21 Lessons for the 21st Century
In Sapiens, he explored our past. In Homo Deus, he looked to our future. Now, one of the most innovative thinkers on the planet turns to the present to make sense of today's most pressing issues.How do computers and robots change the meaning of being human? How do we deal with the epidemic of fake news? Are nations and religions still relevant? What should we teach our children?Yuval Noah Harari's 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today's most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.In twenty-one accessible chapters that are both provocative and profound, Harari builds on the ideas explored in his previous books, untangling political, technological, social, and existential issues and offering advice on how to prepare for a very different future from the world we now live in: How can we retain freedom of choice when Big Data is watching us? What will the future workforce look like, and how should we ready ourselves for it? How should we deal with the threat of terrorism? Why is liberal democracy in crisis?Harari's unique ability to make sense of where we have come from and where we are going has captured the imaginations of millions of readers. Here he invites us to consider values, meaning, and personal engagement in a world full of noise and uncertainty. When we are deluged with irrelevant information, clarity is power. Presenting complex contemporary challenges clearly and accessibly, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is essential reading.

21 Lessons for the 21st Century Details

Title21 Lessons for the 21st Century
Author
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherSpiegel & Grau
ISBN-139780525512172
Rating
GenreNonfiction, History, Philosophy, Science, Politics

21 Lessons for the 21st Century Review

  • Anni
    January 1, 1970
    It's Life as we know it, Jim! (But don't ask what it means).'A wise old man was asked what he learned about the meaning of life. ‘Well,’ he answered, ‘I have learned that I am here on earth in order to help other people. What I still haven’t figured out is why the other people are here.’As Harari explains: “We are now living in an age of information explosion … the last thing people need is more information. What they really need is somebody to arrange all of the bits of information into a meani It's Life as we know it, Jim! (But don't ask what it means).'A wise old man was asked what he learned about the meaning of life. ‘Well,’ he answered, ‘I have learned that I am here on earth in order to help other people. What I still haven’t figured out is why the other people are here.’As Harari explains: “We are now living in an age of information explosion … the last thing people need is more information. What they really need is somebody to arrange all of the bits of information into a meaningful picture – and this is what I try to do.”Following on from Sapiens and Homo Deus, both of which were entertainingly accessible, this investigation of our species has a more personal approach, yet is just as vigorously researched and remarkably impartial. There are so many fascinating insights that I wanted to highlight in this book that it is hard to chose examples, and many are frightening to contemplate, such as:'Globalisation has certainly benefited large segments of humanity, but there are signs of growing inequality both between and within societies. Some groups increasingly monopolise the fruits of globalisation, while billions are left behind. Already today, the richest 1 per cent owns half the world’s wealth. Even more alarmingly, the richest hundred people together own more than the poorest 4 billion. This could get far worse'.However I'm sure that contributors to Goodreads will particularly enjoy the section on the importance of literature, especially for aficionados of SF :-“… it is equally important to communicate the latest scientific theories to the general public through popular-science books, and even through the skilful use of art and fiction. Does that mean scientists should start writing science fiction? That is actually not such a bad idea. Art plays a key role in shaping people’s view of the world, and in the twenty-first century science fiction is arguably the most important genre of all, for it shapes how most people understand things like AI, bioengineering and climate change. We certainly need good science, but from a political perspective, a good science-fiction movie is worth far more than an article in Science or Nature.”.On the whole, the message Harari imparts is a positive one and he does offer some hope for the survival of our species. At the end of the book he describes his own personal way to discover a ‘firm ethical ground in a world that extends far beyond my horizons, that spins completely out of human control, and that holds all gods and ideologies suspect’ This is the book I will pass on to my grand daughter when she is of an age to wonder why our world is the way it is. In fact, I think it is essential reading for every human being on this planet.Update: Many thanks to the publisher for granting my wish of reading an ARC via Netgalley
    more
  • Anton
    January 1, 1970
    As always, masterful and exquisite non-fiction writing as we come to expect from Mr Harari. Delightful, wise and very perceptive. This book can be seen as an expansion and a companion to Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. The attention of this volume is focused on the Present as opposed to Past or the Future. Some parts will make you feel inspired, others will sow a despair. But it is a relevant and useful book that will give you a plenty to chew on.Strongly recommended
    more
  • Anni
    January 1, 1970
    It's Life as we know it, JimOr: Don't ask what it means!'A wise old man was asked what he learned about the meaning of life. ‘Well,’ he answered, ‘I have learned that I here on earth in order to help other people. What I still haven’t figured out is why the other people are here.’As Harari explains: “We are now living in an age of information explosion … the last thing people need is more information. What they really need is somebody to arrange all of the bits of information into a meaningful p It's Life as we know it, JimOr: Don't ask what it means!'A wise old man was asked what he learned about the meaning of life. ‘Well,’ he answered, ‘I have learned that I here on earth in order to help other people. What I still haven’t figured out is why the other people are here.’As Harari explains: “We are now living in an age of information explosion … the last thing people need is more information. What they really need is somebody to arrange all of the bits of information into a meaningful picture – and this is what I try to do.”Following on from Sapiens and Homo Deus, both of which were entertainingly accessible, this investigation of our species has a more personal approach, yet is just as vigorously researched and remarkably impartial. There are so many fascinating insights that I wanted to highlight in this book