Beastie Boys Book
A panoramic experience that tells the story of Beastie Boys, a book as unique as the band itself--by band members ADROCK and Mike D, with contributions from Amy Poehler, Colson Whitehead, Spike Jonze, Wes Anderson, Luc Sante, and more.Formed as a New York City hardcore band in 1981, Beastie Boys struck an unlikely path to global hip hop superstardom. Here is their story, told for the first time in the words of the band. Adam "ADROCK" Horovitz and Michael "Mike D" Diamond offer revealing and very funny accounts of their transition from teenage punks to budding rappers; their early collaboration with Russell Simmons and Rick Rubin; the debut album that became the first hip hop record ever to hit #1, Licensed to Ill--and the album's messy fallout as the band broke with Def Jam; their move to Los Angeles and rebirth with the genre-defying masterpiece Paul's Boutique; their evolution as musicians and social activists over the course of the classic albums Check Your Head, Ill Communication, and Hello Nasty and the Tibetan Freedom Concert benefits conceived by the late Adam "MCA" Yauch; and more. For more than thirty years, this band has had an inescapable and indelible influence on popular culture.With a style as distinctive and eclectic as a Beastie Boys album, Beastie Boys Book upends the typical music memoir. Alongside the band narrative you will find rare photos, original illustrations, a cookbook by chef Roy Choi, a graphic novel, a map of Beastie Boys' New York, mixtape playlists, pieces by guest contributors, and many more surprises.

Beastie Boys Book Details

TitleBeastie Boys Book
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 30th, 2018
PublisherSpiegel & Grau
ISBN-139780812995541
Rating
GenreMusic, Nonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Audiobook, Biography, Biography Memoir, History, Literature, American, Adult

Beastie Boys Book Review

  • Larry
    January 1, 1970
    I wish MCA could have contributed. The whole book is a tribute to him. It’s as perfect as it can be without him.
  • lit.erary.britt
    January 1, 1970
    Oh man, I loved this Beastie Boys history lesson! The audiobook is sooo pleasing to the ear. In addition to Diamond and Horovitz, there’s a full cast of narrators that will blow your damned mind. The essays and anecdotes are well-written, thoughtful, and often humorous. There are a few guest essayists as well. This collection takes the music memoir to a whole new level. On top of that, it’s a beautiful homage to Adam Yauch. This is one of my top reads of 2018!
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  • Chris Bushman
    January 1, 1970
    The Beastie Boys Book by Mike Diamond is a coffee table book full of pictures but it also contains quite a lot of thoughtfully written essays covering the life of the band in detail. This is a chance for the surviving members and close associates to tell their stories and they take full advantage. It really is very well done.The perfect Christmas gift for the hard to buy for BBoy doin' the freak freak on your shopping list.
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  • Joseph Richardson
    January 1, 1970
    I just want to preface this by saying a couple of things. First of all, I don't really write reviews on here, as writing about music is more my forte. Secondly, Beastie Boys have been my favorite band since I was five or six years old, and Ill Communication was the third CD I owned as a kid. While my peers were listening to whatever was topping the charts in '97, I was listening to burned copies of Licensed To Ill, Paul's Boutique, and Check Your Head (thanks, Auntie). I didn't know why I liked I just want to preface this by saying a couple of things. First of all, I don't really write reviews on here, as writing about music is more my forte. Secondly, Beastie Boys have been my favorite band since I was five or six years old, and Ill Communication was the third CD I owned as a kid. While my peers were listening to whatever was topping the charts in '97, I was listening to burned copies of Licensed To Ill, Paul's Boutique, and Check Your Head (thanks, Auntie). I didn't know why I liked those albums, and I didn't know most of what they were saying, or even what the words meant (you know that interlude bit on "B-Boys Makin' With The Freak Freak"? I repeated that All. The. Time.), but I was drawn in by the personalities, and so in 2012, I mourned Adam Yauch the way most people mourned Michael Jackson."What does any of this have to do with this book?" Well, everything, honestly. Or at the very least, it has