Squint
My name is Flint, but everyone in middle school calls me Squint because I’m losing my vision. I used to play football, but not anymore. I haven’t had a friend in a long time. Thankfully, real friends can see the real you, even when you can’t clearly see. Flint loves to draw. In fact, he’s furiously trying to finish his comic book so he can be the youngest winner of the “Find a Comic Star” contest. He’s also rushing to finish because he has keratoconus—an eye disease that could eventually make him blind. McKell is the new girl at school and immediately hangs with the popular kids. Except McKell’s not a fan of the way her friends treat this boy named Squint. He seems nice and really talented. He draws awesome pictures of superheroes. McKell wants to get to know him, but is it worth the risk? What if her friends catch her hanging with the kid who squints all the time? McKell has a hidden talent of her own but doesn’t share it for fear of being judged. Her terminally ill brother, Danny, challenges McKell to share her love of poetry and songwriting. Flint seems like someone she could trust. Someone who would never laugh at her. Someone who is as good and brave as the superhero in Flint’s comic book named Squint.Squint is the inspiring story of two new friends dealing with their own challenges, who learn to trust each other, believe in themselves, and begin to truly see what matters most.

Squint Details

TitleSquint
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherShadow Mountain
ISBN-139781629724850
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary, Family

Squint Review

  • Fuzaila ~ is on hiatus
    January 1, 1970
    This book has made it to the list of must-reads I'm creating for my possible future kids. Full review to comeThanks to netgalley and the publishers for providing me a free copy in exchange of an honest review.
  • Noha Badawi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very inspiring read!Thank you Shadow Mountain Publishing for the advance copyThis book goes up on my possible-to-read list for my kids in the future. They need such a story to ground them. I’m a big fan of middle grade and I found this book to be exceptionally intriguing, easy to read, simple to understand and very much relatable.From the very first words I was hooked to the story. I loved how the characters were immediately believable and realistic. Flint‘s character – as young as he This was a very inspiring read!Thank you Shadow Mountain Publishing for the advance copyThis book goes up on my possible-to-read list for my kids in the future. They need such a story to ground them. I’m a big fan of middle grade and I found this book to be exceptionally intriguing, easy to read, simple to understand and very much relatable.From the very first words I was hooked to the story. I loved how the characters were immediately believable and realistic. Flint‘s character – as young as he is – was incredibly truthful and honest. A 13 years old kid these days face the horrors of middle school and I love how it was portrayed within the story.Bullying isn’t something you should stand back from or shy away from facing, yet a lot of kids face it every single day, for things they have no power over – like Flint‘s illness. It’s horrible and crippling and if someone thinks that it gets forgotten, big surprise, it doesn’t. A bullied kid will remember every single day for the rest of his/her life.Parents, read this book, teach your kids to be kind and merciful, to be loving and friendly. Teach them to accept each other, to not call one another names, to look in the mirror and be proud of who they are and be an example for them to be proud of you..... Full Review
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  • Emily Zorea
    January 1, 1970
    I do not often give a book five stars, but I did for "Squint". First impressions: the cover is current, eye catching, and reflective of the story. I am a children's librarian, and I have noticed that middle school kids do not want to pick up books if they don't think the cover is cool enough, as in, "I don't want people to see me reading that book" if the cover is not up their standards. No worries with this cover, so we were off to a great start from the beginning. Second impressions: The story I do not often give a book five stars, but I did for "Squint". First impressions: the cover is current, eye catching, and reflective of the story. I am a children's librarian, and I have noticed that middle school kids do not want to pick up books if they don't think the cover is cool enough, as in, "I don't want people to see me reading that book" if the cover is not up their standards. No worries with this cover, so we were off to a great start from the beginning. Second impressions: The story was engaging throughout with characters that were realistic and believable. Reading different selections of the text reminded me of emotions and moments of being in middle school, but the book did not center around the awkwardness, bad memories, and moments where I wish I had acted differently. Instead, the text reminded me of the choices I made in middle school that I was proud of, like practicing my violin concertos, sitting with the kid at lunch that was alone, and doing my chores. I liked that this book encouraged the reader subtly to be their best self. That was told through the themes of forgiveness, quite courage, compassion, and doing hard things that ran through the story, with almost every character. I also loved the gentle life lessons that the grandparents share with Squint, and the reader, throughout. They are excellent role models, and true heroes. The scene where Squint wants to quite writing comics, yet his grandfather encourages him to be proud of his drawings because they represent hard work was a gentle, but important moment. I also loved how Squint and McKell showed the reader how to be a good friend in middle school by caring about each other. Very few middle school books do that, in my opinion. I will be purchasing this book for my library, and promoting it in next year's booktalks when I visit classrooms with my "Box of Books" and give kids a little commercial about all the books I have in the box which I then check out their teacher for the kids to read in their classroom when I leave. I will be recommending this book to fourth-8th graders. Thank you, Chad Morris and Shelly Brown, for this story.
