House of Whispers #1
Forthcoming Autumn 2018Latoya is in a coma. Her girlfriend enlists the help of Latoya’s two younger sisters. Using the Book of Whispers, they mistakenly steal the essence of Erzulie, a deity of voodoo mythology. The psychic blowback of the spell causes her house to crash into the Dreaming, beside the Houses of Secrets and Mystery and their custodians, Cain and Abel.In the real world, the awakened young woman suffers a mystical form of Cotard’s Delusion—she believes she is already dead, and she’s transmitting her belief to others, causing them to become guardians of the Gap that has appeared in the Dreaming.

House of Whispers #1 Details

TitleHouse of Whispers #1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 12th, 2018
PublisherVertigo
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Fiction, Magic, Comic Book

House of Whispers #1 Review

  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this as it was the most interesting and different of the new Sandman comics. It was fairly interesting, in that there was a big voodoo party. But the modern day lesbians baby sitting their younger sisters was a bit, er dull... It made me wonder what sort of family wouldn't let a 15 year old alone in the house as that was too young, as I was babysitting my sisters from the age of 13! One I will see about getting from the library in graphic novel, but not one I'll rush out and buy more in I bought this as it was the most interesting and different of the new Sandman comics. It was fairly interesting, in that there was a big voodoo party. But the modern day lesbians baby sitting their younger sisters was a bit, er dull... It made me wonder what sort of family wouldn't let a 15 year old alone in the house as that was too young, as I was babysitting my sisters from the age of 13! One I will see about getting from the library in graphic novel, but not one I'll rush out and buy more individual comics.
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    This was hard to follow in some parts, even with some background knowledge of voodoo. Not sure if I'll continue to read this one. The illustration, however, is fantastic.
  • Adriana Martinez Figueroa
    January 1, 1970
    I’m intrigued by this story!! I loved the colors and pacing of this issue!
  • BrokenMnemonic
    January 1, 1970
    This was probably the most interesting of the comics I read this week. Three-quarters of it takes place inside Ezrulie's ... palace? home? I'm not sure quite what to call it, but on the outside, it looks like a two-storey swamp shack built out of wood, while on the inside, it's some kind of palace inhabited by Ezrulie, her relatives, and the dreaming forms of all of those who worship her and gather amidst some kind of frenetic, frenzied party/celebration/invocation. Holding court, Ezrulie is pet This was probably the most interesting of the comics I read this week. Three-quarters of it takes place inside Ezrulie's ... palace? home? I'm not sure quite what to call it, but on the outside, it looks like a two-storey swamp shack built out of wood, while on the inside, it's some kind of palace inhabited by Ezrulie, her relatives, and the dreaming forms of all of those who worship her and gather amidst some kind of frenetic, frenzied party/celebration/invocation. Holding court, Ezrulie is petitioned by those who want her favour and attended to by her husband, who brought his own dinner - live prawns, which he seasons with misery and fear to make the flavour more piquant.The other quarter or so of the book takes place inside an apartment where three teenagers are playing around with a book, and inadvertently attract the attention of a voodoo spirit associated with plagues and viruses, vexing Ezrulie with its misbehaviour.The book does some interesting things in this first issue; the idea of memes as a virus is one of the more obvious ones, but I also liked smaller touches, like the way the book took one trope - a woman wants Ezrulie to make a man fall in love with her - and avoided the predictable plotline, whereby said man would become obsessive and the woman would declare that wasn't what she wanted. Instead, the petitioner is well-aware of that pitfall; she doesn't want Ezrulie to make the man fall in love with her; he's already interested, and she just wants Ezrulie to give him a nudge, so that he'll act on those feelings. When Ezrulie warns that the man in question isn't a good man, the petitioner argues that she knows he isn't, but that she's basically sure she can fix him, bring out his better nature - and so, in avoiding the initial, obvious trope, instead deliberately highlights something depressingly common: a woman who believes she can change someone's character, and is instead being set up for a painful fall. There's a lot of unspoken commentary there about how common such patterns are.I liked how the book managed to emphasize that Ezrulie's world is a dark and dangerous one in many ways; her husband is perhaps the most obvious example of that, but there's an undertone of menace running throughout the first issue. Ezrulie and the other gods and beings of her world are powerful and dangerous, and I'm looking forward to seeing more of the story as it rolls forward, as I'm not particularly familiar with the mythology of the various practises that fall under the umbrella of voodoo. One touch I did like was seeing a couple of men dancing together wearing nothing but womens' stockings and underwear in one of the wide-shots of the revelry going on; not just because it adds emphasis that Ezrulie's world is a place where you don't want to lie, by act or by word, but also because of the fact that they were simply there. Rates of violence against African-American trans women or femme men are extremely high, even in comparison to similar communities amongst the white population, so seeing them in Ezrulie's realm felt powerful - after all, isn't voodoo entirely about a place and a power that was born in and from oppression?Of the titles I read this week, this is the one I'm still thinking about; I'm not sure if I'm going to like the story, but I think it's going to be fascinating, and I'm really glad Vertigo are taking a chance and publishing it. Wherever it goes, it'll be interesting - although possibly not to anyone who just wants to read comics about a couple of angry white guys punching each other and angsting about how hard their lives are.
