First Man In
No one is born a leader. But through sheer determination and by confronting life’s challenges, Ant Middleton has come to know the meaning of true leadership. In First Man In, he shares the core lessons he’s learned over the course of his fascinating, exhilarating life.Special forces training is no walk in the park. The rules are strict and they make sure you learn the hard way, pushing you beyond the limits of what is physically possible. There is no mercy. Even when you are bleeding and broken, to admit defeat is failure.To survive the gruelling selection process to become a member of the elite you need toughness, aggression, meticulous attention to detail and unrelenting self-discipline, all traits that make for the best leaders.After 13 years service in the military, with 4 years as a Special Boat Service (SBS) sniper, Ant Middleton is the epitome of what it takes to excel. He served in the SBS, the naval wing of the special forces, the Royal Marines and 9 Parachute Squadron Royal, achieving what is known as the ‘Holy Trinity’ of the UK’s Elite Forces. As a point man in the SBS, Ant was always the first man through the door, the first man into the dark, and the first man in harm’s way.In this fascinating, exhilarating and revealing book, Ant speaks about the highs and gut-wrenching lows of his life – from the thrill of passing Special Forces Selection to dealing with the early death of his father and ending up in prison on leaving the military – and draws valuable lessons that we can all use in our daily lives.

First Man In Details

TitleFirst Man In
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 31st, 2018
PublisherHarperCollins Publishers
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, War, Military Fiction, Audiobook, Autobiography, Memoir, Leadership, Self Help

First Man In Review

  • Lynette
    January 1, 1970
    I have really enjoyed this book (listen) and it was easy to finish. Overall though I don’t really like him having listened to his account of his life, honest that it was, he’s actually a bit of a prick when it comes down to it.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not one for leaving reviews for anything, however with this book I just couldn't resist. Not only is this book one of those precious few that you can't put down until you've digested all of its contents, but it's also a book that enables self-reflection and self-evalutaion, encouraging you to be the best version of you. I would recommend this book for anyone, whether you're the most self-assured person out there or someone who is lacking self-confidence because I garuntee you will learn some I'm not one for leaving reviews for anything, however with this book I just couldn't resist. Not only is this book one of those precious few that you can't put down until you've digested all of its contents, but it's also a book that enables self-reflection and self-evalutaion, encouraging you to be the best version of you. I would recommend this book for anyone, whether you're the most self-assured person out there or someone who is lacking self-confidence because I garuntee you will learn something from this book.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this book wasn't really my cup of tea. Not because of the genre, which I generally find fascinating, but I found it to be a bit tedious; I didn't really care about him as a person (he seemed a bit of a dick, that wasn't very likeable to be honest) and rushed the last few chapter so I could finish the book and return it to the friend I had borrowed it from. I very nearly didn't bother and finishing the book did not enrich the experience for me.Also we don't know how good a leader he really Well, this book wasn't really my cup of tea. Not because of the genre, which I generally find fascinating, but I found it to be a bit tedious; I didn't really care about him as a person (he seemed a bit of a dick, that wasn't very likeable to be honest) and rushed the last few chapter so I could finish the book and return it to the friend I had borrowed it from. I very nearly didn't bother and finishing the book did not enrich the experience for me.Also we don't know how good a leader he really was, as we only have his word for it. Yes, he got awarded by the military, yes he was in the 3 elite forces, but what did his men think of him really? Maybe they thought he was a twat too. Maybe you only get to be in 3 elite forces by being a complete knob. I haven't seen any of the TV programmes, maybe you get a better sense of him through those?However, I was heartened to read that when he was imprisoned, he used the experience to improve himself. Redemption is possible, hurrah! Obviously this is how he came across to me in the book. He's probably a perfectly nice person. I also have to remember that the book had editors and they probably told him what to leave in and leave out etc and that coloured how he came across.I'm sorry but this book was not for me and I therefore would not recommend it. Aren't there other authors who have been in special forces that write about their experiences better?