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  • Mindy
    January 1, 1970
    Squint is another hit for this talented husband and wife author duo. I loved it! These authors really know how to tug at your heart strings, all while having you think, laugh, and smile at the same time. I loved how this book wasn't just Flint's story, but McKell's, Danny's, Grandma's, Grandpa's journey too. I appreciated and loved the lessons learned along the way. A great one was when Flint realized things about himself that he needed to change. No doubt he had been through some hard things wi Squint is another hit for this talented husband and wife author duo. I loved it! These authors really know how to tug at your heart strings, all while having you think, laugh, and smile at the same time. I loved how this book wasn't just Flint's story, but McKell's, Danny's, Grandma's, Grandpa's journey too. I appreciated and loved the lessons learned along the way. A great one was when Flint realized things about himself that he needed to change. No doubt he had been through some hard things with his keratoconus. He wasn't perfect either and tried his best to make changes and be brave himself, all while helping McKell with her challenges. McKell was a doll and Danny was a fun character too. His role was small, but he had a big impact on everyone. I absolutely loved Grandpa's football analogies. He was a hoot!
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  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    I often struggle to enjoy novels with under age characters that have the characters partaking in the most adult of activities because it makes me uncomfortable so I was a little apprehensive about this middle school character. But I am so so pleased I gave Flint a chance because I loved this book so much! I love how flawed Flint was and his constant narrative about his visual impairments impact. I loved the overall message of this book and the plot twist towards the end, I was crying for sure.Fl I often struggle to enjoy novels with under age characters that have the characters partaking in the most adult of activities because it makes me uncomfortable so I was a little apprehensive about this middle school character. But I am so so pleased I gave Flint a chance because I loved this book so much! I love how flawed Flint was and his constant narrative about his visual impairments impact. I loved the overall message of this book and the plot twist towards the end, I was crying for sure.Flint really reminded me of my teenage self: a little in his own world, a little selfish, and a whole lot in need of some good friends.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Five stars. But I cowrote it, so I'd better like it.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus, also available at Netgalley.comFlint, who is very interested in drawing comic books, is now usually called "Squint" by his classmates because he is suffering from a degenerative eye disease the affects his corneas and gives him very poor vision. His classmates, who used to be friendly, now bully him. When McKell suddenly starts talking to him, he is wary that her motives are also devious, but she is friendly and invites him on a hike. She is kind, and Flint soon finds E ARC from Edelweiss Plus, also available at Netgalley.comFlint, who is very interested in drawing comic books, is now usually called "Squint" by his classmates because he is suffering from a degenerative eye disease the affects his corneas and gives him very poor vision. His classmates, who used to be friendly, now bully him. When McKell suddenly starts talking to him, he is wary that her motives are also devious, but she is friendly and invites him on a hike. She is kind, and Flint soon finds out that it is because her brother suffers from progeria and has a YouTube channel where he challenges people to go out and do things that he can no longer do. When Flint's eyes become so bad that he is eligible for a cornea transplant, he is out of school for a while, and upon his return he realizes that McKell has been out, too. Her brother has passed away, and she struggles with her grief and loss. Flint has been trying to finish a comic to submit to a contest, but once his vision improves, he fears it isn't very good. McKell is also shy and beset with anxiety over her own talents. She writes and performs music with a ukulele. She and Flint spend more time together and encourage each other to break out of their boxes and take chances. Strengths: Flint is being raised by his grandparents because his mother has opted out of raising him. There isn't a lot of money, and both grandparents work hard to take care of Flint's needs. There is a growing number of books with grandparents assuming parental roles, which mirrors what is going on in society. There are not many books about children with impaired sight (Although Vrabel has both A Blind Guide To Stinkville and A Bind Guide to Normal, and there is the classic Beverly Butler Light a Single Candle (1962), which captivated me when I was in middle school.) McKell's experience with loss is well done, and the inclusion of a character with progeria is interesting, even if we don't see much of him before he passes away. Weaknesses: I found it hard to believe that Flint's classmates would be so insensitive, although I'm sure that there are places where this is absolutely how people treat others. We had a student with diminishing sight, and as far as I could tell her classmates were kind and remained friends with her. The trajectory of some of the relationships from friends to bullying is well explained, but it was sad. We also had a student who was deaf, and the other students were almost TOO interested in being friends with her and talking about her challenges. What I really think: Definitely purchasing. Even though Flint struggles on so many levels, he keeps trying and is generally upbeat.
