Gideon Falls, Vol. 1
A brand-new ongoing horror series from the acclaimed best-selling creative team of Old Man Logan and Green Arrow!The lives of a reclusive young man obsessed with a conspiracy in the city's trash and a washed-up Catholic priest arriving in a small town full of dark secrets become intertwined around the mysterious legend of The Black Barn--an otherworldly building alleged to have appeared in both the city and the small town throughout history, bringing death and madness in its wake.Rural mystery and urban horror collide in this character-driven meditation on obsession, mental illness, and faith that Mark Millar (Hitgirl) called his "personal pick as the best comic of 2018!" Also featuring a variant cover gallery from some of comics' best artists, including Cliff Chiang (PAPER GIRLS), Jock (WYTCHES), Skottie Young (I HATE FAIRYLAND), and more!Collects GIDEON FALLS #1-6

Gideon Falls, Vol. 1 Details

TitleGideon Falls, Vol. 1
Author
ReleaseOct 23rd, 2018
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781534308527
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Horror, Graphic Novels, Comic Book, Graphic Novels Comics, Fiction

Gideon Falls, Vol. 1 Review

  • Samhain Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    A ritual killer’s doin’ his thang in the small town of Gideon Falls. A Catholic priest is dispatched to replace the previous Father who recently died in strange circumstances. A mental patient with a face mask wanders the city collecting “special” pieces of garbage. Both priest and nutbar have visions of a black barn. *Yawns* Oh, what does it all mean? The creative team behind Old Man Logan, Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino, reunite for their first Image series, Gideon Falls. And it’s not very A ritual killer’s doin’ his thang in the small town of Gideon Falls. A Catholic priest is dispatched to replace the previous Father who recently died in strange circumstances. A mental patient with a face mask wanders the city collecting “special” pieces of garbage. Both priest and nutbar have visions of a black barn. *Yawns* Oh, what does it all mean? The creative team behind Old Man Logan, Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino, reunite for their first Image series, Gideon Falls. And it’s not very good! I feel like Lemire watched two of the crappiest, most overrated, yet absurdly popular, TV shows of recent years, Mr Robot and Stranger Things, and decided to do something derivative of them. The mental patient storyline seemed similar to the main character of Mr Robot’s while the small town sheriff/supernatural goings-on was very much in the Stranger Things vein. Even without those shows’ flavourings, neither storyline is interesting. I also didn’t care about any of the characters who weren’t at all likeable or compelling. The problem is that Lemire’s writing is too obtuse and vague to latch onto. What exactly is going on – why am I meant to care? Something about a religious war between good and evil – like Robert Kirkman’s Outcast but not as good (and even that series isn’t a hill of beans) – while The Black Barn is like The Dark Tower. I found it impossible to be invested in anything that was happening. Lemire looks to do be doing something like what he did a few years ago in his Vertigo book Trillium with the parallel worlds/storylines – the priest is in one world/timeline, the mental patient is in another. I think that’s what the visual inversions mean – and that last panel. It’s just another unoriginal aspect bolted onto this patchwork of other pop culture elements. Andrea Sorrentino’s art is surprisingly underwhelming given his usual quality work, though to be fair he’s not given anything very exciting to draw – lots of mundane everyday stuff for the most part. The visual spectacles are reserved for the batshit final chapter though when Sorrentino’s allowed to cut loose, drawing some remarkable, abstract stuff as the priest and some others venture into Lemire’s cut-price Upside Down. Gideon Falls, Volume 1: The Black Barn is barnstormingly unoriginal and uninspired. Maybe Lemire’s going somewhere more engaging in the next book/s but I didn’t see enough in this first one to want to keep going and find out.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino reunite for their new horror comic with very little horror. This is the slowest of slow burns. If visions of old barns scare you, this may be the book for you. The story follows two separate individuals in two different environments. One, a mentally ill man who wonders through a city's garbage looking for splinters and nails. The other, a priest new to a small town who witnesses a murder. Their only connection an old barn that they see visions of. Speaking of th Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino reunite for their new horror comic with very little horror. This is the slowest of slow burns. If visions of old barns scare you, this may be the book for you. The story follows two separate individuals in two different environments. One, a mentally ill man who wonders through a city's garbage looking for splinters and nails. The other, a priest new to a small town who witnesses a murder. Their only connection an old barn that they see visions of. Speaking of this barn, Lemire borrows heavily from a TV show that used to be on SyFy, Haven, whether intentionally or not. Sorrentino's art is gritty and real, even as it gets more surreal and fantastical. It's very good. Given that this is from Jeff Lemire, I'll give it more time, but I feel this may be better read all at once after the series ends.
