Even Better Than Eden
Most people--Christians and non-Christians alike--are familiar with the garden of Eden, the perfect paradise that God created for the first man and woman. However, many don't realize the Bible teaches that God is preparing an even better world for his people in the future new creation. In this book, experienced Bible teacher Nancy Guthrie traces 9 themes--the tree of life, garden and wilderness, the image of God, clothing, Sabbath rest, marriage, the seed of the Serpent, the temple, and the city of Jerusalem--throughout the Bible, revealing how God's plan for the new heaven and the new earth is far better than anything we can possibly imagine. What's more, she shows how this better world is already having an impact in the world today. Combining theological depth with warmth and accessibility aimed at addressing today's needs, this book will help individuals or small groups understand the story of God's plan for the future of his people.

Even Better Than Eden Details

TitleEven Better Than Eden
Author
ReleaseAug 31st, 2018
PublisherCrossway Books
ISBN-139781433561252
Rating
GenreChristian, Nonfiction, Religion, Christianity

Even Better Than Eden Review

  • Amy Kannel
    January 1, 1970
    I had the privilege of reading a pre-publication manuscript of this book, and I cannot say enough good things about it. Ever since I started reading it, I've raved about it to anyone who will listen! I believe this is an important and needed book for the church. So many people lack understanding of the big picture--they don't grasp that the Bible is one big story that fits together from Genesis to Revelation. And so many people focus all their attention on Jesus' life, death, and resurrection, w I had the privilege of reading a pre-publication manuscript of this book, and I cannot say enough good things about it. Ever since I started reading it, I've raved about it to anyone who will listen! I believe this is an important and needed book for the church. So many people lack understanding of the big picture--they don't grasp that the Bible is one big story that fits together from Genesis to Revelation. And so many people focus all their attention on Jesus' life, death, and resurrection, without giving much thought to His return or anticipating the ways that the New Earth will be far more glorious than what Adam and Eve lost. Guthrie skillfully brings attention and clarity to both. Each of the nine chapters explores how a theme unfolds from the Garden of Eden to the New Jerusalem. She weaves in personal illustrations and relevant application and leaves the reader in awe of what God has done and excited about what is to come.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This book is theologically solid and full of great quotes. Some chapters were really good, some were kind of meh. This book has discussion questions in the back, so I think I would have enjoyed it more as a group study instead of reading it by myself.Full review here.
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  • Emily Schultz
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a lovely narrative-theological work. It is meant to encourage the reader to continue to look to Christ and our future hope- enjoying Him forever. Full review here:https://coffeemeetsass.wordpress.com/...
  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Nancy Guthrie examines nine themes or nine stories of the Bible illustrating that what God has planned for us is even better than Eden. She writes, "Christ came to accomplish what was necessary to open the way for us, not just back into the garden of Eden, but into a home that will be even better than Eden and a life that will be even better than the life Adam and Eve enjoyed there."The nine stories are as follows: the story of the wilderness, the story of the tree, the story of his image, the s Nancy Guthrie examines nine themes or nine stories of the Bible illustrating that what God has planned for us is even better than Eden. She writes, "Christ came to accomplish what was necessary to open the way for us, not just back into the garden of Eden, but into a home that will be even better than Eden and a life that will be even better than the life Adam and Eve enjoyed there."The nine stories are as follows: the story of the wilderness, the story of the tree, the story of his image, the story of clothing, the story of the bridegroom, the story of sabbath, the story of the offspring, the story of a dwelling place, and the story of the city.Guthrie traces each story throughout Scripture often beginning in Genesis and concluding in Revelation. She never pushes too far trying to weave each and every book of the Bible into each story. Some stories might pull more from the history books of the Old Testament, others might pull more from the Old Testament prophets. But all nine stories include illustrations from the Old Testament and the New Testament. Most--if not all--have a beginning, middle, and end. The end being the future glory, the future fulfillment or consummation of God's promises.There is purpose, intentionality in the Bible and how it unfolds. It can--and should--shape us, shape how we see ourselves, shape how we see others, shape how we see the world, shape how we see God, shape how we live, think, act, speak. Guthrie wants you to be excited about being a citizen of heaven; she wants you to look forward to a new heaven and a new earth--to be eager for the kingdom of God.I love how each chapter relates to the here and now but also builds anticipation and longing for the future. To those perhaps unfamiliar with how the Bible unfolds it might create an interest--or might be used by the Spirit to spark an interest a curiosity to read and see for yourself, to delight in God's Word. To those familiar with the Bible it might be a good reminder of why the good news is the good news.Guthrie's book is a great read.From chapter one:"Have you ever thought about the emptiness you feel in this light? Do you think, perhaps, that God has let you hunger for whatever it is you are so hungry for so that you might become more desperate for him, more convinced that he is the source of what will fill you up? Do you think he might want to retrain