everything to do with my enjoyment of the book. When talk began swirling about a "Beastie Boys book," Mike D and Ad-Rock had said they wanted to do something untraditional, and in the throes of grief following the death of MCA, I thought that sounded terrible. If you've seen the band in an interview, you know they have a way of drifting through questions by way of providing nonsensical answers. It's part of their charm and added a layer of mystique to their existence as a group, something that's all but vanished in the digital age. However, I wanted answers here, and I wanted them to be genuine.Thankfully, Diamond and Horovitz find a nice middle ground where I think they're comfortable from an artistic perspective and I'm more than pleased from a fan's perspective. Because Beastie Boys Book, with it's gloriously bland title (kind of ironic given their discography), does not function as a normal biography, auto or otherwise. Instead, the text reads more like a series of short stories and motifs, with no real timeline. Mike D and Ad-Rock take turns writing their thoughts for these mini-chapters, going through the start of the band, the music scene in NY in the 80s, and briefly touching on each album cycle.But the writing isn't straightforward, as neither member could be categorized as a writer in the traditional sense. Instead, the tone is almost conversational, and as I acclimated myself to their respective writing styles, I began to feel as if I was having one-on-one conversations with Adam and Mike, and it reached a point where I stopped looking at who was writing the new chapter, because I started to understand how the two men wrote. Mike is pretty deliberate and organized, whereas Adam's mind is racing all over the place, and you constantly find him doubting his recollection of certain events.That's what's great about the book, though. The text, like their music, doesn't take itself seriously. The two leave each other little notes in the borders when they want to contest the way an event was addressed, they occasionally bicker like an old married couple (in the best way possible), and I genuinely found myself laughing--like, big, hearty laughs--as I read through some of their stories. And just when you start thinking, "Man, this is crazy. This can't be real, right?" it's like they read your mind because they make a comment on the insanity of their experience.The thing I enjoyed more than anything, however, was just the little pieces of trivia that were scattered throughout the book. When I said earlier that I wanted answers, I didn't mean that I wanted to know every little detail about their personal lives. I just wanted to know little tidbits about the recording process and how they feel about some of their records in retrospect. For example, (view spoiler)[ Adam's favorite album is Hello Nasty, Mike's least favorite song is "What Comes Around," and the beginning of "The Maestro" was taken from a message they got on an answering machine thanks to Yauch having the defunct Paul's Boutique number routed to an unused phone in a basement or something. (hide spoiler)]Don't get me wrong, as a whole, the book isn't perfect, and in the last 150 pages or so things can get a little fluffy, but when weighed against its strengths, any minor infractions have such a small impact that they don't even matter. Because, for example, while I genuinely disliked the bit at the end where André Leon Talley was trashing the Boys' fashion choices over the decades (it felt mean-spirited), it comes shortly after one of the funniest sections in the book where Ad-Rock recounts this experience he had tripping on some strongly laced pot cookies 15 minutes before they had to go on stage. In a book with 100 chapters, the fact that only four or five of them felt a little useless says a lot.Plus, when you break it down, more than anything, this book is a love letter to Yauch. The opening chapter was enough to make me grab the tissues, but by the end, I felt as if I'd gone through a journey with the band, and the conclusion brought a certain sense of closure that I didn't even realize I was looking for. This book may not be for everyone, as it's not the most organized autobiography you'll get your hands on, but the Beastie Boys were always trying to break the mold with their music, so it only makes sense they closed this chapter of their lives in the same way. For that, and for all of their music that's soundtracked my existence, I am eternally grateful.R.I.P. Adam Yauch aka MCA -- We love and miss you."MC-for what I am and do, the A is for Adam, and the lyrics? True."
