Hollywood's Eve
Los Angeles in the 1960s and 70s was the pop culture capital of the world—a movie factory, a music factory, a dream factory. Eve Babitz was the ultimate factory girl, a pure product of LA.The goddaughter of Igor Stravinsky and a graduate of Hollywood High, Babitz posed in 1963, at age twenty, playing chess with the French artist Marcel Duchamp. She was naked; he was not. The photograph, cheesecake with a Dadaist twist, made her an instant icon of art and sex. Babitz spent the rest of the decade rocking and rolling on the Sunset Strip, honing her notoriety. There were the album covers she designed: for Buffalo Springfield and the Byrds, to name but a few. There were the men she seduced: Jim Morrison, Ed Ruscha, Harrison Ford, to name but a very few.Then, at nearly thirty, her It girl days numbered, Babitz was discovered—as a writer—by Joan Didion. She would go on to produce seven books, usually billed as novels or short story collections, always autobiographies and confessionals. Under-known and under-read during her career, she’s since experienced a breakthrough. Now in her mid-seventies, she’s on the cusp of literary stardom and recognition as an essential—as the essential—LA writer. Her prose achieves that American ideal: art that stays loose, maintains its cool, and is so sheerly enjoyable as to be mistaken for simple entertainment.For Babitz, life was slow days, fast company until a freak fire in the 90s turned her into a recluse, living in a condo in West Hollywood, where Lili Anolik tracked her down in 2012. Anolik’s elegant and provocative new book is equal parts biography and detective story. It is also on dangerously intimate terms with its subject: artist, writer, muse, and one-woman zeitgeist, Eve Babitz.

Hollywood's Eve Details

TitleHollywood's Eve
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherScribner
ISBN-139781501125799
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Biography Memoir, History

Hollywood's Eve Review

  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    Hollywood's Eve: Eve Babitz and the Secret History of L.A. by Lili Anolik is a 2019 Scribner publication. I read a lot of rock biographies, love pop culture, and know a fair amount of trivia from the sixties and seventies, but I don’t recall hearing about Eve Babitz. Seeing this book advertised, I was curious enough to do a Google search, which had me jumping down my own rabbit hole, much the same way Lili Anolik must have. However, Anolik took a fascination and turned it into a minor obsession. Hollywood's Eve: Eve Babitz and the Secret History of L.A. by Lili Anolik is a 2019 Scribner publication. I read a lot of rock biographies, love pop culture, and know a fair amount of trivia from the sixties and seventies, but I don’t recall hearing about Eve Babitz. Seeing this book advertised, I was curious enough to do a Google search, which had me jumping down my own rabbit hole, much the same way Lili Anolik must have. However, Anolik took a fascination and turned it into a minor obsession. Her research, and ultimately her interviews, with Babtiz led to an article about Eve, which was published in Vanity Fair magazine in 2014. This seemed to spawn a renewed interest in Eve, prompting the re-issue of her novels. I’m certainly interested in seeing what all the fuss is about and am happy to have found her books at the library and on Scribd. While I did find the information in this book of interest and it did pique my curiosity, basically, this book is just an extended version of the Vanity Fair article, and is a very quick read. (The original Vanity Fair article can easily be found online.) Anolik is obviously a huge fan of Eve’s and the book has a sycophant like tone at times. In fact, it is more a fan girl homage than anything else. Although Anolik’s enthusiasm is catchy, It still left me wanting something more. It would be nice, I think, if Eve wrote a memoir someday. 3 stars
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    This is an expanded version of Anolik’s Vanity Fair article. There is a good bit of information about the author’s pursuit of Babitz and some interesting observations about Joan Didion. It’s a solid biography if you haven’t read the article. If you have read it there isn’t much that is new.
