Frederick Douglass
The definitive, dramatic biography of the most important African-American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era.As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. He wrote three versions of his autobiography over the course of his lifetime and published his own newspaper. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery.Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, often to large crowds, using his own story to condemn slavery. He broke with Garrison to become a political abolitionist, a Republican, and eventually a Lincoln supporter. By the Civil War and during Reconstruction, Douglass became the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. He denounced the premature end of Reconstruction and the emerging Jim Crow era. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. He sometimes argued politically with younger African-Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights.In this remarkable biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. Blight tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. Douglass was not only an astonishing man of words, but a thinker steeped in Biblical story and theology. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. David Blight’s Frederick Douglass affords this important American the distinguished biography he deserves.

Frederick Douglass Details

TitleFrederick Douglass
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 16th, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster
ISBN-139781416590316
Rating
GenreHistory, Biography, Military History, Civil War, North American Hi..., American History, Nonfiction, Race

Frederick Douglass Review

  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley We like, want, our heroes to be uncompleted, to always be heroic and constant while in the spotlight, and to leave that spotlight before they change politics or ideals. We want to remember Lincoln as the great emancipator not as the man who at one point wanted all freed slaves to return to Africa, a place they had never seen. That ruins the image of martyr Lincoln. We have the same feeling of many of our heroes, including Frederick Douglass. Who despite what some pe Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley We like, want, our heroes to be uncompleted, to always be heroic and constant while in the spotlight, and to leave that spotlight before they change politics or ideals. We want to remember Lincoln as the great emancipator not as the man who at one point wanted all freed slaves to return to Africa, a place they had never seen. That ruins the image of martyr Lincoln. We have the same feeling of many of our heroes, including Frederick Douglass. Who despite what some people think is, in fact, dead. Perhaps the memory of Douglass is doing great things in a symbolical sense, but the actual man is long dust. For most people, Douglass is the man who escaped slavery and publicly spoke out against it. Some people even confuse him with Henry “Box” Brown. Many students read Douglass either his Autobiography, or perhaps more commonly, the selection detailing his learning to read. The drawback to the commonly used selection is that it is many times the student’s only reading of Douglass, who sometimes some students think is a woman who is having sex with her mistress. People today have heard of Douglass, but they don’t know of Frederick Douglass. David W. Blight corrects that in his massive, though it does not read that way, new biography of Douglass. Perhaps the hardest part of any Douglass biography is the reconstruction of his early life. This isn’t because of a lack of memoirs, but a surfeit of them, including subtle but important differences. Did he ask to be taught or did Sophia Auld teach him because of her own idea? A combination of both perhaps? Blight’s reconstructing of Douglass’s early life makes it clear when there is a question about what happened, where Douglass himself differs or where scholars raise questions. He does not choose sides; he deals with facts and context. A refreshing thing. It is also something that he uses when dealing with Douglass’s relationship to his first wife Anna Murray, a free black woman who played a central role in Douglass’s escaping slavery. Murray was illiterate, not stupid, but illiterate as common for many people than. She and Douglass married soon after his escape, and they stayed married until her death. She birthed his children, she gave him a home to return to. Sadly, we do not know what she thought about her husband, about his relationship with the white women who would stay at her house, or about his feelings towards her for she is left out of his writing – much of interior family life seems to be. Blight, it seems, is slightly frustrated by this mystery of Anna Murray, and in the beginning, it almost seems like he is being, not condescending or dismissive, but almost shrugging off, not an accurate description but close. As the biography progress, however, you become grateful and happy that Blight does not presume to know what Anna Murray would think. He does suggest authors that try to channel her, but Blight keeps her presence as a real woman, almost shaking his head at Douglass’s silence. It helps that he keeps Douglass’s second wife, Helen Pitts, off page for much of the time as well. Blight’s depiction of Douglass is within the context of his time and dealing with those who see contradictions and problems in who Douglass was – such as his expansionist tendencies, his view on Native Americans. Blight presents an imperfect human, as all humans are, but presents him with understanding and a feeling of fascination that are easily transmitted to the reader.