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  • Jsavett1
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re like me and Amy Poehler (see book), Beastie Boys—or as I often miscall them, THE Beastie Boys—were a central component of your teen and 20s DNA. I was lucky enough to become musically aware well AFTER License To Ill. So the first Beastie Boys album that dropped FOR ME, was Check Your Head. It’s 1992. I’m going to be a junior in high school. I’m one of those kids whose musical identity isn’t just about music and whose identity isn’t about much else. The bands I love teach me what to wea If you’re like me and Amy Poehler (see book), Beastie Boys—or as I often miscall them, THE Beastie Boys—were a central component of your teen and 20s DNA. I was lucky enough to become musically aware well AFTER License To Ill. So the first Beastie Boys album that dropped FOR ME, was Check Your Head. It’s 1992. I’m going to be a junior in high school. I’m one of those kids whose musical identity isn’t just about music and whose identity isn’t about much else. The bands I love teach me what to wear, what to support, who not to trust, what books to read, and whether or not to drink at high school parties (the answer to the latter was no—too much Fugazi in me). It’s weird right? To say that Beastie Boys were one of the proteins of that DNA? A non DRINKING DNA? Right. Because by Check Your Head, they’d already become adults. They were one album past taking sampling to its logical mayhem genius end with Paul’s Boutique. And one album away from MCA issuing his famous apology for “the disrespect to women” to “the mothers and the sisters and the wives and friends.” They cared about Tibet. They played their instruments. They didn’t give a fuck. Perfect.You won’t understand what this book MEANS without all that. Fill in your own teen moments and needs if you’re a fan. Reading this is like listening to a new Beasties album for the first time. Extensive liner notes. Lots of strange and interesting pictures. Lots of laughs. New York City as a character. It’s beautifully bound and the pages are high quality. It feels a little more like an art book than a history of the band.It’s important to remember that the Beasties reached the height of their fame firing the analog musket in the digital revolution. Yeah, the first albums of theirs I owned were on CD. But there was no internet. What I wanted to know about THEM and their SONGS beyond what was recorded was only gained by obsessive magazine hunting and word of mouth. All those references. The locations, the local celebrities, samples and call outs to all those early 70s albums, and finally, the train number shout outs all together formed a map of New York that to me was mysterious and definitionally cool and always slightly out of reach.So to read this book is to finally have a glossary. A flow chart. Like a Luc Sante essay about old NYC, this is an extended love letter. I read slowly in order to savor it. There’s also a deep sadness to this book and, for me, some irony. They’re writing it without Yauch. For Yauch. Because of Yauch. He is the real hero of this book and, from what they say, the band. Here’s the irony. When I was growing up, naturally, I wanted to join. But it’s a trio. Always will be. So someone had to be tossed. I got it in my mind that MCA (Yauch) was superfluous, the only one with the gruff and tough voice. The one on stage always most reserved (of course, next to ADROCK, Henry Rollins looks reserved). So when I formed my own rap group with two friends, Dr. Shmuckler, it was all really rehearsal. So as it happens, wonderfully but tragically, Yauch was the soul—creatively, adventurously, and spiritually—of Beastie Boys. Who knew? Everyone in their circle apparently. And now me. Ultimately, this is what I “learned” most by reading this book. I was so happy to find out who that voice is who says “you should sleep late. It’s much easier on your constitution.” Repeat revealed samples ad infinitum. But I was most moved by what I learned about Yauch, about what an amazing person he was, still being taught by this band, at age 42, who not to trust, where to spend my money, by what acts and non-acts I’ll be remembered. The saddest part is that there’s no way this book gets written, there’s no way these thoughts get thought, if Yauch doesn’t tragically die so young. So the whole read is a mix tape that makes you laugh and cry at the same time. Which, in the end, is always what’cha want to want.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I was so excited to get this hefty (500+ pages) book, and it did not disappoint. I enjoyed it so much I devoured it in a weekend. Who would like this book? A Beastie Boys fan. Yes. A child of the '80s. Yes. A music aficionado. Yes. A New York resident. Yes. Someone who loves New York. Yes. A punk rock hip hop fan? Yes. Basically, you can love the Beastie Boys or not even care about the Beastie Boys and you'll enjoy this book. I happen to be a fan and grew up watching their escapades on MTV, atte I was so excited to get this hefty (500+ pages) book, and it did not disappoint. I enjoyed it so much I devoured it in a weekend. Who would like this book? A Beastie Boys fan. Yes. A child of the '80s. Yes. A music aficionado. Yes. A New York resident. Yes. Someone who loves New York. Yes. A punk rock hip hop fan? Yes. Basically, you can love the Beastie Boys or not even care about the Beastie Boys and you'll enjoy this book. I happen to be a fan and grew up watching their escapades on MTV, attending the Tibetan Freedom Concert and lamenting the loss of bandmate Adam Yauch. As they grew, I grew. In all honesty, this book is a story of friendship. Through short anecdotes/essays detailing the Beasties Boys (beginnings, middles, and unfortunately, ending) this is really the story of three punk rock boys, using NYC as their playground and what they accomplished. The book is a beautiful tribute to the long-lasting friendship of the "boys" and their departed bandmate, Adam Yauch (MCA). This book left me laughing out loud (AdRock's brilliant essay about cassette mix tapes) and crying when Mike D and Ad Rock (Michael Diamond and Adam Horovitz) get real about their friendship with Yauch and what he meant and will always mean to them. It's easy to read in that sections are short, conversational and enhanced with beautiful photography. Essays from the likes of Coleson Whitehead to Amy Poehler, among others, pepper the books. What you won't find is gossip or name-dropping, but instead you'll read a sincere tale of success and what that means, of friendship and how that endures, of music and what that inspires and of a gritty city that provided a soundtrack for us all.