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Lemire & Andrea Sorrentino strike gold. Again.What else to say? Gideon Falls is a comic with 2 storylines that are apart from one another, yet connected. It is a noir feeling, dark, supernatural, thriller that fired for me on absolutely all cylinders. Lemire's prose is gritty and mysterious and adds a creepy voice to Sorrentino's experimental feeling artwork. And I don't mean experimental in a bad way. Its just nice to see pages that don't follow the run-of-the-mill panel layouts for a Jeff Lemire & Andrea Sorrentino strike gold. Again.What else to say? Gideon Falls is a comic with 2 storylines that are apart from one another, yet connected. It is a noir feeling, dark, supernatural, thriller that fired for me on absolutely all cylinders. Lemire's prose is gritty and mysterious and adds a creepy voice to Sorrentino's experimental feeling artwork. And I don't mean experimental in a bad way. Its just nice to see pages that don't follow the run-of-the-mill panel layouts for a change. This very well, and probably is my favorite comic of 2018.**I read this as single issues, which is fine because I am greedy and impatient, but I think this story will read better as a whole in a TPB or premium hardcover editions.
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  • L. McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    Alright, I’ll end my flood of reviews with this.What’s it about?One guy is the new Catholic preacher in the town of Gideon Falls.The other guy is a guy who is supposedly insane and obsessed with digging through the garbage.They both see eerie visions of a black barn that may be more than just visions.Why it gets 5 stars:The story is very interesting. I don’t want to give too much away but it is so great and strange.The art is fantastic! Sorrentino’s gritty style suits this book perfectly! It sor Alright, I’ll end my flood of reviews with this.What’s it about?One guy is the new Catholic preacher in the town of Gideon Falls.The other guy is a guy who is supposedly insane and obsessed with digging through the garbage.They both see eerie visions of a black barn that may be more than just visions.Why it gets 5 stars:The story is very interesting. I don’t want to give too much away but it is so great and strange.The art is fantastic! Sorrentino’s gritty style suits this book perfectly! It sorta reminds me of a mix of Azaceta and Sean Phillips which is something I say with the highest compliments. An amazing artist!The characters are strange and intriguing.The horror stuff in this book... holy shitsnacks! It is so good! It’s very creepy and unsettling! The creepiness is strong here and sure to please fans of horror comics!This is one of the weirdest comics I’ve read in awhile. This might actually be even weirder than The Sandman but still manages to make sense so I love it.This book is very suspenseful and full of exciting twists!The page layouts are done in various cool ways, I really enjoyed that!Overall:Awesome book with lots to love! If you’re a fan of horror and/or you like a strange story you should definitely go for this! I highly recommend this one and can’t wait for the next volume!5/5
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  • Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    Damnation!—literally. Lemire surprises with this dark fantasy horror told through two parallel plots. While characterization is only moderate so far, it’s only because there’s so much going for the plot. Illustrations are sketchy but wonderfully fantastical.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Lemire's new horror/thriller/mystical series starts veeeery slow. It's five long and tedious issues of buildup and one final issue that tries to turn everything on its head (and kind of fails by being too ambiguous), it doesn't feel very original or exciting enough to sustain its length, and the characters are all just... meh. Andrea Sorrentino's artwork is absolutely gorgeous though, better than I've ever seen it in other books. It does much more for building the tone and atmosphere of the Jeff Lemire's new horror/thriller/mystical series starts veeeery slow. It's five long and tedious issues of buildup and one final issue that tries to turn everything on its head (and kind of fails by being too ambiguous), it doesn't feel very original or exciting enough to sustain its length, and the characters are all just... meh. Andrea Sorrentino's artwork is absolutely gorgeous though, better than I've ever seen it in other books. It does much more for building the tone and atmosphere of the book than Lemire did with his writing. Gideon Falls may have potential in the future, but for now I can't say I'm hooked.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    I keep waiting for another Lemire title to grab me like Descender did.And I'm still waiting.😕Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6Total review score: 2.67
  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    This is Lemire doing strange horror things. The plot is a slow build. I dont mind the occasional slow burn and in this case it works. The plot does eventually work but there are a few questions I have after finishing #6. The characters are your typical washed up country characters. Although I do prefer the Norton/Dr interaction. The worldbuilding is quite unique although why do small country towns always have these horror elements. A good first outing although probably not Lemires best work. At This is Lemire doing strange horror things. The plot is a slow build. I dont mind the occasional slow burn and in this case it works. The plot does eventually work but there are a few questions I have after finishing #6. The characters are your typical washed up country characters. Although I do prefer the Norton/Dr interaction. The worldbuilding is quite unique although why do small country towns always have these horror elements. A good first outing although probably not Lemires best work. At times it can get wacky and out there, especially some of the art in #6.