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  • Eleanore
    January 1, 1970
    "On the one hand, how great, new fans for Eve, and who cares if they were fans for the wrong reasons, and is there such a thing as a wrong reason, and bless their ingenuous little hearts in any case. On the other hand, though, Jesus fucking Christ. And as they talked, I'd nod and make appropriate remarks, all the while internally sighing and muttering sarcastic comments to myself. Because unh-uh, because give me a break, because absolutely not. Eve is nothing like Darren Star's heroine, a tough "On the one hand, how great, new fans for Eve, and who cares if they were fans for the wrong reasons, and is there such a thing as a wrong reason, and bless their ingenuous little hearts in any case. On the other hand, though, Jesus fucking Christ. And as they talked, I'd nod and make appropriate remarks, all the while internally sighing and muttering sarcastic comments to myself. Because unh-uh, because give me a break, because absolutely not. Eve is nothing like Darren Star's heroine, a tough cookie with a gooey marshmallow center. Eve's sleep-around, troublemaker front is real. There's no doe-eyed snookums looking for the right fella behind it, no twinkling heart of gold. She isn't an Every Girl, or relatable--the opposite. She's about as far out as you can get: an existential outlaw plus a demon plus an artist. Straight down the line."It's so interesting to me that Anolik opens this book with a clarification that it's not exactly a ("traditional") biography -- and her argument as to why is certainly sufficient, even justifiable... when it turns out to be one of the most fulfilling and clear-eyed biographies I can recall reading, and on such a thorny, elusive subject at that. I adore Eve Babitz, just as Anolik does, though I'll never know her personally, as she does, and I'm even less objective about Babitz's works than Anolik is; she's able to admit up front to not particularly caring for two of Eve's most famous four works, a point on which we diverge, though I see her points. But that's neither here nor there. She delivers a fantastic portrait of a somewhat infamous -- while still being lesser known than she deserves (though, due to recent reissues -- and thanks in some part to Anolik herself, and her Vanity Fair piece that helped set that ball rolling, too -- that is finally changing) -- near-recluse, though one who captured the true spirit of Los Angeles better than any other writer I've yet read. Babitz achieves this in part because she's never able to depersonalize it; every Babitz "novel" or story collection is really at least semi-, if not fully, autobiography, over and over, and she's completely unapologetic about it. Similarly, though Anolik begins with the confession that she's grown too close to her subject for this biography to fully qualify, she never lets herself off the hook as one might expect. She still sees and examines Eve, and her works, exactly as she is, and they are, and we're all included like another listener in on the process, and all the better illuminated for it.This book also delivers the deconstruction and de-mythologizing of Joan Didion I never even knew I wanted so badly, until I finally read it here; it explains at last exactly why, no matter how great Didion is (and she is undoubtedly great), her attitude and writing on Los Angeles, which she staunchly looked sideways and down her nose at, has always left me so cold. Eve is a wrecking ball force contained within a single woman; wrapped up in all her errors in judgment, her drinking and drugging, her infamous love affairs, her several other aborted artistic careers, her dismissals and fascinations... that is the Los Angeles I know and love, and call my home, even though I never have (and never will) live a life anything like hers. (Will any other woman? Doubtful. She is singular, yet her works are near-universally appealing, which is what makes her so brilliant. Her secret is sharing as many of hers as she deems worthy of revealing, which is most of them, and so she makes us all her confidante, enhances all our lives through them, no matter how far apart from her locale or her moment we'll always be.)Most of all, I treasure this book for revealing so much more behind the iconic LA woman, and that of her that's revealed through her own works, as Babitz's work -- coming into my life as I've created my own hard-won home, as a very different sort of artist, in the Los Angeles of now (which both never could be, yet simultaneously always will be, Eve's LA) -- has been revelatory to me unlike that of any other writer. I'll always wish I could write like her, though I never will, nor should anyone bother to attempt it. I'll just have to settle for re- (and re-re-, and so on) reading her, armed now with more to appreciate behind her words and stories than ever before. They were already special to me, but they've grown more so for reading this. If that's non-traditional biography, I'm very satisfied to be not at all a traditional reader.
