Open Earth
Rigo is a young woman of her time: specifically, the time just after the collapse of Earth. After living her whole life on a small space station orbiting the planet, the cultural norms and rules of her Californian parents are just history to her. In between work shifts at the station air farm, Rigo explores her own desires, developing openly polyamorous relationships with her friends and crewmates. When she starts to feel one of those relationships change, however, Rigo must balance her new feelings with the stability of her other relationships, as well as the hard-earned camaraderie of a small crew floating in the vastness of space. But, as the ship motto goes, "Honesty keeps us alive."A heartfelt, positive, and erotic look at one woman's adventure in love and sex, as a new generation learns to make their own rules and follow their own hearts

Open Earth Details

TitleOpen Earth
Author
ReleaseSep 1st, 2018
PublisherLimerence Press
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Lgbt

Open Earth Review

  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Explicitly sexy graphic novel set in space featuring polyamory. ME GUSTA. Read this at the airport and had to cleverly hide the pages from the people sitting around me lmao
  • Julia Sapphire
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an easy and fun read! We follow Rigo and her adventures with sex, love and relationships. This does take place in space so I hope the future volumes have more of a sci-fi feel to them as opposed to this volume.
  • Julie Zantopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    A queer polyamory space based graphic novel with sex positivity, a focus on open communication, and being true to yourself for the win! I got this arc at BookCon and really enjoyed it. I hope that it’s well received and there are more in this series. I really enjoyed the art style, the Spanglish (the language of the future) used, the diversity, the plus girl rep, and overall tone of this graphic novel. Definitely a winner!
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    A sexually explicit version of "The 100" before they left the spaceship for Earth. Focuses on a future where isolated 20-year-olds born in space have a different outlook on sex where it's open and meaningless between multiple partners. It looks like the author writes solely on this topic, so this may be hiding an agenda.Received an advance copy from Oni Press and Netgalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Gbraden
    January 1, 1970
    Today's graphic Novels are not your parent's comic book, like the ones I collected in the 60s and 70s.To be truthful, I am not sure what to think about Open Earth. Kind of 'Brave New Worldish', where one is hooking up with whom they want, marriage is discourage. At least there are babies and the need for birth control. Good story line..The graphics were nice, not too cluttered up with word balloons, flowing nicely as the story unfolds. I love the idea of the muff diving in the anti-gravity room, Today's graphic Novels are not your parent's comic book, like the ones I collected in the 60s and 70s.To be truthful, I am not sure what to think about Open Earth. Kind of 'Brave New Worldish', where one is hooking up with whom they want, marriage is discourage. At least there are babies and the need for birth control. Good story line..The graphics were nice, not too cluttered up with word balloons, flowing nicely as the story unfolds. I love the idea of the muff diving in the anti-gravity room, seems like an ideal place for it. The scene with the parents at the end was a nice touch.No criticism, constructive or otherwise. This just isn't my cup of tea
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  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review.Oh Good Grief. I want to go back to the past and tell myself NOT TO FREAKING get this book. If I had known, if only I had known. URghhhh.So I liked the idea of the book, the cover looked cute, and oh, yes, I didn't see the Erotica genre, otherwise I would most definitely skipped this one. Though OK, maybe I would have tried it, sure, I confess. But if I had known it was sex in this way? No fucking thank you.What my problem was w I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review.Oh Good Grief. I want to go back to the past and tell myself NOT TO FREAKING get this book. If I had known, if only I had known. URghhhh.So I liked the idea of the book, the cover looked cute, and oh, yes, I didn't see the Erotica genre, otherwise I would most definitely skipped this one. Though OK, maybe I would have tried it, sure, I confess. But if I had known it was sex in this way? No fucking thank you.What my problem was with this book? The fact everyone fucks everyone. Really, everyone, fucks, everyone. At one point our MC and one of her boys had a rendezvous in a closet (yes, while they were at work), and apparently after hot and steamy sex decided to chill a bit, they got discovered by one of their friends, who didn't even blink his eye at what he saw before him. Oh no, he was just calling them cute, and then proceeds to say some sexy things to his boy, yes the same one that the girl just had sex with. Ummmmmmm. What the hell? Like really, what the hell?Oh, and during that conversation the boy mentioned that his depto was having room, and so even when she was having sex with another guy (yes, again, and this time with zero gravity because that is such a turn on????????????????) she is thinking about that guy, and then proceeds to run into her friends room, who is having sex with a girl who doesn't care that people just barge in. Like what the actual hell is wrong with these kids. I am all for exploring and being happy with sex, but this is just an orgy, just not in one go. Eww. Just eww. No. Just no. How can you even be casual friends if you all have sex with each other. I am not sure about you, but if I had sex with all my friends I would feel very very awkward about it. Plus maybe a bit jealous that my boy #1 has sex with a best friend of mine. Or boy #2, or girl #4. Well you get the idea.Plus I am kind of confused how there are people who are (slightly) chubby. NO, don't take that the wrong way. Really, don't! But it is just with the food they eat, or actually the engineered stuff they eat, and how well controlled that is in portions, how do you get fat? Plus they all work hard, and with all the sex (and that burns a fair share of calories) I am just so confused. Really, I am. What is in that engineered stuff? Or do they have snacks and other things that they eat, though I didn't see those anywhere.I did like the whole backstory why the characters are now in space. Oh boy, that is quite sad. I hope that one day they will be able to go back to Earth. Maybe it is much healthier now, maybe people are still alive.The art is also one of my favourites, and the sex scenes are done pretty classy and nice.But I wouldn't recommend this book at all. No. Just no.Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • ❈ laura ❈