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  • Bookconfessions
    January 1, 1970
    This book was delightful and had all the feels. It made me laugh and cry and smile the whole way through. The voice was spot on. The characters were adorable! I've never been a hormonal middle school boy, but being in Flint's head through this book, I imagine that's exactly how they are, it was fantastic.Having Flint recite rules for middle school and rules for comic books, was an ingenious plot point. Not only were they entertaining, but they set the stage for us to see that sometimes, rules ar This book was delightful and had all the feels. It made me laugh and cry and smile the whole way through. The voice was spot on. The characters were adorable! I've never been a hormonal middle school boy, but being in Flint's head through this book, I imagine that's exactly how they are, it was fantastic.Having Flint recite rules for middle school and rules for comic books, was an ingenious plot point. Not only were they entertaining, but they set the stage for us to see that sometimes, rules are made to be broken.I loved the story with-in a story. Using Flint's comic book to mirror his hopes and his heartache was awesome. I especially appreciate though that the real story was real. They didn't give him a super hero ending, they taught that sometimes life doesn't go like you plan, and sometimes we're just as much as fault as the bad guy, but "At times, it is our weaknesses that can make us better, let our light out."I loved this book!
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  • Sydney
    January 1, 1970
    Squint is a beautiful, powerful, and inspiring story of two friends, their struggles, fear of being judged, and learning to lean on and trust one another. Chad Morris and Shelley Brown have come together and created a realistic fiction and contemporary story focused on family and friendship that readers will immediately fall in love with. From the delightful and beloved believable characters, to the sweet and charming story of true friendship, readers will come to see what in life matters most.G Squint is a beautiful, powerful, and inspiring story of two friends, their struggles, fear of being judged, and learning to lean on and trust one another. Chad Morris and Shelley Brown have come together and created a realistic fiction and contemporary story focused on family and friendship that readers will immediately fall in love with. From the delightful and beloved believable characters, to the sweet and charming story of true friendship, readers will come to see what in life matters most.Genre: children’s, contemporary, middle grade, family, realistic fictionPublisher: Shadow MountainPublication date: October 2, 2018Number of pages: 256A review copy of this book was provided by Shadow Mountain. A review was not required and all views and opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an advanced reader's copy and this reminded me a lot of Perks of Being a Wallflower totally with the relationship Flint (Squint) and McKell have with one another. I love young adult stories that expresses hidden talents within us. With the adaptive social awkwardness these two characters have combined with their talents and interests made this story relate able automatically. Middle Schoolers and High Schoolers should read this book at some point because there are some st I received this book as an advanced reader's copy and this reminded me a lot of Perks of Being a Wallflower totally with the relationship Flint (Squint) and McKell have with one another. I love young adult stories that expresses hidden talents within us. With the adaptive social awkwardness these two characters have combined with their talents and interests made this story relate able automatically. Middle Schoolers and High Schoolers should read this book at some point because there are some strong life lessons that are presented in such a matter that they can easily understand and apply. An excellent interesting read that we give 5 stars!
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it! It is as amazing as I’ve come to expect from the Morris duo. It feels part graphic novel, a bit of a Kwame Alexander prose flavor thrown in, big part Brown/Morris charm, and ALL genius. There’s heartache, happiness, and humor- friendship and human frailties, and super heroes in unexpected characters. What more could you ask for in a story??! Older elementary ages and up, will be fans of this new, unique story. So glad it will be out in time for Christmas gifts!
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    How do you think you would feel if your favorite thing in the world is to draw comics but you have an eye disease that was causing you to go blind? Flint, or aka Squint as the bullies call him, used to play football and used to have a best friend. Now that he is losing his sight and has to wear big, thick glasses, he cannot play sports, and his best friend is no longer his best friend. The only thing he has is his comics, and he is very good at drawing. He wants to enter his comic into a contest How do you think you would feel if your favorite thing in the world is to draw comics but you have an eye disease that was causing you to go blind? Flint, or aka Squint as the bullies call him, used to play football and used to have a best friend. Now that he is losing his sight and has to wear big, thick glasses, he cannot play sports, and his best friend is no longer his best friend. The only thing he has is his comics, and he is very good at drawing. He wants to enter his comic into a contest and become the youngest person to win, but he is racing the clock. Can he finish and enter the contest before he loses his eyesight completely? He is also having to deal with bullies, and believe it or not, one of the bullies used to be his best friend. Flint has never felt more alone, until he meets McKell. She is new and hangs around with the bully group but she doesn't like they way they treat Flint. One day she sits at the lunch table with Flint because she has been issued a challenge. Flint keeps waiting for something bad to happen from the bullies, but nothing out of the ordinary happens. Can McKell actually want to be his friend or is it all just a colossal joke? Neither one of them know that their meeting is going to be life-changing. Do not miss Squint!This story will make you laugh and cry. It is an incredible story of heartbreak, friendship, and not being afraid to be yourself. The ups and downs will keep you on your toes and make you want to go hug your best friend. Middle school is hard enough on its own, but having a disability makes it even harder. I love how Chad Morris & Shelly Brown show that bullies don't alway prevail, in real life or in the comic books. Everyone needs to read this thought-provoking book! It is fantastic!Follow me:Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.weebly.com/Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - @laurieevans27Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2...YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD...
