Rewrite
In this thematic sequel to Gregory Benford’s award-winning bestseller Timescape, a history professor finds that he is able travel back to 1968, the year he was sixteen—here, he finds a slew of mentors with the same ability, including Robert Heinlein, Albert Einstein, and Philip K. Dick and becomes a successful Hollywood screenwriter until some wicked time travelers try to subvert him. It’s 2002, and Charlie, in his late forties, is a bit of a sad-sack professor of history going through an unpleasant divorce. While flipping the cassette of an audiobook he gets into a car accident with a truck, and wakes up, fully aware as his adult mind, in his sixteen-year-old body in 1968.Charlie does the thing we all imagine: he takes what he remembers of the future and uses it for himself in his present, the past. He becomes a screenwriter, anticipating the careers of Francis Ford Coppola and Steven Spielberg, and then, in a 1980s life of excess, he dies, and wakes up again in his bedroom at sixteen in 1968.Charlie realizes things he didn’t see the first time: that there are others like him, like Albert Einstein, Philip K. Dick, Robert Heinlein. In fact, there is a society of folks who loop through time to change the world for their agenda. Now, Charlie knows he has to do something other than be self-indulgent and he tries to change one of the events of 1968 in this clever thriller.

Rewrite Details

TitleRewrite
Author
ReleaseNov 27th, 2018
PublisherSaga Press
ISBN-139781481487696
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Time Travel

Rewrite Review

  • Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    Huh. Maybe at some point authors should stop writing books. Maybe not. I remember liking Timescape, not loving it, but thinking it a worthwhile award-winner. I really liked Replay. Heck I even read Into the Deep which is basically the book version of the movie that Replay's main character makes with Spielberg on his second? third reincarnation? So having Benford rewrite Replay was jarring. And to have a character spend their entire second life making movies but not funding it with any previous k Huh. Maybe at some point authors should stop writing books. Maybe not. I remember liking Timescape, not loving it, but thinking it a worthwhile award-winner. I really liked Replay. Heck I even read Into the Deep which is basically the book version of the movie that Replay's main character makes with Spielberg on his second? third reincarnation? So having Benford rewrite Replay was jarring. And to have a character spend their entire second life making movies but not funding it with any previous knowledge was also just weird. And then the book takes a right-turn. And we get Robert Heinlein and Albert Einstein and a version of Benford himself as characters. And then the book gets weird. Okay we do see Philip K. Dick and Spielberg and Lucas but that's barely surprising. Is this good? Not really. But is it interesting in and oddly different take on at least half of the book? Well maybe. Though it also has enough of The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August that even that part isn't original. So no. Read Replay. Read Timescape. Heck even read the First Fifteen Lives of Harry August. Read classic Heinlein. Give this book a pass. Or not. Just being unoriginal didn't make it bad. I just expected better. From an ARC - Advance Reader Copy.
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