The Golden Tresses of the Dead (Flavia de Luce #10)
Flavia de Luce, the twelve-year-old chemist and amateur detective "with better than an average brain," is eager to turn professional. She and her father's valet, Dogger, have founded a detective agency, Arthur Dogger & Associates, and unexpectedly cut into their first case during the revelry at her sister Ophelia's wedding reception. After an eventful ceremony with a missing best man and spontaneous ventriloquist act, spirits are high as Feely and her new husband head for the towering and beautifully iced wedding cake. But as Feely slices into the first piece, a scream rings out--the bridal cake contains a severed human finger. Delighted, Flavia wraps the finger in a napkin and whisks it away to her chemical laboratory. By studying the embalmed skin, the indentation of a ring, and the slope of the fingernail, she'll not only be able to determine the identity of the victim--but also point a finger at a killer.

The Golden Tresses of the Dead (Flavia de Luce #10) Details

TitleThe Golden Tresses of the Dead (Flavia de Luce #10)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreMystery, Historical, Historical Fiction, Fiction

The Golden Tresses of the Dead (Flavia de Luce #10) Review

  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    Its so nice to catch up with Flavia:) After the death of her father and her oldest sister getting married, she and Dogger set up their own investigative agency. Something is up in Bishop's Lacey and Flavia sets out to find out what. Two missionaries from Africa are staying at Buckshaw but Flavia thinks there's something not right about the two ladies. Leave it to Flavia to be curious and want to "snoop". Her and Dogger are quite the team! It's no secret that I love Flavia and I'm always ready fo Its so nice to catch up with Flavia:) After the death of her father and her oldest sister getting married, she and Dogger set up their own investigative agency. Something is up in Bishop's Lacey and Flavia sets out to find out what. Two missionaries from Africa are staying at Buckshaw but Flavia thinks there's something not right about the two ladies. Leave it to Flavia to be curious and want to "snoop". Her and Dogger are quite the team! It's no secret that I love Flavia and I'm always ready for a new adventure with her. I did miss the interactions with her sisters. Feely is on her honeymoon and Daphne stays in the library writing/reading--and we never get a chance of Flavia being with Daphne. We do get to see everyone else though--Mrs. Mullet, Undine, the vicar's wife, and so one. Another cute installment in the series.*Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Our little girl is growing up and, frankly, I'm glad to see it. Flavia is still only 12 years old but life hasn't been kind to her so this is the book where she is allowed to grieve for all the heartaches in her young life. Add to that the marriage of her sister Ophelia and Flavia needed this investigation to get her through some tough times. Arthur W. Dogger & Associates, Discreet Investigations tells us all we need to know about where this book is headed. Dogger has always been one of my f Our little girl is growing up and, frankly, I'm glad to see it. Flavia is still only 12 years old but life hasn't been kind to her so this is the book where she is allowed to grieve for all the heartaches in her young life. Add to that the marriage of her sister Ophelia and Flavia needed this investigation to get her through some tough times. Arthur W. Dogger & Associates, Discreet Investigations tells us all we need to know about where this book is headed. Dogger has always been one of my favorite characters in this series but he seemed too often to be held down by his wartime troubles to ever be of prime use as a major character. Luckily Alan Bradley rehabilitated Dogger just enough to make him the perfect partner in investigations with Flavia. Dogger helps to keep things on more of an adult footing but his intimate knowledge of Flavia's personality allows him to gently guide her along a reasonable path of searching for and interpreting the clues they find. They make a brilliant pair.My reason for a four star rating instead of five stars is that I found myself slightly confused about some of the clues and information uncovered by Dogger and Flavia. I'm not 100% sure I quite "got" the solution and have a feeling I might need to read the book again. I did go back over several sections while I was reading but that didn't feel like it helped much. There seems to be information that this was always intended to be a ten book series and with this book being the tenth it will mark the end of our time with Flavia and the others. I have to say the ending did not give me the feeling at all that the series was wrapping up. Instead it feels as if Flavia and Dogger have now established their working - detecting - relationship and they are set to carry on for a good long while. I certainly would love to see that happen.Thank you to NetGalley and Delacorte Press for an eGalley of this novel.
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  • Alisha
    January 1, 1970
    I always enjoy an excursion into the world of Flavia de Luce, the chemistry whiz-kid and mystery-solver extraordinaire of rural 1950's England. The mystery in this installment took a back seat to the characters--and there were really only two to focus on, Flavia, and her father-figure/crime-solving-partner Dogger. These two interact beautifully, and Flavia continues to mature emotionally in small ways as she's growing up.The book did suffer a bit from feeling TOO focused on just Flavia and Dogge I always enjoy an excursion into the world of Flavia de Luce, the chemistry whiz-kid and mystery-solver extraordinaire of rural 1950's England. The mystery in this installment took a back seat to the characters--and there were really only two to focus on, Flavia, and her father-figure/crime-solving-partner Dogger. These two interact beautifully, and Flavia continues to mature emotionally in small ways as she's growing up.The book did suffer a bit from feeling TOO focused on just Flavia and Dogger. Flavia's cousin Undine is there, but her moments lack a certain punch. Also, there is too little of Flavia's sisters. Granted, the oldest one has just gotten married and is simply absent for most of the book. But even Daphne, though physically present, feels very vague. I miss Flavia's family and extended family.That said, I did enjoy the book and found the writing witty and interesting. Examples: "Great music has much the same effect upon humans as cyanide, I managed to think: It paralyzes the respiratory system." "I have noticed that it's the same with all petty officials: Once they catch you breaking a rule they lecture you, not just until the cows come home, but until the cows have eaten dinner, hauled on their flannel pajamas, climbed into bed, listened to a bedtime story, put out the lights, and drifted off to sleep to dream of pastures new."Thanks to NetGalley and Random House for the digital review copy!
