Time's Children
A time traveler trapped in a violent past must protect the orphaned child of a murdered sovereign and find a way home, in this astonishing epic fantasy novel.Fifteen year-old Tobias Doljan, a Walker trained to travel through time, is called to serve at the court of Daerjen. The sovereign, Mearlan IV, wants him to Walk back fourteen years, to prevent a devastating war which will destroy all of Islevale. Even though the journey will double Tobias' age, he agrees. But he arrives to discover Mearlan has already been assassinated, and his court destroyed. The only survivor is the infant princess, Sofya. Still a boy inside his newly adult body, Tobias must find a way to protect the princess from assassins, and build himself a future... in the past.File Under: Fantasy [ Time Demons - They See Me Walkin' - Young Inside - Disturbing Allies ]

Time's Children Details

TitleTime's Children
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN-139780857667915
Rating
GenreFantasy, Science Fiction, Time Travel

Time's Children Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    I've never read the author's other works but that doesn't really matter here. I was caught by the description alone.It's a high-fantasy time-travel novel! Yup. So we have all the goodies of messed up timelines, time-walkers, and similar time/space practitioners in a magic rule system seated in a heavily world-built fantasy world! All the benefits of a kingdom built from scratch AND the breaking of it several times during different periods of its history! Yay!And I wasn't disappointed in the text I've never read the author's other works but that doesn't really matter here. I was caught by the description alone.It's a high-fantasy time-travel novel! Yup. So we have all the goodies of messed up timelines, time-walkers, and similar time/space practitioners in a magic rule system seated in a heavily world-built fantasy world! All the benefits of a kingdom built from scratch AND the breaking of it several times during different periods of its history! Yay!And I wasn't disappointed in the text, either. It starts great with a kid on his effective journeyman quest, only when he's asked to break the rules, we're slapped in the face with the consequences of this particular magic.Every day you go back in time ages you in direct proportion. A fifteen-year-old going back in time by 14 years will have lost half his life in a single jump. Ouch.I can easily recommend this to fans of either Epic Fantasy or Time Travel SF. It combines the best of both worlds and with all the assassins, intrigue, and even love going on here, the novel entertains very roundly indeed.Officially it could be classified as a "saving the baby" tale, but because we keep seeing the timeline change in future and the kingdom change with it, it gets very interesting.My only complaint? The ending is only mildly satisfying. I'm not sure if it's meant to be a series or a single novel, but if it's a single novel, then I kind of wish it came with a more kickin' ending. Otherwise, I really enjoyed the beginning and the core. :)
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  • Marta Cox
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve never read anything by this author before but was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. It’s actually the second time travel story that I’ve read recently but this is far from the standard sci fi or paranormal fare and is actually a fantasy piece. Essentially we have three types of what’s known as Walkers and some can travel distance, others can even penetrate through objects and the rarest of all can move through time. They all have innate abilities but use golden devises bound with magi I’ve never read anything by this author before but was intrigued by the synopsis of this book. It’s actually the second time travel story that I’ve read recently but this is far from the standard sci fi or paranormal fare and is actually a fantasy piece. Essentially we have three types of what’s known as Walkers and some can travel distance, others can even penetrate through objects and the rarest of all can move through time. They all have innate abilities but use golden devises bound with magic to harness and direct their passage so a little like a certain device imagined by J K Rowling.Tobias is our fifteen year old hero and he’s sent to aid a ruler of a distant land at war. Here is where I struggled with the concept and ramifications of this storyline. In order for Tobias to walk back in time just one hour he has to sacrifice an equal part of his lifespan meaning he would age one hour there and another to return. Ok perhaps not exactly terrible you might say but Tobias is asked to travel fourteen years back in time effectively ageing him from fifteen to twenty nine ! Plus when he gets there the all too trusting and strangely loyal Tobias discovers something has changed time leaving him far from home and quite literally holding the baby !I found this a little slow initially and I struggled to connect with Tobias or understand his motives. This man child willingly gives up a huge chunk of his life for a kingdom he knows nothing of. Plus if he were to return to his own time it would add more age to his body effectively making him forty two. Now luckily the author took his readers away from that horrific thought and gave us viewpoints from characters connected with Tobias which greatly opened up the world building and brought humanity. At times I found this a painful read and yes I admit I developed great sympathy for Tobias but luckily the ending left this reader satisfied and hoping that the next instalment won’t be too far away.This voluntary take is of a copy I requested from Netgalley and my thoughts and comments are honest and I believe fair