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    A well-written and creatively illustrated first chapter in a new horror mystery series that tells parallel stories about a reclusive mental patient obsessed with a mystery in the city's trash and a troubled Catholic priest assigned to preach in the small town of Gideon Falls. I love the slow, creeping build-up in the Gideon Falls scenes and I wish the city sections matched it. This series definitely shows promise though.
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  • Jakub Kvíz
    January 1, 1970
    To, co se pet sesitu budovalo, v poslednim sesitu prvniho story arcu tak nejaky vysumelo.Jasne, urcite budu pokracovat a tesim se na dalsi sesity, ale #6 me tak nejak nechalo v klidu.
  • Chaunceton Bird
    January 1, 1970
    This is some quality dark story telling. The premise is one I've never seen/read, and the direction of the first book is promising. Looking forward to later installments.
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]The town of Gideon Falls has a secret. It is haunted by a mysterious Black Barn, whose very existence drives men mad. When a new priest arrives in town after the death of his predecessor, he finds himself trapped in a web of intrigue that may just lead to his demise as well. And across the world, a psychiatric patient finds himself compelled to collect strange pieces of wood from all over the city, and rebuild the Black Barn himself…Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino togeth [Read as single issues]The town of Gideon Falls has a secret. It is haunted by a mysterious Black Barn, whose very existence drives men mad. When a new priest arrives in town after the death of his predecessor, he finds himself trapped in a web of intrigue that may just lead to his demise as well. And across the world, a psychiatric patient finds himself compelled to collect strange pieces of wood from all over the city, and rebuild the Black Barn himself…Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino together are a one-two punch unlike any other in comics these days (Old Man Logan notwithstanding, but that’s a different review all together). Re-teaming for their first independent comic together, you know you’re in for something special from the first few pages of the first issue.Gideon Falls is a mystery story at its heart. There are supernatural elements, and it delves into the psyche of its main characters with reckless abandon, but the mystery of the Black Barn drives its core without even trying. The malevolent building only appears a handful of times, but each one rocks the series hard, and shows that Lemire isn’t going to let up at any point; even when things appear quiet, it’s not too long before it all goes wrong again.The dual narratives are well executed, with a good balance between the two throughout these first issues. It’s not readily apparent how or even if they’re going to interact until right at the last minute, and that once again throws everything you thought you knew out the window and makes you re-evaluate everything that’s been happening so far. And yet, despite that, you do feel like you’re getting somewhere. We may not have all, or even any, answers by the end of this volume, but I do feel like we’re much more informed than we were right at the beginning, even if what we know might not make total sense just yet.Of course, Andrea Sorrentino isn’t slouching either. His iconic panel layouts and insane splash pages are ever-present, but just because he does the big and bombastic so well doesn’t mean he can’t do the quieter talking heads panels just as easily. I do think having Dave Stewart on as colourist instead of Sorrentino’s usual partner in crime Marcelo Maiolo gives his art a very different feel than usual, and it’s a bit of a jarring change at first, but on reflection this grittier edge is more appropriate for this kind of story, it just takes a little getting used to.Gideon Falls isn’t easy reading – it’ll make you gasp more than once, and it’s constantly pulling the rug out from under you, tying it over your head, and hitting you with a brick. But it’s the kind of comic punishment that you’ll love to endure, because the mystery and the characters are so well done. The art is phenomenal, as all Sorrentino comics are, even if it’s a little off-kilter compared to previous experience, but that just helps make Gideon Falls stand out from the crowd even more than it would otherwise. Just don’t go into the Black Barn, people. You might not like what you find.
