There Will Be No Miracles Here
The testament of a boy and a generation who came of age as the world came apart--a generation searching for a new way to live.Casey Gerald comes to our fractured times as a uniquely visionary witness whose life has spanned seemingly unbridgeable divides. His story begins at the end of the world: Dallas, New Year's Eve 1999, when he gathers with the congregation of his grandfather's black evangelical church to see which of them will be carried off. His beautiful, fragile mother disappears frequently and mysteriously; for a brief idyll, he and his sister live like Boxcar Children on her disability checks. When Casey--following in the footsteps of his father, a gridiron legend who literally broke his back for the team--is recruited to play football at Yale, he enters a world he's never dreamed of, the anteroom to secret societies and success on Wall Street, in Washington, and beyond. But even as he attains the inner sanctums of power, Casey sees how the world crushes those who live at its margins. He sees how the elite perpetuate the salvation stories that keep others from rising. And he sees, most painfully, how his own ascension is part of the scheme.There Will Be No Miracles Here has the arc of a classic rags-to-riches tale, but it stands the American Dream narrative on its head. If to live as we are is destroying us, it asks, what would it mean to truly live? Intense, incantatory, shot through with sly humor and quiet fury, There Will Be No Miracles Here inspires us to question--even shatter--and reimagine our most cherished myths.

There Will Be No Miracles Here Details

TitleThere Will Be No Miracles Here
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherRiverhead Books
ISBN-139780735214200
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Biography, Race