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  • Elizabeth McLennan
    January 1, 1970
    It's no secret that I love anything to do with time travel (Doctor Who anyone!) When I saw the synopsis of Time's Children, I knew that it would be a book that I loved and would just speed read through, and I did.Right from the opening salvo you are drawn into this world. The different types of magic Walkers, Spanners and Crossers encompass movement through time and space. This enables people with the talent to either walk through time, move through solid matter or cover great distances is a sma It's no secret that I love anything to do with time travel (Doctor Who anyone!) When I saw the synopsis of Time's Children, I knew that it would be a book that I loved and would just speed read through, and I did.Right from the opening salvo you are drawn into this world. The different types of magic Walkers, Spanners and Crossers encompass movement through time and space. This enables people with the talent to either walk through time, move through solid matter or cover great distances is a small period of time. While not a new type of magic in the fantasy world, it is used really well in this setting.Our main character Tobias, is a Walker able to move through time. This is a rarer talent in his time and makes him very popular. At only fifteen he is sent to work at a far court , to do that rulers bidding. This move sets into motion a chain of events that will change the past and the future. The consequences of walking through time means that the amount of time you've walked is added to your age. Tobias walks back 14 years which ages him 14 years, making him a boy in a man's body.The writing and world building in this novel is fantastic. I loved the way everything is described and the way you don't get all the information at once. I also really liked how it cut from Tobias in the past to our main supporting character Mara, in the future. This shows us what has changed and makes you wonder just what Tobias has done in the past to change it.I'm really looking forward to the next in the series, and while it didn't end on a cliffhanger, there was enough tension that I would have just kept on reading!I've given Time's Children 4.5 stars.
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  • Kristen Burns
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsReview:*I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.*A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body, stuck 14 years in the past, trying to keep a baby safe and change the future for the better. That was a premise that caught my attention. It's unique and intriguing but also very heavy and sad when you realize that no one, especially a teenager, should have to sacrifice that much or have that much responsibility put on their shoulders. But I'm getting ahead of 3.5 StarsReview:*I received an ecopy of this book via NetGalley. This has not influenced my review.*A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body, stuck 14 years in the past, trying to keep a baby safe and change the future for the better. That was a premise that caught my attention. It's unique and intriguing but also very heavy and sad when you realize that no one, especially a teenager, should have to sacrifice that much or have that much responsibility put on their shoulders. But I'm getting ahead of myself. I think this is a good time for some lists!Things I Disliked:- The book was a little too slow-paced for my taste.- There were a lot of descriptions of settings (rooms, cities, buildings).- There were multiple POVs, and I liked some more than others. But the various POVs did give the book a slightly more epic feel with a wider scope, without going overboard, so that's something some readers may like.- This is not my preferred version of time travel---the kind where characters are actually able to change the outcome of the future. However, I accepted that as the premise of the book going in, so I can't really complain about that.Things I Liked:- The creativity of the Walkers, Crossers, and Spanners. Walkers can walk back in time. Crossers can pass through wood or stone. Spanners can teleport over distances. But they all require training and the proper tools, and there are rules and limits and sometimes consequences (like how Walkers age whatever amount of time they travel, both when they go back in time and when they go forward to get back to the present).- The creativity of the whole premise. A 15-year-old in a 29-year-old body getting stuck in the past and having to keep the princess, who's only a baby, safe, with assassins following close behind.- The main characters were good people who were trying to do the right thing, so they were easy to root for.