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received this galley via NetGalley. To be clear about my excitement about this 10th book in the Flavia series, let it be known that I stalked NetGalley for the past several weeks, checking every few days to see if this book had shown up yet. When it did appear, I immediately put in my request. When it was approved a few hours later, I squealed with glee.So yeah, you might say my expectations were high.The Golden Tresses of the Dead revives all of the best elements of the Flavia books. I say th I received this galley via NetGalley. To be clear about my excitement about this 10th book in the Flavia series, let it be known that I stalked NetGalley for the past several weeks, checking every few days to see if this book had shown up yet. When it did appear, I immediately put in my request. When it was approved a few hours later, I squealed with glee.So yeah, you might say my expectations were high.The Golden Tresses of the Dead revives all of the best elements of the Flavia books. I say that, as some of the past books have been somewhat off for me (and my mom, who is also hooked on these books). This series is at its best when Flavia is at home at her family estate of Buckshaw, rolling about the nearby village of Bishop's Lacey on her beloved bicycle/steed, Gladys. This book uses that setting to the fullest, bicycle and all. I should add that even an "off" Flavia book is a fantastic read and still better than the average book. As I said a few paragraphs up, my expectations run high for this series.This book doesn't begin with a murder, but with a surprise in the wedding cake of Flavia's sister. The action picks up from there as Flavia and her loyal family bat man, Dogger, acquire a client for their new 'discreet' investigations business. There are dark plots, dead bodies, and of course, chemistry work in Flavia's lab. I'm charmed at how Flavia is maturing in such a realistic way. It's especially funny to see her interactions with her cousin Undine, who is essentially Flavia's Mini Me. Flavia gets a taste of her own medicine, there.If you've been disillusioned by some of the recent Flavia books, pick up with this one. It will restore your faith. If you're like me, and loyal to Flavia through all, rejoice! This book will deliver fresh-baked delight (courtesy of the Buckshaw Aga) with a dash of murder and justice.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    In this 10th installment life for Flavia is full of changes. The most noticeable is her sister Feely's marriage. The more subtle is changes in Flavia herself as she is on the verge of becoming a teenager. Never fear though, Flavia is still a girl that loves chemistry and solving crimes. Imagine her excitement when a human finger is found in her sister's wedding cake! She views it as the perfect first case for her and Dogger to investigate, which unsurprisingly leads to the inevitable tangled and In this 10th installment life for Flavia is full of changes. The most noticeable is her sister Feely's marriage. The more subtle is changes in Flavia herself as she is on the verge of becoming a teenager. Never fear though, Flavia is still a girl that loves chemistry and solving crimes. Imagine her excitement when a human finger is found in her sister's wedding cake! She views it as the perfect first case for her and Dogger to investigate, which unsurprisingly leads to the inevitable tangled and sinister mystery.As for a rating... I have mixed feelings. As usual I enjoyed the writing style and characters. It's always fun to spend more time in Flavia's head. In this case, her confusion over her pendulum of emotions (such as confidence to uncertainty, or joy to deep sadness) felt realistic and relatable. It's also great that Flavia now has Dogger as a full-time partner in crime (solving) that she can confide in. However, I felt rather indifferent about the actual mystery. While the science was fascinating, I never was overly concerned with figuring out what was going on. Even when the mystery was explained, the motives and chain of events weren't very clear to me.Overall, it was a good continuation of the series, but I doubt it would be a compelling read to someone who hadn't read the first 9 books. Thanks to NetGalley and Random House-Ballantine for providing me with a digital review copy!
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  • Fran
    January 1, 1970
    Flavia is back and better than ever. It is an adjustment, having the formerly reticent Dogger as such a vocal main character, but the relationship between them is delightful as always. The mystery was sound and I enjoy the recent story arcs much more than the previous outlandish spy tangent.
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  • Kristen Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    After finding a finger in Ophelia’s wedding cake, Dogger and Flavia team up to investigate. As they investigate more foul events are afoot. Can Dogger and Flavia figure out who-dun-it before anything else bad happens? Dogger comes to life in this latest installment of the Flavia de luce series and that is really fun to see. It is a very mystery-driven plot and not so much on the character development side for Flavia, which I had been enjoying in the last few books. Nevertheless, Alan Bradley nev After finding a finger in Ophelia’s wedding cake, Dogger and Flavia team up to investigate. As they investigate more foul events are afoot. Can Dogger and Flavia figure out who-dun-it before anything else bad happens? Dogger comes to life in this latest installment of the Flavia de luce series and that is really fun to see. It is a very mystery-driven plot and not so much on the character development side for Flavia, which I had been enjoying in the last few books. Nevertheless, Alan Bradley never disappoints with his Flavia books!
