Dead Man Running (Alex McKnight, #11)
Alex McKnight--hero of Steve Hamilton's bestselling, award-winning, and beloved private eye series--is back in a high-stakes, nail-biting thriller, facing the most dangerous enemy he's ever encountered.On the Mediterranean Sea, a vacationer logs on to the security-camera feed from his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. Something about his living room seems not quite right--the room is bright, when he's certain he'd left the curtains closed. Rewinding through the feed, he sees an intruder. When he shifts to the bedroom camera, he sees the dead body.Martin T. Livermore is the key suspect in the abduction and murder of at least five women, but he's never been this sloppy before. When the FBI finally catches him in Scottsdale, he declares he'll only talk to one person: a retired police officer from Detroit, now a private investigator living in the tiny town of Paradise, Michigan. A man named Alex McKnight.Livermore means nothing to McKnight, but it soon becomes clear McKnight means something to Livermore...and that Livermore's capture was only the beginning of an elaborate, twisted plot with McKnight at the center. In a hunt that will take him across the country and to the edge of his limits, McKnight fights to stop a vicious killer before he can exact his ultimate revenge. And his grand finale will cut closer to home than he ever could have imagined.

Dead Man Running (Alex McKnight, #11) Details

TitleDead Man Running (Alex McKnight, #11)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 21st, 2018
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Crime, Mystery Thriller

Dead Man Running (Alex McKnight, #11) Review

  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    One of the last things a man did before he and his wife went on a Mediterranean cruise was set up a security camera at their house. Maybe it seemed a little paranoid, but better safe than sorry, right?When he's finally able to log on for the first time, his fears are unfounded—wait, why does the living room seem brighter than when they left? Did the front door just open? He watches, aghast, as an intruder enters their house and heads up to their bedroom. While he readies for the intruder to stea One of the last things a man did before he and his wife went on a Mediterranean cruise was set up a security camera at their house. Maybe it seemed a little paranoid, but better safe than sorry, right?When he's finally able to log on for the first time, his fears are unfounded—wait, why does the living room seem brighter than when they left? Did the front door just open? He watches, aghast, as an intruder enters their house and heads up to their bedroom. While he readies for the intruder to steal his wife's diamonds (which he didn't let her bring on the cruise), he is utterly unprepared for the woman's body on their bed. Not to mention what the intruder does to the body...The intruder turns out to be Martin Livermore, a gifted scientist who is the suspect in the abduction and murder of at least five other women. The FBI has been hunting him for a while, but he's never been this sloppy before. When he is apprehended returning to the vacationers' home for another encounter with his latest victim, the feds feel victorious, but they can't help but wonder why it seems as if he was trying to get caught this time.Livermore once again gets the upper hand, when he refuses to speak to anyone but Alex McKnight, a former police officer and private investigator from the small town of Paradise, Michigan. McKnight has no idea why Livermore has involved him, can't figure out any connection to this murderer whatsoever. But Livermore knows too much about him, and Alex is a crucial part of a tangled, dangerous plot that Livermore is about to put in motion.With each action, Livermore ups the stakes, and as Alex races to figure out why the murderer has drawn him into his schemes, the danger continues to grow, and it threatens to affect him in places he'd never expect. How do you catch a criminal mastermind who has targeted you, who taunts you with his crimes, and knows your every step before you take it? Alex faces off with a relentless killer, and only one of them can survive.In a veritable sea full of thriller writers, Steve Hamilton is the real deal. He's one of the rare breed of authors in this genre who can write pulse-pounding action scenes while creating characters with depth, characters you root for and care about. Every time I read another one of his books I say the same thing—I cannot understand why he isn't a household name, because his books are far superior (a little Michigan humor) to many more popular authors.It was great to have Alex McKnight back again, but I definitely missed Paradise, and Vinnie, Jackie, and Leon. Still, it was good to see Alex have to leave his comfort zone and try and figure out his connection to Livermore. While I don't love villains who are always one step ahead of everyone else, and who can always outsmart law enforcement, Livermore was one creepy character who made me shudder. (His diversions were pretty dastardly.) Dead Man Running is a prime example of a writer at his peak. If you've never read any of Hamilton's books, you don't know what you're missing. Whether you read his Alex McKnight series, his newer series featuring Nick Mason, or one of his standalone books, you'll see this is an author whose name you should see on books being read everywhere you look. Hopefully someday soon the world will catch on to what I've known for years—Hamilton is one of the best.NetGalley, PENGUIN GROUP Putnam, and First to Read provided me an advance copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available!See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com, or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2017.html.