- The heavy topics were handled with the seriousness they deserved. No teen should have to sacrifice as much as Tobias did, or take on as much responsibility as he did, and those things were not taken lightly or glossed over. This whole book had a heavy, serious feel to it. And the dark scenes, violence, etc. were written well. I feel like the author found the perfect balance of not being gratuitous in his descriptions of violence but not pulling any punches or sugar-coating things either. (Trigger Warning: *MILD SPOILER* (view spoiler)[There were some fairly explicit scenes of torture, but it was a brief section that could be skipped, I think, if need be. (hide spoiler)] *END SPOILER*)- Interesting supernatural creatures. Like time demons that fed upon the years of life left in a person and loved riddles, and mist demons that loved song.- The writing flowed well.Other:- Just a heads up, since at the time of this review it's not stated on the Goodreads page, this is the first in a series (a trilogy, I believe). So this is only the beginning of the story for these characters.OverallAs I said, this was a little slow-paced with a little too much description for my taste, but I still thought it was a good book. The writing and the creativity made this a worthwhile read that I think many fans of high fantasy, time travel, and fantasy/sci-fi mashups will like!Recommended For:Anyone who likes high fantasy worlds, time travel, slow-paced stories, heavy themes, and the unique premise of a teenager in an adult body. Original Review @ Metaphors and Moonlight
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  • Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the world building, in particular the interesting magic with devastating consequences and the chilling demons that you learn to love. Enjoyed the various viewpoint characters and was pleasantly surprised to see one or two when their plot arcs began. The ending was not what I was expecting, but sets up nicely for a thrilling sequel.I haven't read many time travel stories, and I certainly haven't seen much of it in fantasy. But I really enjoyed this novel and look forward to Time's Demon nex Loved the world building, in particular the interesting magic with devastating consequences and the chilling demons that you learn to love. Enjoyed the various viewpoint characters and was pleasantly surprised to see one or two when their plot arcs began. The ending was not what I was expecting, but sets up nicely for a thrilling sequel.I haven't read many time travel stories, and I certainly haven't seen much of it in fantasy. But I really enjoyed this novel and look forward to Time's Demon next year.
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  • Hélène Louise
    January 1, 1970
    What an excellent surprise! Time’s Children was an excellent read, intelligent, original and thorough. The book is rather long, but doesn’t show, the reading is always easy and satisfying, quite enjoyable.I really like reading fantasy stories but can be easily disappointed. I love personality and good writing, but can’t stand thoroughly longish sadistic descriptions, so frequently used to create some kind of dramatic? serious? adult? atmosphere. Young adult fantasy can be great but is often (and What an excellent surprise! Time’s Children was an excellent read, intelligent, original and thorough. The book is rather long, but doesn’t show, the reading is always easy and satisfying, quite enjoyable.I really like reading fantasy stories but can be easily disappointed. I love personality and good writing, but can’t stand thoroughly longish sadistic descriptions, so frequently used to create some kind of dramatic? serious? adult? atmosphere. Young adult fantasy can be great but is often (and more and more so I’m afraid) monotonous and stereotypical, cliched even. For these reasons I’m always really happy to read some good fantasy, which qualifies as « adult », but could be read by a teenager or a sensitive adult (who don’t care having over stressful readings, as l). For instance Brandon Sanderson’s or Patricia Briggs’ works do the trick for me! Some parts of their stories may be terrible, but their author never dwells unhealthily over them.Time’s children was perfect in this way. Tobias’ life isn’t easy and gets on being harder and harder! Still, I could read and appreciate the story comfortably (actually I skimmed through a very small passage, just one).Before starting this book you should know that it isn’t a stand alone. Not quite a surprise with this genre, for surem but never said explicitly (it seems the new fashion, I don’t appreciate this method much, to be honest). Probably a trilogy, who knows?Anyway, I was quite happy to read the book which was a lovely surprise!The main character, Tobias is very likeable; his choices speak for him. The narration was always logical, credible, Tobias’ decisions were always coherent regarding his background and personality. The magic was great: interesting and developed with a creditable rigour, which I applaud. Tobias’ magic makes possible for him to come back in the past (in a way rather similar as Hermiome’s Time Turner). But nothing is easy or comfortable, and the worst point is probably that each travel makes you older. If you come back a month ago, then come back to your own time, you’ll be two months older: this particular magic has a cost.I’m always reticent about time travel: thinking about it is always difficult, impossible even. Most stories over simplify or at the contrary over complicates the thematics. In Time’s Children, the idea was used with care, elaborating an uchronia along. Clever, entertaining and clear! An accomplishment.All in all the story is very enjoyable, with good characters, credible interactions and some very good ideas, as time demons and time magic. The end isn’t frustrating, the story has met a sensitive point, and can be suspended for a while. I’ll be really happy to read the sequel, which isn’t so frequent for me nowadays: even if I’ve liked a story, I rarely continue the series. A book must have personality, originality, and good writing, with endearing characters, to make me reading the sequel.To conclude « Time’s Children » is a solid, intelligent and over the top fantasy, which will, I hope, meet its readers!(I thank Netgalley and Angry Robot for sending me the ARC in exchange for my honest review)