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  • Sheila
    January 1, 1970
    This story was written for the Middle Grade crowd, ages 8-13, but it's truly for people of all ages. I felt it spoke to me in so many ways. Even though I'm no longer in Middle School, I still looked back to myself at that age and my experiences. Chad Morris and Shelly Brown capture this age group perfectly in how they think and act.Flint a.k.a. Squint, has an eye disease that is basically running and ruining his life. All he cares about is his comic that he is drawing. Life hasn't been good to This story was written for the Middle Grade crowd, ages 8-13, but it's truly for people of all ages. I felt it spoke to me in so many ways. Even though I'm no longer in Middle School, I still looked back to myself at that age and my experiences. Chad Morris and Shelly Brown capture this age group perfectly in how they think and act.Flint a.k.a. Squint, has an eye disease that is basically running and ruining his life. All he cares about is his comic that he is drawing. Life hasn't been good to him with his parents both leaving and Flint now living with his grandparents.Now that his eyesight is failing him he's losing his friends, his humor and his confidence. One day a new girl comes into his life, McKell. The awkward friendship forms and blossoms into something grand. There is a lot of heartache and tears along the way as they find out what true friendship is. Both McKell and Flint also learn valuable lessons about life from McKell's brother Danny. You will laugh and cry as the two friends find their true potential in each other and themselves.This beautifully written story is one to be shared in families and other groups of young people...and also for all of those over thirteen. There is something to be learned by everyone in this novel.****Come follow me & my reviews at:http://whynotbecauseisaidso.blogspot.comLike my Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/WhyNotBecaus... *****
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    “So hit me with your best challenge for spreading kindness…. A challenge that helps people relate to people…. Share a little piece of yourself, like I did, and let us get to know and love you.” (238) These final words from Danny, a boy who suffered and died from progeria, guide Flint and McKell in their search for acceptance and belief in themselves.Flint, nicknamed Squint because he has an eye disease that compromises his eyesight, has two goals: to win a comic book contest and make friends in “So hit me with your best challenge for spreading kindness…. A challenge that helps people relate to people…. Share a little piece of yourself, like I did, and let us get to know and love you.” (238) These final words from Danny, a boy who suffered and died from progeria, guide Flint and McKell in their search for acceptance and belief in themselves.Flint, nicknamed Squint because he has an eye disease that compromises his eyesight, has two goals: to win a comic book contest and make friends in middle school. McKell is a new student from a school where she had few friends. In Flint’s school she hangs out with the popular kids who bully Squint. But McKell befriends Squint, and they encourage each other, following her brother’s Danny’s video challenges, to attempt something new and follow their passions. When Squint adds a female superhero hero, Diamond, to aid his comic hero also named Squint, he supports McKell in overcoming her fear of sharing her talent. As they step out of their comfort zones, Squint confronts his bullies and finds that relationships are not always what you think they are.This is a powerful novel about trust in others and trust in oneself and about adolescents learning to be themselves as they navigate middle school with all its rules. I was hoping for some comics (graphics) to go along with the story, but the Squint does share the text of his comic book as he creates it.