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  • Donna Davis
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars, rounded up. Thanks go to Net Galley and Simon and Schuster for the DRC, which I received free in exchange for this honest review. Douglass is a key figure in American history, and Blight has made his career largely through his expertise on Douglass’s life. I expected to be impressed here, and indeed, the endnotes are meticulous and I would be amazed if there was a single error anywhere in this work. But aspects of the biography rub me the wrong way, and ultimately, I realized that the 2.5 stars, rounded up. Thanks go to Net Galley and Simon and Schuster for the DRC, which I received free in exchange for this honest review. Douglass is a key figure in American history, and Blight has made his career largely through his expertise on Douglass’s life. I expected to be impressed here, and indeed, the endnotes are meticulous and I would be amazed if there was a single error anywhere in this work. But aspects of the biography rub me the wrong way, and ultimately, I realized that the best way around this is to go back and read Douglass’s own autobiographies again. Whether we read what Douglass tells us, or what Blight (or any credible biographer) has to say, there are two impediments that stop me short, and because I have never been required to start at the beginning and end at the end to complete a scholastic or professional assignment, I tend to read the beginning; recoil; abandon; and then return in an undisciplined, skipping-around manner that is uncharacteristic of my usual methods. First we have the Christian aspect. Douglass was tremendously devout, and during his time it was much more common to discuss religion publicly and even in daily conversations, sometimes at length. It repels me. So that’s my first problem. It’s not Blight’s problem, but it’s one I have to deal with. The second problem—again, not Blight’s, and it’s inherent in reading about Douglass—is that slavery was horrible. Douglass actually had a slightly better life than most of his peers, gaining an education and living in the master’s house, but it was nevertheless traumatic. It is unavoidable to see what he endured and not reflect on exactly how hellish life was for the four million that endured life in this dehumanizing, degrading system. After I read a certain amount of it, I feel as if I need to take a long shower to wash away the stain. As for Blight’s book, there are some good moments here, and I learned some things. Who helped Douglass on his road to freedom? Free Black people did. Who knew that there were vastly more free Black folks in Maryland than there were slaves? The textbooks and other materials used to teach adolescents about slavery and the American Civil War overemphasize, to a degree amounting to deception, the participation of kindly white people, largely Quakers, and provide only a fleeting glimpse of the occasional African-American. But I find that the eloquent passages that I highlight as I read this are not Blight’s words, but quotations from Douglass himself. Meanwhile, the obstacles to appreciating this book are consistent and irritating. Blight makes much of inconsistencies in Douglass’s three autobiographies, and when he refers to the differences there is a superior, smirking quality to his prose that doesn’t sit well. I wouldn’t like it coming from any writer, but when the writer is a Caucasian, it adds an extra layer of insult. No matter how long Blight publishes, no matter his standing in the Ivy League, he will never be fit to polish Douglass’s boots. If he once knew it, I suspect he has forgotten it. So that’s a problem, and it’s hard to read around it.The other issue, a more common one, is the tendency to guess at what is not known. This makes me crazy. The narrative will flow along in a readable, linear fashion, and then I start seeing the speculation, which is barely visible. Might have. Must have. Likely. It makes me want to scream. If you don’t know, Professor Blight, either don’t put it in, or address the unknown in a separate paragraph explicitly addressing the possibilities. Weed out the unimportant guesses and deal with the more critical ones head on. When these inferences are salted randomly into the text, we come away with tangled notions. Apart from the key events in his life, which of the finer details were fact, and which were surmise? Excuse me. I need to find a nice brick wall so I can slam my forehead against it. So there it is. For all I know, Blight may gain half a dozen prestigious awards from this work; it wouldn’t be the first time a book I’ve complained about went on to garner fame and glory. But I call them like I see them, and what I see is that it’s a better plan to read what Douglass says about himself, even though Blight appears to consider himself a more reliable resource than his subject. If you want this thing, you can have it October 2, 2018.
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  • Calzean
    January 1, 1970
    This is a big book that held my interest for most pages.The book traces the life of Frederick Douglass in a linear progression. The early chapters on his years in slavery depend mostly on his autobiographies which is not surprising given the lack of other written sources. The best chapters related to the civil war and its aftermath. Again this is not surprising given this is the author's chosen field.At times the book sunk into a lot of detail which would be only for the determined fan.The autho This is a big book that held my interest for most pages.The book traces the life of Frederick Douglass in a linear progression. The early chapters on his years in slavery depend mostly on his autobiographies which is not surprising given the lack of other written sources. The best chapters related to the civil war and its aftermath. Again this is not surprising given this is the author's chosen field.At times the book sunk into a lot of detail which would be only for the determined fan.The author has an easy style which has produced a five star effort that provides an honest, and extremely well referenced, biography of a much needed man of his time.