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  • Angie Boyter
    January 1, 1970
    Flavia goes pro!When I burst out laughing just reading the description of a book, I have high hopes for an enjoyable read. Of course, since I have read the nine previous Flavia de Luce novels, I would have high hopes already…. And I will leave you in suspense no longer: The Golden Tresses of the Dead is a fine continuation of the adventures of twelve-year-old Flavia de Luce, amateur chemist and no-longer-amateur detective. The book, narrated by Flavia herself, opens with two major life events. F Flavia goes pro!When I burst out laughing just reading the description of a book, I have high hopes for an enjoyable read. Of course, since I have read the nine previous Flavia de Luce novels, I would have high hopes already…. And I will leave you in suspense no longer: The Golden Tresses of the Dead is a fine continuation of the adventures of twelve-year-old Flavia de Luce, amateur chemist and no-longer-amateur detective. The book, narrated by Flavia herself, opens with two major life events. Flavia and family retainer Dogger have formed the private inquiry firm of Arthur W. Dogger & Associates, and Flavia’s older sister Ophelia (better known as Feely) is getting married. The tone is set for the wedding when the groom himself sings a beautiful solo by Franz Schubert, which leaves Flavia breathless and causes her to reflect that “Great music has much the same effect upon humans as cyanide…: It paralyzes the respiratory system.” Such good feeling cannot last long, however, and a bizarre event at the reception launches Dogger and Associates into their first investigation. Almost immediately, though, their caseload doubles when they are approached by their first real client, Mrs. Anastiasia Brocken Prill, the daughter of a renowned homeopathic doctor. She hires them to recover some stolen letters, but their search soon leads them to a body. And a nursing home, and graveyards, and the tale of the London Necropolis Railroad. There are lots and lots of apparently loose ends, but Arthur W. Dogger & Associates pursues the connections and ties everything up in a neat denouement that is a bit outlandish but completely in line with the tone of the story. As always, Flavia is able to take advantage of her extensive knowledge of chemistry and her great-uncle Tarquin’s chemistry apparatus and library, and Dogger contributes significantly with his Sherlockian powers of observation. There is the usual supporting cast. Flavia’s trusty sidekick, her bicycle Gladys, is around to provide the “lift” she needs in her investigation, and many of the townspeople we know from earlier books are back, like her cousin Undine, the vicar’s wife Cynthia Richardson, and Inspector Hewitt. Feely is gone, though, off on her honeymoon, and Flavia surprises herself by missing her sister very much. Musings like this show a depth to our heroine’s character that is often lacking in humorous mysteries.Humor abounds, and I made a marginal note early on that the book has way too many fun passages to highlight! When housekeeper Mrs. Mullet tells the sad story of a townswoman of her acquaintance, “’Er ‘usband…run off with a tart from the Bunne Shop the day after they got ‘ome from their ‘oneymoon in Hastings”, Flavia cannot resist replying, “If it were me, I’d have run off with an apple pie.”The word is that this will be the last Flavia de Luce book, and as the book ends there is no foreshadowing of what may lie ahead for Dogger and Associates. On the other hand, there is also no indication that Flavia and her companions will not continue to have the adventures that delight her many fans. I know I am not ready to say farewell to Flavia, but if I must I would agree with her closing thoughts, “It is pleasant to think that we have---in this way or that, for better or worse---reached out and touched one another. That, in the end, is what chemistry is all about, isn’t it?” And that is what a good book is all about, also.My thanks to Netgalley for an advance review copy of this book
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  • Sarah Booth
    January 1, 1970
    This was an advance reader's copy that happened to purloin with limitless glee as this is my favorite series and I had searched for it for quite a while and had co-workers keep an eye out for it for me. I love our heroine Flavia and the way she views the world. Tween (or is she 13 yet?) Chemist extraordinaire with wonderful deductive reasoning and a vast array of knowledge she's gleaned from reading and her sisters, she is the complete package.Once more Flavia de Luce is involved with a case and This was an advance reader's copy that happened to purloin with limitless glee as this is my favorite series and I had searched for it for quite a while and had co-workers keep an eye out for it for me. I love our heroine Flavia and the way she views the world. Tween (or is she 13 yet?) Chemist extraordinaire with wonderful deductive reasoning and a vast array of knowledge she's gleaned from reading and her sisters, she is the complete package.Once more Flavia de Luce is involved with a case and this time she's teamed up with Mr. Dogger the family's caretaker as her partner in a genuine business venture under his name. I'm a bit surprised that Aunt Felicity hasn't put her back in school somewhere, but she's quite the autodidact. Two events keep Flavia and Dogger occupied; the presence of a finger in Feely's wedding cake and Mrs. Prill's request that some missing letters be looked into. Add two missionaries being billeted at Buckshaw and the occasionally worrisome presence of Undine and it's another wonderful tale with lines such as:"The Old Ones? This was becoming truly interesting. First Poisons, and now malevolent supernatural spirits. And it wasn't even ten o'clock in the morning!""Although Miss Lavinia and MIss Aurelia were both in their seventies, and well past the age when most females traipse to the alter, hope still burned eternal, apparently, in their respective withered breasts. These two ancient sisters shot off their respective shooting sticks like ancient skyrockets, and fell upon the flowers as hounds upon the fox, clawing and hissing at each other as if it were a catfight rather than a celebration of Holy Matrimony. Blows and several shocking words were exchanged. It was not a pleasant spectacle. ""To cheer myself up a bit, I began to whistle that silly song about whistling while you work. But I found myself wondering if, by whistling about whistling while you work, while you were actually working, you would cause some odd bit of the universe in some unknown dimension, to fold in upon itself––rather like a Klein bottle, which has no inside or outside––causing you to disappear up your own posterior in a cloud of probably invisible orange smoke.""I have noticed that it's the same with all petty officials: Once they catch you breaking a rule they lecture you, not just until the cows come home, but until the cows have eaten dinner, hauled on their flannel pajamas, climbed into bed, listened to a bedtime story, put out the lights, and drifted off to sleep to dream of pastures new."There are wonderful informational paragraphs about Chemistry, Literature and all manner of interesting subjects in a Flavia de Luce story and one feels not only wonderfully entertained but also painlessly educated. I can't tell you how much I love these stories! Read the first ones though this book could probably stand alone. Either way you're in for some enjoyable reading and even more enjoyable characters!