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  • Lynn K : Grimmedian
    January 1, 1970
    Both a portal and flintlock fantasy, Time’s Children creates an intricate world and an emotionally gripping story. Portal fantasies have long been a favorite and the time travel which is central to the story creates myriad plot loopholes which can be very difficult to write well, and D.B. Jackson does so with aplomb and great style. There are so many effects of each action that must be taken into account and so much additional detail to the plot that requires a well thought out story line. Obvio Both a portal and flintlock fantasy, Time’s Children creates an intricate world and an emotionally gripping story. Portal fantasies have long been a favorite and the time travel which is central to the story creates myriad plot loopholes which can be very difficult to write well, and D.B. Jackson does so with aplomb and great style. There are so many effects of each action that must be taken into account and so much additional detail to the plot that requires a well thought out story line. Obviously, D.B. Jackson is natural storyteller whose has devoted years to honing his craft. The easy readability of the book along with the gut-wrenching experiences of the characters create a riveting tale. Once begun, I found it extremely difficult to put down again and the story has been on my mind again and again since finishing. The characterizations are well done and will draw readers into their hopes and dreams as well as their worst fears. Even the enemies of the main characters are so well crafted as to have a sympathetic vein of their own. Time’s Children is also full of fantasy creatures based in myth and legend, and a few uniquely fascinating ones as well, like the Tirribin, child-like in appearance, ancient in years, they feed on the years of humans and are given a large role in the story. The terrifying Belvora, a huge bird-like creature that hunts humans only by order of a malevolent master and make an early appearance in this dark tale of desperation and lost time. The beautiful cover done by Jan Weßbecher is a breathtaking piece that I found myself admiring repeatedly as Tobias' story unfolded. The ability to Walk through time is rare talent. There are many more with abilities of spanning or crossing, but a time walker is much more rarely found. The experience of Walking and the constraints placed upon its use, due to its aging the Walker, are genuinely frightening. The rules in this magic system are quite clear. Those with the ability to span, moving instantaneously from one place to another, Crossers, who can move through solid matter, or the rare walker, the ability to travel in time, all who have been trained for since childhood for generations at Windhome keep. The best school of training Ilsevale, Windhome Palace has been Tobia’s home since he was five years old. He’s an excellent student and is not surprised to be ordered to the court at Hayncalde, in Daerjen. Before he can even set foot aboard a ship to leave, Tobias is being tracked and is in grave danger, the ripples of what he has yet to do already hot on his heels. This book doesn’t shy from detailed violence, giving the book a very dark theme. There are torture scenes which will leave you gasping with the character and weeping with him in despair. Time's Children is the first is a series of what is set to become three books. The ending of the first only solves the smallest of the problems Tobias faces and will leave you wanting the next installment immediately. Time’s Demon is slated for a May 2019 release by Angry Robot Books.Find more info, pics and author bio at Grimmedian.com
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  • Cheyanne Lepka
    January 1, 1970
    This book mixes time travel and fantasy seamlessly in a secondary world, and presents it in an impossible to put down package. The time travel in this book is top notch, never losing the fantasy feel, while still adding all the best time travel elements. My favourite twist is how when the walkers travel through time, they age the number of years they’ve travelled. This really ups the stakes for the characters, as they have a lot of lose by travelling so far into the past. The world-building is s This book mixes time travel and fantasy seamlessly in a secondary world, and presents it in an impossible to put down package. The time travel in this book is top notch, never losing the fantasy feel, while still adding all the best time travel elements. My favourite twist is how when the walkers travel through time, they age the number of years they’ve travelled. This really ups the stakes for the characters, as they have a lot of lose by travelling so far into the past. The world-building is spot-on, and the strength of it really comes through in the alternate timeline, where the reader gets to experience the changes that occur when Tobias changes the past. Add in time demons and it’s brilliant how the time travel magic is so entwined with the world-building. As far as characters go, I wasn’t much of a fan of Tobias, I just found him to be too much of your classic hero (not saying there’s anything wrong with that, but it just doesn’t do it for me as a reader). I did really enjoy Dröe and Mara, who I thought were really interesting characters (I’m not sure I completely buy some of Mara’s motives, but I found her to be a great character regardless). Overall, this is a great book, and I would highly recommend it to anyone who loves fantasy and loves time travel and wants to experience both at once.