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  • Ashleigh
    January 1, 1970
    I received this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. TITLE - Frederick Douglass: Prophet of FreedomAUTHOR - David W. BlightGENRE - Biography THESIS - Marvelous example of inspirational writing that gives a new perspective to be explored, of the complexity and prowess that was Frederick DouglassRATING - 3/5SUMMARY - Blight's reconstruction of Frederick Douglass' early life is portrayed quite differently in comparison to other Douglass biographies. I found it to be most original, I received this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. TITLE - Frederick Douglass: Prophet of FreedomAUTHOR - David W. BlightGENRE - Biography THESIS - Marvelous example of inspirational writing that gives a new perspective to be explored, of the complexity and prowess that was Frederick DouglassRATING - 3/5SUMMARY - Blight's reconstruction of Frederick Douglass' early life is portrayed quite differently in comparison to other Douglass biographies. I found it to be most original, due to the directness of the facts presented, opposed to the authors interpretation of the events that unfolded. When retelling the story of how Douglass learned to read, Blight was unambiguous in the description.This seeming commitment to relaying the story in an authentic way left me underwhelmed with the portrayal of Douglass' wives. It is widely written that Douglass was unfaithful, and had affairs with white women. In a time of post slavery, this is a scandalous act that I feel it was a disservice not to include, along with more information about how this affected his marriage to Anna Murray & Helen Pitts.This is a story of the views, actions and opinions of a deeply complex man who was flawed, but also a hero to those who value equality. This book is an insightful humanization of a widely known and written about figure. "If there is no struggle, there is no progress." - Frederick Douglass
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  • Scott Pomfret
    January 1, 1970
    This account of the life of Frederick Douglass convinced me that in a hundred years we will view anti-immigrant sentiment as we now look at those who opposed abolition. Not because "Prophet of Freedom" made any such case, but because all the bones of the current strife are within Douglass's life, writing, and oratory. Douglass was an incredibly prescient and forward-thinking man.To be sure, "Prophet of Freedom" is no hagiography. There's plenty to disturb modern ears. Douglass was virulently ant This account of the life of Frederick Douglass convinced me that in a hundred years we will view anti-immigrant sentiment as we now look at those who opposed abolition. Not because "Prophet of Freedom" made any such case, but because all the bones of the current strife are within Douglass's life, writing, and oratory. Douglass was an incredibly prescient and forward-thinking man.To be sure, "Prophet of Freedom" is no hagiography. There's plenty to disturb modern ears. Douglass was virulently anti-Catholic and anti-Irish, and his emphasis on self reliance can come across as blaming the oppressed and his thirst for civil war as almost unprincipled. Moreover, his slavish adherence to the Republican party after it largely abandoned the project of Reconstruction disappoints. These flaws, however, do not detract from the powerful figure and autodidact who made his own life emblematic of the not-quite-endless possibilities of a determined and gifted black man even in an often unapologetic white slave-holding America.Blight's is a brisk, well-written, well-organized account that attempts mostly successfully not to rely too much on Douglass's prodigious auto-biographical output. Blight situates Douglass in his era, paints masterful portraits of Douglass's wives, children, and fellow travelers (and in particular of a trio of American presidents--Lincoln, Johnson and Grant--from the perspective of a contemporary person of color). Blight pulls no punches when addressing the flaws referenced above, but he does effectively contextualize them. In any event, Douglass's accomplishments were awesome and for all his pride his moral force remains resonant. I heartily recommend this biography.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    This book proves that a lengthy in-depth footnoted biography can be interesting as well as informative. Included are pictures which complement the well-written text. The author tells not only the story of Douglass’s life, but also about the time period in which he lived and people he encountered along the way.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I read this biography because I have not read one about Frederick Douglass although he has been indirectly addressed in an number of other books that I have read. This is a very detailed and exhaustive biography. That said, it is well written making it an engaging read. The author frequently refers to passages from the three autobiographies writtten by Douglass himself which provides a unique perspective to the book. While history has lionized the man, this biography points out his failings alon I read this biography because I have not read one about Frederick Douglass although he has been indirectly addressed in an number of other books that I have read. This is a very detailed and exhaustive biography. That said, it is well written making it an engaging read. The author frequently refers to passages from the three autobiographies writtten by Douglass himself which provides a unique perspective to the book. While history has lionized the man, this biography points out his failings along with his successes.I recommend this book for anyone with an interest in the the life of Frederick Douglass and the role he played in the development of our country.I received a free Kindle copy of Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight courtesy of Net Galley  and Simon and Schuster, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazonand my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.This is the first book I have read by the author.