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  • Jason Weber
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing book! The whole complete history of the Beastie Boys. An absolute must read for any Beastie Boys fan, or music fan. It’s a shame that this did not come out prior to Yauch’s passing, because it would have been great to read his perspective. It’s big, it’s heavy, but you can NOT put this book down! I could read 500 more pages! RIP MCA.
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  • Bianca
    January 1, 1970
    I don't need to finish this book to give it a 5 star rating. I've been waiting since 1991 for the epic 590 page Stromboli Pizza to land. Pixpixpixpixpixpixpixpixpixpix!!!!
  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    From start to finish, this book made me cry. This is something I wrote 12 years ago that has nothing to do with this book and how fucking great it is but has everything to do with how much a band can infect your entire life:This morning, I'm driving to work and the stunted horns that open "Brass Monkey" begin to play over the radio. I'm singing along when it hits me that this year is the 20-year anniversary of Licensed to Ill. 20 years...It was my 11th birthday party and I was having a huge, bac From start to finish, this book made me cry. This is something I wrote 12 years ago that has nothing to do with this book and how fucking great it is but has everything to do with how much a band can infect your entire life:
This morning, I'm driving to work and the stunted horns that open "Brass Monkey" begin to play over the radio. I'm singing along when it hits me that this year is the 20-year anniversary of Licensed to Ill. 20 years...
It was my 11th birthday party and I was having a huge, backyard sleepover/campout. I'd invited all my friends from Dunedin Highland Middle School: John Koch, Greg Oreste, Ben Brandt, Ryan Foster, Archie Higgins, Jason Bayman - and some others I can't even remember. One kid in particular I had to invite because he was a friend of John Koch's and, although he was a jerk to me, he felt left out and I'm a sucker for guilt so invited him at the last minute. His name was Kevin Kline or something similar and he was surprisingly nice that night.
To get the point, I had asked my parents for Licensed to Ill for my b-day and I got it! Outside, in my party's mega-tent, we bumped that tape over and over for most of the night and my bond with The Beasties began to seal.
When I moved to Cali, my desire for new rap grew by leaps and bounds and I was discovering one rapper after another. I rarely broke out Licensed to Ill over the next couple of years - too busy listening to all those early West Coast rappers.
In late Spring of '89, I was at Jared Westermeyer's house, playing Strider, when he asked me if I'd heard the new Beastie Boys' album.
"WHAT?" I was shocked. How did this news pass me by? Was it good? When did it come out? Jared smiled and pulled out a tape. One of his older brothers had loaned him a copy.I was oozing anticipation. Jared pops the tape in his boom box, pushes play and -
---
---
I didn't get it. I didn't get it at all. This wasn't The Beastie Boys I had fallen in love with that sticky, summer night back in Florida. Not at all. The music and samples were so busy and all over the place and when the tape finished and I thought to myself, "Well, that's too bad," and wrote off the group. It would be 6 years before I again heard Paul's Boutique (and that it would become my fave Beastie album). But I would revisit The Beastie Boys well before then.
Nurse was the guy in Willow who I first remember playing Licensed to Ill in high school. I still had my copy, but it was pretty much collecting dust. But one day, Jay came to pick me up playing 'Slow and Low'.
"Listen to that shit hit," Nurse said as I hopped up in the cab of his truck.
"Is this the Beastie Boys?" I asked, not really understanding...this was for 6th-graders.
"Yup. Dug out my old tape. Forgot how good it was."
So.
Had.
I.
The music sounded brand new to me as it pounded my ears through a high-quality stereo. Plus, so many of the references finally clicked. Wow. This wasn't an album for 11-year olds. This was music for teenagers looking to party.