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  • Sean Newgent
    January 1, 1970
    Last week's The Dreaming provided a very heavy and satisfying read, one that provided a lot of hope that the Sandman Universe was going to be good stuff. House of Whispers is such a weak book that hardly connects to anything Sandman related that I wonder what it's doing in this series. House of Whispers first issue has a lot more problems than it does interesting facets. From ugly and one-note art that lacks any visually exciting frames or pages to a script that felt like it didn't establish any Last week's The Dreaming provided a very heavy and satisfying read, one that provided a lot of hope that the Sandman Universe was going to be good stuff. House of Whispers is such a weak book that hardly connects to anything Sandman related that I wonder what it's doing in this series. House of Whispers first issue has a lot more problems than it does interesting facets. From ugly and one-note art that lacks any visually exciting frames or pages to a script that felt like it didn't establish anything, didn't go anywhere, and failed to interest me in any way shape or form about the characters or plot to the annoying in-your-face way it shoves as many gay or trans or cross-dressing characters into it. Art-wise I'd be fine with mediocre art if the script was good. But it's bad and somewhat nonsensical. If you're going to throw nonsense my way, at least give me characters I may like. The gay/lesbian/alternate life-style thing is fine for me if it exists for a reason. This book is one of a growing number of more liberally minded comics that are turning off so many readers from the medium. Having the representation is in no way bad but when you make it such a prevalent part of the work for no reason it makes for questionable reading. It also paints a weird picture of New Orleans culture. That facet was what I was looking forward to with this book and I feel like it failed to give me any sense of the voodoo gods or New Orleans culture in general. In working with characters like this and a setting, something that I've never seen before, I expect to learn a little bit about the culture and history. Instead I see a weird sex party, crawfish being eaten...and that's about all the culture I took from this book. House of Whispers is a pretty awful book that feels like it may have been written without the purpose of providing story and characters that expose some truths of New Orleans, but instead push political leanings. Again, this is fine if the book is subtle about it. House of Whispers isn't. It's an underwhelming and disappointing piece that, if nothing else, can be read in three minutes in the comic shop before being returned to the shelf.
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  • Lea Taranto
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved Erzulie ever since I learned about her. It’s thrilling that she will initiate us into the world of the loa and become part of the Dreaming. Some ppl have been giving bad reviews to this first issue without understanding that there is world building, an entire new religion/pantheon and setting along with culture to establish. It’s fascinating to see how Erzulie is portrayed and illustrated as a mermaid matriarch whereas my own vision of her differs as I’m sure it does for all of thos I have loved Erzulie ever since I learned about her. It’s thrilling that she will initiate us into the world of the loa and become part of the Dreaming. Some ppl have been giving bad reviews to this first issue without understanding that there is world building, an entire new religion/pantheon and setting along with culture to establish. It’s fascinating to see how Erzulie is portrayed and illustrated as a mermaid matriarch whereas my own vision of her differs as I’m sure it does for all of those who love her.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    I would give this 3.5 stars if I could. It was good, but not great. Very much an introduction to a mystical comic book series - so hard to rate as a stand alone. It did not blow me away, but I will pick up the next few issues and. Ay re-visit this review at a later date depending on how other issues go.
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  • Sherri
    January 1, 1970
    I'm super excited to see where this story goes.
  • Sean Byrne
    January 1, 1970
    Just couldn't get into this issue at all.
  • Mo
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars
  • Vincent Stoessel
    January 1, 1970
    Very good entry into the Dreaming Universe. Looking forward to seeing what a shared dreaming looks like
  • Book Nerd Shenanigans
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars
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