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  • Britta Böhler
    January 1, 1970
    More fan-nonfiction than a biography, but I found the mix of the author's personal point of view, interviews and biographical snippets very fitting for the subject in question, and also a highly enjoyable read.
  • Emma Kearney
    January 1, 1970
    For all my feminism and constant work to undo internalized misogyny, I still struggle with unlikable women. Perhaps more than anything, I want to be likable. And I love to dole out compliments to my female friends that are overblown, commenting on their kindness and sweetness. Eve Babitz is not likable, but she is a genius. Practicing sitting with her is a helpful, if uncomfortable exercise. Babitz is like Lana del Rey (also a genius), but it isn’t a pastiche. There is no wink or nod. This is ju For all my feminism and constant work to undo internalized misogyny, I still struggle with unlikable women. Perhaps more than anything, I want to be likable. And I love to dole out compliments to my female friends that are overblown, commenting on their kindness and sweetness. Eve Babitz is not likable, but she is a genius. Practicing sitting with her is a helpful, if uncomfortable exercise. Babitz is like Lana del Rey (also a genius), but it isn’t a pastiche. There is no wink or nod. This is just Babitz’s life. Anolik, especially by also including Eve’s sister’s story, emphasizes that feminine genius often is undocumentable. Its products are sometimes by products and only have One Author and that Author is male. Eve, the writer is one thing. But Eve, the person who gained access to all that she wrote about is another. One lends itself to assessment on established terms, but the other is more interesting. Just harder to reckon with as genius. But hanger-ons, groupies, muses must have something (genius, or perhaps a different word) and Anolik starts to build a vocabulary of how do we revere them. This is bolstered in this book by Anolik giving over to her affection and relationship with Babitz. Rather than implicating fictive distance, Anolik embraces the biographical collapse between subject, object and author and lets the cracks show so much that they cease to be cracks. I still struggle for language to describe sitting with Babitz. But I think of all the behavior I forgive in male geniuses I love, and I wonder what equivalence I should extend to her. Forgiveness isn’t quite the right word because on what authority do I forgive Babitz for her behavior that makes me uneasy? I think maybe the best thing I can give her is my attention.
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  • Meg
    January 1, 1970
    WELL I READ THAT IN A SITTING.It seems like two summers ago, everyone on Bookstagram and on book Twitter was talking about Eve Babitz. The more I read about her from the people I followed, the more I wanted to know who she was through her writing. I purchased Sex & Rage in the fall of 2017 (and, shamefully, still haven't read it), and I bought Eve's Hollywood this past fall at Strand Bookstore in New York City while I was there visiting a friend. I read Eve's Hollywood from the end of Novemb WELL I READ THAT IN A SITTING.It seems like two summers ago, everyone on Bookstagram and on book Twitter was talking about Eve Babitz. The more I read about her from the people I followed, the more I wanted to know who she was through her writing. I purchased Sex & Rage in the fall of 2017 (and, shamefully, still haven't read it), and I bought Eve's Hollywood this past fall at Strand Bookstore in New York City while I was there visiting a friend. I read Eve's Hollywood from the end of November to December last year, and I simultaneously wanted to devour that book in a day and savor it over all time. I finally understood why everyone was talking about Eve Babitz (again).Babitz is an enigma. She'll make you fall in love with her Los Angeles, and she'll make you fall in love with her, all while keeping you at an arm's length so you can't help but want to listen to everything she has to say. Lili