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  • Lady Jayme,
    January 1, 1970
    Utterly charming and gleefully ghoulish, The Golden Tresses of the Dead is another knockout Flavia de Luce! I've seen this described as being the final book in this series, which is a bit sad but I'll deal with it by restarting the series and reading it all over again. The Golden Tresses of the Dead starts off with a momentous occasion: Feely is getting married! Huzzah! However, when the wedding cake is cut, a severed human finger is found inside. How deliciously gruesome. "A church is a wonderf Utterly charming and gleefully ghoulish, The Golden Tresses of the Dead is another knockout Flavia de Luce! I've seen this described as being the final book in this series, which is a bit sad but I'll deal with it by restarting the series and reading it all over again. The Golden Tresses of the Dead starts off with a momentous occasion: Feely is getting married! Huzzah! However, when the wedding cake is cut, a severed human finger is found inside. How deliciously gruesome. "A church is a wonderful place for a wedding, surrounded as it is by the legions of the dead, whose listening bones bear silent witness to every promise made - and broken - at the altar." Pure poetry! Arthur W. Dogger & Associates, Discreet Investigations, have had their very first case delivered right to them; Flavia neatly pockets the finger for further investigation while Feely is overcome by the vapors. Then, right after Feely's wedding day, Flavia and Dogger's newly minted firm receives their very first client. The Case of the Clue in the Cake and the Case of the First Paying Client are a go!The clues lead Flavia and Dogger on railway adventures to cemeteries, to the lab for testing severed fingers and poisons, and to various places for picking locks and snooping. Flavia, of course, is in hog heaven hanging out with Dogger and conducting chemical tests in her beloved laboratory. A big plus about this installment is that Flavia returns to Buckshaw and Bishop's Lacey, a setting I definitely missed in the last book. And while Feely has moved on to her honeymoon and new life, Undine has more of a presence in this book and I enjoy her and Flavia's rivalry. Some favorite quotes:"First poisons, and now malevolent spirits. And it wasn't yet ten o'clock in the morning!""I had been quite looking forward to a jolly good old-fashioned case of grave-robbing.""I don't know if you've ever dissected a rat, but to me, there was only one word for it: exhilarating."Isn't Flavia the absolute best? Thanks to NetGalley for the digital ARC!
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  • Laura Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for an advance reader copy in exchange for my honest opinion. Book to be released on Jan. 22, 2019. Writing: 4/5 Plot: 3.5/5 Characters: 3.5/5New word (to me): deliquescence — the process by which a substance absorbs moisture from the atmosphere until it dissolves in the absorbed water and forms a solution. Shakespeare’s sonnet on grave robbers starts “Before the golden tresses of the dead…” which gives a hint as to the subject matter of this Thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for an advance reader copy in exchange for my honest opinion. Book to be released on Jan. 22, 2019. Writing: 4/5 Plot: 3.5/5 Characters: 3.5/5New word (to me): deliquescence — the process by which a substance absorbs moisture from the atmosphere until it dissolves in the absorbed water and forms a solution. Shakespeare’s sonnet on grave robbers starts “Before the golden tresses of the dead…” which gives a hint as to the subject matter of this delightful installment of the Flavia De Luce series. For those of you who haven’t met Flavia before, she is the precocious pre-teen with a penchant for poisons and passion for chemistry and now the owner of Buckshaw — the somewhat decaying family estate in Bishop’s Lacy. This episode was internally referred to as the “Curious Case of the Clue in the Cake” (said clue was the finger bone of a recently deceased Spanish guitarist found in Flavia’s sister’s wedding cake!) — but the digit-based investigation uncovers a more deliciously evil plot swirling around homeopathic distillations and murder.Bradley’s writing is fun — every volume is full of arcane references in the fields of literature, history, anthropology, architecture, and of course Flavia’s favorite: chemistry. My favorite line: “Like a sponge the human brain can only absorb so much before it begins to leak.” This one is pretty good too:“Great music has much the same effect upon humans as cyanide, I managed to think: It paralyzes the respiratory system.”You can certainly read this one without the others — or really start anywhere you like in the series, though there is a nice progression to going in order.