    January 1, 1970
    ✰✰✰In this graphic novel we follow Rigo, a latinx girl in a polyamory relationship living in a spaceship, that wants to move with one her partners but she's worried it's going to affect to the rest of her relationships. I liked this volume, it was a easy and fun read that I would recommend between more complex books (but if you don't like explicit sex scenes stay away from it), and it has body a sex positivity, a diverse cast, and the art was fine (nothing mindblowing but not hard to appreciate ✰✰✰In this graphic novel we follow Rigo, a latinx girl in a polyamory relationship living in a spaceship, that wants to move with one her partners but she's worried it's going to affect to the rest of her relationships. I liked this volume, it was a easy and fun read that I would recommend between more complex books (but if you don't like explicit sex scenes stay away from it), and it has body a sex positivity, a diverse cast, and the art was fine (nothing mindblowing but not hard to appreciate or get into), but I didn't 100% work for me overall. First, it was so strange for me to see how different point of views have one single generation, these changes happens over years and years. Second, this was a very character driven graphic novel with barely no plot, but I can say a lot from this characters, we know what they work on, maybe some personal attribute if we're lucky, but nothing more, and it frustrated me in a character driven read, more even with a interesting world and politics behind this story, so this had me thinking well if we're not going to get a lot of this characters give more of this world but we didn't get it. I hope this is fixed in future volumes if we get them.Like I say, I would recommend this only if you want something quickly to read and distract your mind but you aren't going to get much more of this one. ARC provided by Oni Press in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Devann
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalleyThe background info for this story is basically that a group of scientists left earth to live in space because of vague climate change stuff and this follows their children who, as the first generation born in space, have much more open ideas of sex and relationships. It actually makes sense in a way that they would feel this way based on their new living situation, but I wish the story had gone a bit more in detail with that aspect of the plot i I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalleyThe background info for this story is basically that a group of scientists left earth to live in space because of vague climate change stuff and this follows their children who, as the first generation born in space, have much more open ideas of sex and relationships. It actually makes sense in a way that they would feel this way based on their new living situation, but I wish the story had gone a bit more in detail with that aspect of the plot instead of just focusing so much on the sex.Yeah, there is a TON of sex in this so it's definitely not for kids. It was a fun read and I didn't mind the sex by any means [it was actually really great to see some cute chubby ladies with realistically drawn bodies get some lovin'], but I feel like the story should have either focused on the societal and behavioral changes of the characters compared to their parents OR just been a straight up erotica graphic novel where people bang in space because reasons. It tried to both in a very limited number of pages and as a result both things just felt kind of half-finished.Also just an observation that while everyone in this story does seem to be bi/pan/poly, all the sex scenes are M/F so if that is going to bother you then you might want to skip this. I'm still not really sure how I feel about the whole thing in general, but I will say it's a bit weird to present a book as being lgbtia and then have several fairly graphic M/F sex scenes and only a few kisses with the same sex couples. [And yes I know it's still lgbtia because 'the b stands for bisexual' but you have to admit it seems a bit shady]
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  • Ije the Devourer of Books
    January 1, 1970
    I thought the art work and colouring were lovely and I really enjoyed the idea of a group of scientists who are making a new life for themselves in space. Twenty years ago a group of scientists left Earth, never to return. They no longer know what has happened on Earth but they have established a new community in space and they no longer wish to be bound by traditional societal expectations or customs. The first generation of people who were born on the spaceship are now young adults and they do I thought the art work and colouring were lovely and I really enjoyed the idea of a group of scientists who are making a new life for themselves in space. Twenty years ago a group of scientists left Earth, never to return. They no longer know what has happened on Earth but they have established a new community in space and they no longer wish to be bound by traditional societal expectations or customs. The first generation of people who were born on the spaceship are now young adults and they do not want to be bound by the forms of sexual relationships and expectations of Earth, instead they want to negotiate their own intimate lives. Rigo is one of these young adults and she has open relationships with a couple of people on the ship. Her parents have what she sees as a traditional relationship but Rigo is trying to work out what she wants for herself.That's basically what the story is about - working out a relationship/relationships and deciding what you want and then negotiating this with others. In space there is freedom to try new things and the community is much more open and accepting. I enjoyed the art, but I can't say I was really interested in Rigo's love life or sexual activity. There are sex scenes in the novel so it isn't for children. I enjoyed the ethnic diversity of the characters but I wasnt interested in Rigo's dilemma. What I really wanted to know is what happened to the people left on planet Earth?Copy provided by publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is really outside the box when breaking cultural norms, which I appreciated. Loved the body positive aspect. Felt a little confused by parts. It gave me lots to ponder. Oh and Spanglish as an official language was pretty awesome.