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  • Jessica Bronder
    January 1, 1970
    Flint is in middle school and trying to hurry to finish his comic book. He dreams of winning “Find a Comic Star” before he goes blind from keratoconus. Sadly middle school is tough enough without being bullied for going blind. Then there is McKell, she is the new girl at school. She fits in with the popular kids but is interested in Flint. But she is hesitant to get to know him because she doesn’t want to be bullied to. But McKell has a secret of her own, she has a passion for poetry and songwri Flint is in middle school and trying to hurry to finish his comic book. He dreams of winning “Find a Comic Star” before he goes blind from keratoconus. Sadly middle school is tough enough without being bullied for going blind. Then there is McKell, she is the new girl at school. She fits in with the popular kids but is interested in Flint. But she is hesitant to get to know him because she doesn’t want to be bullied to. But McKell has a secret of her own, she has a passion for poetry and songwriting and her brother pushes her to embrace that even if she is afraid of being laughed at. This is an amazing story. Bullying is such a horrible thing to go through along with witnessing it and being afraid to stand up for someone. Flint is an amazing kid, very open an honest. I felt bad for him with both the blindness and the bullying. I also understood why McKell didn’t want to stand up for Flint. She’s the new girl and stands out enough and doesn’t want to stand out more. But you can’t let that stop you from following your dreams or helping someone.I loved this story. It’s a great lesson about bullying that applies to all ages. It’s also a great message about following your dreams too. This is definitely one of those must read stories for all ages.I received a complimentary copy of this book. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    I wish there were more books like this.Even as an adult, I love reading the Middle Readers, because of the imagination and humor.  But too few Middle Reader books deal with REAL problems. Even if your kid has a "perfect" family and life, books like "Squint" and "Mustaches for Maddie" can help your kid understand the struggles others go through."Squint" doesn't just deal with bullying (with an eye-opening perspective) and making friends, but also the real-life situations of kids raised by their g I wish there were more books like this.Even as an adult, I love reading the Middle Readers, because of the imagination and humor.  But too few Middle Reader books deal with REAL problems. Even if your kid has a "perfect" family and life, books like "Squint" and "Mustaches for Maddie" can help your kid understand the struggles others go through."Squint" doesn't just deal with bullying (with an eye-opening perspective) and making friends, but also the real-life situations of kids raised by their grandparents, kids dealing with health problems, with the possible loss of sight, and loss of a loved one...As a loner kid raised by a widow, I appreciated these perspectives.I'll admit, it took me a while to get into as it begins with a lot of comic description, and I wanted the actual comic pictures.  Half-way through the book, I realized why they didn't include them, but I do think including the drawings would have been better suited for Middle Readers.Without giving any spoilers, the ending is perfect.  It ends happily, but doesn't bend the characters or their situations to fit the mold of a "happily ever after."  It's satisfying with closure and hope for the future.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    I will start with the caveat that this is a 3-star book as an adult, but I think the message is important enough for the Middle Grades audience to bump it up to that 4th star. The book has an amazing message about empathy that I think makes this book a good class read. One of the most interesting things to learn as a teacher is that empathy is a learned skill, not an inherent one, and we don't live in a society that values it nearly enough. This book really spotlights the need to realize everyon I will start with the caveat that this is a 3-star book as an adult, but I think the message is important enough for the Middle Grades audience to bump it up to that 4th star. The book has an amazing message about empathy that I think makes this book a good class read. One of the most interesting things to learn as a teacher is that empathy is a learned skill, not an inherent one, and we don't live in a society that values it nearly enough. This book really spotlights the need to realize everyone has a struggle, and I think there is a good project to be made out of #DannysChallenge that I hope catches on.This book is lacking something, however. I don't think it's heart because I really did care about Squint, and even McKell. I think the problem was focus, ironically enough. The theme was established very clearly (maybe too on the nose, but it is Middle Grades fiction), but there were too many routes to discuss it with not enough attention paid to any one. Still, as a teacher, I will gladly take this as a class book club pick for 4th - 7th grade.
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  • Kirsti Call
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This story was compelling, well written, and moving. Squint is a flawed yet lovable character who has had his fair share of hard knocks. I love how the story is told from his POV and how his comic book stories mirror his experiences. The way he talks about rules of comics or rules of grandparents or rule of middle school is engaging and funny. I love how Squint lives with Grandparents who have sacrificed and raised him and taught h I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This story was compelling, well written, and moving. Squint is a flawed yet lovable character who has had his fair share of hard knocks. I love how the story is told from his POV and how his comic book stories mirror his experiences. The way he talks about rules of comics or rules of grandparents or rule of middle school is engaging and funny. I love how Squint lives with Grandparents who have sacrificed and raised him and taught him with anecdotes and "old people" advice. The experiences Squint has in middle school are authentic and true to life. This book touches on abandonment, depression, illness, bullies, loss, grief, friendship, social media and much more. The story subtly gives the messages of forgiveness, bravery, empathy and doing what you know is right, despite what others think. I also love the message of being true to yourself. There's so much to love about this story and so much to think about and discuss. I highly recommend it to anyone grades 4 and up.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    I chose to read this book because of the cover and catchy title and once I started it, I couldn't put it down. I read it in just a few hours. This book touches on so many areas related to many middle school children today: sickness, loss, fear, bullying, friendship and perseverance. The most unique part of the book was how Flint aka Squint wrote a comic book throughout the story, which reflected his own personal desires and heartaches and his special friendship with McKell. Although the two came I chose to read this book because of the cover and catchy title and once I started it, I couldn't put it down. I read it in just a few hours. This book touches on so many areas related to many middle school children today: sickness, loss, fear, bullying, friendship and perseverance. The most unique part of the book was how Flint aka Squint wrote a comic book throughout the story, which reflected his own personal desires and heartaches and his special friendship with McKell. Although the two came from different backgrounds, they realized that they weren't that different after all. I would recommend this book for 4th grade students and up and will use it in my college course next semester.