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  • Shari
    January 1, 1970
    With both parents now dead, things are finally moving on in the de Luce house as Flavia's sister, Ophelia, is finally having the wedding of her dreams. But the wedding doesn't even end before Flavia and her new partner, Dogger, get their first case for the newly established, Arthur W, Dogger & Associates, Discreet Investigations, in the form of a human finger found in the wedding cake! Though only 12, Flavia has already solved her fair share of mysteries in Bishop's Lacey and it isn't long b With both parents now dead, things are finally moving on in the de Luce house as Flavia's sister, Ophelia, is finally having the wedding of her dreams. But the wedding doesn't even end before Flavia and her new partner, Dogger, get their first case for the newly established, Arthur W, Dogger & Associates, Discreet Investigations, in the form of a human finger found in the wedding cake! Though only 12, Flavia has already solved her fair share of mysteries in Bishop's Lacey and it isn't long before she and Dogger are hunting down suspects. A very delightful mystery.
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  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    My most sincere thanks to Netgalley and Penguin Random House for the chance to read Flavia's newest adventure early and review it.I adore Flavia - her curiosity, her calculating mind, and her thirst for adventure. I also loved Dogger in this one and how he had a main role. Like Flavia says, he has said more words to other people during this investigation than he's said in all the others combined. Another great case for Flavia - these just keep getting better and better.
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  • Cori
    January 1, 1970
    It doesn't seem that long ago when I read the first newly released Flavia de Luce novel, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, and now we are on number 10! Flavia is growing up but still solving crimes. Now she's working alongside Dogger as an associate of Arthur W. Dogger & Associates (Discreet Investigations), and I'm loving this fabulous duo. While the mystery part of the book was just OK, visiting with all my favorite characters more than made up for it. More please Mr. Bradley, and th It doesn't seem that long ago when I read the first newly released Flavia de Luce novel, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie, and now we are on number 10! Flavia is growing up but still solving crimes. Now she's working alongside Dogger as an associate of Arthur W. Dogger & Associates (Discreet Investigations), and I'm loving this fabulous duo. While the mystery part of the book was just OK, visiting with all my favorite characters more than made up for it. More please Mr. Bradley, and thank you to NetGalley for offering the read in exchange for a honest review.
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  • Kidlitter
    January 1, 1970
    A DRC was provided by Edelweiss for a fair and honest review."Somewhere, a corner of the universe clicked into place, and the day brightened. I knew that things hereafter were never going to be the same."The 10th entry in the Flavia de Luce series couldn't arrive soon enough for her ardent fans, which says something about the comforting fun these books continue to provide. This latest frolic doesn't disappoint, provided the reader is fully satisfied with the familair rhythm of a Bradley mystery. A DRC was provided by Edelweiss for a fair and honest review."Somewhere, a corner of the universe clicked into place, and the day brightened. I knew that things hereafter were never going to be the same."The 10th entry in the Flavia de Luce series couldn't arrive soon enough for her ardent fans, which says something about the comforting fun these books continue to provide. This latest frolic doesn't disappoint, provided the reader is fully satisfied with the familair rhythm of a Bradley mystery. Here is our spunky, smart girl sleuth racing about on her beloved bicycle Gladys and solving mysteries in a bucolic but murderous corner of 1950s rural England. Vice of all sorts abounds in the lovely setting but Flavia seems to be forever teetering on the verge of adolescence whilst remaining the same preternaturally gifted chemist, Shakespeare quoting, and moridly curious detective who always gets her murderer. She collects eccentric facts and characters along the way, airily dropping bon mots such as "Macbeth, incidentally, ought to be essential reading for anyone who wishes truly to understand British family life. It has helped me to understand many people, including myself." Parents may die, sisters may marry and hints of progress with the London railroad may threaten the status quo, but Flavia the golden tressed perpetual child hero of these books will always triumph in the end, however sticky the journey and gruesome the discoveries she makes along the way. Kudos for enhancing the faithful Dogger's role as partner in solving crime, and for allowing some of the local colourful characters more of a voice, but Flavia firmly occupies central stage in our hearts and in the plot as she micro inches her way towards maturity and of course, more murders.