  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    A really interesting look at a future human society of a type that isn't often seen in sci fi. I found this very refreshing and thought-provoking, though I'm not entirely sure I agree with the points it raises.
  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting read. Young adults, trying to find their place in society. A story of all ages, all generations...
  • Becky Boudreau
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 3.75/5. **I received an advance copy of this graphic novel from NetGalley and Oni Press in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.** More reviews like this one can be found on my blog--ReviewAfter hearing Chelsea and Julie talk about this one, I was super eager to get my hands on this one!Upon reading it, I actually really enjoyed it, but I didn’t absolutely fall in love with it.This graphic novel takes place in the near-future, where the US goes to complete hell Actual rating 3.75/5. **I received an advance copy of this graphic novel from NetGalley and Oni Press in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.** More reviews like this one can be found on my blog--ReviewAfter hearing Chelsea and Julie talk about this one, I was super eager to get my hands on this one!Upon reading it, I actually really enjoyed it, but I didn’t absolutely fall in love with it.This graphic novel takes place in the near-future, where the US goes to complete hell and those who live in a succeeded California are able to escape to space. We then follow our MC, Rigo, who is in open polyamorous relationships with some of the fellow crew members.What drew me to this graphic novel was definitely the polyamorous relationships. I don’t think we see enough poly rep, especially positive poly rep. I really love the way the poly relationships were handled, including the communication, worries, and changing preferences.I also love that this graphic novel had a plus-sized main character that was confident in her sexuality. While Rigo does begin to question things about her relationships, she never loses her confidence. Oh, and I really enjoy that comments about the MC’s body never really come up, unless it’s during a sexy time scene and it’s part of the sexy time.One thing I wasn’t expecting, but I really enjoyed was the use of Spanish in this graphic novel. As mentioned above, California succeeded from the US and they declared Spanish their official language. Because of this, the characters sometimes go into Spanish when talking to each other. My knowledge of Spanish is pretty limited, I took Spanish 1 and 2 in high school…and that’s about it. That being said, I was able to figure out most of the Spanish comments through context clues or through my limited knowledge.It was also nice to see a Latina MC with a solid relationship with her parents. It felt so wholesome and sweet. There was one scene with the parents that had me actually laugh out loud. If you read the graphic novel, you’ll know what scene. But it’s a bit of a visual gag and I loved it.Now, with all that good, I did want to address what lowered my rating.I know this is a graphic novel and there are (most likely) going to be more volumes to build on the plot. That being said, the plot for this one was cute but not as climatic as I was hoping it would be. I am curious to see where this series goes, but I did want a bit more from the first volume.Final ThoughtsThis is a great read for those of you that like more contemporary graphic novels (yes it’s technically sci-fi and it’s in space, but plot-wise, it’s pretty contemporary). I loved how the polyamorous relationships were handled, how the family dynamic was addressed, and how confident our MC is. However, I did want a bit more from the plot. Though, I’m curious to see how this series continues.I do still recommend this one though! Contemporaryathon round 3 is happening in September and depending on the challenges, this may be a great pick! Oh and if you don’t mind some sexy time, those scenes were pretty fun too.