There Will Be No Miracles Here Review

  • Tina Panik
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike any book, or any memoir, I have ever read. Casey’s honesty is equal parts shame and pride, brains and ignorance, hope and despair. His story is still unfolding, and I’ll be first in line for a follow up volume...This was an ARC from Book Expo NYC, where I saw Casey speak at a dinner that left everyone in tears.
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  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    I read a lot of memoirs. I love memoirs. This is one of the best I've ever read. It's so beautifully written, so honest, and so timely. The perfect trifecta of a memoir.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I was asked to read this ARC/memoir for an honest review. It is already receiving notable buzz from many reliable, reputable sources - Lissa Muscatine (One of the owners of Politics & Prose) and Colm Toibin (Author) to name two. And, the true life story of Casey Gerald's rise from "rags to riches" is truly astonishing in the way only true stories can be. The book begins at a religious revival with 12 year old Casey discovering doubt for the first time in his life. He grew up in Texas with a I was asked to read this ARC/memoir for an honest review. It is already receiving notable buzz from many reliable, reputable sources - Lissa Muscatine (One of the owners of Politics & Prose) and Colm Toibin (Author) to name two. And, the true life story of Casey Gerald's rise from "rags to riches" is truly astonishing in the way only true stories can be. The book begins at a religious revival with 12 year old Casey discovering doubt for the first time in his life. He grew up in Texas with a father who following a legendary football career descends into drug use and a mother who battled mental illness. His sister and other female family members were the ones who saved Casey - saved him from bullying, saved him from homelessness and saved him from floating through school with indifferent, meaningless class assignments. Casey improbably pursues football in high school as a way to connect with his father's victorious history. Usually 3rd string and warming the bench, he is unexpectedly given a chance in one game's desperate attempt for victory and ends up scoring a touchdown. This play is repeated and he finally has what he wants - a spot on varsity and some respect. From this unlikely point, he begins his ascent to recognition and is ultimately offered a football scholarship to Yale. Everyone that has influence over Casey's decision advises him to take it - to make his high school proud and to be an example of success for his town. From his first visit to the campus through his first semester, he writes of his struggle to fit in to a place and a people so different than anything he has ever experienced before. What makes this memoir so poignant is the seemingly insurmountable climb that Casey has accomplished as he goes on to become a Rhodes scholar finalist and attend Harvard Business School. But, it is also his brutal honesty about the conflicts in his life that create such empathy that you feel devastated when he describes feeling so alone in the world and his bouts of sobbing without reason. Nothing is ever easy, but for Casey, what is the personal cost? How do some people stay positive in an uncertain world full of inequities - some just due to your station in life at birth? This is the gift the reader receives from selecting and reading diverse books. It creates compassion. A brilliant, spiritual young man searching for answers in life, a unique, true-life narrative, and a writer's voice worth reading. Look for this release in October 2018.
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  • Germaine Irwin
    January 1, 1970
    I think this is a fabulous book, a life so far lead with no shortage of problems, naïveté, desire, strength, foolishness, and enlightenment- just like many of us and also very different from many of us. He shows us his path without judgements (except for himself) and thus shows us a way to relate experiences while also opening our eyes to other truths.
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  • Cherise Wolas
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting memoir. A coming of age tale, of a young queer black boy. Rags to riches. From the other side of the river in Dallas in 1999, in a family of preachers, with a father who was a star football player, and then became a drug addict, a bipolar mother who disappears, a boy who finds himself at Yale, etc. There is fury and poetry in some of the prose that makes it shimmer.
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  • Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir
    January 1, 1970
    Casey Gerald, the author of this magical mystical tour, is a Yale grad, football star and business maven who was raised in poverty. In his 30s, he is still defining himself by a standard that includes equal parts angst, irony and glimmers of hope.Casey’s father was a football star back in the day when black college players were a rarity. He was also absent for much of his son’s adolescence, reappearing as a reformed addict whose redemption was sufficient to earn him a role as an evangelical prea Casey Gerald, the author of this magical mystical tour, is a Yale grad, football star and business maven who was raised in poverty. In his 30s, he is still defining himself by a standard that includes equal parts angst, irony and glimmers of hope.Casey’s father was a football star back in the day when black college players were a rarity. He was also absent for much of his son’s adolescence, reappearing as a reformed addict whose redemption was sufficient to earn him a role as an evangelical preacher. Casey’s mother also disappeared, her reasons never fully defined and her reemergence in his life fraught with misunderstanding. A sister was an example and a mainstay for the young man grappling with big issues. The family lived in public housing in a black section of Dallas, yet Casey somehow got the impression that being black in the US was a positive. It wasn’t until his college years that he began to understand that being black might mean having “so little money in our bank accounts, so little food on our tables, so few books in our classrooms…”In a series of remarkable coincidences, the boy who played football in the projects was drafted to play football for Yale, where he found out that he could write. By that time, he also had realized that he was gay, giving him yet another barrier to push back at. In the later stage of his college career, he became a campus leader of his African American cohort and was a finalist for a Rhodes scholarship. Free from the restraints of education for a while, he drifted, but got back into the swim with an MBA from Harvard; helped found MBAs Across America, aimed at helping people in the hinterlands make it as entrepreneurs; and then took a sabbatical from everything else to write this hugely fascinating autobiography.Casey’s professors at Yale were certainly correct: the man can write. His stream-of-consciousness tell-all style captures the reader from the opening segment in which he explains the book’s title (no spoilers here). He can make almost any subject simultaneously painfully hilarious and wistfully sad, as so much of his life has encompassed that paradox. He confesses that when asked, as part of his interview for a Rhodes scholarship, what book he had most recently read, at that point he had never actually completely read any single book, though he did delve into such diverse tomes as BLACK LIKE ME and JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH. In speaking of his highly dysfunctional family, Casey depicts their interactions as something like “a blaxploitation Fellini movie.” Yet his spiritual side is quietly evident at times. There is one family member, a cherished niece, who he refuses to sully with his sorrow or his sarcasm, because “I like that baby.”This is a life in progress, one senses, rather than a mere memoir. The reader undoubtedly will feel that, as much as Casey Gerald can and will retreat into his mental world again and again, he is also destined and determined to do good things and take justifiable pride in their accomplishment.Reviewed by Barbara Bamberger Scott
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    I tried to force myself through this book and succeeded through it for awhile. It might have a message somewhere in there about who Casey is/was and what he has learned. Obviously, he had an unsettled childhood from what I did read. I do not want to wade through the rest of the book to find out the moral of the story (if there is one) because of the coarseness of the narrative and language. It was interesting to hear the lingo of his world.
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    Probably more like 3.5 stars, but I'm rounding up because the writing is beautiful. The story is disjointed and I didn't care for how he chose to wrap up the book (kind of a cliffhanger - what is he doing now? What was he doing at publication time? It just drifts off!), but the storytelling is compelling. I'm eager to know more about his life, but I also recognize it's none of my damn business.
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  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, I read a lot of memoirs but haven't read one like this often...maybe ever. The details of the journey aren't what makes this book so amazing but rather the raw feeling that comes through every word. Seriously, this memoir is poetry.
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