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  • Kaijsa
    January 1, 1970
    As much as I've enjoyed the Flavia de Luce series, I'm happy to see Flavia finally starting to grow up. It seemed like she would be eleven and it would be 1950 forever, and while her precociousness was charming at first, I started to feel a bit weary once we got several books deep. The previous book, The Grave's a Fine and Private Place, dealt with the aftermath of Colonel de Luce's death and the odious cousin Undine settling into Buckshaw for good. This time, Flavia's saying goodbye to Feely, w As much as I've enjoyed the Flavia de Luce series, I'm happy to see Flavia finally starting to grow up. It seemed like she would be eleven and it would be 1950 forever, and while her precociousness was charming at first, I started to feel a bit weary once we got several books deep. The previous book, The Grave's a Fine and Private Place, dealt with the aftermath of Colonel de Luce's death and the odious cousin Undine settling into Buckshaw for good. This time, Flavia's saying goodbye to Feely, whose wedding is the scene of the murder/precipitating event ( a severed finger found in the wedding cake!), and Daffy doesn't even make an appearance. Flavia and Dogger and their new detective agency are the stars of the show, and even Udine and Mrs. Mullet don't get much attention. The mystery is fine for what it is, but I was more interested in what has changes. It's now 1952, and Flavia is showing signs she's growing up. Instead of always having the answers, she defers to Dogger in several conversations, and she even admits when Undine knows something she doesn't. Basically, we get a less snarky, more empathetic Flavia. The mystery of the severed finger is fun, and involves missionaries, relics, a famous musician, con artists, and Flavia galloping around town on Gladys, her trusty bicycle steed. I've heard this is the last book in the series, which makes me a little sad, but I think it's going out on a good note. I received a free ebook ARC from Random House via NetGalley. This is my honest review
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Review based on a digital ARC provided via NetgalleyIn his latest Flavia de Luce novel, Bradley deftly conjures a Flavia that is at once a young, carefree girl (scampering about on her trusty bicycle, Gladys) and a more mature young woman coming of age. The story begins with Feely’s wedding, which ends rather abruptly, throwing Flavia and her crew into one mystery after another, each seemingly separate, but perhaps tied together in some way. There isn’t quite as much of a sense of urgency to thi Review based on a digital ARC provided via NetgalleyIn his latest Flavia de Luce novel, Bradley deftly conjures a Flavia that is at once a young, carefree girl (scampering about on her trusty bicycle, Gladys) and a more mature young woman coming of age. The story begins with Feely’s wedding, which ends rather abruptly, throwing Flavia and her crew into one mystery after another, each seemingly separate, but perhaps tied together in some way. There isn’t quite as much of a sense of urgency to this book, as there is no impending doom for Flavia. She seems to have come into her own and is not necessarily trying to beat the police to the answer. Well, I suppose she is, but they don’t seem to be working at cross-purposes quite so much as in earlier books. Flavia is getting older, so there are a few less shenanigans on her part (there are still shenanigans, never fear), but Undine steps neatly into this role in some memorably humorous scenes. Dogger, too, has a few shining moments and one hopes this new partnership continues to flourish in future books. Dogger has always been an important character, and a favorite of Flavia, but their newly founded detective agency provides the opportunity for some grand old adventures! As always, Flavia finds herself embroiled in mysteries that are well suited to her love of chemistry experiments, which feature prominently throughout the book. All in all, this is a good outing for Flavia and a thoroughly enjoyable read.
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  • Cuppa
    January 1, 1970
    Flavia de Luce rides again! Flavia is going pro with her mentor Dogger. They have formed the Arthur W. Dogger & Associates detective's agency to make "discreet investigations." Their first case is closer to home than they expected when an embalmed human finger is found in Flavia's sister's wedding cake. The finger points them (if you will excuse the pun) to a grim venture taking place under the noses of the respectable people in Bishop's Lacey. Flavia fans will be glad to know that this stor Flavia de Luce rides again! Flavia is going pro with her mentor Dogger. They have formed the Arthur W. Dogger & Associates detective's agency to make "discreet investigations." Their first case is closer to home than they expected when an embalmed human finger is found in Flavia's sister's wedding cake. The finger points them (if you will excuse the pun) to a grim venture taking place under the noses of the respectable people in Bishop's Lacey. Flavia fans will be glad to know that this story is filled with the unexpected twists and turns, philosophical questions, dark beauty and sly humor we have come to associate with the series. Most mysteries are not good for repeat reads but the Flavia de Luce mysteries are so much more than simple whodunits. There is much to ponder here through many re-readings. But don't expect loose ends to be neatly sewn up for you. Author Alan Bradley leaves them hanging for us to wonder about long after we've closed the book. I would not recommend reading these books out of order. Start with The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie if you are new to Flavia's world. If you are already a Flavia fan, you know what you are in for when you begin this book. And you won't be disappointed.
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  • Katra
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Delcourte for making an advance copy available for an honest review.Rumors say that I must, but this is a series that I really hate to let go. The final offering in Alan Bradley's Flavia de Luce mysteries was a satisfying conclusion. I did miss the interaction with despicable sisters but the loathsome cousin Undine did her best to fill in. I am enjoying new antagonisms and perhaps companionship that will evolve between the characters even though I know the developments wi Thanks to NetGalley and Delcourte for making an advance copy available for an honest review.Rumors say that I must, but this is a series that I really hate to let go. The final offering in Alan Bradley's Flavia de Luce mysteries was a satisfying conclusion. I did miss the interaction with despicable sisters but the loathsome cousin Undine did her best to fill in. I am enjoying new antagonisms and perhaps companionship that will evolve between the characters even though I know the developments will remain in fantasy form.Having a bit of healing for poor old Dogger was welcome, and I was rewarded to see the traces of brilliance that peeked from beneath the damage in previous novels begin to bloom. The story itself was macabre, creepy, and thoroughly entertaining with plenty of twisted and greedy bad guys who get their due from the quick thinking and test tubes of Arthur Dogger and Associates.I also found passages that were profound. A section on using humility as a barometer will be going in my book of favorite quotes and the closing paragraphs on chemistry are truly beautiful. Bradley's ten Flavia books are a treasure. I look forward to seeing what he comes up with next.
