How to Be Alone
The former Sex & Relationships Editor for Cosmopolitan and host of the wildly popular comedy show Tinder Live with Lane Moore presents her poignant, funny, and deeply moving first book.Lane Moore is a rare performer who is as impressive onstage—whether hosting her iconic show Tinder Live or being the enigmatic front woman of It Was Romance—as she is on the page, as both a former writer for The Onion and an award-winning sex and relationships editor for Cosmopolitan. But her story has had its obstacles, including being her own parent, living in her car as a teenager, and moving to New York City to pursue her dreams. Through it all, she looked to movies, TV, and music as the family and support systems she never had.From spending the holidays alone to having better “stranger luck” than with those closest to her to feeling like the last hopeless romantic on earth, Lane reveals her powerful and entertaining journey in all its candor, anxiety, and ultimate acceptance—with humor always her bolstering force and greatest gift.How to Be Alone is a must-read for anyone whose childhood still feels unresolved, who spends more time pretending to have friends online than feeling close to anyone in real life, who tries to have genuine, deep conversations in a roomful of people who would rather you not. Above all, it’s a book for anyone who desperately wants to feel less alone and a little more connected through reading her words.

How to Be Alone Details

TitleHow to Be Alone
Author
ReleaseNov 6th, 2018
PublisherAtria Books
ISBN-139781501178832
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Essays, Autobiography, Memoir

How to Be Alone Review

  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    I am pleased that I was given the chance to read this book but I was left with confusion on what exactly I read. I felt that the message and title of the book was very misleading. I thought it was going to be about people that are alone and how to overcome the challenges that are associated with being alone. But, the story was focused primarily about Lane Moore's life and "not being alone."I think that being "alone" can mean different things to different people and clearly I feel that the messag I am pleased that I was given the chance to read this book but I was left with confusion on what exactly I read. I felt that the message and title of the book was very misleading. I thought it was going to be about people that are alone and how to overcome the challenges that are associated with being alone. But, the story was focused primarily about Lane Moore's life and "not being alone."I think that being "alone" can mean different things to different people and clearly I feel that the message behind Moore's book was she had romantic relationships, friends, etc and felt completely alone in the world. I feel like because I was so focused on it being the latter of what I felt the book should be about.. I just was pretty disappointed. I think the novel would have been a lot stronger if Lane Moore offered advice at the end of each chapter behind her stories of her life.Overall, 2.5 stars on this for me.Huge thank you to Atria and Netgalley for a copy of this arc in exchange for my honest review.Publication date: 11/6/18Published to GR: 10/15/18
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  • Tabitha
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an advanced readers copy of this book, but all opinions are 100% my own.* How to Be Alone is the soon to be released book by Lane Moore. If you haven’t heard of her yet, I’m confident one day soon you will. Lane Moore is a comedian, musician, writer, and host of Tinder Live.Though technically How to Be Alone is an autobiography, it’s more than that. Lane Moore’s book is touching, witty, and relatable. It discusses inadequacy, loneliness, longing for love, and finding your place in th *I received an advanced readers copy of this book, but all opinions are 100% my own.* How to Be Alone is the soon to be released book by Lane Moore. If you haven’t heard of her yet, I’m confident one day soon you will. Lane Moore is a comedian, musician, writer, and host of Tinder Live.Though technically How to Be Alone is an autobiography, it’s more than that. Lane Moore’s book is touching, witty, and relatable. It discusses inadequacy, loneliness, longing for love, and finding your place in the world both on a personal and interpersonal level.Told through 14 personal essays, Lane dives deep into her most personal thoughts and experiences. From practically raising herself, living in her car, making the ballsy move to NYC, and reconstructing her heart after a series of toxic relationships, she bares it all. To put it simply, this girl has been through some sh*t. But instead of letting that control the way she lives her life and sees the world, she uses humor, music, and writing to create a different picture.Read my full review here: https://tabithoughts.com/2018/08/26/b...
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    A very misleading title/premise for this book. It has nothing to do with loneliness or solitary person, it’s more like a biography, very personal, about the author and her own experience with solitude/and not. Closer to a biography, no reflexion or explanation here. If you love this author/person you may enjoy it, but if you are looking for something to help yourself, this isn’t the right book!