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  • Lucas Brandl
    January 1, 1970
    Frederick Douglass was a truly amazing person, and this is a truly amazing story. He was born into slavery, escaped, educated himself, and became probably the most famous/eloquent/influential abolitionist of the Civil War era. A lot of people know those things about him from reading other books or articles that he is mentioned in as part of a broader Civil War history. But what I really liked about this book and devoting so many pages just to his life is that it introduced a lot of other storyli Frederick Douglass was a truly amazing person, and this is a truly amazing story. He was born into slavery, escaped, educated himself, and became probably the most famous/eloquent/influential abolitionist of the Civil War era. A lot of people know those things about him from reading other books or articles that he is mentioned in as part of a broader Civil War history. But what I really liked about this book and devoting so many pages just to his life is that it introduced a lot of other storylines about him that I had never known or thought about before.After he escaped slavery, he was doing speaking tours that were extremely risky. The more famous he got the more likely it was that someone would kidnap him and bring him back into slavery. He eventually had to go to Europe to do speaking there while his freedom with his old slavemaster was negotiated. Even after becoming technically free, he was still at great risk in many of the places he gave speeches. Riots broke out in several places before he was even able to go on stage. His relationship with fame was particularly interesting. The book suggests that he was the most photographed and well traveled person in 19th century America. His speaking tour schedule is exhausting just to sit on a couch and read about. With that level of fame and influence though, there are tradeoffs, and I like that the author didn't attempt to paint a purely admiring portrait of Douglass. He had an immense ego that came with the fame, and a lot of psychological issues that would be almost unavoidable given the way he grew up. He also expressed a lot of views that may not have much approval today. I was surprised to learn about the jockeying for civil rights and equality that happened between Native Americans, African Americans and women. Several times Douglass was very dismissive of the abuse Native Americans had suffered, and he was generally sympathetic to women's suffrage but did get into arguments with some of the leading feminists of the time over whether African American or women's suffrage should come first and who deserved it more. Another thing that I really enjoyed about this book was the portrayal of Abraham Lincoln. It included some pretty damning quotes from Lincoln, who really wasn't that into the idea of emancipation when the Civil War started. Lincoln's priority at first was to end the war, not to free anyone in existing slavery. He said that "that thunderbolt" would have to wait. He also believed that whether right or wrong, equality between races in America was not achievable, and that the best solution might be allowing African Americans to emigrate to an island country, which Douglass was vigorously against. Some of the best parts of the book are the moments when Douglass has meetings with Lincoln and pushes Lincoln to be more progressive than he previously had been. I also found the depictions of an older aged Douglass to be interesting. He had been doing speaking tours for decades about his experiences growing up in slavery. This is the story people came to hear, but he eventually wanted to talk about something else. He wondered if he would ever move beyond being known as the self educated fugitive slave. In his older age he also became less angry and vicious as he had been in his younger days, and many younger black rights activists accused him of becoming soft. Some also accused him of selling out when he started taking Government posts with later Presidents. As far as the writing of the book itself, I overall enjoyed it. The two things I struggled with were first, the pacing and level of detail in some places seemed off. The second thing is that it frequently referenced Douglass's three autobiographies, and really made me wonder why I was reading this book instead of those. The author's source material for the first twenty years of Douglass's life is almost entirely the three autobiographies, which he refers to over and over and brings up the differences between the three. Ulysses Grant wrote an autobiography. But when I read Ron Chernow's biography of Grant, I never had any doubt that I was reading the best possible book about Grant. With this book, I frequently felt like I would be better off reading the autobiographies.
