Little Libraries, Big Heroes
From an award-winning author and illustrator, the inspiring story of how the Little Free Library organization brings communities together through books, from founder Todd Bol's first installation to the creation of more than 75,000 mini-libraries around the world.

Little Libraries, Big Heroes Details

TitleLittle Libraries, Big Heroes
Author
ReleaseSep 3rd, 2019
Publisher Clarion
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Nonfiction, Biography, Writing, Books About Books

Little Libraries, Big Heroes Review

  • Lisa Vegan
    January 1, 1970
    A full 5 stars book for me!I love Little Free Libraries but I’d never known how they had started. This book educated me. The story of the founder(s) is so touching and so interesting. I appreciate how the original founder had difficulty reading when young and how when as an adult mourning the death of his mother (who’d always encouraged him) he came up with this idea as a way to share the books his mother loved and as a way to strengthen a feeling of community in his neighborhood. The story is t A full 5 stars book for me!I love Little Free Libraries but I’d never known how they had started. This book educated me. The story of the founder(s) is so touching and so interesting. I appreciate how the original founder had difficulty reading when young and how when as an adult mourning the death of his mother (who’d always encouraged him) he came up with this idea as a way to share the books his mother loved and as a way to strengthen a feeling of community in his neighborhood. The story is told in an engaging manner and I loved the included humor. I found it inspirational and it almost brought me to Patricia Polacco style tears at times in the book proper and in the author’s note at the end. The author’s note, which has a few pages of extras in the back, is equally moving and informative. It includes the sad information that the original creator of these libraries died last year of cancer at age 62. It sounds as though he knew about this book and I am glad that he did and I’m glad that he lived to see the development of thousands of LFLs all over the world in all sorts of settings.The Little Free Library movement from its inception all the way to the present is a perfect example of how every person at any age can make a large impact on the world, and how we can all do something to help others, and that the idea of “ordinary heroes” vs. extraordinary ones is powerful. That message and the message of how books and reading have great power to open our world and promote empathy for others is also wonderful. I enjoyed the illustrations. They fit this true story and there is much to look at and their colors are lovely. Highly recommended for all book lovers and especially those who appreciate Free Little Libraries. I need to get rid of many of my books and I’ve been meaning to post in my NextDoor community to ask the locations of all our little free libraries so I can start dropping off books (easier than bringing thousands to my public library sale) and I might, but my area has a relatively good free public library. I’d love to get some books to areas with Little Free Libraries but that lack a public library or good public library. They have a greater need for free books. And it looks as though the participating registered LFLs can be found at littlefreelibraries.org.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    A colorful telling of the inception and growth of the Little Free Library movement, from creator, Todd Bill’s childhood love of reading to his desire to share such after his mother, another avid reader, passed away. Starting the expansion with friend, Rick, they began to make more Libraries out of scrap wood and offer them up locally. That gave way to road trip dispersal and finally to a mail order nonprofit that, as of last count, has about 80,000 registered LFL’s worldwide. Highlighting a few A colorful telling of the inception and growth of the Little Free Library movement, from creator, Todd Bill’s childhood love of reading to his desire to share such after his mother, another avid reader, passed away. Starting the expansion with friend, Rick, they began to make more Libraries out of scrap wood and offer them up locally. That gave way to road trip dispersal and finally to a mail order nonprofit that, as of last count, has about 80,000 registered LFL’s worldwide. Highlighting a few of the more heroic stewards behind their Libraries, it’s a warm fuzzy read with lots of smile factor. More info and resources finish up this inspirational read.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect non-fiction story for a picture book, with stand-out art from John Parra.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Author Miranda Paul and illustrator John Parra join forces in this inspiring picture-book examination of the "Little Free Library" movement, from its creation to its worldwide growth and influence. Conceived by Minnesotan Todd Bol, who had struggled with his own reading as a boy, and who, as an adult man, was mourning the death of his mother, the first "Little Free Library" was intended to bring people together, offering a space where readers could exchange books. A small, play-sized wooden "sch Author Miranda Paul and illustrator John Parra join forces in this inspiring picture-book examination of the "Little Free Library" movement, from its creation to its worldwide growth and influence. Conceived by Minnesotan Todd Bol, who had struggled with his own reading as a boy, and who, as an adult man, was mourning the death of his mother, the first "Little Free Library" was intended to bring people together, offering a space where readers could exchange books. A small, play-sized wooden "schoolhouse" with books inside, the library was placed in Bol's yard, and soon attracted attention from curious neighbors. Although it took a while for the idea to spread, eventually ordinary people - the heroes of the title - acted to create more such libraries in their own communities, promoting both literacy and community cohesion...As a long-time admirer of the Little Free Library movement, I was excited to pick up Little Libraries, Big Heroes, especially as I have enjoyed books from both Paul and Parra before. I knew nothing about the founder, Todd Bol, so the story here was enlightening, while the information about the various ways in which ordinary heroes - a theme of the book - used the idea in their own communities, was inspiring. I really love the idea, evident in everything from the title to the text, that regular people can make a difference in the world, and I also appreciated the author's afterword, in which she gives more information, as well as a few ideas for further reading. The artwork, done in acrylic paint on illustration board, was colorful and appealing, with a lovely textured feeling that made me think (oddly) of collage. Recommended to all young book and library lovers, and to anyone seeking children's books about people making a difference in their communities.
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  • Laura Hook
    January 1, 1970
