Civilisations

Civilisations Details

TitleCivilisations
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 1st, 2018
PublisherProfile Books
ISBN-139781781259993
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Religion, Art, Classics, Fantasy, Mythology

Civilisations Review

  • Bettie☯
    January 1, 1970
    watch here1: The first film by Simon Schama looks at the formative role art and the creative imagination have played in the forging of humanity itself.2: Mary Beard explores images of the human body in ancient art, from Mexico and Greece to Egypt and China3: Simon Schama explores the depiction of nature. Simon discovers that landscape painting is seldom a straightforward description of observed nature4: Professor Mary Beard explores the controversial topic of religion and art. How, and at what watch here1: The first film by Simon Schama looks at the formative role art and the creative imagination have played in the forging of humanity itself.2: Mary Beard explores images of the human body in ancient art, from Mexico and Greece to Egypt and China3: Simon Schama explores the depiction of nature. Simon discovers that landscape painting is seldom a straightforward description of observed nature4: Professor Mary Beard explores the controversial topic of religion and art. How, and at what cost, do different religions make the unseen visible?5: Simon Schama examines how the role of artists from the different traditions of West and East developed in the years that followed the Renaissances6: In the 15th and 16th centuries distant and disparate cultures met, often for the first time. David Olusoga shows art was always on the frontline7: Simon Schama starts his meditation on colour and civilisation with the great Gothic cathedrals of Amiens and Chartres.8: David Olusoga explores the artistic reaction to imperialism in the 19th century9: In the final programme Simon Schama explores the fate of art in the machine and profit-driven worldWill Gompertz review
    more
  • Annikky
    January 1, 1970
    Very accessible, maybe even too light and brief, but still so many lovely nuggets of insight.
  • James Lancaster
    January 1, 1970
    Very quick read, with beautiful photographs of the various monuments and works presented in the show. I love Mary Beard's work, but her style seems to clash with the more formal approach taken by Kenneth Clark in the first series and Schama and Olusoga's episodes. However, for this review, considering the book on it's own and not the series associated with it. Is a nice, breezy tour through ancient and medieval art with a brief explanation of the theory behind their presentation. While i think i Very quick read, with beautiful photographs of the various monuments and works presented in the show. I love Mary Beard's work, but her style seems to clash with the more formal approach taken by Kenneth Clark in the first series and Schama and Olusoga's episodes. However, for this review, considering the book on it's own and not the series associated with it. Is a nice, breezy tour through ancient and medieval art with a brief explanation of the theory behind their presentation. While i think it's better done in the show, I still enjoyed sitting down with this book. As it is a very relaxing read, that's accessible to a fairly large audience.
    more
  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    Reminds me of why I miss my University days. Mary Beard gives us enough information to spark our interest but not so much that it exhausts our appetite for the subject. We aren’t being thrust information that’s purely black and white, this means this and that is that, but being gently guided to ask questions, explore ideas and think more deeply for ourselves.Plain speaking and very accessible, touching on a broad range for the length of the book, I hadn’t really planned to blitz through in one s Reminds me of why I miss my University days. Mary Beard gives us enough information to spark our interest but not so much that it exhausts our appetite for the subject. We aren’t being thrust information that’s purely black and white, this means this and that is that, but being gently guided to ask questions, explore ideas and think more deeply for ourselves.Plain speaking and very accessible, touching on a broad range for the length of the book, I hadn’t really planned to blitz through in one sitting (having grabbed it on impulse at the supermarket and getting absorbed into the introduction whilst the groceries were still being rung up - sorry cashier!) but the end snuck up on me. This read had all the same post-seminar learning buzz of yesteryears, leaving me all kinds of nostalgic and a little heartbroken. And, possibly, a little too blissed out over the chapter bibliographies in those final two dozen pages.Divided into two halves, as titled, How We Look (5*) and The Eye of Faith (4*), I couldn’t bring myself to give this less than top marks for the final verdict. Stunningly presented, beautiful colour photographs throughout and paperstock that makes my inner book nerd’s toes curl... All in, if the topic floats your boat, you’ll be missing out if you pass this by. Gem.
    more
Write a review