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars, actually.Admittedly, I've read only two books in this series, but they were good enough to make me a fan of former cop Alex McKnight. That familiarity made me doubly happy to be approved for an advance review copy from the publisher (via NetGalley). And once again, I wasn't disappointed. In fact - save perhaps for the knock-down, drag-'em-out ending involving almost super-human feats - this is my pick of the litter so far. It was so good, in fact, that I kept reading all the way throu 4.5 stars, actually.Admittedly, I've read only two books in this series, but they were good enough to make me a fan of former cop Alex McKnight. That familiarity made me doubly happy to be approved for an advance review copy from the publisher (via NetGalley). And once again, I wasn't disappointed. In fact - save perhaps for the knock-down, drag-'em-out ending involving almost super-human feats - this is my pick of the litter so far. It was so good, in fact, that I kept reading all the way through a nightly episode of "The Rachel Maddow Show" (well, okay, with one eye on the program); that should convince those who know how much of a news junkie I am that I'm telling the truth about how much I liked the book.Anyway, this one starts off with a [figurative] bang as a vacationing homeowner watches a live video from the security cameras he installed in his bedroom back home. Not too long of a story short, they catch the perp - a presumed serial killer named Martin T. Livermore - who refuses to talk to anyone except Alex, who's now contents himself working for Superior Bail Bonds in Paradise, Michigan. Hot to trot (or at least get some kind of confession out of Livermore), the FBI agrees to bring Alex in. But when he meets Livermore, he has absolutely no idea why the guy sought him out; there's no readily discernible connection between the two men, nor does there seem to be any among all the other five (at least) women Livermore has brutally murdered over the years.Once in Alex's presence, Livermore not only admits to the heinous crimes, but promises to take him and an FBI crew to the place he's stored his victims' bodies. Livermore isn't exactly trustworthy, but the lawmen agree, albeit reluctantly, that there's no other way to find the bodies - all women. What happens next, though, proves them dead wrong; clearly, Livermore not only can't be trusted, but he's intent on playing some kind of head game with Alex to reach some kind of end that is intended to be the end of Alex.Will Livermore emerge triumphant? Assuming as I read along that this book doesn't mark the end of the series, I was on the edge of my seat but not too worried about Alex's life. But why the killer wants to get Alex remained a mystery almost to the aforementioned action-packed end, making the book almost impossible to put down till then. I must point out one other tidbit made this book more interesting to me - that some of the scenes are set in two of my favorite places on earth: Columbus, Ohio (go Bucks!) and Michigan's scenic, secluded Upper Peninsula. All in all, this is a stellar entry in the series, and yes, I'm already looking forward to the next installment.
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  • The Real Book Spy
    January 1, 1970
    Alex McKnight returns with a bang in Dead Man Running, the thrilling new novel from New York Times bestselling author Steve Hamilton.Alex McKnight, last seen in Let it Burn (2014), is still living in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula when readers meet back up with the former Detroit cop turned private detective. While he’s still battling the tundra-like winter conditions and living in near isolation, McKnight has a new gig this time around working as a “fugitive recovery agent” (a fancy way of saying b Alex McKnight returns with a bang in Dead Man Running, the thrilling new novel from New York Times bestselling author Steve Hamilton.Alex McKnight, last seen in Let it Burn (2014), is still living in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula when readers meet back up with the former Detroit cop turned private detective. While he’s still battling the tundra-like winter conditions and living in near isolation, McKnight has a new gig this time around working as a “fugitive recovery agent” (a fancy way of saying bounty hunter) for Superior Bail Bonds out of Marquette.While on a cruise on the Mediterranean Sea, Frank Thompson takes a moment away from sunbathing on the deck with his wife to check his security camera at home. At first, the video feed coming through seems normal, until. . . Continue reading here: https://therealbookspy.com/2018/06/24...
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  • Mysticpt
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure what this was but it didn't seem like an Alex McKnight book to me. if it wasn't for the author and the character I wouldn't have kept reading as this is not the kind of book I like to read, this was bordering on horror with just one over the top and unbelievable scene after another. Hoping for a much better read, like i am used to, with whatever you write next.
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    Alex McKnight's is back in a page turning serial killer hunt in Phoenix. I admit to losing interest in "brilliant" serial killers but Alex McKnight is too strong and complex a protagonist to ignore. He is definitely in his best form in this imaginative thriller.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Steve Hamilton for bringing back Alex McKnight! It has been too long but well worth the wait. What a thrill ride and heart pounding novel! I couldn't put it down. Please don't wait so long for the next one.Definitely put this one on your to read list. You'll be sorry if you don't.