    Outstanding book sharing the history and power of Little Free Libraries across the world. Also a great Author's Note at the end. I can't wait to read to my students at school and then take them out to show our LFL we have.
  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    How the Little Free Library began and how it’s grown.
  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    What a lovely book chronicling the start of the Little Free Libraries movement. Todd Bol and Rick Brooks started a movement of providing books and dreams and stories to everyone, especially where there were none. This book is a beautiful telling of their story. Excellent illustrations as well.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This book is all about inspiration! Inspiration can take place in the life of a very ordinary person, making their life not so ordinary. Enter Todd Bol...an “ordinary” kid who had an encouraging mother who told him “he could do anything.” Todd struggled with reading as he was growing up. But after his mother passed away, as an adult, he wanted to celebrate her love of reading. And thus, the first Little Free Library was born. Be sure to pay attention to the valuable author notes at the back of t This book is all about inspiration! Inspiration can take place in the life of a very ordinary person, making their life not so ordinary. Enter Todd Bol...an “ordinary” kid who had an encouraging mother who told him “he could do anything.” Todd struggled with reading as he was growing up. But after his mother passed away, as an adult, he wanted to celebrate her love of reading. And thus, the first Little Free Library was born. Be sure to pay attention to the valuable author notes at the back of the book.
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This colorful, exuberant book tells the story of Little Free Library founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks and how they became everyday heroes by getting their idea for little, free libraries off the ground. There are now more than 75,000 registered Little Free Libraries in 88 countries around the world and it all started with an ordinary Wisconsin guy who wanted to commemorate his book-loving mother. Pair this with other books that celebrate books and the power of reading to build a community, like This colorful, exuberant book tells the story of Little Free Library founders Todd Bol and Rick Brooks and how they became everyday heroes by getting their idea for little, free libraries off the ground. There are now more than 75,000 registered Little Free Libraries in 88 countries around the world and it all started with an ordinary Wisconsin guy who wanted to commemorate his book-loving mother. Pair this with other books that celebrate books and the power of reading to build a community, like WAITING FOR THE BIBLIOBURRO by Monica Brown or PLANTING STORIES: THE LIFE OF LIBRARIAN AND STORYTELLER PURA BELPRE.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful illustrations from John Parra combined with the winning story of little free libraries everywhere, written by Miranda Paul. This sweet picture book explores the ideas behind and the history of little free libraries, as well as the theme of the power of books and the community that they create. A wonderful treasure for readers who want to learn more about the little free library movement, as well as book lovers everywhere.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I've worked in libraries for many years, I've known of "Little Free Libraries" for quite some time, but it took a childrens' picture book to teach me about their start! I'm biased, of course, but I love the concept of Little Free Libaries. And I like the angle of this picture book, how there are everyday, ordinary heroes making important contributions to society...even the smallest gesture makes an impact!
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    Information about the start of the Little Free Library organization and the people, Todd Bol & Rick Brooks, who started it. The story takes readers through Todd's childhood and reason for building the first little library (honoring his mom after her death). It proceeds to share how the libraries have been created around the globe.Brightly colored and highly detailed illustrations support the tex.
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  • Michelle Schaub
    January 1, 1970
    Little Libraries, Big Heroes is the engaging biography of Todd Bol, the founder of the Little Free Library movement, but it is also much more. It’s an inspiring account of how ordinary people can spread an extraordinary idea. Miranda Paul’s writing is top notch and John Parra’s illustrations reinforce the magic of this book and Little Free Libraries all around the world.
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  • Indira
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks, Uncle Rudy, for another winning addition to Luxmi's home library. A lovely book of illustrations and a sweet tribute to all those tiny little neighborhood libraries that we sometimes don't notice.
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    The story of the man who started the Little Free Library movement.
  • Engel Dreizehn
    January 1, 1970
    Very good overview and introduction for those who new to the concept of "Little Libraries"...as a patron of little libraries I enjoyed it!
  • Suzanne Artis
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a huge fan of little free libraries!!!
  • Kelly Veatch
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book because I have a Little Free Library at my home. I am a school librarian, and I love sharing books with adults and children!
  • Karol
    January 1, 1970
    The inspiring story of how the Little Free Library vision became an international connection.
  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    Throughout our lives people and their actions influence our mindset and, consequently, our actions. These people's connections to us may last for decades or less than a day. They are family members, friends, teachers or mentors or complete strangers. Most of them we welcome into our world. When a few leave, we breathe a sigh of relief, but make no mistake, they leave a mark.For many, our parents or one of our parents offer love and support lasting beyond their lifetimes. Our memories of their wo Throughout our lives people and their actions influence our mindset and, consequently, our actions. These people's connections to us may last for decades or less than a day. They are family members, friends, teachers or mentors or complete strangers. Most of them we welcome into our world. When a few leave, we breathe a sigh of relief, but make no mistake, they leave a mark.For many, our parents or one of our parents offer love and support lasting beyond their lifetimes. Our memories of their words and deeds guide us when we least expect it or when we need it the most. Little Libraries, Big Heroes (Clarion Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 3, 2019) written by Miranda Paul with illustrations by John Parra is about a special man who took his grief and started a movement which has spread throughout the world.My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...
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