that it is hard to chose examples, and many are frightening to contemplate, such as:Globalisation has certainly benefited large segments of humanity, but there are signs of growing inequality both between and within societies. Some groups increasingly monopolise the fruits of globalisation, while billions are left behind. Already today, the richest 1 per cent owns half the world’s wealth. Even more alarmingly, the richest hundred people together own more than the poorest 4 billion.This could get far worse.However I'm sure that contributors to Goodreads will particularly enjoy the section on the importance of literature, especially for aficionados of SF :-“… it is equally important to communicate the latest scientific theories to the general public through popular-science books, and even through the skilful use of art and fiction. Does that mean scientists should start writing science fiction? That is actually not such a bad idea. Art plays a key role in shaping people’s view of the world, and in the twenty-first century science fiction is arguably the most important genre of all, for it shapes how most people understand things like AI, bioengineering and climate change. We certainly need good science, but from a political perspective, a good science-fiction movie is worth far more than an article in Science or Nature.”.On the whole, the message Harari imparts is a positive one and he does offer some hope for the survival of our species. At the end of the book he describes his own personal way to discover a ‘firm ethical ground in a world that extends far beyond my horizons, that spins completely out of human control, and that holds all gods and ideologies suspect’ This is the book I will pass on to my grand daughter when she is of an age to wonder why our world is the way it is. In fact, I think it is essential reading for every human being on this planet.Update: Many thanks to the publisher for granting my wish of reading an ARC via Netgalley
    more
  • David Wineberg
    January 1, 1970
    Society 101Yuval Harari is well known for his books Sapiens and Homo Deus. He has decided to squander his reputation on a book called 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. The basic problem is that every chapter is the subject of whole shelves of books, and putting them all in one book cannot possibly do them justice. What we have left is a set of 21 editorials, which might inform the totally uninformed, but provide little insight and no solutions. As “lessons” they are unhelpful.He has conveniently Society 101Yuval Harari is well known for his books Sapiens and Homo Deus. He has decided to squander his reputation on a book called 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. The basic problem is that every chapter is the subject of whole shelves of books, and putting them all in one book cannot possibly do them justice. What we have left is a set of 21 editorials, which might inform the totally uninformed, but provide little insight and no solutions. As “lessons” they are unhelpful.He has conveniently distilled all the threats to mankind into three: nuclear war, climate change and technological/biological disruption. But only technological/biological gets examined. You’re on your own for climate change and nuclear war, which apparently don’t rate high enough for “lessons”.Despite those three most important threats, the most common theme throughout the book is criticism of religion, mostly Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, though Buddhism and Hinduism come under attack as well. Looking back from the perspective of the universe, Harari condemns all religions as pompous, pretentious, full of contradictions, and terrifically negative forces.In his chapter on Immigration, Harari boils down the entire complex situation to three superficial “debates”:-The receiving country must be willing-Immigrants must be willing to adopt “at least the core norms and values” of the new country-If immigrants assimilate, they become “us” rather than “them” and must be treated as first class citizens.Simple, inaccurate and totally missing the real issues.In his chapter on terrorism, Harari completely misses the point that the state has a monopoly on violence. Anyone who challenges that monopoly must be put down, no matter how many civil rights and freedoms are trampled in the process. He spends pages explaining how few people are killed by terrorists compared to traffic, war and disease. So why are we so afraid of terrorists, he asks. (Because the state wants us to be, Mr. Harari.)In the chapter on war, he comes to the magical conclusion that we’ve pretty much done away with it. So far, the only new war we’ve seen this century is Russia taking parts of Ukraine. He says countries see too much risk in starting new wars. He completely ignores (not for the first or last time), the effects of climate change, which will result in unprecedented and massive wars as countries face unstoppable waves of immigrants seeking water and land, as countries disappear from the face of the earth, and as those that have will defend it to the death against all comers, foreign and domestic.The final chapter is on meditation. Meditation is Harari’s solution to pretty much everything, because you can focus on what is real – what is going on in your body right then and there. He says he does this two hours a day, plus one or two months a year.If I had to summarize 21 Lesson for the 21st Century, I would say: throw off the false faiths of institutional religions and meditate instead. Not quite what I expected, and not much help in navigating the 21st century.David Wineberg
    more
  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Humans have always lived in the age of post-truth. Homo sapiens is a post-truth species, whose power depends on creating and believing fictions. Ever since the Stone Age, self-reinforcing myths have served to unite human collectives. Indeed, Homo sapiens conquered this planet thanks above all to the unique human ability to create and spread fictions.As Yuval Noah Hurari states in his introduction, his book Sapiens was about the deep past of human history, Homo Deus was about our deep future, and Humans have always lived in the age of post-truth. Homo sapiens is a post-truth species, whose power depends on creating and believing fictions. Ever since the Stone Age, self-reinforcing myths have served to unite human collectives. Indeed, Homo sapiens conquered this planet thanks above all to the unique human ability to create and spread fictions.As Yuval Noah Hurari states in his introduction, his book Sapiens was about the deep past of human history, Homo Deus was about our deep future, and 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a reflection on our present; where we are in the today of 2018 and where he sees us up to about the year 2050. Considering categories such as Work, Nationalism, War, and God, Hurari's primary point is that it's all fiction: Liberalism, Capitalism, Religion, National Borders; these are all simply stories that