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  • Aldo Haegemans
    January 1, 1970
    I Feel like the first book kind off explained the story by the end of issue 6. This should be read in 1 sitting to fully understand and appreciate the story. Shame I read in issues. So Yeah I am not fully invested Yet But I like it enough to continue the series. It could end u becoming great.
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  • Lucas Chance
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent WeirdnessLemire does it again with a Twin Peaks-flavored story that has striking originality and psychedelic visuals. It is really more of a comic you get for the play it does with layouts and form than its story, but it’s very much worthwhile.
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  • Jamie Connolly
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding! 5 stars!
  • Periklis
    January 1, 1970
    A twin-peaks inspired, urban horror series, written and drawn in a planned, cinematic, manner. Too bad it's not finished to read it the whole story in one sitting...
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Freaky. I'm hooked.
  • Candace Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Alright, so I'm docking a star on account of a dissatisfying ending. You FINALLY get to see inside the barn, and even though it's just supposed to be a wild glimpse, it wasn't exactly what I expected...in a disappointing way. I feel like maybe the ending only raises more questions than it answers...a-also in a disappointing way. I'm giving the second volume a chance, and if I'm not feeling swayed by then, I'll just drop the series as a whole. Which is a shame, because I ADORE Lemire's writing 90 Alright, so I'm docking a star on account of a dissatisfying ending. You FINALLY get to see inside the barn, and even though it's just supposed to be a wild glimpse, it wasn't exactly what I expected...in a disappointing way. I feel like maybe the ending only raises more questions than it answers...a-also in a disappointing way. I'm giving the second volume a chance, and if I'm not feeling swayed by then, I'll just drop the series as a whole. Which is a shame, because I ADORE Lemire's writing 90% of the time.
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  • Phillip
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Let me start out by saying that I am a big fan of Jeff Lemire. So it's no surprise that I loved the first volume of this series. There are two storylines. The first follows disgraced priest that is an alcoholic and is assigned to the church in Gideon Falls against his will. It's clear that there is something in his past that has gotten him into trouble, but it doesn't really come out in this part of the story. The Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Let me start out by saying that I am a big fan of Jeff Lemire. So it's no surprise that I loved the first volume of this series. There are two storylines. The first follows disgraced priest that is an alcoholic and is assigned to the church in Gideon Falls against his will. It's clear that there is something in his past that has gotten him into trouble, but it doesn't really come out in this part of the story. The second storyline features a young man that seems to have psychological problems. He has an obsession driving him that he can't really explain. These two stories don't cross paths in this volume, but there are hints of how they could.The art is fantastic. I like how it plays with the format. It does a nice job forcing different perspectives or drawing the eye to certain elements of a scene. And the coloring helps to enhance things as well. There are times when the colors can be pretty drab, but I think that works for the story, particularly with the locations involved. I am really looking forward to the next volume.
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  • gaminette
    January 1, 1970
    [single issues] Creepy and atmospheric story with amazing art. [full disclosure: I adore everything by Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino.]
  • Billy Jepma
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a fan of Lemire and Sorrentino since their run on "Green Arrow" together back in the New 52 days, so when I happened across the first issue of "Gideon Falls" in my LCS one day, I picked it up faster than I knew possible. Lemire's storytelling capabilities, his eye for intimate and often painful truths, and Sorrentino's cinematic artwork work incredibly well together, and I was very excited to see what they would cook up together in the context of a horror series.While I read each of th I've been a fan of Lemire and Sorrentino since their run on "Green Arrow" together back in the New 52 days, so when I happened across the first issue of "Gideon Falls" in my LCS one day, I picked it up faster than I knew possible. Lemire's storytelling capabilities, his eye for intimate and often painful truths, and Sorrentino's cinematic artwork work incredibly well together, and I was very excited to see what they would cook up together in the context of a horror series.While I read each of the first five issues individually as they came out, and enjoyed them thoroughly, it wasn't until I binge-read through them all again before reading issue 6 - the end of this first arc - that the narrative really clicked for me. The story is paced very well, but with so many plot threads and reveals occurring with each new issue, it was hard to keep track of everything from month-to-month. So if you're interested in reading this - and you should be - skip the rest of this review and just read the