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  • Pippa DaCosta
    January 1, 1970
    Ant makes no apologies for who he is and if you've seen him on TV, he says often enough that it takes a special kind of person to excel in the SAS. The kind of person who is trained to plunge into insane situations and thrive. Unfortunately, in Ant's case, he walks that line between good and outright nut-so, just erring on the side of good (he could easily go either way), but it makes him unlikeable for most readers. (His persona is much "nicer" on TV) In this book, he refers to himself as god-l Ant makes no apologies for who he is and if you've seen him on TV, he says often enough that it takes a special kind of person to excel in the SAS. The kind of person who is trained to plunge into insane situations and thrive. Unfortunately, in Ant's case, he walks that line between good and outright nut-so, just erring on the side of good (he could easily go either way), but it makes him unlikeable for most readers. (His persona is much "nicer" on TV) In this book, he refers to himself as god-like, on occasion, and goes into detail about how he looks for weaknesses in people and uses them to get what he wants out of them. Yeah, not exactly your typical "hero" mentality, but admittedly, from a psychological point of view, it's a fascinating glimpse at what makes these kind of operatives tick. And for me personally, it provides excellent insight into that kind of chaotic neutral character that makes such fascinating, multi-layered anti-heroes. The writing (it's doubtful Ant wrote this) is a bit clunky and uninspired. Recommended for fiction writers looking for interesting character studies.
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  • Andy Allsopp
    January 1, 1970
    If I had to sum up the entire book in one quote, it'd be the following:"People might think I’m an arrogant twat, but that doesn’t bother me because I’ve looked in the mirror and I know that I’m not."If you think he's right, then this is an interesting book full of life lessons that you can apply every day. I don't think he's right.
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  • Zoe Hall
    January 1, 1970
    An absolutely fantastic read. After first seeing Ant on SAS: Who Dares Wins, I’ve been fascinated by his life. I recently saw Ant on his tour and think he’s an interesting and endearing speaker. This book felt like an extension of that night. A great read, filled with real stories that convey important life tips. I would highly recommend this book.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    The problem with leadership books based on experiences while kicking in Afghan doors, or smashing up squaddies and getting arrested, or re-enacting the mutiny on the bounty is that they're often quite specific to that experience. The value gained is applicable in that and similar situations, but it isn't necessarily obvious how to apply this in your regular life.Honestly, if this hadn't been Ant Middleton's book, I definitely wouldn't have got it. It's badly written, using the sort of analogies The problem with leadership books based on experiences while kicking in Afghan doors, or smashing up squaddies and getting arrested, or re-enacting the mutiny on the bounty is that they're often quite specific to that experience. The value gained is applicable in that and similar situations, but it isn't necessarily obvious how to apply this in your regular life.Honestly, if this hadn't been Ant Middleton's book, I definitely wouldn't have got it. It's badly written, using the sort of analogies a child might use but it's definitely an insight into an incredible life - and an interesting perspective.
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  • Teena Evans
    January 1, 1970
    This book was outstanding! I literally could not put it down. I was quite intrigued after watching Ant on various TV shows, as to the kind of man he is. The thing with TV is, you always wonder what is actually the truth and what’s shown for entertainment value. So, suffice to say I was hopeful that the book would be as brutally honest, as Ant seems his whole on-screen demeanour to be. Thankfully, I was not disappointed!The book recounts an amazing history of a man who is at peace with himself an This book was outstanding! I literally could not put it down. I was quite intrigued after watching Ant on various TV shows, as to the kind of man he is. The thing with TV is, you always wonder what is actually the truth and what’s shown for entertainment value. So, suffice to say I was hopeful that the book would be as brutally honest, as Ant seems his whole on-screen demeanour to be. Thankfully, I was not disappointed!The book recounts an amazing history of a man who is at peace with himself and who he is. He is an extraordinary character who has taken the time to impart some of his wisdom, to people like me, who could use the life-lessons that he imparts. This book is well written, brutally honest and genuine and I totally devoured it! Roll on winter because I can’t wait for the next ‘Ant Middleton’ book!!
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  • Ruthi Burgess
    January 1, 1970
    I sort of enjoyed it but was left with the overwhelming thought that being in the armed services is an excuse for thuggery. It's great to use anger as your motivation but can it always be channelled like that against an enemy of some sort. It bothers me that someone can see red and knock someone out with a single punch, dislocating their jaw. I get that there's an over all message and he seems like a likeable bloke but I struggle with someone proud of being able to kill and even more so of being I sort of enjoyed it but was left with the overwhelming thought that being in the armed services is an excuse for thuggery. It's great to use anger as your motivation but can it always be channelled like that against an enemy of some sort. It bothers me that someone can see red and knock someone out with a single punch, dislocating their jaw. I get that there's an over all message and he seems like a likeable bloke but I struggle with someone proud of being able to kill and even more so of being friends with gangsters.