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  • Chuck Barksdale
    January 1, 1970
    After a wait of 5 years and 2 books in his new Nick Mason series, Steve Hamilton has brought back Alex McKnight in Dead Man Running, the eleventh book in this excellent series, one of my favorites. This book starts in a more typical third person style when Jack Thompson, checking his security cameras while on vacation, sees something unusual in his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. This eventually leads to the FBI believing they were seeing serial killer Martin T. Livermore. The FBI is surprised that After a wait of 5 years and 2 books in his new Nick Mason series, Steve Hamilton has brought back Alex McKnight in Dead Man Running, the eleventh book in this excellent series, one of my favorites. This book starts in a more typical third person style when Jack Thompson, checking his security cameras while on vacation, sees something unusual in his home in Scottsdale, Arizona. This eventually leads to the FBI believing they were seeing serial killer Martin T. Livermore. The FBI is surprised that Livermore was not careful and even more surprised when Livermore was captured returning to the Thompson’s home. Upon his capture, Livermore says he will only talk to Alex McKnight.The FBI does not understand the connection and neither does Alex when they come to get him at his home in Michigan when the book returns to the first-person perspective more typical of books in this series. Alex reluctantly agrees to go to Arizona to meet with Livermore and upon meeting him, still is unsure of the connection. Eventually, Alex will get to understand the connection and work to stop Livermore from ever killing any more women. This exciting and gripping book adds to the great list of excellent Steve Hamilton Alex McKnight books. I hope we will see more in this series. Although I’d certainly recommend starting at the beginning of this series, Steve Hamilton does a good job in providing the main back story about Alex McKnight so that this book could be read without having read the prior books, especially since the other minor recurring people in this series are not key to this book. The scenes at the Glasgow Inn and those between Alex and Vinnie were minimal in this book and that was a little disappointing after all this time waiting for the new book in the series. (I expressed similar feelings when Misery Bay was published in 2011 after a similar 5-year wait.)
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  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    I was so happy to see the return of Michael McKnight. What an awesome story! A heart stopping story with so many twists and turns that keep you wondering what will happen next. A very well written story with an amazing cast of characters. I loved every minute of it and hated to see it end.Here's hoping we do not have to wait so long for the next Alex McKnight story.
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  • Jeff Benham
    January 1, 1970
    The long awaiting return of Alex McKnight finds him out of his environment in Arizona. Some psycho (With the geeky name Martin T. Livermore.) is coming up with new ways to torture and murder young women. He never leaves any clues, until he is ready to get caught. The FBI believe they have finally caught a break, but when they arrest him, the only person he will talk to is Alex. Neither of them have a connection to each other, so the FBI gathers Alex up and flies him to AZ for the interview. Live The long awaiting return of Alex McKnight finds him out of his environment in Arizona. Some psycho (With the geeky name Martin T. Livermore.) is coming up with new ways to torture and murder young women. He never leaves any clues, until he is ready to get caught. The FBI believe they have finally caught a break, but when they arrest him, the only person he will talk to is Alex. Neither of them have a connection to each other, so the FBI gathers Alex up and flies him to AZ for the interview. Livermore infers that there is still a victim alive and he will take them to her. What he leads them to, however, is the massacre of a lot of FBI agents, where he carefully planned his escape. For most of the book, the reader is kept in the dark and given no clues for why Livermore has targeted Alex. What is missing from this story, is Alex's camaraderie with his UP cohorts and it just wasn't the same without them involved.
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  • AC
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to be in the minority here, but I really did not enjoy this book.It is a bit of a departure for Alex McKnight, heading out of Paradise, MI because a serial killer wants to talk to him - a serial killer unknown to him either by sight or name. Martin Livermore promises to lead the FBI and local authorities to proof of his crimes, but only if Alex McKnight is there. Once there, it's clear that while Alex does not know Livermore, Livermore knows plenty about him, from his minor league base I'm going to be in the minority here, but I really did not enjoy this book.It is a bit of a departure for Alex McKnight, heading out of Paradise, MI because a serial killer wants to talk to him - a serial killer unknown to him either by sight or name. Martin Livermore promises to lead the FBI and local authorities to proof of his crimes, but only if Alex McKnight is there. Once there, it's clear that while Alex does not know Livermore, Livermore knows plenty about him, from his minor league baseball days to his work as a Detroit cop and the incident that caused him to leave the force and return to Paradise.OK, that's fine - sometimes you have to go along with the premise to get into the story. Sometimes it pays off. This time, however, it did not.Probably spoilers ahead, so....(view spoiler)[That investigators get in deep with criminals of all sorts is not a newsflash. But this one simply became more and more unbelievable as the book went along. There are also some of the usual cliches/tropes, which we'll get into.Livermore leads various law enforcement personnel (and Alex) into the desert in Arizona, and subsequently through what amounts to a small canyon. Alex has his doubts about the whole thing, but of course, the FBI guys say they have to go through with it, even if they are still suspicious that Alex knows something about Livermore when he says he doesn't.The team gets shredded by armaments Livermore has embedded into the wall of the small passageway/canyon thing. But not Alex. Just before everything fires, he's taken to the ground by one of the FBI agents because Livermore stops, turns around, and looks at him. Said look apparently is enough for the suspicious FBI agent, who effectively saves his life, taking him out of the line of fire, while getting killed himself.We then go on to hit all the usual tropes: Alex goes to the scenes of the various killings, picks up on and interprets the supersmart killer's codes or symbols, supersmart killer playing not just the long game, but the looooong game, having picked out Alex as his ultimate target years ago because of something that happened decades ago, bringing back Alex's ex-wife into the picture to act as bait, etc.Speaking of the ex-wife, the whole book is devoid of women except as victims in the main story. They are either already dead, killed while the supersmart killer plants clues for Alex to follow so Alex