we tell ourselves and the biggest hurdle we are about to face is sleepwalking into a greater interface with “Big Data algorithms” and allowing them to shape our reality; allowing them to provide the new fictions by which we organise our thoughts about how the world works, enriching the few and enslaving the rest. Seemingly out of nowhere, the final chapter in this book is on the benefits of meditation – of recognising that the only reality is the fact of one's own body – and while I have long understood that meditation is an integral part of Harari's writing process, it's primacy here surprised me (not in a bad way, it just pushed the whole premise out of History and into a New Agey category in my mind). If John Lennon sang, “Imagine no possessions, no countries, no religion, too”, what Hurari is saying is, “We need to stop imagining that there are possessions, or countries, or religion”; and that won't be easy for our post-truth species without acknowledging that our brains are constantly creating these fictions. I received an ARC of 21 Lessons, and although I am not actually supposed to quote from it, all I want to do in this review is allow Hurari to speak for himself, so be advised: these passages may not be in their final forms.If somebody describes to you the world of the mid twenty-first century and it sounds like science fiction, it is probably false. But then if somebody describes to you the world of the mid twenty-first century and it doesn't sound like science fiction – it is certainly false. As Hurari begins with, we Sapiens found ourselves in the 20th century being asked to choose between three organising stories – Fascism, Communism, and Liberalism – and after the fall of the Soviet Union, we in the West believed that we had arrived at the “end of history”; that the spread of liberal democracy (even if it was achieved with the threat or fact of violence) was inevitable; we were marching towards one global community with freedom and liberty for all. But we suddenly find ourselves facing the resurgence of strongmen on the other side of the world, and to the liberals' horror, the rise of nationalism/populism in our own countries. From this opening, all of the rest follows: • In 1938 humans were offered three global stories to choose from, in 1968 just two, in 1998 a single story seemed to prevail; in 2018 we are down to zero. No wonder that the liberal elites, who dominated much of the world in recent decades, have entered a state of shock and disorientation. To have one story is the most reassuring situation of all. Everything is perfectly clear. To be suddenly left without any story is terrifying. • Any story that seeks to gain humanity's allegiance will be tested above all in its ability to deal with the twin revolutions in infotech and biotech. If liberalism, nationalism, Islam or some novel creed wishes to shape the world of the year 2050, it will need not only to make sense of artificial intelligence, Big Data algorithms and bioengineering – it will also need to incorporate them into a new meaningful narrative. • Twentieth-century communism assumed that the working class was vital for the economy, and communist thinkers tried to teach the proletariat how to translate its immense economic power into political clout. The communist political plan called for a working-class revolution. How relevant will these teachings be if the masses lose their economic value, and therefore need to struggle against irrelevance rather than against exploitation? How do you start a working-class revolution without a working class? • We are now creating tame humans that produce enormous amounts of data and function as very efficient chips in a huge data-processing mechanism, but these data-cows hardly maximise the human potential. Indeed, we have no idea what the full human potential is, because we know so little about the human mind. And yet we hardly invest much in exploring the human mind, and instead focus on increasing the speed of our Internet connections and the efficiency of our Big Data algorithms. If we are not careful, we will end up with downgraded humans misusing upgraded computers to wreak havoc on themselves and on the world. • Radical Islamists have been influenced by Marx and Foucault as much as by Muhammad, and they inherit the legacy of nineteenth-century European anarchists as much as of the Umayyad and Abbisid caliphs. It is therefore more accurate to see even the Islamic State as an errant offshoot of the global culture we all share, rather than as a branch of some mysterious alien tree. • At present, it is far from clear whether Europe can find a middle path that would enable it to keep its gates open to strangers without being destabilised by people who don't share its values. If Europe succeeds in finding such a path, perhaps its formula could be copied on a global level. If the European project fails, however, it would indicate that belief in the liberal values of freedom and tolerance is not enough to resolve the cultural conflicts of the world and to unite humankind in the face of nuclear war, ecological collapse and technological disruption. If Greeks and Germans cannot agree on a common destiny, and if 500 million affluent Europeans cannot absorb a few million impoverished refugees, what chances do humans have of overcoming the far deeper conflicts that have beset our global civilisation? • When the peasants and workers revolted against the tsar in 1917, they ended up with Stalin; and when you begin to explore the manifold ways the world manipulates you, in the end you realise that your core identity is a complex illusion created by neural networks...In truth, everything you will ever experience in life is within your own body and your own mind. • There is no divine script, and nothing outside me can give meaning to my life. It is I who imbue everything with meaning through my free choices and through my own feelings...In itself, the universe is only a meaningless hodge-podge of atoms. Nothing is beautiful, sexy or sacred – but human feelings make it so. It is only human feelings that make a red apple seductive and a turd disgusting. Take away human feelings, and you are left with a bunch of molecules. Always an interesting thinker, I really enjoy Hurari as a writer. As in his other two books, Hurari is able to find spots in 21 Lessons to promote his most personal causes – gay rights, the immorality of the meat industry, the Agricultural Revolution as the worst thing that ever happened to Sapiens – and for the first time, he is overt about the solution to what ails us as a species: the practise of daily meditation as a way to see past the fictions our minds create; those stories that create all the pain and suffering in the world. I have no doubt that humanity is marching towards a revolution in the ways we live our lives, and while I'm not sure that I agree with everything Hurari writes about here, it was fascinating to see what he had to say about our immediate future.
    more
  • Nadia Refaniadewi
    January 1, 1970
    can't wait!