"Wonder what happened to these guys?" Jay asked.
"I heard their second album and it was wack. Sounded nothing like this."
"Too bad."
"I know."
So we rode on over dusty, gravel-strewn back road after back road, asking no more questions, listening to the reverse cymbal on "Paul Revere" and wondering what had possessed us to ever put the album away.
The story ain't over. Not even close.
I moved to KC. Olathe, to be exact. Senior year of high school. My buddy Pat tells me he and his girlfriend just went to a House of Pain/Beastie Boy show at Memorial Hall.
Again - surprise on my part.
"They played Memorial?"
"Oh, man, their new album is awwwwwesome."
So he plays it for me. Again, what they're doing doesn't click.
"Why are they playing funk and punk?"
"It's great, eh? It's like weird rap."
"Umm...here dude, let me play you some weird rap." So I put on The Pharcyde's Bizarre Ride II The Pharcyde. Pat shrugs it off, makes me a copy of Check Your Head and I listen to it a few times then forget about it.
So I go to KU. And one of the guys I live with is a B-Boy nut. And Ill Communication comes out and he asks me to go with him to Streetside on the day it's released. I go. He gets. We listen. He loves. I think...sounds like Check Your Head.
So I quit college and move back to Olathe to try to find something else to do. I start hanging out with some guys I'd met the summer before: Jeff and Damien. Now these guys are some B-Boy fiends. 24-7, all they listened to. And one day, we're enjoying the bong (yep - that's the something else I'd found to do), and Jeff puts on Paul's Boutique...
And I'm sold. One listen through in my altered state and I realize in a flash the grave error of my earlier snap judgements. This was not music for teenagers looking for a party. This was music for people who are on a whole other level. This is important and groundbreaking music. After Paul's, more bongs and Check Your Head then Ill Communication. Then Licensed to Ill, then Paul's again. I had become part of a cult.
Those albums, along with many illicit substances, shaped me and trained and challenged my ears. As I grew more familiar with the songs, and how they were assembled, I began to listen to how the band evolved through their teens and into their late 20s. One night, while enjoying the bong, I proclaimed to those who could hear through the thick cloud of smoke, "The Beastie Boys are our generation's Beatles."
Some laughs, some coughs, some "whattaya talking 'bouts?"
"Look: the Beatles started as a bar band, drinking beers and playing simple rock and roll. Then they started smoking weed and dropping acid and their music and attitude toward their music shifted - became more multi-layered and experimental. The guys became interested in Eastern philosophy and advocates for peace. The Beastie Boys followed an almost identical trajectory. The Beasties are to rap what the Beatles were to rock. Both have changed things forever." (I made this statement well before the second wave of alt-rap came about in the mid-late 90s.)
"Dude, you're smoking too much."
Maybe, but I cling to the comparison to this day, even if it doesn't hold the water I once thought it did. Because more important to me than the paths the two bands followed is that I feel about The Beastie Boys the way I imagine Beatles fans feel: that there is an unbreakable bond between myself and the music and that the music and the group, goofy as they were at times, spoke for me and my peers and our love of skating and rap and punk and dressing up in costumes and being annoying at times and being concerned at times and doing it all with a sense of humor. I don't really know that The Beasties have had the reach of The Beatles, our little self-contained B-Boy cult probably skewed my perception of their fanbase. From where I sit today, however, I feel OK saying that I think The Beastie Boys are the most important rappers that have existed to date.
For 20 years they've been with me, doing their thing while I do mine. And this is a love letter to them, a feeble attempt to thank them for making me laugh, making me think, making me happy, hypin' me up when I needed it and coolin' me out during those bad trips.
The funny thing is, our little B-Boy cult followed the same damned trajectory as The Beatles and the Beastie Boys and countless of other young people who've come of age in a counterculture, be they hippies, punks, b-boys, goths or ravers. Our B-Boy cult is now made up of 30-year-olds. Maybe that's why I have trouble seeing any true countercultures around me. I listen to the music and observe the scene and see the goths and hippies and b-boys and ravers...and they're all co-opted. They became co-opted the day Nirvana broke, though I didn't know it then, and I imagine that any subcultures are now so far underground that it would take more than my tired eyes to notice them. And that's OK by me. I have remodeling to attend to and a baby pirate on the way.