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    More like 3.5 stars. It was not the book I was expecting. I should have paid attention that the author was a relationship editor whose book would most likely be about finding a romantic relationship versus just finding a connection with someone. I was very interested in her experience living independently at a young age and having the guts to pursue what she wants. She details her mercurial adventures in dating and all the while, I keep thinking, she sure meets a lot of interesting characters; n More like 3.5 stars. It was not the book I was expecting. I should have paid attention that the author was a relationship editor whose book would most likely be about finding a romantic relationship versus just finding a connection with someone. I was very interested in her experience living independently at a young age and having the guts to pursue what she wants. She details her mercurial adventures in dating and all the while, I keep thinking, she sure meets a lot of interesting characters; not to mention many strangers who have ultimately stood in for a “family.”There were times that I felt like she contradicted herself, which explains the one less star rating. Ultimately, there is plenty of insight here about what people want and she gives advice to those who feel like they don’t fall in any particular category, but know that it might feel a bit preachy for those who are jaded. Thanks to the publisher for access to the review copy.
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    It’s hard to find the words to explain my feelings about this book. It’s so raw and authentic and honest that some parts hurt to read. The dark humour in it both lightened things up but also highlighted the pain Lane was (and is) dealing with. If you like memoirs that hold nothing back and explore an aspect of the human condition that is key for all of us(love) then you need to read this book.
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  • Castille
    January 1, 1970
    See full review at SometimesSnarky.home.blog Lane Moore is the cutest human, creating relatable comedic material that is so raw, you’ll want to cry and cuddle with her— partly because she point-blank states that she craves comfortable, platonic cuddling, and partly because you’ve realized, while reading, how much you crave it, too. And by the way, yes, I can say a woman is ‘cute’ and still be a feminist. I’m not saying it in a condescending way. I genuinely find Moore’s outlook on life and her s See full review at SometimesSnarky.home.blog Lane Moore is the cutest human, creating relatable comedic material that is so raw, you’ll want to cry and cuddle with her— partly because she point-blank states that she craves comfortable, platonic cuddling, and partly because you’ve realized, while reading, how much you crave it, too. And by the way, yes, I can say a woman is ‘cute’ and still be a feminist. I’m not saying it in a condescending way. I genuinely find Moore’s outlook on life and her sensitivity to be adorable, though by no stretch do I mean to suggest that this precludes her from also being a badass. After all, how many authors have the brass to give their book the same name as a Franzen work, in the same nonfiction space? I can just imagine a (probably male) editor saying “so, Lane, we like all of it– at least all of it we understand and digest– but you do know the title is taken? By none other than Jonathan Franzen…” and her being like “yeah. I know. I like it, though.” end of story.I have a hunch this book won’t appeal to everyone, and that quite a lot of people will find it “too millennial”; too soft, too much complaining, too much. But that’s also what makes it so special, that it won’t have universal appeal, that an agent and an editor and a publisher (and all the other members of the village it takes to raise a book up from a conceptual stage, through publication), all found the story worthwhile. They saw past profit margins, to the heart, and decided it was more important to publish good writing that would likely only resonate with a niche market. A book that could make an actual difference in. Areader’s life. A book called How to be Alone, that, for a few hours, makes you feel you’re not alone. Someone, a real, living human, also experiences similar emotions, and she’s afraid to express them, yet she pushes past her comfort zone to deliver us this gift.If you're a fan of funny female memoirs, or if Carrie Fisher, Jenny Lawson, or Sloane Crosley are on the top of your list, pick up this gem immediately.Rating: 4.5/5 stars, rounded up on Goodreads because 99% of the people on here are assholes or idiots (or a combination of the two) and I want to make sure I’m bringing the average up.