  • SueLucie
    January 1, 1970
    I am becoming quite an evangelist for this book. I am keen to discuss it with everyone I know and, when it is published in a couple of months, I’ll be making sure they all read it. Perceptive and witty, seriously well researched, I was mesmerised by Harari’s take on the world as it is now and how it could be in the near future. He is the first to admit he doesn’t have all the answers to solve modern dilemmas but he is a whiz at distilling current thinking on our personal and global problems into I am becoming quite an evangelist for this book. I am keen to discuss it with everyone I know and, when it is published in a couple of months, I’ll be making sure they all read it. Perceptive and witty, seriously well researched, I was mesmerised by Harari’s take on the world as it is now and how it could be in the near future. He is the first to admit he doesn’t have all the answers to solve modern dilemmas but he is a whiz at distilling current thinking on our personal and global problems into understandable themes for discussion.Two themes struck me particularly. Firstly, the prospect of a physically and genetically superior elite based on how much you can afford to pay for technological innovations to improve your own body and those of your offspring is real and frightening. His ideas on how we might ensure fairness got me thinking.Secondly, I was fascinated by his thoughts on educating our children in the future. I am already a dinosaur in these terms, imbued with the three Rs from infancy and the product of a narrow national curriculum, but I am invested in the future success of my grandchildren. ‘In such a [21st century] world, the last thing a teacher needs to give her pupils is more information. They already have far too much of it. Instead, people need the ability to make sense of information, to tell the difference between what is important and what is unimportant, and above all to combine many bits of information into a broad picture of the world.’‘So what should we be teaching? Many pedagogical experts argue that schools should switch to teaching “the four Cs” - critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. More broadly, schools should downplay technical skills and emphasise general-purpose life skills. Most important of all will be the ability to deal with change, to learn new things, and to preserve your mental balance in unfamiliar situations. In order to keep up with the world of 2050, you will need not merely to invent new ideas and product - you will above all need to reinvent yourself again and again.’‘…in the 21st century, you can hardly afford stability. If you try to hold on to some stable identity, job or world view, you risk being left behind as the world flies by you with a whooooosh. Given that life expectancy is likely to increase, you might subsequently have to spend many decades as a clueless fossil. To stay relevant - not just economically, but above all socially - you will need the ability to constantly learn and to reinvent yourself, certainly at a young age like fifty.’An incredibly interesting book and very readable. I’d recommend it to everyone, young and old, but especially teenagers and parents of teenagers as its messages will have immediate impact for those generations.With thanks to Random House Vintage via NetGalley for the opportunity to read an ARC.
    more
  • SueKich
    January 1, 1970
    Brainstorming the future.Superstar publishing phenomenon Yuval Noah Harari has racked up 12 million sales of his books, Sapiens and Homo Deus. From talking about the past, he now turns to the future. Some of it we already know of course – artificial intelligence, algorithms – but as he goes into the ramifications of this rapidly-evolving technology, it’s scary stuff: the systems that will know us better than we know ourselves, the lack of meaningful work, the looming prospect of human irrelevanc Brainstorming the future.Superstar publishing phenomenon Yuval Noah Harari has racked up 12 million sales of his books, Sapiens and Homo Deus. From talking about the past, he now turns to the future. Some of it we already know of course – artificial intelligence, algorithms – but as he goes into the ramifications of this rapidly-evolving technology, it’s scary stuff: the systems that will know us better than we know ourselves, the lack of meaningful work, the looming prospect of human irrelevance. Even scarier are the chapters on nuclear war and climate change. Just when nations should be pulling together as one united civilisation in whose common interest it is to find global solutions to global threats, we are being torn further apart by rising nationalism and entrenched religion. What’s to be done? With no ‘war of the worlds’ to push us into allied comradeship, one of the answers for Harari is education; rather than the conventional subjects, children should be taught the Four Cs – critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity. (To which I would add an E for empathy.) But other than this, the author is short on practical ideas. Despite all evidence to the contrary and with several words of warning along the way, Harari remains an optimist and believes that liberalism will continue to triumph. His relaxed style of writing makes for a highly readable book and I found myself highlighting a great many well-expressed thoughts: “When a thousand people believe some made-up story for one month – that’s fake news. When a billion people believe it for a thousand years, that’s a religion.” “Most stories are held together by the weight of their roof rather than the strength of their foundations.” “Nations and religions are football clubs on steroids.” But his final lesson for the 21st century is a personal one: the positive power of meditation. If only that was all it took. My thanks to Jonathan Cape for the review copy courtesy of NetGalley.
    more
  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Yuval Noah Harari, author of 'Sapiens', which looked at the history of mankind and 'Homo Deus' which looked to the future, is back with '21 Lessons for the 21st Century' a book which very much explores present day issues. As I enjoyed his previous two books I was excited to delve into this collection to see how it would compare. Just as accessible as the others it discusses important topical issues such as fake news, immigration, terrorism, and climate change, to name but a few. I found each top Yuval Noah Harari, author of 'Sapiens', which looked at the history of mankind and 'Homo Deus' which looked to the future, is back with '21 Lessons for the 21st Century' a book which very much explores present day issues. As I enjoyed his previous two books I was excited to delve into this collection to see how it would compare. Just as accessible as the others it discusses important topical issues such as fake news, immigration, terrorism, and climate change, to name but a few. I found each topic provided just the right amount of detail without overwhelming the reader, a fine balancing act if ever there was one! Each chapter flows beautifully into the next, and alongside the various topics are lots of citations. There is no doubt that Harari is an excellent writer, and here he has meticulously researched each of the "lessons". There is certainly a lot of thought-provoking material included in this book, and I can imagine it being of interest to a great many people. This is most likely destined to be another bestseller! With the sheer amount of hard work that has gone into it, and the honesty it provides, it certainly deserves to be.Many thanks to Jonathan Cape for an ARC. I was not required to post a review, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.