Anolik's fascination with Eve Babitz, her life, and writing, turned into a Vanity Fair article that was later expanded into Hollywood's Eve. I read Anolik's Hollywood's Eve in a single sitting. I picked it up, read a few chapters, and did what I had to do for the day quickly so that I could spend the rest of my afternoon completely engrossed in Anolik's discovery, research, and eventual personal connection with Babitz.I really enjoyed Anolik's emulation of Babitz's style, mixing in personal experience with the subject at hand. I find for certain biographies, this style works well, because a writer is able to add in personal anecdotes about people and places that would seem out of place in a more "formal" biography. I learned a lot about Hollywood in the 60s and 70s through Eve's Hollywood and Hollywood's Eve that I've not really seen or read discussed anywhere else -- like the bits about the Didions and Harrison Ford. Sometimes for me, who has only recently begun to dive into the behind-the-scenes stories of a Hollywood that's gone, it's a little jaw-dropping to see so many well-known faces know having those connections back then. That knowledge adds so much depth to the writing and film I'll consume from that point forward, you know?Eve Babitz is not often likeable, but she is an incredible observer and writer. I thoroughly enjoyed the small part Anolik included that contrasted Eve with her sister Mirandi because it added so much more understanding to Eve as a person. Over the years I've read a lot more about and by "difficult" women, women who sometimes behave in ways that men do and the men are praised for it (or have their actions conveniently brushed aside) while the women are villainized or shamed for it? And why? Because they're women? I'm still confronting that within myself and realizing the best thing I can do is listen, absorb, and pay attention. And maybe be more like Babitz myself.Thank you to Scribner for sending me a copy of Hollywood's Eve to review! All opinions are my own.
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  • Lorri Steinbacher
    January 1, 1970
    Guys, this book! It’s sex and art and celebrity before it was tainted by the internet. It’s 60’s and 70’s Hollywood. Names you know (Harrison Ford makes sense to me now) and names you won’t (but wished you could have partied with). Eve Babitz is Joan Didion but with grit and a beating heart and a DGAF attitude. Recommend
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  • Don
    January 1, 1970
    This is a terrible book. It is about half gushing over over babitz and her at best mediocre writings as if they were creative gems and blistering the overrated Joan Didion, particularly for her Play It As It Lays. She praises bibitz beauty, especially when she was young, but the photos of Babitz belie that praise. Babitz was a Hollywood groupie who had sex with many notables, including the overrated Jim morrison and dozens of hollywood lounge lizards. Anolik writes partial sentences in some case This is a terrible book. It is about half gushing over over babitz and her at best mediocre writings as if they were creative gems and blistering the overrated Joan Didion, particularly for her Play It As It Lays. She praises bibitz beauty, especially when she was young, but the photos of Babitz belie that praise. Babitz was a Hollywood groupie who had sex with many notables, including the overrated Jim morrison and dozens of hollywood lounge lizards. Anolik writes partial sentences in some cases and long, convoluted difficult to follow sentences elsewhere. She is a sloppy writer, e.g., she refers to NOW as National Organization of Women; she refers to Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray as "Portrait of Dorian Gray," and in one sentences uses fraught and freighted as if they were different in meaning [those are just a few examples]. The second biggest question is why did Anolik seek to extol such lavish attention and praise of the writings and lifestyle of Babitz, a virtual nobody? The biggest question is why did I read it to the end?