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  • Alexia Cambaling
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review.I requested Time’s Children from Angry Robot Books on NetGalley partly because of its unique and interesting premise. Basically, a fifteen-year old boy travels fourteen years back in time. Doing so had some pretty interesting consequences for our character, Tobias. Basically, every time he travels through time, he ages. So, when he was sent on a mission to try and prevent a war fourteen years before the start of a war, he arrives looki I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a review.I requested Time’s Children from Angry Robot Books on NetGalley partly because of its unique and interesting premise. Basically, a fifteen-year old boy travels fourteen years back in time. Doing so had some pretty interesting consequences for our character, Tobias. Basically, every time he travels through time, he ages. So, when he was sent on a mission to try and prevent a war fourteen years before the start of a war, he arrives looking like he’s in his late twenties. So basically, he gets stuck in the past in an adult body despite having the mentality of a fifteen-year old boy. Not something anyone would be keen to experience.First up, as usual, the worldbuilding. I really enjoyed the worldbuilding in Time’s Children. Basically, the magic users here use the aid of certain magical devices in order to access their abilities. There are those who can travel through time, those who can travel great distances, and even those who can create such devices. There are clear limitations to the usage of such devices and capabilities which I really appreciate. I think that having these clear limitations allow the world to be more believable. Of course, having people researching ways to circumvent these limitations also make for a more believable world.In addition to that, the royal assassination that happens when he goes back also had clear implications for what happens in the future. I liked that the future basically changed drastically because of it and that we actually got to see it change. It was a very tangible way of seeing that yes, this world has consequences. What the character does is very vital and we actually see how it changes the future world that they have. How it was woven into the story through the eyes of another character was also very interesting.As for the characters, I really liked Tobias as a protagonist. He starts off being really excited to be posted to a royal court and while he is pretty young, he also happened to be rather responsible. He understands the importance of his position and he goes along with this insane plan because he understands the implications of it. Unfortunately for him, things don’t work out as expected and he becomes stuck in the past. I really enjoyed how this was portrayed because Tobias was really forced to grow up quickly especially since he has to take care of the princess. The bits where he has to fight to keep the both of them alive and out of danger has got to be some of my favorite parts of the book. I’m really excited to see where his story goes and how he basically deals with his situation.Mara is also another interesting character because we see her in the first few chapters and at first, she’s just a side character. Someone who Tobias might regret leaving. Then, as the change in the timeline happens, she forgets about him but senses that something is wrong so she enlists’ Droe’s- a sort of time demon- help. She does eventually figure it out but what happens while she’s discovering all of these things is also interesting. She lived an entirely different life than what we were originally shown and we did see how the world changed through her eyes. I felt like the way it happened was very natural and it flows rather well.The plot is fairly fast-paced and I read through it in like a day or so. It’s also pretty fun and rather well-written. For me, the best part of the book is really the interesting world and the premise. The ending leaves me with some questions for what happens next and I’m really excited to see that. That said, I can definitely see myself reading the next one because I do want to see what happens next.This review is also on The Bookworm Daydreamer
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  • Crystal