your appetites, redirecting them away from this world, this life, even this age, so that your anticipation of the age to come might begin to shape your perspective on whatever it is you lack?"From chapter two:"The tree of life is not simply a thing of the past. It’s a promise for our future."From chapter three:"So how are we meant to see ourselves? And how can finding a solid source of identity keep us from floundering with a fragile or distorted sense of self?"From chapter four:"As we bring ourselves naked and exposed before the Word of God, this living and active Word goes to work in the interior of our lives, discerning our impure thoughts and ugly intentions of the heart so that we can confess, repent, and truly change (Heb. 4:12–13). The Spirit does his work of transformation so that we are increasingly wrapped in the robes of the righteousness of Christ—not simply in a judicial sense, but in the reality of our lives."From chapter five:"It makes sense that the Bible would begin with this poetic exclamation of love because the Bible is a love story from beginning to end. It’s the story of God choosing, gathering, and beautifying a bride for his Son. She’s not necessarily the prettiest or the most loving in return. In fact, as we read the story of the bride, we’re a little shocked at times that God would chose her. We see that she often has a hard heart; she’s often resistant to his affections and wholly dismissive of his gifts. Yet the Father is relentless in his pursuit and preparation of this bride for his Son. So far, it’s proving to be an unexpectedly long engagement. The Father has set a date for the wedding, and the invitations have been sent out. Of course, as much as we anticipate that day, the wedding will be only the beginning. It is the eternal marriage, the one in which we’ll never have to say “till death do us part,” that we anticipate most—a marriage that will be even better than the marriage Adam and Eve enjoyed in Eden."From chapter six:"This life was never meant to be an aimless existence; it has always been headed somewhere, somewhere better than Eden. The destination out in front of us should shape how we live day by day, week by week, and year by year. “Let us therefore strive to enter that rest.” How? By resting in Christ’s finished work and by spending a day, every week, anticipating the rest that is ahead for us because of it. The day is coming when we will rise from sleep to an eternal day of rest that will never end. Wouldn’t it be nice, in the restlessness of this world, to just spend a day, every week, in anticipation of that day?"From chapter seven:"Though God ordained a world in which evil and rebellion were possible, he didn’t create them. He is, however, clearly sovereign over them. Just as his word has the power to bless, so his word has the power to curse. He made clear that the days of this Evil One are numbered. One day a baby would be born, a descendant of the woman Satan had just deceived and so cruelly harmed. Her offspring would do the job Adam should have done. One day her offspring would crush the head of evil for good."From chapter eight:"Many of us would have to admit that our relationship with God is not nearly as passionate as we might wish, and our desire to be with him isn’t as strong as it ought to be. We sometimes find that we want to keep God at a safe distance."From chapter nine:"The story of the Bible is the story of two cities—the city of man and the city of God.""We’re called to live in the tension of being in the world but not of it. Do you feel that tension?"
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  • Heather Persing
    January 1, 1970
    **I received this book from Crossway through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.**In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie shares nine ways that the new heaven and new earth will be better than the garden of Eden. If this world has captured your attention and heaven doesn’t feel very appealing sometimes, this book will stir your heart for your future home.
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  • Ronja
    January 1, 1970
    Coming out at the end of August: Even Better than Eden by Nancy Guthrie. In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie traces nine themes throughout the Bible. These themes reveal how God’s plan for the new creation will be far more glorious than the original. This new creation glory isn’t reserved just for the future, however. The hope of God's plans changes so much our daily live, in the here and now as well.I think we are all familiar with the Garden of Eden. I think we are all even familiar with t Coming out at the end of August: Even Better than Eden by Nancy Guthrie. In Even Better than Eden, Nancy Guthrie traces nine themes throughout the Bible. These themes reveal how God’s plan for the new creation will be far more glorious than the original. This new creation glory isn’t reserved just for the future, however. The hope of God's plans changes so much our daily live, in the here and now as well.I think we are all familiar with the Garden of Eden. I think we are all even familiar with the events that happened in the Garden of Eden. We might not, however, think about all the implications that the actions set there. This are what the nine themes in the book discuss. As we reflect on these themes found in the story of Eden, we find how they still affect our lives today. And we find redemption even now.I found Nancy Guthrie was theologically solid. She reminds the reader of the wonderful promises of God throughout the Scriptures. The book starts in Genesis and ends in Revelations -- which is a wonderful way to cover God's promises to us. I loved how these chapters brought great insights for our lives right now. At the same time, Nancy Guthrie reminds the reader of the glorious hope of eternity and the beauty of it. I do think this book is better for those who are fairly new to the Bible and the Scriptures. Still to those who are familiar with the Bible, Even Better than Eden holds great reminders. Though not all chapters spoke to me, I gained good and inspirational insights from reading this.
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