first volume in its entirety. There's a lot of great work here, and it shines brightest when seen as a whole. With that said, having read the series from issue 1, "Gideon Falls" comes out of the gate in a way few comics seem able to do. It's tone, style, and world felt immediately and firmly established, and even though I didn't have a firm grasp of the motivating plot until several issues in, Lemire and Sorrentino have created a world that is very hard to not get quickly invested in.The story is told from two perspectives - Father Fred, a priest sent to the town of Gideon Falls after their previous pastor disappears; and Norton, a mentally disturbed man living in an urban minefield of trash and poverty who is convinced that there's a twisted conspiracy that only he can solve. Both characters are fiercely compelling, and the juxtaposition between is often used to great effect. Lemire will focus on one character, and then cut them off mid-sentence as he sends us into the world of the other. It creates a shared world that feels tangible and connected, and only adds depth to the mystery both men are inadvertently wrapped up in.This first arc is a lot of set-up, so as much as I am all-in for whatever disturbing story Lemire and Sorrentino are building, it's hard to know exactly where this is going from the ending of this introductory arc. The "climax" is a mind-bending trip, but not a satisfying one, as the prior five issues did such a superb job at leading up to a reveal that didn't end up feeling all that monumental. Still, there's a far larger tapestry being made here, so even though the end of this arc didn't exactly leave me satisfied, it did leave me hungry for me. There's a bit too much of an emphasis on the abstract right now, and as breathtaking as most of Sorrentino's art is, I hope to see him stick to the more realistic qualities of his arc in the future. His mind-bending work is no less spectacular than anything else he does, but for a story that already feel pretty out there, I would like to see Lemire and Sorrentino balance the tangible with the intangible a bit better so the stakes and characters don't get lost in the clouds.Overall though, Lemire and Sorrentino have capably set up an unsettling and fascinating foundation for the world of "Gideon Falls," and I genuinely cannot wait to see where the story will go from here.
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    In the city, Norton Sinclair* rummages through rubbish, convinced he's finding clues to something monstrous - or maybe he's just going mad, but why not both? Both is (not) good. And in the little town of Gideon Falls, new priest Father Fred finds himself mixed up in mystery and murder. The two men don't know of each other's existence, at least not yet, but they're both haunted by visions of the ominous Black Barn... A brilliantly brooding new horror series from Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino, In the city, Norton Sinclair* rummages through rubbish, convinced he's finding clues to something monstrous - or maybe he's just going mad, but why not both? Both is (not) good. And in the little town of Gideon Falls, new priest Father Fred finds himself mixed up in mystery and murder. The two men don't know of each other's existence, at least not yet, but they're both haunted by visions of the ominous Black Barn... A brilliantly brooding new horror series from Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino, who having previously collaborated on the New 52 Green Arrow and the superfluous Old Man Logan, are now working on something I actually want to read. And what a pairing they are. The first page is upside-down, and you don't immediately realise it's not your mistake, which throws you off balance from the beginning. Throughout, angles and perspectives will suddenly shift, doing with comics something very similar to the giddy unease The Haunting achieved on film. When we do see the Barn, and especially with our first glimpse of what's inside, it's genuinely unnerving, even set against the grubby, worn-down tone the art team establish for the everyday world. The supporting cast are established in enough detail that we're very quickly invested in their lives too, and the mystery - but also the reluctance of some characters to become embroiled in it - is instantly compelling. And I love the covers, which each double Arcimboldo-style as aerial view and character portrait. Which mirrors some of the inventive layouts in the book itself, stuff to rival Morrison/Quitely or Gillen/McKelvie, but with none of their reassuring cleanness. Because nothing here is clean, or at least not for long before the Barn taints it.My one reservation: the spot of bother in Father Fred's past not being specified sooner. I naturally assumed he was just another nonce being shielded by the diocese, so when it turns out he's only a fighty drunk, a) it's anticlimactic and b) I was annoyed at not having been able to invest in him before that point.*A name which were this set in London would feel so on the nose that even Ales Kot might reconsider, but which seems to be coincidence. Lemire talks in a backmatter essay about how the character has been with him since before he was even making comics, initially appearing in a short film, and there's no hint that Iain's work is an inspiration, though you could say that both are sifting through the urban wreckage in their own ways.(Edelweiss ARC)
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  • Matheus Gonçalves
    January 1, 1970
    Sobre duplas criativas que não decepcionam. Jeff Lemire e Andrea Sorrentino.Acho que cheguei no ápice das minhas leituras de 2018.