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  • Alice Teets
    January 1, 1970
    I was given a copy of this book by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. In the latest entry in the Flavia de Luce series, Flavia and her mentor (and father figure), Dogger, have started a private investigation business. This was a much less dark book than the last few books. Flavia had some cause to celebrate with her oldest sister getting married, but of course there is a mystery to solve, and she and Dogger are on the case with her trusty bicycle Gladys making appearan I was given a copy of this book by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. In the latest entry in the Flavia de Luce series, Flavia and her mentor (and father figure), Dogger, have started a private investigation business. This was a much less dark book than the last few books. Flavia had some cause to celebrate with her oldest sister getting married, but of course there is a mystery to solve, and she and Dogger are on the case with her trusty bicycle Gladys making appearances.I always feel bad for Flavia because of the loss of her parents and the lack of closeness between she and her her sisters. She is such a solitary person, but in this book you saw more of a feeling of family between she and Daffy and she and Undine, a de Luce cousin who lives with them. There are also hints that Flavia is maturing, which it is nice to see the character growing.This series is reminiscent of Agatha Christie, and I highly recommend it!
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  • Laura M
    January 1, 1970
    I had a rough time with the last few books in this series, but they have been inching closer to the origins and this one is pretty close to the Flavia I know and love! In this book, Dogger and Flavia open a detective agency. Sadly, their services are required sooner rather than later when a severed finger is found in Feely’s (Flavia’s sister, Ophelia’s) wedding cake. Flavia has a lot to deal with, what with the new agency, a finger without a body, her sister’s wedding and absence from the house, I had a rough time with the last few books in this series, but they have been inching closer to the origins and this one is pretty close to the Flavia I know and love! In this book, Dogger and Flavia open a detective agency. Sadly, their services are required sooner rather than later when a severed finger is found in Feely’s (Flavia’s sister, Ophelia’s) wedding cake. Flavia has a lot to deal with, what with the new agency, a finger without a body, her sister’s wedding and absence from the house, visiting missionaries, and residual effects of the events from the last book. All in all, Flavia is back in top form. I was just a bit confused (as I always am) at the science-y stuff in the middle, as well as the hows and whys of the whodunnit. Thank goodness there is a recap at the end to catch me up to speed. I look forward to the next book. I received an advanced reader copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher. (oh, and I love the cover!)
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  • Taylor Holt
    January 1, 1970
    I was THE most excited when I saw that NetGalley had the newest Flavia mystery available. I love Flavia, and am always ready to read another of her escapades. This novel is a lovely addition to the canon - as Ophelia is finally getting married. But, of course, trouble is afoot. Immediately upon cutting the cake, Ophelia discovers someone's bloody finger. And everything snowballs from there. Flavia is thrilled to partner up with Dogger (an amazing man that I could read about for ever), and the ub I was THE most excited when I saw that NetGalley had the newest Flavia mystery available. I love Flavia, and am always ready to read another of her escapades. This novel is a lovely addition to the canon - as Ophelia is finally getting married. But, of course, trouble is afoot. Immediately upon cutting the cake, Ophelia discovers someone's bloody finger. And everything snowballs from there. Flavia is thrilled to partner up with Dogger (an amazing man that I could read about for ever), and the ubiquitous Undine, to solve whose finger, and what could possibly had led to its' human's demise. I highly recommend reading these books in order to get the relationships' full power, and significance. A truly beautiful series of novels.I received a digital copy of the book from NetGalley - courtesy of Random House-Ballentine - in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Soup
    January 1, 1970
    The Flavia de Luce series comes to an end (reportedly) with The Golden Tresses of the Dead, a bittersweet farewell for fans of the series like myself. The mystery is perhaps somewhat lacking, but this is a minor matter as much of the joy of the Flavia book is the characters themselves. Flavia is a little bit older and slightly more mature, Dogger is ever his faithful self, and the community appears to be accepting Flavia as a talented (if very young) detective instead of the local busybody probl The Flavia de Luce series comes to an end (reportedly) with The Golden Tresses of the Dead, a bittersweet farewell for fans of the series like myself. The mystery is perhaps somewhat lacking, but this is a minor matter as much of the joy of the Flavia book is the characters themselves. Flavia is a little bit older and slightly more mature, Dogger is ever his faithful self, and the community appears to be accepting Flavia as a talented (if very young) detective instead of the local busybody problem-attracting child (that role seems to have been inherited by Undine). There is space for the series to continue (potentially with a significant skip in time), but should this volume genuinely turn out to be the conclusion of the series, fans should be delighted with one last go in Bradley’s 1950’s Britain that so charmingly blends the macabre with the elements of “cozy” mysteries.
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  • Don
    January 1, 1970
    I am always anxious to find and receive an advance reader copy of Flavia’s next adventure, more this time with a shift in narrative to include Dogger as a more prominate character. My least favorite characters, the sisters are little seen here. These stories warm my heart, which may seem odd as they are all murder mysteries akin to Agatha Christie, one of my favorite authors. I always seem to find a favorite quote in Bradley’s work, this time it is on the next to last page and is Dogger’s line: I am always anxious to find and receive an advance reader copy of Flavia’s next adventure, more this time with a shift in narrative to include Dogger as a more prominate character. My least favorite characters, the sisters are little seen here. These stories warm my heart, which may seem odd as they are all murder mysteries akin to Agatha Christie, one of my favorite authors. I always seem to find a favorite quote in Bradley’s work, this time it is on the next to last page and is Dogger’s line: “Humility is a most excellent barometer,” he said, “and ought to be looked for in all those we are made to look up to.” Apropos to our current leaders. Sorry to get a bit political, if you take that as such. This book comes out in February 2019.