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  • Y (Bookiful.life)
    January 1, 1970
    This was written by a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, who became obsessed with Babitz sometime before 2012. She became so fascinated with Babitz that she ended up doing a bunch of research on her and writing a featured article for Vanity Fair in 2014, which is what prompted the reissuing of Babitz's work two years later by NYRB.In this book, Anolik adds on more info on Babitz, and though I am grateful for ANY new info on Babitz, none really felt like a revelation or even "new", necessarily. This was written by a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, who became obsessed with Babitz sometime before 2012. She became so fascinated with Babitz that she ended up doing a bunch of research on her and writing a featured article for Vanity Fair in 2014, which is what prompted the reissuing of Babitz's work two years later by NYRB.In this book, Anolik adds on more info on Babitz, and though I am grateful for ANY new info on Babitz, none really felt like a revelation or even "new", necessarily. This felt like a longer and wordier version of her featured article in Vanity Fair.Don't get me wrong I am happy this book exists! This is a good book for anyone learning about Eve for the first time ever.Another thing I was disappointed about was that there weren’t many new photos of Eve included in this book. The ones that are included in here are the ones we see over and over again.[This book was sent to me by the publisher in return for an honest review]
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    Before she became an artist and author ("Slow Days, Fast Company"), Eve Babitz was a party girl par excellence. Carousing with artists, actors and musicians came naturally to her: Eve's mother was an artist; her father was a movie musician; and her godfather was composer Igor Stravinsky. In 1963, when she was 20, she gained notoriety when for an art exhibit she posed for a nude photograph playing chess with artist Marcel Duchamp. She was sexually free and enjoyed her drugs. Babitz once said, "An Before she became an artist and author ("Slow Days, Fast Company"), Eve Babitz was a party girl par excellence. Carousing with artists, actors and musicians came naturally to her: Eve's mother was an artist; her father was a movie musician; and her godfather was composer Igor Stravinsky. In 1963, when she was 20, she gained notoriety when for an art exhibit she posed for a nude photograph playing chess with artist Marcel Duchamp. She was sexually free and enjoyed her drugs. Babitz once said, "Anyone who lived past thirty just wasn't trying hard enough to have fun."Much of this juicy and illuminating biography concerns how Vanity Fair contributing editor Lili Anolik's appreciation of Babitz's numerous books and album cover art led her to seek out the now-reclusive icon. Babitz left the limelight after a 1997 fire left her with third-degree burns and massive medical debt. The generous quotations from the author's novels display a witty, caustic and observant writer well worth rediscovering.But many will read Hollywood's Eve for the tantalizing tales of her sexual exploits. She dated Steve Martin, Jim Morrison, Jack Nicholson and others. Novelist Dan Wakefield remembers, "Our year together was one of my favorite years, but I couldn't have lived through two of them. My God, the decadence!" Her relationship with struggling actor Harrison Ford was strictly physical. "Harrison could f***," says Babitz. "Nine people a day. It's a talent, loving nine people in one day. Warren [Beatty] could only do six." HOLLYWOOD'S EVE is a gossipy delight and entertaining reintroduction to a very talented writer of L.A. life. This fascinating and juicy bio of Eve Babitz will satisfy gossip-lovers and resurrect the superb chronicler of sex, drugs and life in Los Angeles.
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  • Jamele (BookswithJams)
    January 1, 1970
    Lili Anolik gives us what we have been missing regarding the life of Eve Babitz, along with a bonus glimpse into L.A. during one of its most glamorous time periods, the 60's. I loved every bit of this, she painted perfectly the setting, and the format was ideal to convey Eve's history, first as a 'groupie' and then later on as a writer. I did not know who she was prior to reading this book, but by the end, I understood why the author was so enamored with her.Thank you to Scribner and Edelweiss f Lili Anolik gives us what we have been missing regarding the life of Eve Babitz, along with a bonus glimpse into L.A. during one of its most glamorous time periods, the 60's. I loved every bit of this, she painted perfectly the setting, and the format was ideal to convey Eve's history, first as a 'groupie' and then later on as a writer. I did not know who she was prior to reading this book, but by the end, I understood why the author was so enamored with her.Thank you to Scribner and Edelweiss for the electronic ARC to review. All opinions above are my own. Pub date is 1/8/19.
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  • Matthew Wilder
    January 1, 1970
    Breezy and exhilarating critical biography cum first person stream of consciousness on the forgotten and remembered doyenne of counterculture Hollywood.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I can’t even with this book. Babitz is what Didion doesn’t allow herself to be and she is better for it. There I said it. So many more thoughts but they are better suited for Tumblr and all caps texting to friends.