I just hope that those new alternative kids have mouthpieces as imaginative and sharp as The Beastie Boys. I hope they are somewhere, growing and learning about the world, expanding their minds and wearing thin their souls, united under an artistry that drops science like Galileo dropped an orange.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Just enormously entertaining. Ten stars!! The massive Beastie Boys Book is basically an oral history of the band--the music, the relationships, the dumb shit, the style, the creativity, the inspirations, the pother dumb shit, the processes, and the NYC streets and downtown clubs in the late '70s/early '80s from which it all emerged--by Adrock and Mike D. I mean, they write it, but in an extremely casual voice, and the whole thing is structured as stories and anecdotes and asides that serve to il Just enormously entertaining. Ten stars!! The massive Beastie Boys Book is basically an oral history of the band--the music, the relationships, the dumb shit, the style, the creativity, the inspirations, the pother dumb shit, the processes, and the NYC streets and downtown clubs in the late '70s/early '80s from which it all emerged--by Adrock and Mike D. I mean, they write it, but in an extremely casual voice, and the whole thing is structured as stories and anecdotes and asides that serve to illuminate whichever period or event or recoding session we're in the thick of. It is also, inevitably, an intimate, loving, moving eulogy to Adam Yauch, who died in 2012. And it's very funny in parts. And it'll give you excellent playlist suggestions (remember Dominatrix Sleeps Tonight???). And there are a hundred great photos. Also guest essays from the likes of Luc Sante, Amy Poehler, Jonathan Lethem, Ada Calhoun, Colson Whitehead, Andre Leon Talley, and lots more. It's honest about the shitty, obnoxious things they did and said back in the Fight For Your Right heyday, but a huge part of the book (maybe even half) takes place before License To Ill even came out, and the nostalgia level here, for those of us alive back then and in NYC, is through the roof. Really, it's the perfect gift for someone exactly like me, but I already bought it so give it to someone else you love.
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  • Lisastrawberry
    January 1, 1970
    Super fun, sad, random and chock full of Beastie tales of yore. I loved every bit of this book, and devoured the paper book as well as the audio, which is read by a cast as varied as the Beasties themselves (Amy Poehler, Rachel Maddow, Jon Stewart, John C. Reily, Maya Rudolph, Rosie Perez, etc.). If you have an interest in BBoys, run and get this!
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  • Nate Meadows
    January 1, 1970
    The Boys are surprisingly great writers (Adrock especially). Insanely entertaining and informative about a wide range of subjects besides the band itself. New York City, Punk Rock, Hip Hop, sampling...the list goes on and on. There is even a chapter about how to make a good mixtape and fix it if your player eats it.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Honest, candid and thoughtful chronicle of their journey from pranky punks to elder statesmen. I've been with them pretty much all the way, and it's been a fun ride.
  • Jabiz Raisdana
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect. If you’re a fan- everything you want in a Beastie Boys book. I flew through it and wish there was more.
  • Anne Earney
    January 1, 1970
    So much fun to read. I was 14 when License to Ill was released and more or less grew up with the Beastie Boys, so reading about their past reminded me of my own.
  • kc
    January 1, 1970
    I laughed, I cried, I mourned MCA. I read this and listened to the audio version at the same time, which was a perfect way to experience the story.
  • Michael Legge
    January 1, 1970
    It’s a shame he dies in the end.
  • Simon Sweetman
    January 1, 1970
    Book of the year for me. An emotional read, too. I realised, reading this, I grew up with this band - watched them grow up; they represent a lot to me - they have talent but aren't extraordinary, so it's believable, it always seemed achievable - they were flawed too. We heard them mature, musically, philosophically and spiritually across the albums. And the story was never able to be (correctly) finished. So there's a sadness there. Obviously. And you feel it through these pages and in these voi Book of the year for me. An emotional read, too. I realised, reading this, I grew up with this band - watched them grow up; they represent a lot to me - they have talent but aren't extraordinary, so it's believable, it always seemed achievable - they were flawed too. We heard them mature, musically, philosophically and spiritually across the albums. And the story was never able to be (correctly) finished. So there's a sadness there. Obviously. And you feel it through these pages and in these voices. But there's so much humour and silliness and happiness too. There's joy and experimentation and chance and luck and fun. And there's a love-letter to friendship and there's some great fucking musical taste. It's a book to read again, to listen to over and over (audiobook). To save. To share. To care deeply about.