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  • Melise
    January 1, 1970
    This was a difficult book to read. I am probably a bit older than the average person who knows Lane Moore from her Tinder Live with Lane Moore comedy show, and really didn't know what to expect.The book is filled with raw and open essays about the author's struggles to survive in a world that provided very little external support. Her stories have a flare of the grotesque, but within this context I mean outsized and difficult to believe. Yet, I do not think that she is making anything up, but is This was a difficult book to read. I am probably a bit older than the average person who knows Lane Moore from her Tinder Live with Lane Moore comedy show, and really didn't know what to expect.The book is filled with raw and open essays about the author's struggles to survive in a world that provided very little external support. Her stories have a flare of the grotesque, but within this context I mean outsized and difficult to believe. Yet, I do not think that she is making anything up, but is instead sharing experiences that she was never taught to avoid. I have to say that, based on the description, I was expecting that this book would be funnier than it was. I don't consider that a negative, but it wasn't necessarily what I would expect from an author who has been named one of the 75 funniest people on Twitter (see her Goodreads profile). If you are reading this review, please be aware that you won't finish this book with tears in your eyes from laughter.All in all, I found this a very moving book--full of essays that elucidate many of the same struggles that I find myself facing everyday with trying to find personal connections within a world that seems to be all about surface understandings.I received an advanced reading copy from the publisher via NetGalley. Thanks!
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  • Katherine Gypson
    January 1, 1970
    Lane Moore has written the book I needed to exist. In some of the most raw, funny and kind writing I've ever read, Moore not only bares her life, she says the unpopular, uncomfortable truths about life today that need to be said. I rarely read books in one sitting but this was one of those experiences where it was more like meeting a fascinating, witty, honest person and just wanting the conversation to keep on going. I sobbed at the end of the book and truly consider the experience of reading i Lane Moore has written the book I needed to exist. In some of the most raw, funny and kind writing I've ever read, Moore not only bares her life, she says the unpopular, uncomfortable truths about life today that need to be said. I rarely read books in one sitting but this was one of those experiences where it was more like meeting a fascinating, witty, honest person and just wanting the conversation to keep on going. I sobbed at the end of the book and truly consider the experience of reading it a gift. Then I clicked over to Amazon to pre-order a hard copy because I know this will go on my shelf next to "How To Be a Person in the World" and "Tiny Beautiful Things" - "How to Be Alone" is that good.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!
  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Like some of the other reviewers, I was disappointed to find that this book of essays focuses mainly, though not exclusively, on the author's search for a romantic relationship. I was expecting a collection about connecting with yourself and learning to enjoy spending quality time with yourself as a way of recharging from socializing. I identified with some of the author's struggles to connect with other people, and her desperate need for a secure attachment. However, the overall feel of the col Like some of the other reviewers, I was disappointed to find that this book of essays focuses mainly, though not exclusively, on the author's search for a romantic relationship. I was expecting a collection about connecting with yourself and learning to enjoy spending quality time with yourself as a way of recharging from socializing. I identified with some of the author's struggles to connect with other people, and her desperate need for a secure attachment. However, the overall feel of the collection was a bit of a bummer, which is surprising considering Moore is (a) a comedian who (b) writes for the Onion. I didn't even feel like she was making an attempt at wry, self-deprecating humor. I didn't find any humor, honestly. I just felt sad.I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lane Moore
    January 1, 1970
  • Tanja
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know anything about Lane Moore before reading her book but if I did I wouldn't have "wished" for it. I found the swearing throughout to be offensive and perhaps this is Lane's no nonsense way of speaking her truth, but it wasn't something I liked. I thought the title of her book and message misleading. I thought this book was going to be a survival guide for loners, but instead it was a series of chapters about Lane, ironically not being alone. There is a difference between being alone I didn't know anything about Lane Moore before reading her book but if I did I wouldn't have "wished" for it. I found the swearing throughout to be offensive and perhaps this is Lane's no nonsense way of speaking her truth, but it wasn't something I liked. I thought the title of her book and message misleading. I thought this book was going to be a survival guide for loners, but instead it was a series of chapters about Lane, ironically not being alone. There is a difference between being alone and feeling alone and this book is definitely about the latter. One can be alone in this world by not having any friends whatsoever or never having been in a romantic relationship and another person can feel alone by having all those things which was Lane's issue. I didn't feel her brutally honest stories of her life to be helpful in any way. She didn't offer any concrete advice or make me feel better about my own life. She tried linking her lonely childhood to her failed relationships as an adult but it felt like she was trying to sound like a therapist...but not a very good one. I was left feeling very confused about this book. The cover made it look like a psychology textbook and her central message was weak. She didn't explain how to be alone. It was more of a rant and nostalgic trip down memory lane about her issues around attachments in relationships. If she explained in her individual chapters about what it actually "felt like" to be alone in relationships it would have made a huge difference. Also, if she offered advice or tips at the end of each chapter on how to work with this and accept it, this book would have been successful.
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