ends up either tripping a napalm(!) trap that kills one woman or sleeping in a room below where supersmart killer has merrily drilled through the floor above Alex's hotel room so he gets covered in the woman's blood as supersmart killer tortures and kills her, or a current victim (the ex-wife). From the outset, it was difficult to put aside disbelief. As each woman dies, or after Alex stumbles across another clue, it got harder and harder.Alex is also not himself in this book, compared to all the previous ones. In this one, he's laser -focused on tracking down the killer. That's fine, and would be completely believable if he wasn't such a bumbler without a lick of sense at times, which is how he is in all the previous books. He does get shot at and injured a couple of times here, so at least that is somewhat in tune with the previous books, but that isn't enough. Here, Alex is dour, and apparently able to grasp the psyche of a serial killer he's never met and knows nothing about, unlike the FBI, who can't seem to figure things out if he isn't there.The end: let's talk about that. I know people get obsessed by things or people. But getting obsessed with a person you met, once, decades ago, and barely spoke to? That's the connection between Livermore and Alex: he's pissed off because Alex married Jeannie, claiming Alex "stole" her because she wasn't immediately enamored by Livermore when he spoke a few words to her when they were thirteen and she was sitting on the dock at her grandparent's house. That's is - that's the "twist", such as it is. Livermore abducts Jeannie, ties her up n an elaborate fashion. Alex shows up, and instead of taking appropriate precautions, knowing what he's dealing with, just walks right into the Livermore house. He gets knocked out and then handcuffed to a sink via the plumbing under it. Livermore, of course, plans all sorts of tortuous things for Jeannine when she doesn't act the way he wants. Conveniently, he leaves Alex handcuffed to the sink and takes her down to the basement, where he stores the bodies and bones of his victims.Naturally, Alex manages to get loose, stumbles down to the basement, and thanks to help from Jeannie, who manages, somehow, to stab Livermore in the back just as he's about to kill Alex, strangles Livermore with the handcuff chain as he turns to Jeannine, the knife sticking out of his back. (hide spoiler)]And that's it. That's the end. Alex goes back to Paradise, fields a call or two from Jeannie. I suppose this means she'll be popping up in another book. If she does, her fate will probably not be a good one.This book had none of the humor of the previous books in this series. It started dark and got darker, and the usual characters only make an appearance in the beginning and at the end. We're left with a completely different Alex hauling himself around chasing a serial killer who is, of course, smarter than anyone else, ever, and leaves no forensics except those he intends to leave.Not recommended.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    DEAD MAN RUNNING (Alex McKnight #11)By Steve HamiltonThis was my first time reading an Alex McKnight book and it could be read as a stand alone even though this is #11 in the series. The pacing is fast and action packed that keeps the pages turning. A man is on a cruise and he has cameras and video set up in his house in Arizona. He studies the video and he sees something off but he can't quite figure out what is wrong. As he rewinds the video he notices the living room drapes are open making th DEAD MAN RUNNING (Alex McKnight #11)By Steve HamiltonThis was my first time reading an Alex McKnight book and it could be read as a stand alone even though this is #11 in the series. The pacing is fast and action packed that keeps the pages turning. A man is on a cruise and he has cameras and video set up in his house in Arizona. He studies the video and he sees something off but he can't quite figure out what is wrong. As he rewinds the video he notices the living room drapes are open making the sunshine in the room. He thought it seemed bright. Then upon closer inspection he sees the front door wide open. He inspects the video in the bedroom and in his and his wife's bed lays a body of a dead woman.This book went in an entirely different direction than I was expecting. The FBI get in contact with fugitive hunter Alex McKnight and fly him to Arizona as a person of interest. There is a serial killer who was caught on camera on the video that the man on the cruise had running in his home. When the FBI try to question the serial killer he is callous and he won't answer any questions. The serial killer does write down two words on a piece of paper and they are Alex McKnight. When Alex is brought in the room to meet the serial killer Alex has no idea who he is. Alex never saw him before.This was very suspenseful and fans of this series won't be disappointed with this one. The writing is above average and there is a desire to keep reading to find out why this serial killer keeps on taunting Alex. This was a bit dark for me as the serial killer escapes in transit tricking the FBI, State police and a few prison guards as he has them believing that he is leading them to the five dead girls. The serial killer leads them to a remote area and leads them into an ambush. Why does he kill all of them except Alex? This leads to more killings and a cat and mouse chase. If you like serial killers and more killing then this book is for you.Thank you to Net Galley, Steve Hamilton and G.P Putnam's Sons for providing me with my digital copy in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Gloria Feit
    January 1, 1970
    Alex McKnight has had a long rest: five years since he appeared in the last novel in this great series. And he needed it for this, the 11th novel in the series. It seems a tourist traveling in Europe remotely checks his home where he recently installed security cameras, and discovers an illegal entry. Moreover the intruder, Martin T. Livermore, is having sex on the marital bed. It turns out the female is dead.Police capture the culprit, who refuses to speak to anyone but Alex McNight, who is tho Alex McKnight has had a long rest: five years since he appeared in the last novel in this great series. And he needed it for this, the 11th novel in the series. It seems a tourist traveling in Europe remotely checks his home where he recently installed security cameras, and discovers an illegal entry. Moreover the intruder, Martin T. Livermore, is having sex on the marital bed. It turns out the female is dead.Police capture the culprit, who refuses to speak to anyone but Alex McNight, who is thousands of miles away in the upper Michigan peninsula. He promises to lead McNight to his possible seventh victim, who may be alive. Alex accedes to the perp’s wishes and, along with all kinds of law enforcement personnel, is led into a trap where only McNight and Livermore, who then escapes, survive. Thus begins a grueling chase to save the victim as well as capturing Livermore. Actually Livermore, with his superior intellect, sets up a challenge for Alex, based on an obscure relationship between the two, unknown to McNight. The author maintains a steady tension throughout the novel, a characteristic for which he is famous. At the same time, the plot develops in countless deviations as Livermore keeps Alex on the run until the novel concludes in an unexpected fashion. Recommended.