    more
  • Hayli
    January 1, 1970
    Sapiens explored the past, Homo Deus transported us to the future and 21 Lessons leaves us in the very real, very tragic present. Did I like it more than Sapiens? Yes. Did I like it more than Homo Deus? I don't know yet. Nobody can doubt that Harari is an excellent writer I'm just not sure if his subject matter is entirely what I want to read. On the one hand I commend him for being so accessible to those who want to learn more about the evolution of our species and the future of artificial inte Sapiens explored the past, Homo Deus transported us to the future and 21 Lessons leaves us in the very real, very tragic present. Did I like it more than Sapiens? Yes. Did I like it more than Homo Deus? I don't know yet. Nobody can doubt that Harari is an excellent writer I'm just not sure if his subject matter is entirely what I want to read. On the one hand I commend him for being so accessible to those who want to learn more about the evolution of our species and the future of artificial intelligence, but he never quite explores these subjects in the detail I would like. It almost feels like he tries to cram everything he thinks is important into one small book so you are rather exposed to 21 basic ideas than a few really well thought out and researched ones. For example the chapter about God which I thought would be a particularly interesting concept to explore was like 10 pages (if that). Also it is incredibly important to point out that even though he provides case studies for some of the predictions he makes, they are still all predictions so take what he says with a pinch of salt. With all three of his books I have found myself skipping over entire sections because I have realised that I just don't care enough and don't have the time to devote to reading things I don't find incredibly engaging. Something that I liked way more in this book than in his previous two was how personal this work felt. Normally in non-fiction books like this one if the author started waxing lyrical about their own life I would prefer them to shut up and move on with the story but that is absolutely not the case here. I think Harari is in such a unique position of power being so well known and he is using his voice for something very important. He is an openly gay professor who lives in Israel and writes about evolution and artificial intelligence and does not hesitate to critique both Judaism and Israel. I think he provides a much needed voice in this field of research and I am sure many people (myself included) are grateful for how outspoken he is about various very important issues.If you enjoyed his previous two books then I would recommend this one, but do not be super surprised if you find yourself feeling like you have read something similar before, he has recycled some of his thoughts from his previous books.
    more
  • Reza Mahmoudi
    January 1, 1970
    هراری در کتاب «انسان خردمند گذشتهٔ ما را بررسی کرد.در کتاب انسان خداگونه به آیندهٔ ما میپردازه اکنون یکی از خلاقترین اندیشمندان این سیاره به حال حاضر بازمیگردد تا عاجلترین موضوعات و معضلات امروزین را در کتاب 21 درس برای قرن بیست و یکم توضیح دهد.چگونه کامپیوترها و روباتها معنای انسان بودن را تغییر می دهند؟ چگونه با بیماری همه گیر اخبار جعلی برخورد کنیم؟ آیا ملت ها و ادیان هنوز هم بهم مرتبط هستند؟ ما باید به فرزندانمان چه چیزی آموزش بدهیم؟ کتاب 21 درس برای قرن بیست و یکم نوشته یووال نوح هراری، در هراری در کتاب «انسان خردمند گذشتهٔ ما را بررسی کرد.در کتاب انسان خداگونه به آیندهٔ ما میپردازه اکنون یکی از خلاق‌ترین اندیشمندان این سیاره به حال حاضر بازمیگردد تا عاجل‌ترین موضوعات و معضلات امروزین را در کتاب 21 درس برای قرن بیست و یکم توضیح دهد.چگونه کامپیوترها و روباتها معنای انسان بودن را تغییر می دهند؟ چگونه با بیماری همه گیر اخبار جعلی برخورد کنیم؟ آیا ملت ها و ادیان هنوز هم بهم مرتبط هستند؟ ما باید به فرزندانمان چه چیزی آموزش بدهیم؟ کتاب 21 درس برای قرن بیست و یکم نوشته یووال نوح هراری، در زمانه‌ای که به سوی قلمرو مبهم آینده گام بر میداریم، پژوهشی کاوشگرانه (عمیق) و روشنی‌بخش (الهام‌بخش) برای ضروری ترین مسائل امروز را ارائه می دهد.همانطور که تکنولوژی سریع تر از درک ما پیشرفت میکند،هک کردن، یک جنگ تاکتیکی به حساب می رود و جهان بیش از پیش حالت دو قطبی به خود می گیرد، هراری به ادامه دادن زندگی در این شرایط که همه چیز تغییر می کند و باعث سردرگمی می شود، پرداخته و سوال های مهمی را می پرسد که ما برای نجات یافتن، نیازمند پاسخ به آن ها هستیمهراری در قالب ۲۱ فصل برانگیزاننده که عمیق و در عین حال قابل فهم هستند،با زدودن پیچیدگی از مقولات سیاسی،فناورانه، اجتماعی و بیان توصیه هایی در مورد چگونگی مهیاشدن برای آینده ای کاملا متفاوت از زمانه ای که در آن زندگی میکنیم، به تحکیم و پیرایش ایدههای ارائه شده در کتابهای پیشین.خود می‌پردازد.چگونه ما می‌توانیم آزادی انتخاب خود را حفظ کنیم در حالی که کلان-داده (اشاره داره به الگوریتم‌های جمع‌آوری دادهٔ سایت‌هایی چون گوگل و فیسبوک) ما را می‌نگرد و زیر نظر دارد؟ نیروی کار آینده به چه صورت خواهد بود و چگونه باید خود را برای آن آماده کنیم؟چگونه باید با تهدید تروریسم روبه‌رو شویم؟ چرا لیبرال دموکراسی دچار بحران است؟ توانایی منحصر به فرد هراری برای معنابخشی به جایی که از ;کجا آمده ایم (تاریخ) و آن چه به سوی آن می رویم (سرنوشت انسان)، توجه میلیون ها خواننده را به خود معطوف کرده است.در این نوشتار، وی در جهانی سرشار از غوغا و عدم اطمینان، از ما، ارزش ها، معانی و دقت نظر شخصی را می طلبد. در زمانهٔ احاطه شدن با اطلاعات نامرتبط، شفافیت و وضوح می‌تواند نقطهٔ قوت باشد.یان چالش های پیچیده دوران معاصر به گونه ای شفاف و قابل فهم، کتاب ۲۱ درس برای قرن بیست و یکم را به یکی از خواندنی های ضروری تبدیل کرده است این کتاب در 30 آگوست 2018 منتشر میشه
    more
  • Yzabel Ginsberg
    January 1, 1970