  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Scribner for sending me a free copy of this fascinating chronicle of Eve Babitz’s life and Los Angeles in the 1960s/1970s. It publishes next week on the 8th!I had a debacle when deciding to read this one: I have two Eve books on my shelf, Black Swans and LA Woman, that I haven’t read yet. In fact, I haven’t read any of Eve’s work, though I’ve been meaning to. Instead of reading her books first, I decided to pick this up, feeling like it would give me more insight into her writing and c Thank you Scribner for sending me a free copy of this fascinating chronicle of Eve Babitz’s life and Los Angeles in the 1960s/1970s. It publishes next week on the 8th!⁣⁣I had a debacle when deciding to read this one: I have two Eve books on my shelf, Black Swans and LA Woman, that I haven’t read yet. In fact, I haven’t read any of Eve’s work, though I’ve been meaning to. Instead of reading her books first, I decided to pick this up, feeling like it would give me more insight into her writing and context of her life. It certainly did. I’m even more excited to read Eve now. ⁣⁣This is not a typical biography - it is not broken into chapters with chronological, boring timelines of events in Eve’s life. It reads more like a series of anecdotes with context of the LA cultural, music, film, and art scenes sprinkled in. I can see the book appearing jumbled to those that prefer clear stopping points and chapters, but it didn’t bother me; it actually made the book more entertaining, as biographies can have a reputation for being boring. Background is given on the characters in Eve’s life - captivating people like Joan Didion & Jim Morrison. I’m a sucker for intimate looks into artists’ and creators’ lives, and this book provides a number of these moments throughout, with Eve connected to so many famous and rattling events in LA history. Eve ran in the circles of legends, both revered ones and infamous ones, and she was shameless in the best way possible in her pursuit of a crazy, creative life.⁣Though I obviously wasn’t alive in the time period Anolik writes of here, I felt weirdly nostalgic for the time I spent growing up in the LA area during my middle school years. That enchantment LA has no matter how you want to resist it. I often look back on my time there with a sort of melancholy - everything is so outlandish and alluring and tainted by excessiveness, but at the same time you want to be a part of the action. I love that Anolik captures this spirit of LA. ⁣⁣Whether you’ve read Babitz before or not, pick this up and get lost in her Los Angeles - in all its beauty and darkness.
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    Anolik would probably be delighted to learn that I read all of Babitz' books, pretty much as they came out, beginning with Slow Days, Fast Company (it had been remaindered at the bookstore where I worked and I was seduced by the cartoon dog on the cover -- a Saluki, as she points out, and not a Dachshund as I had thought.) I thought her voice was one of the most remarkable I had ever read, and the stories stayed with me, particularly "Dodger Stadium," which epitomizes my fascination with her -- Anolik would probably be delighted to learn that I read all of Babitz' books, pretty much as they came out, beginning with Slow Days, Fast Company (it had been remaindered at the bookstore where I worked and I was seduced by the cartoon dog on the cover -- a Saluki, as she points out, and not a Dachshund as I had thought.) I thought her voice was one of the most remarkable I had ever read, and the stories stayed with me, particularly "Dodger Stadium," which epitomizes my fascination with her -- she could be enthusiastic about something she really had little experience with and could make me see the joy in things that, in reality, I would flee. I expected celebrity gossip (and, after all, really who wouldn't want to know who took her to Chavez Ravine) but after the first several pages realized that I had stumbled on to something akin to Boswell, also a biographer of another sort of celebrated wit and society darling. Anolik is briefer (less is more), funnier, and of course the temperaments of subject and object been reversed, but it is a wonderful book, full of insights and remarkably honest. "She's great on the present as well, if you're willing to wait out the political rants. (Her views took a sharp right turn post-fire.) She tells me about the book she's reading, Life, Keith Richards' autobiography: 'The reason Keith doesn't die is because he doesn't mix his drugs.' Why she isn't writing: 'I'd rather do nothing for as long as I can stand it.' What her skin looks like: 'I'm a mermaid now, half my body.' It's the last remark that knocks me out the most. I love it not simply because itshows how tough she is,how unbowed, what a sport and a champ and a trouper, but because of its sneaky eroticism, She's comparing her burned epidermis, a painful and grisly condition -- a disfigurement -- to the scales on the tail of a mermaid the seductress of the sea. As an image, it's grotesque and romantic at once. Not just sexy, perversely sexy. Not just perversely sexy, triumphantly perversely sexy. On the phone she talks like she writes." (p. 157) I have never gotten much wilder than sun- and beer-drunk at the beach, where Babitz refers to her own excess as "squalid overboogie." Anolik's book did for me what I thought was impossible -- explains what makes me enjoy Babitz' writing so much.