  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    A combination of genuinely surprising twists and insanely intricate and beautiful artwork make the somewhat slim story more than worth it as you dip into the demented world of Gideon Falls, a small village that houses as much evil as (i'm sorry, i have to say it) Twin Peaks.
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  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    The Truth Is Out ThereThis is easily and by far the best evil-horror-psycho thriller I've read in the past few years. It succeeds across the board. But, be careful about how you approach it. I picked up Issue 3 somewhere, then read Issue 1 later, and maybe then came across Issue 5 or 6. Each issue was interesting enough to skim, but the whole thing felt like a mumbo-jumbo mess. That was a totally unfair impression. This volume collects Issues 1 through 6, in order (duh!). Read this or read the s The Truth Is Out ThereThis is easily and by far the best evil-horror-psycho thriller I've read in the past few years. It succeeds across the board. But, be careful about how you approach it. I picked up Issue 3 somewhere, then read Issue 1 later, and maybe then came across Issue 5 or 6. Each issue was interesting enough to skim, but the whole thing felt like a mumbo-jumbo mess. That was a totally unfair impression. This volume collects Issues 1 through 6, in order (duh!). Read this or read the six separate issues in order if you want to really get into this supremely well done tale.Here's the gist, with NO or MINIMAL SPOILERS. The tale starts with two unrelated characters who will probably end up meeting later on, (this is only volume 1 of a longer tale). Our main hero, Norton, is a paranoid schizophrenic, (or is he?), who wanders the city picking up nails and splinters, and trying to reassemble them, because he is haunted by a Big Black Barn. Our second hero, Father Fred, is an alcoholic priest who's been shipped off to some nowhere burg, Gideon Falls, to dry out and stay out of trouble. Two people are murdered his first day in town, and at the scene of the crime he sees, (wait for it), a Big Black Barn. So, what is this Barn? I'm not telling, but it's definitely eeeevil. Here's the best part. Norton is obsessed, but he's coherent and sympathetic. Father Fred is pretty washed up, but once he gets on the trail of the Barn he catches fire in a grownup and pretty balanced sort of way. Each picks up sidekicks, helpers, believers, and the occasional monologuer, who add style and variety to the tale, help with exposition, and feel authentic. They all help keep the tale grounded and balanced on that narrow edge between fantasy and reality that gives stories like this their energy and their claim on the imagination. Some of the best scenes just involve Father Fred wandering around Gideon Falls talking to local characters about the legend of the "Black Barn".All of this is carried by excellent drawing. The pencils are detailed and the inking keeps things dark but still recognizable. Lots of red splashes balance the muted color palette, and give everything a somber and brooding sort of feel. Sometimes we switch from this quasi-realistic style to something wilder and more impressionistic, but that usually involves encounters with the Barn and the splashy exaggeration actually enhances the otherworldly horror feel.So, this is one of the few graphic novels I've had recently that was a pleasure to just read. Good narration, good dialogue, balanced pacing, and efficient plotting and storytelling sure add a lot. That the story was so nicely complemented by the creative and well conceived art was a huge bonus. As I say, a very nice find.(Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Ready for a paranormal thriller thick with an ominous atmosphere? Don’t miss Gideon Falls Vol 1.Father Fred is given a new flock and church in Gideon Falls. The prior priest, Father Tom, had died mysteriously. After dreaming of being visited by Father Tom, Father Fred chases him outside into a cornfield. He sees an ominous black barn in the distance. However, stumbling over a church body forces him to stop his search and call the police.In a parallel storyline, Norton has recently been released Ready for a paranormal thriller thick with an ominous atmosphere? Don’t miss Gideon Falls Vol 1.Father Fred is given a new flock and church in Gideon Falls. The prior priest, Father Tom, had died mysteriously. After dreaming of being visited by Father Tom, Father Fred chases him outside into a cornfield. He sees an ominous black barn in the distance. However, stumbling over a church body forces him to stop his search and call the police.In a parallel storyline, Norton has recently been released from a mental institution. He is convinced that the trash he collects is trying to tell him something. When he has a vision of a black barn harboring evil, he also sees a mysterious stranger poised to help him conquer the evil within.I expected a horror comic but was pleasantly surprised that Gideon Falls Vol 1 is actually a mystery with paranormal elements. As Father Fred and Norton work to decipher their visions, the feeling of dread increases. Who or what is hiding inside the black barn? The most disturbing part? The Vol 1 in the title implies that I may have to wait to discover the barn’s secrets.Gideon Falls Vol 1 is highly recommended for fans of