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    #11 in the Alex McKnight series. This 2018 series entry by author Hamilton is an enigma. Except for 5 pages of chapter 2 and 3 pages of the Epilogue, this series entry. after a five year hiatus, might be a standalone thriller with the same protagonist name and police experience as the series. It is never adequately explained why the villain put himself so at risk and dependent on the FBI and Alex dancing to his tune. Eventually, his end game is revealed but since it is sufficient to engage Alex #11 in the Alex McKnight series. This 2018 series entry by author Hamilton is an enigma. Except for 5 pages of chapter 2 and 3 pages of the Epilogue, this series entry. after a five year hiatus, might be a standalone thriller with the same protagonist name and police experience as the series. It is never adequately explained why the villain put himself so at risk and dependent on the FBI and Alex dancing to his tune. Eventually, his end game is revealed but since it is sufficient to engage Alex in itself, the majority of the novel seems like an unrelated thriller stitched to an Alex McKnight novella.The novel does end with a hook to a sequel, so we'll see which Alex appears in that one.Thanks to a home surveillance system, robotics engineer Martin Livermore, a necrophiliac who's eluded the law, is spotted abusing a corpse in the Arizona home of a couple vacationing in Europe. It's unclear whether he murdered the victim before or after he brought her to the house. As Livermore's m.o. is to return to where he left his victim, FBI agent Roger Halliday leaves the cadaver in place and later arrests Livermore when he goes back to the scene of his crime. The FBI brings in Alex McKnight, a retired Detroit police officer who now works as a bounty hunter in Michigan, after Livermore discloses that he knew about the surveillance system and that he will provide details only to McKnight about another potential victim, who, at least for now, is still alive. McKnight, who has never heard of Livermore, has no idea why the killer requested his involvement.
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  • Mike Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    While this is a very good book, an Alex McKnight book it is NOT. What makes this series extra special is the setting and the cast of characters. Agree with some of the other reviewers that i could plug in any character into the lead role and this still be a very good book. But to me, without the normal setting and the characters we have grown to love over the years, this was no Alex book. Hamilton still produced a book that could have been five stars, but because he put this into this incredible While this is a very good book, an Alex McKnight book it is NOT. What makes this series extra special is the setting and the cast of characters. Agree with some of the other reviewers that i could plug in any character into the lead role and this still be a very good book. But to me, without the normal setting and the characters we have grown to love over the years, this was no Alex book. Hamilton still produced a book that could have been five stars, but because he put this into this incredible series and tried to pass it off he only gets four stars from me.
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  • Shoshana
    January 1, 1970
    Oh. My. Stars. This book starts fast and never lets up. I have enjoyed others of the Alex McKnight books by Steve Hamilton, but this one is spectacular. Do you want to read something you cannot put down? This is the book for you.Alex McKnight, a former Detroit police officer, has lived in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula near the small town of Paradise for twenty years. A criminal in FBI custody in Arizona refuses to cooperate without the presence of McKnight. The FBI picks up Alex and flies him to Ph Oh. My. Stars. This book starts fast and never lets up. I have enjoyed others of the Alex McKnight books by Steve Hamilton, but this one is spectacular. Do you want to read something you cannot put down? This is the book for you.Alex McKnight, a former Detroit police officer, has lived in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula near the small town of Paradise for twenty years. A criminal in FBI custody in Arizona refuses to cooperate without the presence of McKnight. The FBI picks up Alex and flies him to Phoenix where he confronts the criminal; a man who is a complete stranger to him but who seems to know everything about McKnight’s life. Creepy. And it gets creepier.I don’t like spoilers, and I normally do not give any, but for this book I especially do not want to give the game away. Hamilton is a master, and this book is a masterpiece of plotting and tension. I tried to not read “Dead Man Running” after ten o’clock because I wanted to be able to go to sleep!I highly recommend “Dead Man Running.” Other books may be described as a thrill-ride. This one is like the highest, fastest roller coaster you can imagine, and what a ride it is.