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    "Culturally, L.A. has always been a humid jungle alive with seething L.A. projects that I guess people from other places just can't see. It takes a certain kind of innocence to like L.A., anyway. It requires a certain plain happiness inside to be happy in L.A., to choose it and be happy here. When people are not happy, they fight against L.A. and say it's a "wasteland" and other helpful descriptions." ~Eve Babitz•This was a facinating account of one of L.A.'s most promiscuous and unapologetic pa "Culturally, L.A. has always been a humid jungle alive with seething L.A. projects that I guess people from other places just can't see. It takes a certain kind of innocence to like L.A., anyway. It requires a certain plain happiness inside to be happy in L.A., to choose it and be happy here. When people are not happy, they fight against L.A. and say it's a "wasteland" and other helpful descriptions." ~Eve Babitz•This was a facinating account of one of L.A.'s most promiscuous and unapologetic party girls of the 60's and 70's!I knew little of Eve Babitz (and less of L.A.) going into this book. But the author Lili Anolik presents her story in such a way that you slowly fall in love and facination with Eve and her world of L.A. She was wild, and bold and unapologetic about sex. There is so much history in here. Not just Babitz's personal history but L.A.'s. I found all the landmarks and big names so interesting. Hollywood was such a different world than it is now or will ever be again! And there will never be another Eve!The writing was well done too. It flowed nicely. You can tell by how the author writes that she herself is writing from a point of view of admiration and love of her subject. Biographies can be a bore sometimes it's why I prefer memoirs honestly but this kept my interest. I found myself having a hard time putting it down.I have only read one of Babitz books before but I definitely want to read more now. She has said that they are all written accounts from her life, names have just been changed for privacy. •Thank You to the publisher for sending me this ARC.• For more of my book content check out instagram.com/bookalong
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  • Nancy Gates
    January 1, 1970
    Hollywood's Eve, the new bio of Eve Babitz by Lili Anolik. So blessed in the beginning: Eve was the IT girl of '60s and '70s LA. Her dad was a studio musician, her godfather was Stravinsky, she was gorgeous and, as she often boasts "stacked". Her initial claim to fame was posing nude with Marcel DuChamp as they played chess. Eve also turned out to be a brilliant observer and a snarky, zesty essayist. Her books Eve's Hollywood and Slow Days, Fast Company provide great portraits of life at Hollywo Hollywood's Eve, the new bio of Eve Babitz by Lili Anolik. So blessed in the beginning: Eve was the IT girl of '60s and '70s LA. Her dad was a studio musician, her godfather was Stravinsky, she was gorgeous and, as she often boasts "stacked". Her initial claim to fame was posing nude with Marcel DuChamp as they played chess. Eve also turned out to be a brilliant observer and a snarky, zesty essayist. Her books Eve's Hollywood and Slow Days, Fast Company provide great portraits of life at Hollywood High (mascot Rudolph Valentino?!?) with future movie and music star classmates, to the SunSet Strip and encounters with Johnny Stompanato (doomed lover of Lana Turner), Jim Morrison, Gram Parsons. Bobby Beausoleil was briefly her roommate. A sweet guy, until he hooked up with Charles Manson. Babitz disguised most of her friends and lovers in her essays, but real names are revealed in this bio.Some readers will be put off Babitz endless sexual appetite and escapades (she was never a victim; she was the instigator), not to mention her drug use and string of affairs with married men. Eve is proof a person can be compelling even if you don't always like them. Her recovery from a horrible accident is absolutely awe-inspiring. Now 75, she lives a quiet, somewhat secluded life, but remains fascinating.