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  • Ryan Chadderton
    January 1, 1970
    Great book, great author. Bought the book at Ant's signing in Manchester. Read the first third in the queue and the remaining over the next 24 hours. The book differs from other special forces biographies in that its underlying story is a lesson of leadership.I would 100% recommend this book to anyone. There are such a wide number of things to take from this book; whether you come for the story of his life or the leadership lessons he provides, you won't be disappointed.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    What a great insight in to the life of Ant Middleton and how he came to be the man he is, wow what a life he's led! By the end of it I wondered if there is anything this man isn't capable of?But the purpose of this book was to inspire the reader to take control of their life and harness the lessons we learn and use them in a positive way. Initially flicking through the book I wondered what the ending of each chapter entitled Leadership Lessons could really do for me in my normal life with my nor What a great insight in to the life of Ant Middleton and how he came to be the man he is, wow what a life he's led! By the end of it I wondered if there is anything this man isn't capable of?But the purpose of this book was to inspire the reader to take control of their life and harness the lessons we learn and use them in a positive way. Initially flicking through the book I wondered what the ending of each chapter entitled Leadership Lessons could really do for me in my normal life with my normal job but actually each chapter had so many examples of ways to change your mindset in your own life and use things like anger and upset to energise you in a positive way. There is something we can all learn from this book and I would highly recommend it.
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  • Stuart
    January 1, 1970
    Really disappointing, l thought this might be a good read unfortunately not
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    A good book with principles of Leadership and self development/awareness of Ant Middleton’s life Journey.
  • Matt Oliver
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely book about leadership and lessons from the military. No nonsense and motivating.
  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    A great read. Leadership lessons all in one.
  • Ollie Rising
    January 1, 1970
    Great book - less of a life lesson and more of an autobiography. Really interesting bloke.
  • Jonathan Downing
    January 1, 1970
    Yeah, very good book. Most chapters had pretty cheesy titles, but his "leadership lessons" were good and highly applicable.
  • Xiang Li
    January 1, 1970
    Not much of the content is actually teaching you how to lead. To me this book seemed more like a marketing tool for Middleton to show the world, this is where he began and this is where he is now. Majority of the book is actually about what not to do, i.e. not hit a cop.... not do anything stupid to get into jail as you will disappoint your family and friends... etc... these things are pretty standard for most people. Some chapters were quiet interesting, particularly the first couple of chapter Not much of the content is actually teaching you how to lead. To me this book seemed more like a marketing tool for Middleton to show the world, this is where he began and this is where he is now. Majority of the book is actually about what not to do, i.e. not hit a cop.... not do anything stupid to get into jail as you will disappoint your family and friends... etc... these things are pretty standard for most people. Some chapters were quiet interesting, particularly the first couple of chapters but then later on each chapter just turned into a new story about what he has done rather than a lesson to be taught.Okay read overall.
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  • Abbie Hooton
    January 1, 1970
    The most shocking thing for me was realising that he hasn't had the straight forward life that I thought he would have had. I figured he would have gone straight into the army and everything work from there, but not for this guy, he definitely fought some demons and plenty of battles before deciding where he was happiest! It was so interesting to read about the different parts of his life, the highs and lows and some of the frankly crazy stuff he has done throughout it! I like that he has manage The most shocking thing for me was realising that he hasn't had the straight forward life that I thought he would have had. I figured he would have gone straight into the army and everything work from there, but not for this guy, he definitely fought some demons and plenty of battles before deciding where he was happiest! It was so interesting to read about the different parts of his life, the highs and lows and some of the frankly crazy stuff he has done throughout it! I like that he has managed to include some great lessons and pieces of advice throughout, a way to get you to get a grip on your life and make it what you want it to be. A great read with interesting stories on every page.