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an un-biased review.I’ve loved a good time travel story since the old days when I saw a double header of Back to the Future and Pee Wee’s Big Adventure at a drive in movie theater. Yes … I am old. (ha!) I loved the twisty-turny way it made my brain feel. What if Marty met himself? What if his parents figured out who he was. What if someone died and it eliminated his timeline? Time travel can be tricky! Time’s Children is not afra Disclaimer: I received this book free from Netgalley in return for an un-biased review.I’ve loved a good time travel story since the old days when I saw a double header of Back to the Future and Pee Wee’s Big Adventure at a drive in movie theater. Yes … I am old. (ha!) I loved the twisty-turny way it made my brain feel. What if Marty met himself? What if his parents figured out who he was. What if someone died and it eliminated his timeline? Time travel can be tricky! Time’s Children is not afraid to meet these questions head on.Tobias is a young man with an innate ability to “time walk” with the use of a Chronofor. He is 15 years old and has been trained primarily as an assassin. He will be employed by the king of an embattled kingdom, who hopes to use Tobias’ abilities to prevent the war. Time travel in this book ages a person. For every year you walk … you age. Tobias takes a walk 14 years into the past and emerges to find himself a 15 year old mind in a 29 year old body. This creates an interesting character arc. His body is different, he’s not been slowly habituated to the slow aches and pains of growing up and older. He’s a boy in a man’s body, still idealistic and I think a little tenderhearted. However, his walk has now changed history in ways that couldn’t have been foreseen and now he is stuck. I don’t want to say more because SPOILERS.I quite liked the book and the authors style of writing. It put me in mind of Jeff Wheeler’s books. They are easy to sink into. As a trigger warning, there is some off-focus torture in the book. I say off-focus because it is not dwelt on in grisly detail, but the effect and emotion is kept intact. I’m not sure exactly how many books are going to be in this series, but I know that there is a second book coming out relatively soon. I’m hoping I can come across it on Netgalley in the near future. I’d really like to see how this story shapes up.Song for this book: What Time Do You Call This? by Elbow
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  • Maxine Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    A great read.I've had a hard time trying to articulate exactly what I thought made this book special. It's quite unassuming. It was a book that I found myself willing to put down at night, not because it was bad or I was bored, but because I wanted it to last as long as possible. I savoured it, I enjoyed the writing and the characters and I didn't want to rush it. It was almost a heavy read, a book that made you feel for Tobias and his struggle.Tobias is a wonderful character. He is devoted to h A great read.I've had a hard time trying to articulate exactly what I thought made this book special. It's quite unassuming. It was a book that I found myself willing to put down at night, not because it was bad or I was bored, but because I wanted it to last as long as possible. I savoured it, I enjoyed the writing and the characters and I didn't want to rush it. It was almost a heavy read, a book that made you feel for Tobias and his struggle.Tobias is a wonderful character. He is devoted to his job, he is willing to take risks, he does his best to do the right thing. After travelling back in time he finds himself in a 29 year olds body. He takes on the mammoth task of trying to single handily prevent a war and then when everything goes wrong, he takes on a baby and tries to escape. He has to find a way to fix everything while navigating a city he doesn't really know and with nobody who knows him. Tobias never complains, he continues trying to move forward. All of the characters felt distinct and you had to appreciate just how fierce the women in Time's Children are. Those on either side are capable, willing to face their fear and get things done, even at their own detriment.The magic revolved around time and movement. Walkers could travel through time, Spanners could travel distances and Crossers could move through solid matter. People with the talent were trained and needed specific objects to be able to use their magic. For walkers there was a heavy price for using the magic.There was a lot of world building, but it felt organic. It didn't bog down the story. It flowed, it built up tension and had me wanting more. There was political intrigue, demons, twisted timelines and pirates. The book surprised me and I'm looking forward to finding out what happens next. (Book 2 will be out in May 2019)I received this book from the publishers via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Stacey Kondla
    January 1, 1970
    The twist on time travel hooked me with this one - to travel through time costs you years, you age prematurely physically, but are the same age mentally and emotionally as when you travelled or “walked” Aside from the cool twist on time travel, Time’s Children offers interesting, sympathetic characters who are in a tough spot with no easy answers. Great world building, intriguing politics, and time demons (who I want to know better because they are repulsive and fascinating at the same time)I ea The twist on time travel hooked me with this one - to travel through time costs you years, you age prematurely physically, but are the same age mentally and emotionally as when you travelled or “walked” Aside from the cool twist on time travel, Time’s Children offers interesting, sympathetic characters who are in a tough spot with no easy answers. Great world building, intriguing politics, and time demons (who I want to know better because they are repulsive and fascinating at the same time)I eagerly await the sequel....