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  • A
    January 1, 1970
    There was a time (the 70s?) when I became aware that writing began to sound like talking. It did not have the reconsidering what was written. It was informal. Sometimes it sounded like gossip. Eve Babitz's writing did not sound like she had just said something out loud. Although it might have had a stream-of-consciousness feel, she was in complete control. It was gossipy, yet there was something that set it apart from gossip.This biography and paean to Babitz is on the gossip level. It is all ab There was a time (the 70s?) when I became aware that writing began to sound like talking. It did not have the reconsidering what was written. It was informal. Sometimes it sounded like gossip. Eve Babitz's writing did not sound like she had just said something out loud. Although it might have had a stream-of-consciousness feel, she was in complete control. It was gossipy, yet there was something that set it apart from gossip.This biography and paean to Babitz is on the gossip level. It is all about talking and nothing else.
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  • Allison Floyd
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun, smart read, if you can grit your teeth through the author's love affair with her own cleverness. Don't get me wrong—clever she is, and good things to say, she has. And a worthy subject, certainly. But there are times when it gets to be a bit much (see: "The novel is dead. Long live the novel."). I just about forgave her, though, when I arrived at the Eve Babitz vs. Carrie Bradshaw breakdown (p. 259-60). No regrets here! Now pass the taquitos!
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  • Spiros
    January 1, 1970
    A nice chronicle of the author's obsession with the amazing Eve Babitz, an obsession which I feel all right thinking people ought to share; it sheds occasional, strobe-like light on Eve herself. I hadn't, for example, known that Eve went straight from rehab to living with Warren Zevon, which seems like just about the most counter-productive situation possible. Altogether, an entertaining and valuable supplement to Eve's work.
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this because I love Babitz's work, and I love a dishy, gushy biography too. There's much here that I also didn't care for (Anolik is at her best when she's following a story or series of them rather than analyzing or theorizing), though I appreciated the way this book openly embraced being a an out-and-out fan as a position from which to write. If you enjoy Babitz, Jean Stein's oral histories, Pamela Des Barres' memoirs etc you will definitely enjoy.
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  • Susan Tryforos
    January 1, 1970
    I will admit that I'd never heard of Eve Babitz before picking up this book at the library. It looked like an interesting insight into the 1960s Los Angeles scene; the writing style is breezy and fast-paced and there are enough famous names dropped throughout to keep it interesting (mostly). But, I just don't get why the author is so fangirling her subject. To me it is a sad story about a woman who pissed away her talent and who is not a particularly nice person to boot.
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  • Janelle Samuel
    January 1, 1970
    Listened to the audiobook via Scribd. Eve Babitz is Joan Didion’s less reserved, less political, crazy-sexy shadow self. This was a story beautifully told about a woman who we are only discovering now, many years after her glory ones. Her stories are wild and seasoned with an irresistible, incandescent madness- a life lived fast and furious and rough.
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    Compulsively readable but empty, this is a gushy fan-girl rehash of the life and work (if by "life and work" you mostly mean name-dropping and gossip) of a minor figure more known by the company she kept than by her small shelf of books.
  • Amelia
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone close to Eve (and still living), including Eve herself, participated in the writing of this book and is quoted frequently and at length. For that reason, and that reason only, it's worth reading.
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    The way this book was written made me feel like I was the only sober person at a party where everyone else had helped themselves to silver bowls filled with cocaine. Dizzying to the point where it almost wasn't worth finishing.
  • Daniella
    January 1, 1970
    Captivating woman who knew a young harrison ford *swoons*
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Three stars for creative prose, but ultimately I don't care for this Kerouac-like, stream-of-consciousness style. But Babitz sounds And I wasn't entirely impressed with Ms. Babitz herself
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