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  • NaDell
    January 1, 1970
    Really liked this book about a boy named Flint who has an eye condition that makes him squint, so they call him Squint. He loves to draw comics and comes up with great stories about superheroes and has villains who match up with people who were his friends before his eye condition began. He goes through a lot in this short book. Well written and entertaining while still spreading awareness of this disease as well as reminding everyone to be aware of people who need someone to care about them.The Really liked this book about a boy named Flint who has an eye condition that makes him squint, so they call him Squint. He loves to draw comics and comes up with great stories about superheroes and has villains who match up with people who were his friends before his eye condition began. He goes through a lot in this short book. Well written and entertaining while still spreading awareness of this disease as well as reminding everyone to be aware of people who need someone to care about them.The only thing I would change is to have the comics he makes drawn throughout the book instead of just written.My 13 year old daughter read it and liked it too.
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  • Theresa Grissom
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss Plus for an ARC of this book.I didn't plan on this being a one day read, let alone a one-sitting read but that is what ended up happening. Boy did I love this book! Great story... I truly couldn't wait to see how it would play out. Loved the characters. There is so much to take away from this book. I believe this would make a fantastic read aloud to upper elementary or middle school classes. Looking forward to grabbing a few copies once the book is published and sharing with Thanks to Edelweiss Plus for an ARC of this book.I didn't plan on this being a one day read, let alone a one-sitting read but that is what ended up happening. Boy did I love this book! Great story... I truly couldn't wait to see how it would play out. Loved the characters. There is so much to take away from this book. I believe this would make a fantastic read aloud to upper elementary or middle school classes. Looking forward to grabbing a few copies once the book is published and sharing with the students from my school!
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  • Bonnie
    January 1, 1970
    This was an incredible story. It had me captivated till the end. The timid relationship between Flint and McKell is amazing to see develop. How they both help to push one another in their own struggles, and help build and support one another is a powerful lesson that we could all use more of in our lives. I would recommend this book to any and everyone. Absolutely amazing.
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  • Kathryn Veil
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! It made me laugh and cry. I felt connected to the characters in a way that doesn't happen often. The characters are believable and realistic.I have a teenager with one more child quickly getting there, and I like that this book talks subtly about things kids deal with. Kids go through difficult things and I feel like Squint gives them a way to handle them. Not belittling or making light of their problems, but acknowledging and giving their difficulties credence.I highly recomm I loved this book! It made me laugh and cry. I felt connected to the characters in a way that doesn't happen often. The characters are believable and realistic.I have a teenager with one more child quickly getting there, and I like that this book talks subtly about things kids deal with. Kids go through difficult things and I feel like Squint gives them a way to handle them. Not belittling or making light of their problems, but acknowledging and giving their difficulties credence.I highly recommend this book to adults and kids alike.
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  • Michelle Stimpson
    January 1, 1970
    You can't help but cheer for Flint. I thought the authors might have trouble following up after "Mustaches for Maddie," but "Squint" is every bit as well done. I laughed. I cried. I'm making my kids read it. (They want to. How could they not? Look at that cover.)
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  • Jennifer Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Flint is a thirteen year old boy who is losing his sight. Kids at school call him Squint and he really doesn't have any friends. He loves to draw comics and is planning on entering a comic contest in a little over a month. Not only is he losing his sight, but his dad left before he was born and his mom is not good at being a mom so her parents are raising him. McKell is a newish girl at school and she slowly begins to befriend Flint, but then her brother dies, Flint gets a new cornea and things Flint is a thirteen year old boy who is losing his sight. Kids at school call him Squint and he really doesn't have any friends. He loves to draw comics and is planning on entering a comic contest in a little over a month. Not only is he losing his sight, but his dad left before he was born and his mom is not good at being a mom so her parents are raising him. McKell is a newish girl at school and she slowly begins to befriend Flint, but then her brother dies, Flint gets a new cornea and things get a little sticky as they work through their friendship and the problems each of them is dealing with. Great book! I can't wait to share it with my middle school students.