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  • Reviews & Robots
    January 1, 1970
    Time’s Children is a tour-de-force, setting a fascinating tale of magic and intrigue amidst a world filled with dark corners and creatures who are not to be trusted. I loved every part of this book, and applaud the author on creating a compelling story filled with brilliantly rendered scenes, settings and details that made the world come alive. Prepare to be swept away by the tides of this masterful story.Full review at: https://reviewsandrobots.com/2018/10/...NOTE: I was provided a free copy of Time’s Children is a tour-de-force, setting a fascinating tale of magic and intrigue amidst a world filled with dark corners and creatures who are not to be trusted. I loved every part of this book, and applaud the author on creating a compelling story filled with brilliantly rendered scenes, settings and details that made the world come alive. Prepare to be swept away by the tides of this masterful story.Full review at: https://reviewsandrobots.com/2018/10/...NOTE: I was provided a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for my honest, unbiased review. I only publish reviews of books I enjoy, and this novel meets that criterion.
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  • Nicole Luiken
    January 1, 1970
    Great premise: time travel with a high price. Both sides of the war have Travelers thus leading to a lot of point, counterpoint action. I was also very intrigued by the time demon and am happy that she seems likely to feature prominently in book two.Quibble: the book didn't end where I thought we'd been promised it would.
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  • Sachin Dev
    January 1, 1970
    https://fantasy-smorgasbord.blogspot....
  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    It's...a pleasant book, I guess?? FRTC
  • S
    January 1, 1970
    If it wasn't a cliffhanger I might have gone 5 stars.... took me a bit to get into it, but once I did I had to keep reading. Well written, great characters... now I want the second book!
  • Dino
    January 1, 1970
    NEW look at time travel. Great new series by an author I adore.
  • Glennis
    January 1, 1970
    When the cost of time travel is actual time off your life, to travel 14 years in the past is a huge sacrifice, but to stop a war from happening seems to be worth it to a 15-year-old Walker named Tobias. The problem is that other people are very motivated to see this war happen and crush the kingdom that Tobias has gone to work for straight out of school. Tobias is now on the run with an infant princess, looking and sounding like a 29-year-old man, he is still very much a 15-year-old boy inside t When the cost of time travel is actual time off your life, to travel 14 years in the past is a huge sacrifice, but to stop a war from happening seems to be worth it to a 15-year-old Walker named Tobias. The problem is that other people are very motivated to see this war happen and crush the kingdom that Tobias has gone to work for straight out of school. Tobias is now on the run with an infant princess, looking and sounding like a 29-year-old man, he is still very much a 15-year-old boy inside trying to do the right thing. An interesting world setup with not only time walkers but people that can phase through solid walls and others that can travel great distances make all tree types very useful to the various kingdoms around this world. A fun read and there are more planned in this series. Digital review copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley
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