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    This is so nearly a good book. Elements of it are interesting, and parts of the story of Ant’s life are sufficiently unusual to make for an engaging narrative. But oh dear god the toxic masculinity, the unexamined sexism, the lack of true self-awareness in something that calls itself some kind of self-help book. I counted about thirty times when I was deeply disappointed as I read this book - not that things happened in Ant’s life, but that he wrote them down without reflecting on their meaning This is so nearly a good book. Elements of it are interesting, and parts of the story of Ant’s life are sufficiently unusual to make for an engaging narrative. But oh dear god the toxic masculinity, the unexamined sexism, the lack of true self-awareness in something that calls itself some kind of self-help book. I counted about thirty times when I was deeply disappointed as I read this book - not that things happened in Ant’s life, but that he wrote them down without reflecting on their meaning in any interesting way. As a woman, I felt very much excluded by both the language and the attitudes in this book.I also tried to talk to Ant about it but he chatted over my head with a male friend of mine instead.*eye roll so hard I give myself a migraine*
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    A very readable book, especially the first half covering his training which is particularly interesting and gives you a really good insight into. It's very ghostwritten in that way that it's super stylised in it's depiction of events, that's not a criticism as such but just sometimes I found it took you out of the story a little. The clunky 'Art of War' observations that you could apply to business or everyday life I also found a little cliche and at some points a tad patronising. It's conflicti A very readable book, especially the first half covering his training which is particularly interesting and gives you a really good insight into. It's very ghostwritten in that way that it's super stylised in it's depiction of events, that's not a criticism as such but just sometimes I found it took you out of the story a little. The clunky 'Art of War' observations that you could apply to business or everyday life I also found a little cliche and at some points a tad patronising. It's conflicting about himself as well, you spend half the time admiring him for accepting and adapting to his own flaws whilst the other half thinking man he really was a bit of a dick at times here. Anyway a worthwhile read and easy to plough through, perfect for the winter commute. (3.5 Stars)
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  • Patrick Oakley
    January 1, 1970
    True leader, ultra positive human being!!Really enjoyed this book, bit of comedy from the moment he turned up for basic training (1 week early!!) to the more serious stuff like Afghan. I'm guessing Ant wasn't aloud to reveal too much about the SBS as he only really speaks of the recruitment/selection, no mention of any missions. Enjoyed the story regarding the young girl he helped reunite with her mother.
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  • Rose Auburn
    January 1, 1970
    I've waited a day to write this review (normally write them the day I finish a book) purely because I am not entirely sure what to say. I had been looking forward to reading this and it was a bit of a disappointment. Maybe I expected something different, I thought there would be more about his military career whereas it's kind of 'Life and Lessons with Ant'. It's certainly readable, the writing style is very easy and basic, you could easily polish this off in a day or couple of afternoons. I fou I've waited a day to write this review (normally write them the day I finish a book) purely because I am not entirely sure what to say. I had been looking forward to reading this and it was a bit of a disappointment. Maybe I expected something different, I thought there would be more about his military career whereas it's kind of 'Life and Lessons with Ant'. It's certainly readable, the writing style is very easy and basic, you could easily polish this off in a day or couple of afternoons. I found the beginning awkward, he came across as quite different to the chap on the telly. I found it very cheesy/corny in places and cringed a bit at some of it. I also found that, for me, there were an awful lot of blanks and missing information; maybe he did not want to fill in the spaces but then don't write a semi-biography/self-help book, in that case. For example, a few photos would have been good even if there were only of him just to ground you in the story. I found elements of it lazy as well. There is no doubt he is an absolutely first-class operator but, I don't know, something was lacking for me here. I certainly did take some useful ideology from some of the chapter lessons - a couple of pointers have helped me cope with a few stressful situations but some of his 'lessons' need a bit more explaining and he needs to appreciate that not everyone is able to see everything as black and white as he comes across as viewing them. 'Making friends with your demons' needs more explanation; to me that means indulging them. The last chapter is a rehash of the TV programme following Captain Bligh, which is interesting but if you are reading this book, then you probably (like me) saw the programme so I felt that was a bit of filler as well. I have a strong suspicion this is not the only book he will bring out. I suspect that it was not really aimed at me, but more at men in the their early thirties who are not massive readers, if you fit that bill, then it's probably a good poolside read on your Summer holiday. It's a shame because I feel there was a better book in there somewhere.