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  • Beth Mendelsohn
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book at Book Expo America and was excited to read it since I enjoyed reading 𝘔𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘔𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘦. Thirteen-year-old Flint lives with his maternal grandparents and has a corneal disease that is causing Flint to lose his sight. He wears thick glasses but still needs to squint (thus his nickname) when writing and drawing. He is currently working on drawing a superhero comic called "Squint," with characters based on people in Flint's life. Flint is resigned to his status in middle s I received this book at Book Expo America and was excited to read it since I enjoyed reading 𝘔𝘶𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘤𝘩𝘦𝘴 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘔𝘢𝘥𝘥𝘪𝘦. Thirteen-year-old Flint lives with his maternal grandparents and has a corneal disease that is causing Flint to lose his sight. He wears thick glasses but still needs to squint (thus his nickname) when writing and drawing. He is currently working on drawing a superhero comic called "Squint," with characters based on people in Flint's life. Flint is resigned to his status in middle school until he meets new girl McKell. McKell's brother is terminally ill and challenges people to venture outside their comfort zones on his YouTube channel. As Flint and McKell spend more time together, Flint questions if it is all real. I would recommend this book for kids grade 4 and up, adults, and fans of 𝘞𝘰𝘯𝘥𝘦𝘳.#Squint
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  • Susie
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC of this title, for which I am happy to offer my honest review.One of my favorites of the year; this book has it all: humor, pathos, character development, bullying, service learning, and many possible connections for teachers and students. Readers will enjoy the way the comic reflects what is going on with Flint and McKenna; at times, you might think you know what is going to happen, but then the story takes another turn. There are so many wonderful metaphors that Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC of this title, for which I am happy to offer my honest review.One of my favorites of the year; this book has it all: humor, pathos, character development, bullying, service learning, and many possible connections for teachers and students. Readers will enjoy the way the comic reflects what is going on with Flint and McKenna; at times, you might think you know what is going to happen, but then the story takes another turn. There are so many wonderful metaphors that relate to vision and seeing. There are so many situations that we can all relate to, even if our situation is very different from these characters.Perhaps some of the parallels I was experiencing at the time that I read this added to the book's impact on me; the day I read most of it, my sister had eye surgery. This was also the same week that Tyler Trent from Purdue University was in the news for his inspiring quest to attend the Ohio State football game. In the case of both Tyler and Danny, we know that death is imminent, but revel in their strength.Flint is a hero, but a flawed protagonist. His realizations of his own strengths and weaknesses could be such a boon to students who read this. At the same time he can physically see his family and friends better, his perceptions of their relationships sharpens its focus as well. None of the characters are all bad or all good, which Flint eventually realizes. The power of the friendship between Flint and McKenna is transformational in so many ways. I can't count the number of times that I have thought about my school, "If only that student had one good friend or one supportive adult." What a difference that would make.Students will enjoy the story told through Flint's comic; I imagine that it might take on a different form in the published book. I especially appreciated the fact that even the comic did not have an epic over-the-top, fight-to-the-finish, violent ending, but one of realization.I would love to see teachers use this books with students; there is so much they could learn. What if they took on #DannysChallenge? What if they reflected on their actions toward others and considered the power of forgiveness?I highlighted and commented on so many passages while I read; it is a delight to look at them to remind me how much I enjoyed this book.