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  • Hilary Martin
    January 1, 1970
    I love these dumbasses. Who would have thought that the "Fight for your right to party..." guys would be such a force for good and creativity?
  • Jeanine
    January 1, 1970
    “Oh my god that’s the funky shit” - loooooved this book“I drink it, I think it, I see it, I be it” - yes, I have been obsessed with this book and the shitload of incredible music in it ... and yes the 3 crazy ass bboys“I like my sugar with coffee and cream” this book is the sugar “Because you can’t you won’t and you don’t stop” I will be still listening to all the awesome playlists in this book ...so much and so many different kinds of music inspired the bboys during different phases of them ... “Oh my god that’s the funky shit” - loooooved this book“I drink it, I think it, I see it, I be it” - yes, I have been obsessed with this book and the shitload of incredible music in it ... and yes the 3 crazy ass bboys“I like my sugar with coffee and cream” this book is the sugar “Because you can’t you won’t and you don’t stop” I will be still listening to all the awesome playlists in this book ...so much and so many different kinds of music inspired the bboys during different phases of them ...they are SO much more than “fight for your right” “Pass the Mic” (if you love music read this book!)If you can feel what I'm feeling then it's a musical masterpieceHear what I'm dealing with then that's cool at leastWhat's running through my mind comes through in my walkTrue feelings are shown from the way that I talk and this is me, y'allAn M.C., y'all my name is M.C.A. and I still do what I pleaseAnd now I'd like to introduce (what's up?)I'll pass the mic to D for a fistful of truthThe name is D, y'all, and I don't playAnd I can rock a block party 'till your hair turns grey(So, what you sayin'?) I explode on siteI'm like Jimmy Walker, I'm (dy-no-mite!)And now I'd like to pass the micTo Adrock, c'mon and do anything you likeI'm the A-D-R-O-C-K, in the place with the bass, I'm going all the wayI can't stop y'all, tock-tick, y'allAnd if you think that you're slick you'll catch a brick y'all'Cause I'ma turn it in and I'ma turn it outBut for now I've got to pass the mic to YauchWell, on and on and on and onI can't stop, y'all, 'till' the early morn'So rock-rock, y'all, tick-tock y'all, to the beat, y'allTo the beat, y'all, c'mon and rock, y'allI give thanks for inspiration, it guides my mind along the wayA lot of people get jealous, they're talking about meBut that's just 'cause they haven't got a thing to sayWell, everybody rapping like it's a commercialActin' like life is a big commercialSo this is what I've got to say to you allBe true to yourself and you will never fallActually .... LISTEN to this book AND read along with the physical book to enjoy all the pix and fun stuff in the book. Plus, a full cast of cool readers are involved. Also the best part Mike D and Ad Rock reading their own stuff is Awesome! Just the laughter at the fucked up shit and the inside jokes in their voices is worth it. Sadly, MCA, aka Yauch, is missing in voice and physical presence in the world but he is so much apart of this book. Love how Mike D concludes, when a random, crazy opportunity comes your way, ask yourself “what would Yauch do?” Gratitude and Namaste!!!!
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  • Sean Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of the most-fun I've ever had reading a book. I read a ton of books about rock/pop/country artists and this ranks among my favorite. I've been a fan of the band since I was in elementary school, and now as a man in his early 40s, I realize that we basically grew up together. The book mostly-written by Adam Horovitz (Ad Rock) and Michael Diamond (Mike D) with contributions from all kinds of people who have been in and around the Beastie Boys camp over the years. If there was an edito This was one of the most-fun I've ever had reading a book. I read a ton of books about rock/pop/country artists and this ranks among my favorite. I've been a fan of the band since I was in elementary school, and now as a man in his early 40s, I realize that we basically grew up together. The book mostly-written by Adam Horovitz (Ad Rock) and Michael Diamond (Mike D) with contributions from all kinds of people who have been in and around the Beastie Boys camp over the years. If there was an editor or a ghost writer involved, I could not tell as much...it reads in their language. I laughed a lot. I cried a little (RIP, Yauch.) and learned a ton about how the band evolved from a small punk/hardcore band, to an-almost novelty misogynistic bro rap act, to absolute geniuses and one of the best bands of my generation. I can't wait to start chasing down the samples and records and songs mentioned in the book...as well as my next trip to NYC when I bore my family by seeking out the hidden landmarks from the book. This book is a must for fan of the band.
