved it. But, I think a lot of books have an amazing main plot. What made this book special and truly beautiful was its subplots. One of the best things about this book was the subplots of what each character and person was going through. It showed that everyone is dealing with stuff and going through it. One of my favorite parts of this was how Ivy changed each of these people in the book. Whether it seemed for better or worse, she started out with good intentions and the mistakes she made along the way she fixed. I think that's amazing. Also, can we talk about that romance? That was so adorable and sweet. Their relationship is what I aspire to have too. I want my best friend as a lover, because then they know everything about me, my likes and dislikes, its never awkward, there seems to be so many more advantages than disadvantages.To be continued....
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  • Sarah Bowe
    January 1, 1970
    A book about the good (self expression) and the bad (again.... Self expression) of social media. I like Ivy. She always meant well, even when it didn't turn out. I was bummed out with Harold until he redeemed himself at the end. I'm glad Ivy found a friend in Nate when Harold wasn't there.
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