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  • Patricia Ann
    January 1, 1970
    After Flavia’s sister’s wedding, transformations were happening all round With the arrival of two missionaries from Africa, the story becomes more bizzare and mysterious, The newly formed detective agency has to solve the enigma of a human finger found in Ophelia’s wedding cake. I will miss reading this series since this is the final book. I enjoyed Alan Bradley’s similes, his familiarity of historical facts, and his knowledge of human nature and philosophical logic. I especially liked his endin After Flavia’s sister’s wedding, transformations were happening all round With the arrival of two missionaries from Africa, the story becomes more bizzare and mysterious, The newly formed detective agency has to solve the enigma of a human finger found in Ophelia’s wedding cake. I will miss reading this series since this is the final book. I enjoyed Alan Bradley’s similes, his familiarity of historical facts, and his knowledge of human nature and philosophical logic. I especially liked his ending with the statement that we are all mere particles of dust touching each other.My critique was based an ARC that was provided by the publisher via Netgalley.
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  • Clara
    January 1, 1970
    What’s not to love about the latest Flavia de Luce adventure—begun when Flavia’s sister Ophelia finds a severed finger in her wedding cake. Having launched a detecting agency with her father’s former manservant, Dogger, the perfectly-suited partners deduce their way through another murder conveniently located within cycling distance (for the 12-year-old Flavia’s benefit) of Buckshaw, the ancestral home of the de Luce family. Author Allan Bradley wisely allows Flavia’s life story to develop, but What’s not to love about the latest Flavia de Luce adventure—begun when Flavia’s sister Ophelia finds a severed finger in her wedding cake. Having launched a detecting agency with her father’s former manservant, Dogger, the perfectly-suited partners deduce their way through another murder conveniently located within cycling distance (for the 12-year-old Flavia’s benefit) of Buckshaw, the ancestral home of the de Luce family. Author Allan Bradley wisely allows Flavia’s life story to develop, but keeps Flavia’s alternately annoying and lovable precocious personality intact. It’s impossible to read the latest entry in the de Luce saga without immediately pining for the next one.
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  • Jo Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley.I have enjoyed following Flavia in the Alan Bradley series. In this 10th installment, the reader sees the now teenage Flavia begin to mature and take on a more adult approach to matters. She and Dogger form a detective agency and solve their first case. Although she has successfully solved other mysteries by herself, Flavia is now more comfortable collaborating with others. While this mystery is not dependent on the previous books, it would be helpfu I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley.I have enjoyed following Flavia in the Alan Bradley series. In this 10th installment, the reader sees the now teenage Flavia begin to mature and take on a more adult approach to matters. She and Dogger form a detective agency and solve their first case. Although she has successfully solved other mysteries by herself, Flavia is now more comfortable collaborating with others. While this mystery is not dependent on the previous books, it would be helpful for the reader to become familiar with the characters by reading one or more of the previous novels. I look forward to further adventures of Flavia de Luce.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    By now, on this still-so-satisfying 10th outing with Flavia de Luce, one knows that the mysteries in these mystery novels are not the reason one reads Alan Bradley’s books. The mysteries would be standard fare without the magic ingredient of precocious British tween Miss Flavia de Luce, the irresistible and clever chemistry-lover who is drawn to death like flies to a corpse. As always, this book didn’t disappoint and, as always, I’m already eager for a new installment.*I received an ARC in excha By now, on this still-so-satisfying 10th outing with Flavia de Luce, one knows that the mysteries in these mystery novels are not the reason one reads Alan Bradley’s books. The mysteries would be standard fare without the magic ingredient of precocious British tween Miss Flavia de Luce, the irresistible and clever chemistry-lover who is drawn to death like flies to a corpse. As always, this book didn’t disappoint and, as always, I’m already eager for a new installment.*I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    I love Flavia. This one was really good. In this, Flavia's sister, Feely gets married. Obviously, there is a severed finger in the cake. Then people begin dying and Flavia and Dogger begin one of their investigations, using science to solve the crimes. They are serious and humorous at the same time. I am especially beginning to enjoy the cousin, whose name I am completely blanking on. I think this series is great and young girls, especially, should be encouraged to read it. This one definitely l I love Flavia. This one was really good. In this, Flavia's sister, Feely gets married. Obviously, there is a severed finger in the cake. Then people begin dying and Flavia and Dogger begin one of their investigations, using science to solve the crimes. They are serious and humorous at the same time. I am especially beginning to enjoy the cousin, whose name I am completely blanking on. I think this series is great and young girls, especially, should be encouraged to read it. This one definitely lives up to the awesomeness of the series as a whole. I definitely recommend this.
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  • Melanie Coombes
    January 1, 1970
    I always love reading another mystery involving the famous Flavia de Luce. In this installment of the series, their is a lot more focus on the relationship between Flavia and her new partner in crime solving, Dogger. The two of them work so well together and we also see a bit more of how Flavia is maturing. I do miss reading about Flavia's extended family, but her dad has since died and the older sister is now off and married. Still another fun read and I always look forward to the witty humor i I always love reading another mystery involving the famous Flavia de Luce. In this installment of the series, their is a lot more focus on the relationship between Flavia and her new partner in crime solving, Dogger. The two of them work so well together and we also see a bit more of how Flavia is maturing. I do miss reading about Flavia's extended family, but her dad has since died and the older sister is now off and married. Still another fun read and I always look forward to the witty humor in every book. I received a complimentary ebook from Netgalley.
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