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  • Jenna Bookish
    January 1, 1970
    While I had of course heard of Frederick Douglass before reading this book, my knowledge of him was spotty at best, consisting mostly of fuzzy, half-remembered elementary school lessons detailing how he cajoled white children into teaching him to read as a young slave. He then went on to become a prominent abolitionist as an adult after escaping slavery. This was the beginning and the end of my knowledge of Douglass. Blight's biography brings Douglass into sharp focus, not just as a historical f While I had of course heard of Frederick Douglass before reading this book, my knowledge of him was spotty at best, consisting mostly of fuzzy, half-remembered elementary school lessons detailing how he cajoled white children into teaching him to read as a young slave. He then went on to become a prominent abolitionist as an adult after escaping slavery. This was the beginning and the end of my knowledge of Douglass. Blight's biography brings Douglass into sharp focus, not just as a historical figure, but as a man. The regal looking figure we can see in photos today was once a small boy, treated as property by the Auld family. He was heartbroken when he was emotionally rejected by his mistress, Sophia Auld, who had begun his education before her husband convinced her it was dangerous to educate a slave. He had a granddaughter who liked to braid his hair. His love of music was bordering on the spiritual. He also, like all of us, had flaws. He may have been unfaithful to his wife. His emphasis on self-reliance was so extreme that it at times felt like a blind spot. He was a self-made man who pulled himself up out of slavery to become a highly influential figure and seemed at times almost disdainful of anyone who couldn't or wouldn't do the same. But that single-minded determination was perhaps his defining trait; he fought for equality quite literally up to his dying day. Douglass had a speaking arrangement scheduled for the evening of his death, before a heart attack took him unexpectedly. "Slavery is not abolished until the black man has the ballot."Blight's recounting of the life of Frederick Douglass is intensely researched and thorough. It was not quite as readable as other biographies I've read, such as Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton biography, but there's something to be said for valuing substance over style. Reading this was an infinitely valuable education experience, and I recommend it to anyone with an interest in American history and the beginnings of the civil rights movement.  
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  • Karen Meeus
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very comprehensive and meticulously researched biography of an absolutely fascinating man. This book is a true joy to read for every history buff. Must-read, even.The author brings us an incredibly detailed analysis and thought-provoking insights into Douglass' life and times, and sadly, also shows us that some of the attitudes he struggled against his entire life are still relevant today. This is by no means light reading, but it is oh so very interesting. The reader's full attention This is a very comprehensive and meticulously researched biography of an absolutely fascinating man. This book is a true joy to read for every history buff. Must-read, even.The author brings us an incredibly detailed analysis and thought-provoking insights into Douglass' life and times, and sadly, also shows us that some of the attitudes he struggled against his entire life are still relevant today. This is by no means light reading, but it is oh so very interesting. The reader's full attention is required to keep abreast with the many people important to Douglass and/or the 19th century US & world at large, not to mention all the political strife and machinations of that turbulent era. I very much enjoyed David W. Blight's writing style. He has a real gift for the written word, sounding almost literary at times and creating clear and dramatic scenes in my mind's eye. Very much bringing home the emotional impact of certain key moments in Douglass' life. I really liked that the author doesn't shy away from Douglass' character flaws or less sympathetic moments, not idolizing him, but painting us an objective picture of a great, though not perfect, man. The many quotes from letters, as well as from his autobiographies, especially held my interest and I also loved that the book has so many photographs in it, of Douglass, his family and contemporaries. It's a pity that we have so little information about Anna Murray, Douglass' first wife. More insight into Douglass' feelings for her or Julia Griffiths, Ottilie Assing or Helen Pitts for that matter, would have been wonderful and would have helped us discover more of Douglass the man, be it as a husband or lover, rather than Douglass the public figure. As a European who only just discovered him, I have to admit that I'm left awestruck by the courageous and complex man that was Frederick Douglass.