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  • Sam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    A truly inspiring read about an incredible man.I thought this book was great. I really enjoyed reading through it and learning all about Ant's past. This book doesn't act as if Ant has always been this incredible, inspiring, godlike man. This book shows what he really used to be like: a bully. Even as I was reading some of the things he's done, I thought to myself "Jesus this guy was a twat". But the story of how he has turned his life around, and the things he's done, is nothing short of incred A truly inspiring read about an incredible man.I thought this book was great. I really enjoyed reading through it and learning all about Ant's past. This book doesn't act as if Ant has always been this incredible, inspiring, godlike man. This book shows what he really used to be like: a bully. Even as I was reading some of the things he's done, I thought to myself "Jesus this guy was a twat". But the story of how he has turned his life around, and the things he's done, is nothing short of incredible.The positives about this book are clear as day. Ant has really made me rethink certain things, and made me think about how important a positive mindset it, no matter what previous circumstances you've been in. I also think his stories are incredible. Such as how he got through prison, the mutiny story, SAS, Para 9 and everything else. Everything he's gone through, even with his troubled life, is amazing.The negatives are I would have liked to know more about his time in the forces, as a lot of this book talked more about his TV shows, his mistakes etc. These weren't bad things to read at all, but it just covered the main part of the book. I also think it wasn't the best of written books. This didn't take much away, but at times I thought some parts could have been taken out, or at least tweaked.Also, a lot of his "lessons" were things I was already well aware of: battle your demons, the main battle is in your head etc. Again, these lessons were great and really thought provoking, but it wasn't anything too new.Overall, a great book. I love Ant as a person and I'm happy I know more about his life and past now, as I now know how he used to be, and how he's changed himself.While this might not be the most well written book, I think it's something any Ant Middleton fan should read, or anyone who wants a new perspective on life.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Jag misstänker att jag till viss del inte riktigt ingår i den särskilda målgruppen för den här boken, då jag vare sig är man, särskilt inriktad på militären, träning eller den specifika typen av ledarskap som Anthony Middleton står för, men den här boken har ändå gett mig mycket att tänka på.Dels en väldigt stor tacksamhet för att jag inte har mött samma typ av svårigheter som Middleton har gjort i sitt liv men också en rejäl dos av densamma för att jag inte har fått samma äventyrslusta, den sku Jag misstänker att jag till viss del inte riktigt ingår i den särskilda målgruppen för den här boken, då jag vare sig är man, särskilt inriktad på militären, träning eller den specifika typen av ledarskap som Anthony Middleton står för, men den här boken har ändå gett mig mycket att tänka på.Dels en väldigt stor tacksamhet för att jag inte har mött samma typ av svårigheter som Middleton har gjort i sitt liv men också en rejäl dos av densamma för att jag inte har fått samma äventyrslusta, den skulle haft ihjäl mig. Men den har också hjälpt mig att vända mig inåt, det behövs fler böcker av den här typen som visar på direkta erfarenheter som har dragits och livslärdomar på det sättet som kan hjälpa andra.Jag gillar sättet Förste man in är uppbyggd på, som del självbiografi med ledartips inblandat. För den utan tålamod (eller för oss som kanske behöver gå tillbaka och titta på vad som står i tipsen i slutet av varje lektion. Det är spännande att komma någon så nära inpå livet. Middleton är öppen och ärlig i boken och det är kul att följa alla olika sidor av honom. En människa är aldrig ensidig och det blir väldigt tydligt i Middletons bok. Den kan säkert hjälpa många som är i samma position som han varit. 
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  • Ruth Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I started watching the celebrity special of SAS who dares wins and quickly got hooked, the other four series were on sky demand and I quickly downloaded those and became obsessed and had watched them all within two weeks. I’ve had Ant’s book sitting on my shelf for a while, I’m not entirely sure what compelled me to buy it other than I had an interest in the military, because at that point I hadn’t heard of or seen the programme. I pulled the book of my shelf after a few episodes in and started I started watching the celebrity special of SAS who dares wins and quickly got hooked, the other four series were on sky demand and I quickly downloaded those and became obsessed and had watched them all within two weeks. I’ve had Ant’s book sitting on my shelf for a while, I’m not entirely sure what compelled me to buy it other than I had an interest in the military, because at that point I hadn’t heard of or seen the programme. I pulled the book of my shelf after a few episodes in and started reading. It’s full of valuable life lessons and was kind of what I needed to read right now. I’ve been struggling mentally the last few months with all the things going on my life right now and this book made me look at things differently, more positively, it’s very inspiring and motivational. I admired that he could hold his hands up and say I’ve made mistakes, but I’ve learnt from them and it’s made me stronger. I look forward to reading his next book and watching the rest of the celebrity SAS who dares wins series.