Stephen King and Stranger Things. It has the same creepy things-aren’t-what-they-appear vibe. Both narrators are unreliable, which is always fun. The art matches the atmosphere perfectly. Even the lettering is done in an ethereal way to emphasize the frailty of humans. Great art and the terrific plot makes this a 4 star read!Thanks to Image Comics and Edelweiss+ for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What a piece – but then what should I have expected from one of the more readable creators of self-owned titles in comics? But it's not just about the script and ideas here – although they're more than fine. Just witness that visual inventiveness, where the first arc's covers have the characters' faces picked out in top-down views of the Gideon Falls landscapes, and where two people and their coats make for a hellish skull in the middle of the street. The subdued palette is wonderfully appr Wow. What a piece – but then what should I have expected from one of the more readable creators of self-owned titles in comics? But it's not just about the script and ideas here – although they're more than fine. Just witness that visual inventiveness, where the first arc's covers have the characters' faces picked out in top-down views of the Gideon Falls landscapes, and where two people and their coats make for a hellish skull in the middle of the street. The subdued palette is wonderfully appropriate for a book that concerns ghostly buildings, mad imaginings, missing people and bizarrely murderous religious types. I did think the sixth issue went a little too off-the-wall, but I think there's a reining in of the more OTT elements just in time as well, meaning this is definitely one to look out for. The author's notes accompanying the first issue say it's all mapped out, pending the feedback and sales. How those could ever be slightly negative I have no idea. This really is one of the comics of the year.
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  • Václav
    January 1, 1970
    Everybody's losing their minds, both in Gideon Falls and around me about Gideon Falls comics. I don't. And I fail to see (except involvement of Lemire, who's THE GUY now) what the fuzz is all about. Yes, Gideon Farts are different, especially for comics fast-food consumers (what are the DC fried comics and McMarvel producing). But sometimes too different. But Gideon falls try hard to be "different". And it feels superficial to me. Well, the story is interesting, but it's all over the place. The Everybody's losing their minds, both in Gideon Falls and around me about Gideon Falls comics. I don't. And I fail to see (except involvement of Lemire, who's THE GUY now) what the fuzz is all about. Yes, Gideon Farts are different, especially for comics fast-food consumers (what are the DC fried comics and McMarvel producing). But sometimes too different. But Gideon falls try hard to be "different". And it feels superficial to me. Well, the story is interesting, but it's all over the place. The art is... interesting. Works well for the "horror" parts, but the mundane world just looks... unappealing. Also, this is a good example of why I avoid reading the issues. The waiting between issues strips me out of the thrill and lets me forget what I realized from the comics. And in some cases, I eventually realize that the only thrill I have left from that series is waiting to next issue. And this is almost the case of Gideon Falls. So I strongly suggest reading this as the whole (even wait for second (and I hope the last) book). If I would do that, I might enjoy it much more.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    I've been waiting for a comic that makes me wait in anticipation of the next issue. This is it. I love the mystery, the weird, and the feeling that all this is connected, but you're waiting to see how it comes together. Gideon Falls is two stories being told simultaneously. One follows Father Fred, a besmirched priest arriving at the small town of Gideon Falls where he is to be the new priest. It is also the story of Norton, a man with paranoid delusions who wanders the city collecting trash. He I've been waiting for a comic that makes me wait in anticipation of the next issue. This is it. I love the mystery, the weird, and the feeling that all this is connected, but you're waiting to see how it comes together. Gideon Falls is two stories being told simultaneously. One follows Father Fred, a besmirched priest arriving at the small town of Gideon Falls where he is to be the new priest. It is also the story of Norton, a man with paranoid delusions who wanders the city collecting trash. He is trying to piece something together, and it is as these two seemingly disparate stories collide that the weird horror happens. I liken this story to The Maxx because of how realities seem to blend together into one cohesive unit. I really liked this story. I can't wait for more.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Lemire and Sorrentino are my favorite writer/artist duo. These guys can't do anything wrong, but this is by far their masterpiece. Lemire's work back on horror is really a great thing, with two great and interesting plot lines that start to intertwine as the book progresses. Also, this is Sorrentino's finest work to date. This book brings two great artists at their a-game.
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