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  • Maria Antonia
    January 1, 1970
    **Note: I received a free copy of this title from the people at NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**Basic Plot: Squint has problems with his eyesight... but he isn't letting that stop him from creating a comic for a contest. Except then his former friend plants the seeds of doubt. When he meets McKell, he's introduced to her brother's challenges, which is something that just might give him that lift to finish what he started.WHAT’S COOL…1) I loved Squint. I definitely felt for him and h **Note: I received a free copy of this title from the people at NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**Basic Plot: Squint has problems with his eyesight... but he isn't letting that stop him from creating a comic for a contest. Except then his former friend plants the seeds of doubt. When he meets McKell, he's introduced to her brother's challenges, which is something that just might give him that lift to finish what he started.WHAT’S COOL…1) I loved Squint. I definitely felt for him and his insecurities as he navigated through the rough waters of middle school. I was rooting for him the entire book.2) The Danny subplot was really good, and I liked how it merged with Squint's story. The authors were able to capture the hurt and emotion necessary to make this work. And yes, I cried at several parts in the book! And there's a twist with regards to Danny and Squint's eyes that I didn't see coming...3) I loved all the discoveries and the twists. I saw some of them coming, but there were others that I didn't anticipate. However, once I read those parts I couldn't believe I hadn't seen it before!4) I enjoyed how the comic (the story-within-a-story) worked with Squint's real life. It was nice to see how Squint took the events of his world and worked them into his comic world.5) The little "Rules" that Squint scattered throughout were a great addition to the story.6) Also, what a roller coaster of emotions this book was! There's a great scene with Squint and his grandfather. And then there's McKell. There's a stunning moment when Squint begins to wonder if he's just an item for McKell to tick off her challenge-list. I liked how this book shows that friendship isn't always easy.7) And I liked how things don't exactly work out in the most ideal way... that things aren't perfect by the end of the book. And I think that is part of this book's power. (Not that this story doesn't have a satisfactory ending, but it's more a realistic/happy ending.)8) Love that book cover!WHAT’S NOT COOL…1) While I liked the story-within-a-story, I did find was a skipping some of it a bit. I wonder if I would have liked it more IF it were actually the comic itself?FINAL THOUGHTSMy rating is 5 Stars (out of 5) – I don't often give 5 starts. But this is probably one of the best MG reads I've read this year. Highly recommend it! :)
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  • hpboy13
    January 1, 1970
    Squint’s summary conveys that the book was written with the best of intentions, a middle-grade story at the cross-roads of disability, art, and coming of age. It’s the kind of book that, if done well, will be found on a whole generation’s bookshelves – tattered and dog-eared from love. Unfortunately, Squint isn’t written quite well enough to live up to its intriguing premise.The book is a short fast read – took me a day – rendered all the shorter by shoe-horning in the story that the protagonist Squint’s summary conveys that the book was written with the best of intentions, a middle-grade story at the cross-roads of disability, art, and coming of age. It’s the kind of book that, if done well, will be found on a whole generation’s bookshelves – tattered and dog-eared from love. Unfortunately, Squint isn’t written quite well enough to live up to its intriguing premise.The book is a short fast read – took me a day – rendered all the shorter by shoe-horning in the story that the protagonist is writing. I feel comfortable saying that this literary device NEVER works – it serves to interrupt the flow of the actual story being told, and the parallels are never as clever as the writer seems to think they are. Because of these constant interruptions, the book didn’t really engage me until the second half, and by then there was too little of the slim book left to enjoy.There are a lot of interesting threads woven into Squint – Flint’s relationship with his grandparents, or his broken friendship with his former bestie turned bully. Unfortunately, none of them are really fleshed out besides Flint’s relationship with McKell. Consequently, the big emotional payoffs in those relationships ring hollow because of a lack of buildup. Flint’s relationship with his estranged mother is a complete afterthought, almost begging the question of why it’s there. Similarly, tiny bombshells are scattered all over the text – like the depression of McKell’s mother – and not engaged with at all.Squint isn’t a bad book by any means, but there’s just a lingering sense that it fails to live up to its potential. Which is a shame, because it could have been great.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    I loved Mustaches for Maddie so I was very excited when I heard that the authors were releasing another book. Squint and Mustaches for Maddie have a similar feel, although I didn't connect as deeply with Squint. I think my connection may have been less because I'm not into comic books, so the parts where we read Squint's comic story didn't hold my attention as much as the rest of the story. That said, I still enjoyed the story and thought it had a great message.My takeaway was that we don’t know I loved Mustaches for Maddie so I was very excited when I heard that the authors were releasing another book. Squint and Mustaches for Maddie have a similar feel, although I didn't connect as deeply with Squint. I think my connection may have been less because I'm not into comic books, so the parts where we read Squint's comic story didn't hold my attention as much as the rest of the story. That said, I still enjoyed the story and thought it had a great message.My takeaway was that we don’t know what people are going through and a little kindness goes a long way. I loved Danny and his friend Yellow and the difference they made by Danny sharing his happy attitude. His challenges made people stretch outside of their comfort zones to help people and make a difference for someone.I thought Squint’s situation with Gavin was quite eye-opening. Gavin didn’t recognize how his joking was hurtful, and Squint didn’t realize that his defense mechanism of not talking to Gavin was making him think that Squint didn’t like him. You don’t typically think about it from that side.I loved when Squint's grandpa said, "Hard work is always something you should be proud of." So true. We might not get the results we hoped for, but that shouldn't diminish our effort.Sometimes we’re blind to the sacrifices the people make for us (Squint’s grandparents, especially his grandma).Parts of this book are pretty emotional and I couldn’t help but cry. This is a clean and inspirational read that I recommend.*I received a complimentary copy. All opinions expressed are my own.
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