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  • Sara Hunt
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't a fan of Ant before reading this book. I have never seen him on the telly either. This book is a very interesting read. It chronicles his life through all it's ups and downs and it highlights the personality traits we all have but don't always recognise. At the end of each chapter Ant summed up the main points you should take away from the book and how you could help yourself be a better person. Ant's life hasn't been easy. There have been enormous challenges. Some brought on by stupidi I wasn't a fan of Ant before reading this book. I have never seen him on the telly either. This book is a very interesting read. It chronicles his life through all it's ups and downs and it highlights the personality traits we all have but don't always recognise. At the end of each chapter Ant summed up the main points you should take away from the book and how you could help yourself be a better person. Ant's life hasn't been easy. There have been enormous challenges. Some brought on by stupidity and others by the desire to be the best. Ant is an interesting character as this book highlights. It's not a challenging book to read by any means but it's definitely worth a read if your are interested in the military and Ant as a celebrity. I liked that this book doesn't gloss over the bad bits. Ant is honest and open throughout. I think that makes it a better read. I read this book in two sittings. It was hard to put down. A really enjoyable and interesting read. It makes you think about yourself as well, which is a bonus.
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  • Will Peach
    January 1, 1970
    Being a big fan of Ant Middleton's TV series; both SAS and Mutiny, I was curious to read this book and see what he had to say on the topic of leadership. Ant, for me, is a little like a British Jocko Willink (another guy I'm a huge fan of) but perhaps not as insightful. That's not to downplay this book though, as it is a relatively easy and enjoyable read about life before, in and after the forces.Even if reading about a military guy isn't for you however, a lot of Middleton's experiences (espec Being a big fan of Ant Middleton's TV series; both SAS and Mutiny, I was curious to read this book and see what he had to say on the topic of leadership. Ant, for me, is a little like a British Jocko Willink (another guy I'm a huge fan of) but perhaps not as insightful. That's not to downplay this book though, as it is a relatively easy and enjoyable read about life before, in and after the forces.Even if reading about a military guy isn't for you however, a lot of Middleton's experiences (especially the ones relating to family issues, making peace with demons of the past etc.,) are highly relatable. I've read some reviewers say that he comes across as a 'bit of arsehole', and although I could see some readers interpreting his writing this way, I thought he was actually pretty self-aware of his own ego and humble enough to recognise his deviations into arrogance (and label them as mechanical responses to his past).
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  • MarmottanReads
    January 1, 1970
    Ant Middleton is ex British special forces and most famous for his appearances in the TV programme SAS: Who Dares Wins, where members of the public take part in a curtailed version of special forces selection. And when I say members of the public, clearly these are hugely fit people who are as hard as nails, not people like me who’d cry 200m up a mountain path and try and order an Uber. This book is a bit of a curiosity as it’s part memoir, part treatise on leadership. What does shine through is Ant Middleton is ex British special forces and most famous for his appearances in the TV programme SAS: Who Dares Wins, where members of the public take part in a curtailed version of special forces selection. And when I say members of the public, clearly these are hugely fit people who are as hard as nails, not people like me who’d cry 200m up a mountain path and try and order an Uber. This book is a bit of a curiosity as it’s part memoir, part treatise on leadership. What does shine through is how the military looks after its own on the battlefield but less so on civvy street, and the author doesn’t shy away from some of the issues he faced in adapting to civilian life (one of the lessons here is not to hit a police officer, if that sums it up). A resounding four stars from me, but that may be because I’m a huge fan of the TV series and enjoyed learning about the man.
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  • Jim Dennison
    January 1, 1970
    More autobiographical than self-help but inspiring in places and quite a page turner. I wasn’t convinced the early part of the book (Ant’s time in the paras) was a very good example of how to live a good life ... and many aspects of military life are probably the opposite of what helps in civilian life IMO ... but I think he came to that conclusion himself and certainly his time in the Marines and SBS has more valuable examples. The last few pages of the book are the most helpful IMO. A leader i More autobiographical than self-help but inspiring in places and quite a page turner. I wasn’t convinced the early part of the book (Ant’s time in the paras) was a very good example of how to live a good life ... and many aspects of military life are probably the opposite of what helps in civilian life IMO ... but I think he came to that conclusion himself and certainly his time in the Marines and SBS has more valuable examples. The last few pages of the book are the most helpful IMO. A leader is someone who never takes things personally or lets others define them. And they realise the buck stops with them, rather than trying to blame other people or things for their issues. And they accept their shortcomings and work on fixing them. A good read
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