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't read this book late at night, the suspense was so intense. This psychological thriller is right up there with the best I have read. The character development of the crazed killer may be the best I've experienced. Just thinking about him makes me shudder. The plot is an engaging one, as well thought out as the plans of the villain. The shocking first pages of the book grabbed me and the near continuous action never let go. I realize that there is backstory to the hero as this is down t I couldn't read this book late at night, the suspense was so intense. This psychological thriller is right up there with the best I have read. The character development of the crazed killer may be the best I've experienced. Just thinking about him makes me shudder. The plot is an engaging one, as well thought out as the plans of the villain. The shocking first pages of the book grabbed me and the near continuous action never let go. I realize that there is backstory to the hero as this is down the line in a series of books featuring McKnight. But this novel read entirely well on its own. His history was clearly presented where needed. This is the first novel by Hamilton I've read and I will certainly be looking for more.I recommend this novel to readers who like well plotted suspense, a genius of a villain who keeps one step ahead of the FBI, and an engaging hero who just will not give up until he has caught his man.I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. I have been a fan of Steve Hamilton and the Alex McKnight books since A Cold Day In Paradise came out 20 years ago. I was a little disappointed that Paradise, Michigan only makes a cameo appearance this time, but, hey, it's Alex McKnight. Fast paced and suspenseful, from Phoenix to Grand Rapids, my only qualifier is that you read it quickly and don't overthink it because it does require a suspension of disbelief probably one too many times. Not that that will stop me from running out 3.5 stars. I have been a fan of Steve Hamilton and the Alex McKnight books since A Cold Day In Paradise came out 20 years ago. I was a little disappointed that Paradise, Michigan only makes a cameo appearance this time, but, hey, it's Alex McKnight. Fast paced and suspenseful, from Phoenix to Grand Rapids, my only qualifier is that you read it quickly and don't overthink it because it does require a suspension of disbelief probably one too many times. Not that that will stop me from running out and purchasing the next Alex McKnight as soon as it comes out.
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  • Jim Durrett
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, want to be on the edge of your seat for a whole novel? This was one suspense filled ride.It's a long way from Paradise, Mi., in Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Phoenix, Az. But, you won't bebored on the trip. This was Alex McKnight's most complicated and challenging story yet. Steve Hamilton cooked up a cauldron of bones in this one. My only regret was McKnight didn't get to have many Molson Canadians.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This has it all, a flawed hero, the usual authorities, a serial killer who makes those of Thomas Harris look tame and a plot complex and well written enough to encompass them all. When new Alex McKnight adventures come around (and based on the ending I am sure there will be more) I will be reading them. Thanks to Net Galley and Putnam for an ARC for an honest review.
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  • Evelyn Switzer
    January 1, 1970
    Good story but the serial thing gets old in books. I really wish good authors like this would just stick to great mysteries.
  • Beth Andrews
    January 1, 1970
    DisappointedI have so been looking forward to a new Alex McKnight novel and this wasn't it. Please send him back up North.
  • Bent Hansen
    January 1, 1970
    Steve Hamilton is one of the true masters of writing thrillers with stubborn protagonists with a solid moral compass fighting evil of almost unspeakable proportions.I have read Hamilton's recent series about Nick Mason, but this was my first encounter with Alex McKnight, and jumping into book number 11 is sooo not me, but it felt right from the beginning, and Hamilton had me hooked from cover to cover. True, it gets pretty depressing with all the killing and dispair throughout the book, so if yo Steve Hamilton is one of the true masters of writing thrillers with stubborn protagonists with a solid moral compass fighting evil of almost unspeakable proportions.I have read Hamilton's recent series about Nick Mason, but this was my first encounter with Alex McKnight, and jumping into book number 11 is sooo not me, but it felt right from the beginning, and Hamilton had me hooked from cover to cover. True, it gets pretty depressing with all the killing and dispair throughout the book, so if you have a weak stomach or are more into slapstick crime novels with a funny twist, then Hamilton is not for you. The plot is solid and clever and the twists and turns believable. Now, I have 10 other books to add to my to-read list... This one lacks a little to reach the fifth star but it is close to 4½.[An ARC of the book was generously provided by the publisher through the First to Read program in exchange for an honest review]
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  • Dave Robbins
    January 1, 1970
    A bit different than the other McKnight books. The Upper Peninsula is an important character in previous books, not here.