    [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]I read Harari’s two other books (“Sapiens” and “Homo Deus”), and quite liked them, so when this one was available, I couldn’t help but request it. It did turn out to be an interesting read as well, dealing with current problems that we just can’t ignore: global warming, terrorism, the rise of harmful ideologies, etc. It’s definitely not seen through rose-tinted glasses, and it’s a good thing, for it’s time peopl [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.]I read Harari’s two other books (“Sapiens” and “Homo Deus”), and quite liked them, so when this one was available, I couldn’t help but request it. It did turn out to be an interesting read as well, dealing with current problems that we just can’t ignore: global warming, terrorism, the rise of harmful ideologies, etc. It’s definitely not seen through rose-tinted glasses, and it’s a good thing, for it’s time people in general wake up and—to paraphrase one of the many things I tend to agree with here—stop voting with their feet. (Between the USA and Brexit Country, let’s be honest: obviously too many of us don’t use their brains when they vote.)I especially liked the part about the narratives humans in general tend to construct (nationalism and religions, for instance, being built on such narratives)—possibly because it’s a kind of point of view I’ve been holding myself as well, and because (as usual, it seems), the “narratives of sacrifice” hit regular people the most. Another favourite of mine is the part played by algorithms and “Big Data”, for in itself, I find this kind of evolution both fascinating and scary: in the future, will we really let algorithms decide most aspects of our lives, and isn’t it already happening? (But then, aren’t we also constructs whose functioning is based on biological algorithms anyway? Hmm. So many questions.)I don’t necessarily agree with everything in this book, and to be fair, there was too much matter to cram everything in one volume, so some of it felt a little hurried and too superficial. I’ll nevertheless recommend it as an introduction to the topics it deals with, because it’s a good eye-opener, and it invites to a lot of introspection, questioning and thinking, which is not a bad thing.
    more
  • Michael Perkins
    January 1, 1970
    NetGalley isn't going to like this, but I did not learn much from this book. I read his two previous books and have been covering Silicon Valley for 30 years. There was nothing new for me in his tech discussion. I also have deep background in religion and history, which he covers extensively. But don't let me discourage anyone else for whom the details of these topics are somewhat new. He's done his homework. Now on to a topic I know almost nothing about, everyday life in North Korea.=========== NetGalley isn't going to like this, but I did not learn much from this book. I read his two previous books and have been covering Silicon Valley for 30 years. There was nothing new for me in his tech discussion. I also have deep background in religion and history, which he covers extensively. But don't let me discourage anyone else for whom the details of these topics are somewhat new. He's done his homework. Now on to a topic I know almost nothing about, everyday life in North Korea.=============An attempt at deploying artificial intelligence and some amusing attempts to thwart it....https://tinyurl.com/yax9g3zr
    more
  • Jonas
    January 1, 1970
    litt mindre sammenhengende enn de forrige to og av og til en repetisjon av dem, men solid ''i det hele tatt,,
  • Henri
    January 1, 1970
    4.5*Haven't read Sapiens or Home Deus so cannot compare to those. Very well written, and fantastically engaging. I felt as if some bits were not needed though and i could not help but feel that conclusion spirals into a self help type of advertisement for meditation and free thinking. Not sure whether much personal stuff was called for, although author's explanation in the end as to why he mentioned his own experiences does justify this partly. Would have been five stars but i am not a fan of bo 4.5*Haven't read Sapiens or Home Deus so cannot compare to those. Very well written, and fantastically engaging. I felt as if some bits were not needed though and i could not help but feel that conclusion spirals into a self help type of advertisement for meditation and free thinking. Not sure whether much personal stuff was called for, although author's explanation in the end as to why he mentioned his own experiences does justify this partly. Would have been five stars but i am not a fan of books that attempt to present big picture, big history, as it often dilutes important details at the crux of things in favour of a broad view. Having said that, i now see why Harari is often seen as one of the finest authors of big history. I have even bought Sapiens.
    more
  • Avid
    January 1, 1970
    Another hit for yuval noah harari, “21 lessons” is a perfect follow-up to “sapiens” and “homo deus”. While the previous two focused more on the history and future of mankind, this one reveals the author’s insights on the individual - motivation, awareness, intelligence, and how we are influenced by education, religion, and experience. As an atheist and secularist, i found much to inspire and focus my thoughts and energy, rendered with originality, compassion, and clarity. I will continue to reco Another hit for yuval noah harari, “21 lessons” is a perfect follow-up to “sapiens” and “homo deus”. While the previous two focused more on the history and future of mankind, this one reveals the author’s insights on the individual - motivation, awareness, intelligence, and how we are influenced by education, religion, and experience. As an atheist and secularist, i found much to inspire and focus my thoughts and energy, rendered with originality, compassion, and clarity. I will continue to recommend all three of harari’s recent books to both customers and friends.