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    I've decided I cannot read the last few pages. If i finish the last few pages, that means this literary adventure with the B boys, this Tom-Sawyer-Huck Finn-going-down-the-river-adventure is...over. And i don't ever, ever want it to be over. I absolutely LOVE this book. I laughed out loud in so many parts and it reminded me again, why the Beastie Boys are one of this Deadhead's favorite bands. They remind me of driving around with a bunch of guys singing the lyrics at the top of our lungs. It re I've decided I cannot read the last few pages. If i finish the last few pages, that means this literary adventure with the B boys, this Tom-Sawyer-Huck Finn-going-down-the-river-adventure is...over. And i don't ever, ever want it to be over. I absolutely LOVE this book. I laughed out loud in so many parts and it reminded me again, why the Beastie Boys are one of this Deadhead's favorite bands. They remind me of driving around with a bunch of guys singing the lyrics at the top of our lungs. It reminds me of good - no, GREAT friends listening to music, messing around, just doing stupid stuff together because why not? Why not hang out with your friends? I can't even imagine how hard it must have been for Adam and MIke to lose Yauch. It was hard on me, so i can't even imagine. It must have felt like losing a limb. So, i thank thee B boys. I thank you for making me laugh. I thank you for great rhymes, I thank you for not selling out and staying true to yourselves. I love ya. Stay true to yourself and you will never fall...Lastly, I thank MCA for my favorite rhyme EVER. "I got a peg leg at the end of my stump. Shake your rump."
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  • Karrie Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    This book was phenomenal! I got into the Beastie Boys in 1999 when "Hello Nasty" came out. I can remember riding to school with my older brother just jammin' at 7:00 in the morning. I highly recommend listening to this as well as reading it at the same time or flip through after you have listened to it. This book not only covers the boys history, but also dives into "the scene" in New York and LA at the same time. After finishing it, I realized this really was a love letter to Adam "MCA" Yauch ( This book was phenomenal! I got into the Beastie Boys in 1999 when "Hello Nasty" came out. I can remember riding to school with my older brother just jammin' at 7:00 in the morning. I highly recommend listening to this as well as reading it at the same time or flip through after you have listened to it. This book not only covers the boys history, but also dives into "the scene" in New York and LA at the same time. After finishing it, I realized this really was a love letter to Adam "MCA" Yauch (RIP). If it wasn't for him, I don't think The Beastie Boys would have gone very far.
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  • Christine Bilaniuk
    January 1, 1970
    This was fabulous! I'm a casual fan who knows mostly the hits but I was very entertained by this book. The format is too cool, incorporating comics, recipes, insider info and lots of cool pics! I knew the boys were cool but not this cool!My only complaint is this is a heavy mother and I actually got tennis elbow reading this in bed and trying to hold it up. For real suffering for the arts!Well worth the pain!
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. I did the audiobook and it was fun to hear stories read by celebrities intermingled with Ad-Rock and Mike D. What really came through for me was how much the Beasties love each other (still!) and how much they miss MCA. It’s evident that he was the heart of the band and as a result he is the heart of their story. Highly recommended.
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  • Jakub Kratochvil
    January 1, 1970
    Všetko o Beastie Boys. Naozaj všetko. Od Gertrude Stein po Madonu, cez recepty na varenie a mixtapy zúčastnených. NewYork posledných 40 rokov. Krása. Obrázky, fotky, punk, rap a strašná sranda. Skoro som zmeškal vlak. (Samozrejme som ju celu neprečítal, ale ona s náď na to ani nebola stvorená podľa toho ako je spravená) Každopádne je to majsteršyk.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I'm listening to this book and reading it at the same time and both formats are wonderful. I need to purchase it just to have it at home to peruse at my leisure. But the audio narrations from a wide mix of famous people are fabulous and impressive and I highly recommend it!
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  • Kathy (Bermudaonion)
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars
  • Justin Walshaw
    January 1, 1970
    His name's Mike D and he's the ladies choice . . . and other stunning insights into the world of pizza making.
  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    There were some goofy parts, but it IS a Beastie Boys book so it’s to be expected and embraced.
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