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  • Adam Shields
    January 1, 1970
    Short Review: This is a very well written book. It is somewhat amazing that there is so much documentation that this can be based on. And part of what I find amazing about the book are the little details that Blight has clearly worked hard to reveal. Blight seems particularly good match. He writes with real literary skill. He is known for his work on memory and for Douglass who wrote three autobiographies, and has multiple editions of those, Blight's work on memory is especially helpful. Blight Short Review: This is a very well written book. It is somewhat amazing that there is so much documentation that this can be based on. And part of what I find amazing about the book are the little details that Blight has clearly worked hard to reveal. Blight seems particularly good match. He writes with real literary skill. He is known for his work on memory and for Douglass who wrote three autobiographies, and has multiple editions of those, Blight's work on memory is especially helpful. Blight also has written about slave narratives, the underground railroad and reconstruction. All of which come to bear with Douglass. I think the best I can say is that after reading 900 pages on Douglass, I was left wanting more.I have a fuller review on my blog (about 1450 words) at http://bookwi.se/frederick-douglass/
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Review first appeared in Booklist.Any biography of Douglass must compete with the ones he wrote himself; passionate memoirs which vividly illustrate the anguish of slavery, and testify to the humanity and intelligence of African Americans. Yet, as David Blight demonstrates in this brilliant and compassionate work, Douglass could never escape the ingrained racism tainting even abolitionist circles. When he disagreed with “Liberator” William Lloyd Garrison’s policy of combating slavery with “suasi Review first appeared in Booklist.Any biography of Douglass must compete with the ones he wrote himself; passionate memoirs which vividly illustrate the anguish of slavery, and testify to the humanity and intelligence of African Americans. Yet, as David Blight demonstrates in this brilliant and compassionate work, Douglass could never escape the ingrained racism tainting even abolitionist circles. When he disagreed with “Liberator” William Lloyd Garrison’s policy of combating slavery with “suasion” as opposed to outright political activism, Garrison suggested that slaves lacked the sophistication to understand the “philosophy” of the antislavery cause. A pained Douglass replied, “Who will doubt hereafter the natural inferiority of the Negro, when the great champion of the Negroes’ rights thus broadly concedes all that is claimed respecting the Negroes’ inferiority…?” (p. 226)In Douglass’s resistance to the paternalism of white abolitionists, we hear premonitions of Martin Luther King’s denunciation of mealy-mouthed white “gradualism”. Douglass’s support for violent resistance against slave catchers and slave owners prefigures the MLK vs Malcolm X polarization of the 60s, as well as contemporary debates over radicalism and the Black Lives Matter movement.Blight’s Douglass is an unapologetic prophet and radical: ‘It is precisely because the prophet engages his society over its most central and fundamental values that he is radical. They are not “reasonable”...they do not abide “compromise” and their role in the world is that of a sacred “extremist”’. (p. 237) The voice of this “sacred extremist” has never been more relevant.
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  • Hezekiah
    January 1, 1970
    A comprehensive read about an extraordinary man and his accomplishments/failures.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom is an interesting read. I give this book four and a half stars. I recommend it for those who want to learn more about this important man in history.
  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    This made me want to go back and read the rest of Douglass' volumes of autobiography in order to compare his self-presentation.
  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorites this year - will definitely be reading more Douglass. I had a half-scanned Wikipeda entry knowledge of him, and really enjoyed getting a fuller picture.
  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    This biography of Fredrick Douglass was well written an very informative. I learned a lot about him that I didn't know. If you are interested in history and Fredrick Douglass, I highly recommend this book.I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest and unbiased opinion of it.
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  • Cristie Underwood
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting biography on someone that I thought I knew more about than I actually did know! I found Douglass' opinions about the Abolition War to be extremely interesting and relevant. Mr. Douglass was a very interesting man and the author of this biography captured his life in such a brilliant manner.
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  • PWRL
    January 1, 1970
    SM
  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Frederick Douglass by David W. Blight is not a boring biography but the story of a man who lived his beliefs. I enjoyed reading about the people who shaped his life by force and others he chose to affect him even more deeply in his spirit. This biography portrays Douglass realistically with an in depth look at his family, contemporaries and fellow workers. Frederick Douglass learned from his experiences and changed the lives of others with his spirit, beliefs and work to abolish slavery. I recom Frederick Douglass by David W. Blight is not a boring biography but the story of a man who lived his beliefs. I enjoyed reading about the people who shaped his life by force and others he chose to affect him even more deeply in his spirit. This biography portrays Douglass realistically with an in depth look at his family, contemporaries and fellow workers. Frederick Douglass learned from his experiences and changed the lives of others with his spirit, beliefs and work to abolish slavery. I recommend this book to anyone interested in abolition, slavery and United States History. My thanks to the author, the publisher and netgalley for making this book available to read and review.
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