  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Alex McKnight like you never saw before, some of his past involved in this story; a real page-turner
  • Roger
    January 1, 1970
    Alex McKnight is back. After a five year respite, Steve Hamilton has published the 11th entry in his Alex McKnight series, DEAD MAN RUNNING. Harlan Coben, on a back cover blurb, says that the Alex McKnight books are his recommendation when readers ask for a detective series they may have missed, and there does seem to be something to the sense that Hamilton's series work often flies under the radar despite the numerous awards the novels have earned. Hamilton's stand alone work THE LOCK ARTIST wo Alex McKnight is back. After a five year respite, Steve Hamilton has published the 11th entry in his Alex McKnight series, DEAD MAN RUNNING. Harlan Coben, on a back cover blurb, says that the Alex McKnight books are his recommendation when readers ask for a detective series they may have missed, and there does seem to be something to the sense that Hamilton's series work often flies under the radar despite the numerous awards the novels have earned. Hamilton's stand alone work THE LOCK ARTIST won awards too, and seems much better known. Hamilton created a new protagonist and a new series since the last McKnight book appeared five years ago, and both Nick Mason books landed on the bestseller lists.Hamilton's versatility is laudable and probably an artistic lifesaver. It has to be incredibly difficult to sustain a character, any character, over the course of book after book, publishing one per year like clockwork. Establishing new writing challenges must keep Hamilton's creative juices flowing at peak levels. THE LOCK ARTIST is surprising and masterful. Not always an easy combination. Nick Mason's first appearance exploded from the gate, producing an exciting novel that begs to be turned into a movie script. That said, I missed Alex McKnight.So, DEAN MAN RUNNING proved to be a bit of a disappointment. Now, my expectations were high so even if this book did not meet those expectations it is a worthwhile read. But this Alex McKnight was not the character I remembered. First, Hamilton literally takes him out of Paradise (the small town in upper Michigan where McKnight lives). Most of the action in DEAD MAN RUNNING takes place in Arizona, Texas, St. Louis, Columbus, and Grand Rapids. The friends we've made in Paradise make only cameo appearances, at best. Second, this version of Alex McKnight is not as well-rounded as I remember. Here, he is an avenging angel, taking on a Herculean task without a lot on nuance. There is action, though, set in motion by a singular bad guy.Without going into too much detail, the villain and the catalyst for his villainy are fantastic, as are his abilities, which become almost superhuman in their capacity to impose his will. One quick example--the villain is able to set up an explosion that kills his captors but allows him to escape unscathed. Okay. But in this same explosion he is able to ensure that Alex survives by, days in advance, predicting a sequence of events and human actions with split-second perfection. There should be more Alex McKnight novels. DEAD MAN RUNNING sets the stage for a new role for McKnight, as a defender of those hopeless souls who are preyed upon but who have no one to turn to for help. At least that is the way I read the conclusion. There is though, I think, more to be accomplished in Paradise, even though the bad guys may be more mundane.From out of his past,a pure evil emerges. Her story not his.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of "Dead Man Running" by Steve Hamilton from Goodreads to read and review. That in no way influenced my opinion, which is: Grab this book and read it!There are books offered every day featuring a serial killer. Many many of them. But I can say honestly that " DeadMan Running" is the best one of tat sub-genre that I have read since " Silence of the Lambs" or the first James Patterson novel featuring his character Alex Cross and the villainous Gary Soniji ( spelling?)Alex Mc I received a free copy of "Dead Man Running" by Steve Hamilton from Goodreads to read and review. That in no way influenced my opinion, which is: Grab this book and read it!There are books offered every day featuring a serial killer. Many many of them. But I can say honestly that " DeadMan Running" is the best one of tat sub-genre that I have read since " Silence of the Lambs" or the first James Patterson novel featuring his character Alex Cross and the villainous Gary Soniji ( spelling?)Alex McKnight is a former Detroit cop retired after He was blinded and his partner killed in a shooting. Now -Alex lives quietly in the Upper Penninsula of Michigan, working for a bowl bomd company as a bounty hunter, searching for bail and warrant jumpers. Then one day he is on the chase for a warrant jumper when he is destined by FBI agents. Alex is told that that a serial killer on the loose in the western states had been apprehended and that the killer has promised to talk-if Alex McKnight is in the room. The problem is that Alex up has never heard of the guy, nor does he recognize his mug shot. The killer is a complete stranger to him, but the killer knows all about him. Alex has no choice in the matter as the Feds bundle him up and whisk him to Phoenix to me the killer.What is going on? Well, that is what the author Steve Hamilton unravels in the next 280 pages of taut, exciting drama in a book filled with mystery, thrills and action. This is not a book of deep socio-psychological probing. It is about a cunning , cruel killer who has shown he always plans ahead and can outwit even the FBI( which these days is not saying much about that once esteemed organization.) Neither they nor McKnight can figure out what the killer has in mind until the very end of the book, whose climactic pages will keep you glued to the pages.One of the best crime thrillers that I have read in a long time, and I read many. Recommendation:well worth your time.Note: it features violent actions but it is not gore-porn, nor are there pages of sexual violence . There is, as noted, cruelty and murder.