    more
  • Jeremy
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received an ARC from NetGalley.This book was fantastic. I loved reading Homo Deus, which is why I wanted to read this book in the first place. I was a bit cautious about the book, since the title put me off (I don't like titles that are lists), but thankfully the book is not just a big list. Instead, it's a unified whole. Each chapter flows to the next, and the topics are all interesting. I found myself interested in each topic the author discussed. He includes plenty of citations, and e Note: I received an ARC from NetGalley.This book was fantastic. I loved reading Homo Deus, which is why I wanted to read this book in the first place. I was a bit cautious about the book, since the title put me off (I don't like titles that are lists), but thankfully the book is not just a big list. Instead, it's a unified whole. Each chapter flows to the next, and the topics are all interesting. I found myself interested in each topic the author discussed. He includes plenty of citations, and each chapter gave me something to chew on for the next century. We have a lot of work to do if we want to get things right in society.I highly recommend reading this book.
    more
  • Greg Swierad
    January 1, 1970
    Next book by Yuval Noah Harari. I would say, it's the bestselling author, but it would not be said enough. Amount the top 10 most rated books on Goodreads (in the category of non-fiction books), two books are written by him! Sapiens is in third position and Homo Deus on 7h. What's more, his book Sapiens has the highest rating among the top 100 most popular books on Goodreads.Based on the statistics, I can say that Yuvan is currently the best writer of non-fiction books. This is a bold statement, Next book by Yuval Noah Harari. I would say, it's the bestselling author, but it would not be said enough. Amount the top 10 most rated books on Goodreads (in the category of non-fiction books), two books are written by him! Sapiens is in third position and Homo Deus on 7h. What's more, his book Sapiens has the highest rating among the top 100 most popular books on Goodreads.Based on the statistics, I can say that Yuvan is currently the best writer of non-fiction books. This is a bold statement, but it's fully backed by the data.This new book is long awaited by me, that would make more practical lessons from the theory that we learned from Homo Deus and Sapiens.I did not read the book yet, as I'm writing this before it's released, but I will definitely include it in HabitCoach so that everyone can follow the lessons designed by Yuval Noah Harari.
    more
  • GONZA
    January 1, 1970
    REVIEW TO COME!
  • Heleen Osse
    January 1, 1970
    Harari flikt het weer! Erg interessant boek waarin je blijft lezen. Van Trump tot #MeToo, van terrorisme tot de Brexit, alle hedendaagse problemen komen voorbij. Aanrader!
  • Benjamin Drakovac
    January 1, 1970
    I'm in.
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    As usual with Harari, it's very smart. Now it's also briefer. Kind of like On Tyranny on steroids.Having looked at the past and the future, he's taking on the present, tackling some of the big themes of modernity in rapid-fire succession. Democracy, AI, God, humility.All the biggies. One great package.
    more
  • Naqvi Hussain
    January 1, 1970
    Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present.It sounds more like a self help book. Let's see what's in store.....been a big fan of his previous two booksThrough this book YNH doesn't actually try to give in any solutions/ lessons to the problems, he wrote it to actually to highlight the problems we have becuz he felt that we are actually distracted from what the real problems are
    more
  • Angie Boyter
    January 1, 1970
    Yuval Noah Harari is a historian, a person who studies and writes about the past, but his latest book looks at our present and derives twenty-one lessons intended “to stimulate further thinking and help readers participate in some of the major conversations of our time.” There are a number of books, some of them very well-conceived, about the challenges presented by technology in the 21st century, but 21 Lessons for the 21st Century goes beyond that sphere. It consists of 21 chapters, each on a Yuval Noah Harari is a historian, a person who studies and writes about the past, but his latest book looks at our present and derives twenty-one lessons intended “to stimulate further thinking and help readers participate in some of the major conversations of our time.” There are a number of books, some of them very well-conceived, about the challenges presented by technology in the 21st century, but 21 Lessons for the 21st Century goes beyond that sphere. It consists of 21 chapters, each on a different subject and delivering a different lesson. Earlier versions of some of the chapters appeared elsewhere in different form. Parts I and II, on technological and political challenges presented by the merger of infotech and biotech ( a merger he covers in depth in his book Homo Deus), offer the kind of discussion and proposed remedies to be expected in a book of this title. Towards the end of Part II, though, the topics become both more social and more personal and often draw on Harari’s own experiences and interests, with chapters like Religion: God Now Serves the Nation and Immigration: Some Cultures Might Be Better than Others. The exploration of a broader range of subjects continues throughout the rest of the book: Part III, Despair and Hope, Part IV, Truth, and Part V, Resilience. The last two chapters are especially philosophical and personal: Meaning: Life is Not a Story and Meditation: Just Observe. Not surprisingly for an author who is from Israel, Harari is especially interested in religion, and sometimes he can be provocative. For example, in the chapter Post-Truth: Some Fake News Lasts Forever, he says: “When a thousand people believe some made-up story for one month, that’s fake news. When a billion people believe it for a thousand years, that’s a religion.” He qualifies this assertion by saying, “I am not denying the effectiveness or potential benevolence of religion….For better or worse, fiction is among the most effective tools in humanity’s tool kit.”I did not always agree with everything the author said, but he offered an interesting viewpoint and made me ponder his subjects myself. With such a broad range of subjects covered, I would expect most readers would find some of the lessons more convincing than others, but just about anyone who likes to be stimulated should find food for thought. The author has done his job.I received an ARC of this book for review from Netgalley and the publisher.A stimulating look at our times
    more
  • Steve Pickard
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this book one can't help but feel that humans are on the brink of monumental upheaval. There are important conversations to be had, with critical decisions to be made, and perhaps this type of literature is the frontier for both? The possibility alone makes it quite difficult to submit my review with anything less than a five star rating! I particularly enjoyed the passages on postwork society and Harari's frank analysis of Judaism, which I suspect took an element of courage despite his Reading this book one can't help but feel that humans are on the brink of monumental upheaval. There are important conversations to be had, with critical decisions to be made, and perhaps this type of literature is the frontier for both? The possibility alone makes it quite difficult to submit my review with anything less than a five star rating! I particularly enjoyed the passages on postwork society and Harari's frank analysis of Judaism, which I suspect took an element of courage despite his indifference towards all religion. To offer a general criticism: the author seems intent on ridiculing nationalism and religion, but doesn't consider the possibility that recent resurgence in both is based on the corruption of his championed ideals. Perhaps those oft referenced Brits who voted to leave the EU did so not due to culturism/racism, or lack of a globalist/humane vision, but in response to an institutional exploitation of the working class propagated under the guise of liberalism? And perhaps those who express Christian beliefs do so because Christianity offers a chance of community, shared morality, and a belief that there's more to "the cosmic mystery" than the ignorance of atheism? A logical agnostic can certainly see the appeal, and would go as far as saying he holds more hope in a future lead by those who have abstract faith over those who oppose the possibility of it at all. There are some great chapters about Religion, God and Secularism. "Humans should always retain the freedom to doubt, to check again, to hear a second opinion, to try a different path". Like Brexit or going to church? Food for thought. Harari is right when he says that some of our problems transcend nations, and that ultimately the human race needs to come up with worldwide responses to issues such as global warming and hunger. I only hope that when those important decisions are made, the decision makers exercise some critical thinking. Ultimately we are all humans, and ultimately we need a strategy to make this planet our Heaven; or at the very least somewhere where nobody starves. If we can stop starvation, perhaps we can aim a little higher again and look at suffering in general. The final chapters on shared fictions and meditation are an important conclusion. If we can't stop all suffering then perhaps we can learn to subdue our own. Matters like this should be top of our political agenda, so it's refreshing to see them being given the attention they deserve. Required reading for the modern adult.
    more
  • Ahmed Alsahaf
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike the author's previous books, this one was clearly "written" at the request of publishers; a pure marketing move.This should have been obvious, if not from the painfully commercial title, then from the fact that the author would not have had the time to write anything of substance since Homo Deus.The book is a collection of essays, and it would have been more honest to market it as such. The essays themselves vary in quality; some are fairly interesting and/or enjoyable, others so full of Unlike the author's previous books, this one was clearly "written" at the request of publishers; a pure marketing move.This should have been obvious, if not from the painfully commercial title, then from the fact that the author would not have had the time to write anything of substance since Homo Deus.The book is a collection of essays, and it would have been more honest to market it as such. The essays themselves vary in quality; some are fairly interesting and/or enjoyable, others so full of banalities that they would pass as generic blog posts on "the meaning of life" or "the fate of humanity".The most annoying thing was the attempt at faking cohesion by superficially connecting each chapter to the one after it. At times, this was done in such an obvious and contrived way using a single paragraph. My disaffection with the book's misleading marketing was only made worse when the book ended with the author's anecdotal experience with meditation. Specially since that mini chapter counted as one of the "21 Lessons for the 21st century". Notwithstanding the pompous title and the distasteful marketing, the book may still contain some insights for some people. But I would manage my expectations before reading it.
    more
  • Jennie Rosenblum
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided via NetGalleyI have read the other two books by this author and while I did not love them, I did learn from them and they led to several wonderful conversations with other readers. I do not see that happening with this book. I felt as if this was much more opinion based than a provider of information. Subjects are touched on lightly and solely from the POV of the author. There is also many references to his other works and responses they received. I understand that this book was cre ARC provided via NetGalleyI have read the other two books by this author and while I did not love them, I did learn from them and they led to several wonderful conversations with other readers. I do not see that happening with this book. I felt as if this was much more opinion based than a provider of information. Subjects are touched on lightly and solely from the POV of the author. There is also many references to his other works and responses they received. I understand that this book was created because of unanswered questions from the first two books but do not think those questions were answered in this book.
    more
  • Mollie
    January 1, 1970
    Not to be missed. Courageous. Comprehensive.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Good book full of insights into the present and potentially the future of mankind. Robots, AI, ownership of data, understanding of ones own mind, and other important topics of interest are all mentioned and explored. I thought this book was very interesting and a mix of both fearful and hopeful. If you wonder about both present day issues our world has and what might come to pass check out this book. Thanks to Netgalley for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Lorraine Woodall
    January 1, 1970
    What a thought provoking book! It really made me think about how things are likely to be in the future and how things have changed from our past. Initially I wasn’t too sure if it was going to be too heavy a read for me based on the first few pages but I read on and I am glad I did so. The author explains things so well with lots of examples to illustrate his points. I found myself agreeing with views that I had never given any thought to before. I am glad I read this book, I feel that it has op What a thought provoking book! It really made me think about how things are likely to be in the future and how things have changed from our past. Initially I wasn’t too sure if it was going to be too heavy a read for me based on the first few pages but I read on and I am glad I did so. The author explains things so well with lots of examples to illustrate his points. I found myself agreeing with views that I had never given any thought to before. I am glad I read this book, I feel that it has opened up my mind a little more than it was prior to this. Indeed in the chapter on Education he says:“people need the ability to make sense of information, to tell the difference between what is important and what is unimportant, and above all to combine many bits of information into a broad picture of the world.”I feel that this is what this book has begun to do for me.
    more
Write a review