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  • Jacki (Julia Flyte)
    January 1, 1970
    Steve Hamilton has written 10 books about Alex McKnight, a former police officer and one time baseball pitcher, who has retired to Paradise (a tiny town in upper Michigan). Over the course of the series he has worked on and off as a Private Investigator and when this book opens he's working as a bounty hunter. However he's about to get drawn into a man hunt, because in Arizona the FBI are on the trail of a serial killer who has been apprehended but says that he will only talk to Alex McKnight. I Steve Hamilton has written 10 books about Alex McKnight, a former police officer and one time baseball pitcher, who has retired to Paradise (a tiny town in upper Michigan). Over the course of the series he has worked on and off as a Private Investigator and when this book opens he's working as a bounty hunter. However he's about to get drawn into a man hunt, because in Arizona the FBI are on the trail of a serial killer who has been apprehended but says that he will only talk to Alex McKnight. I feel extremely ambivalent about this book - it's a very good thriller but it is evolving a series that I love into something that I'm not so sure about. It's highly readable - it draws you in immediately in a way that's very cinematic and it keeps up the tension and pace throughout. But a lot of the charm of this series has been the wry humour, the strong sense of place and the very real characters and those things are almost entirely lost. The ending suggests that there will be another Alex McKnight book at some stage - hooray - but also that this book sets the tone for the next and presumably any that are to follow.It has always perplexed me that this series hasn't attracted more attention and love and I presume that this is a move to make it more commercial. And this is a good thriller - albeit more unpleasant than I like (there's too much detail about how people get murdered in various nasty ways). But it's not really Alex McKnight #11, it's more Alex McKnight 2.0 #1, and I feel sad about that. If you are also in mourning for the series that was, I point you in the direction of Paul Doiron's Mike Bowditch series, which has a similar feel to it (although without the humour).
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  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    10/5 Stars!Steve Hamilton proves once again why he is on my top 3 list of living American mystery writers with his Alex McKnight series. This series is in the top 3 of all series I recommend to readers in ANY genre. Dead Man Running came out swinging in page one and the pulse-pounding, WTH "twistedness" of the crimes didn't stop til the end. I love when a book keeps me guessing and Hamilton managed it. Hamilton's character development and keeping McKnight fresh was perfect and the story woven ke 10/5 Stars!Steve Hamilton proves once again why he is on my top 3 list of living American mystery writers with his Alex McKnight series. This series is in the top 3 of all series I recommend to readers in ANY genre. Dead Man Running came out swinging in page one and the pulse-pounding, WTH "twistedness" of the crimes didn't stop til the end. I love when a book keeps me guessing and Hamilton managed it. Hamilton's character development and keeping McKnight fresh was perfect and the story woven kept me guessing. This story reverts frequently back to the beginnings of the McKnight series. This book was so good that I tried to force myself to pace myself to savor each morsel not knowing when I would get my next McKnight book. I failed. McKnight is a highly character driven series. Do yourself a treat and read the entire series. I promise you that I am not steering you wrong. This book was NUMEROUS years in the waiting and it was worth it. I am hoping we just don't need to wait this long again. Full blog review to follow closer to publish date. Arc from publisher for review.
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  • DP Lyle
    January 1, 1970
    The Alex McKnight thriller series by Steve Hamilton keeps rolling with DEAD MAN RUNNING. In this installment, serial killer Martin Livermore engineers his own capture only to refuse to speak to anyone except McKnight. Yet, McKnight doesn’t know the killer, has no connection to him. Or does he? Brought by the FBI from his isolated, calm existence in Michigan’s UP and seated before the killer, McKnight still can’t tease out a connection. But Livermore has a plan. To save another victim, he is take The Alex McKnight thriller series by Steve Hamilton keeps rolling with DEAD MAN RUNNING. In this installment, serial killer Martin Livermore engineers his own capture only to refuse to speak to anyone except McKnight. Yet, McKnight doesn’t know the killer, has no connection to him. Or does he? Brought by the FBI from his isolated, calm existence in Michigan’s UP and seated before the killer, McKnight still can’t tease out a connection. But Livermore has a plan. To save another victim, he is taken by McKnight and a team of FBI agents to a canyon, where the imperiled young woman is supposedly being held. Livermore’s explosive escape leaves the agents dead, McKnight injured, and Livermore on the run. McKnight must then pursue the most dangerous and diabolical killer he has ever faced while attempting to uncover the thread that binds them together. Fast paced, convoluted, and breathless, this story will raise your pulse and your hair. Highly recommended. DP Lyle, award-winning author of the Jake Longly thriller series
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  • Cynthia
    January 1, 1970
    I was giving this book a 4 star rating thru out the 1st half of the book.....it's a 'thriller' & moves at a pretty fast pace, which is great........ & then at about the half way point.....I felt like it seemed to get too 'fantastical/repetitive/unrealistic/unbelievable' for me.... Thru out the 1st half, I was into it, it was kind of scary-good......then it turned into 'Oh come on.....he can't get away that many times!' It does continue at a fairly good clip thru out the entire book, it's I was giving this book a 4 star rating thru out the 1st half of the book.....it's a 'thriller' & moves at a pretty fast pace, which is great........ & then at about the half way point.....I felt like it seemed to get too 'fantastical/repetitive/unrealistic/unbelievable' for me.... Thru out the 1st half, I was into it, it was kind of scary-good......then it turned into 'Oh come on.....he can't get away that many times!' It does continue at a fairly good clip thru out the entire book, it's a 'thriller', there's a 'chase' thru out...... it just became a bit 'over the top/over done' for me.....& then I thought it ended almost abruptly....? Maybe for other readers, it works tho? It was a very fast read, short chapters lead the reader to 'divide & conquer' pretty quickly!I received this e-ARC from Penguin's First-To-Read giveaway program.....in exchange for my own fair & honest review.
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