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Rigs is a child of the first generation of scientists who fled Earth after its collapse. As the space station prepares to celebrate the 20th anniversary of leaving Earth, Rigs talks over a more personal problem: possibly sharing living quarters with Franklin without becoming exclusive.I loved the body positivity, latinx rep, PC rep, sex positivity and the emphasis on open communication and consenting relationships. Bonus for polyamorous relationship rep too!I didn't like that Rigs was pretty one Rigs is a child of the first generation of scientists who fled Earth after its collapse. As the space station prepares to celebrate the 20th anniversary of leaving Earth, Rigs talks over a more personal problem: possibly sharing living quarters with Franklin without becoming exclusive.I loved the body positivity, latinx rep, PC rep, sex positivity and the emphasis on open communication and consenting relationships. Bonus for polyamorous relationship rep too!I didn't like that Rigs was pretty one-dimensional and that this fascinating world was so under-developed. It could have explored more about Earth's collapse and the station's future and how the survivors adapted to sharing such a tight living space and future prospects for biodiversity (and also a little bit about the privilege of surviving when everyone else possible died), but instead it focused on: boring Rigs and Rigs talking over her feelings while having NSFW sex all over the place. I also wanted to know why Franklin was Rigs' possible super-special, when their relationship felt less important than the other relationships that she had on the station.TL;DR: wanted more than I got.I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Kinda simple, but it's great to read a really positive poly story!
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    As much as I'd like to see more polyamorous representation in books and media, this isn't the way to do it. There is nothing outwardly problematic about this. It's just dull.The main character has no qualities, skills, or interests other than the boy she loves for reasons not made clear. She is worried he will not want to be her new roommate, and her friends are worried she won't want to have sex with all of them if she falls in love with him only. There is some labored "how can our parents be m As much as I'd like to see more polyamorous representation in books and media, this isn't the way to do it. There is nothing outwardly problematic about this. It's just dull.The main character has no qualities, skills, or interests other than the boy she loves for reasons not made clear. She is worried he will not want to be her new roommate, and her friends are worried she won't want to have sex with all of them if she falls in love with him only. There is some labored "how can our parents be monogamous"/"adults are so out of touch" narrative as well, and then everything is fine in the end.The dynamic among the central social group is portrayed as though anyone will sleep with anyone and sexual openness abounds in this unlikely sci-fi setting where fewer than 20 years have passed since humans left earth, yet earthling ways are "oh so bizarre".The art is in the competent to middling range, but drawn in an appealing style. Character faces tend to morph, though, and the eyes go wonky now and then.So it's too shallow to be a worthwhile exploration of a polyamorous group, yet not funny or sweet enough to be an entertaining fluff piece.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this, and it’s has spurred me on to try other graphic novels. It was hot and steamy and very body positive. It also explores the idea of open vs. closed relationships, which I thought was interesting. I also like that birth control was a part of the discussion, excuse you can’t have an open “society” without taking the necessary precautions. From Carrie “committed yet curious”! Yep that sums it up.
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  • Bernadett
    January 1, 1970
    i got my copy from netgalleythe concept and the execution was excellent. we do need to pry into taboos like polygamy and this comic dwell into it rather well. there were few kink-shaming in it and a lot of +18 content. while important and informal it was it didnt go into detail for more topics that should have been discussed. the comic didnt go too deep into politics religion and how food is being processed in space, it only focused on morals and what is considered good or bad behavior. in my op i got my copy from netgalleythe concept and the execution was excellent. we do need to pry into taboos like polygamy and this comic dwell into it rather well. there were few kink-shaming in it and a lot of +18 content. while important and informal it was it didnt go into detail for more topics that should have been discussed. the comic didnt go too deep into politics religion and how food is being processed in space, it only focused on morals and what is considered good or bad behavior. in my opinion it could have been something really special and drawn out instead the sexuality and its loose ends were rushed into one volume. the comic is most likely targeted towards the 18-25 years old audience because i feel like those would be the age group that discusses the very same topic. it could have had a more diverse cast and it could have had more cultural references but as a european reader i didnt get the Spanish? langugages or italian ? it kind of really pisses me off that every single piece of comic/ literature i consumed lately features USA as the main focus or the american people as survivors of the apocalypse. come on people you know there is 7 continents. you know what are the odds for someone to live in AUSTRALIA or god FORBIT RUSSIA? AFRICA did you know its not a country? or what about the poles? there are people who live there too you know they called Eskimo like your freezed goods you buy in the grocery store. you know peas and corn and all goodies. I just love when an attempt of diversity fails to actually bring forward diversity. as a plus size person im disgusted in the representation. why the hell not? get a plus size girl as a main character with slim and athletic build lovers? oh please... why not have the "pretty" girl have a chubby hairy balding boyfriend? talk about double standards... and if those people up there eat rations of artificial food... did that chubby girl sell blowjobs (those seem to be popular) for extra muesli bars? and the cherry on top. either that girl whips her hair from one side to the other or the artist just doesnt understand the concept of ANGLE.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    What did one reviewer say about this book? Banging in space? There is a slight plot here, in that scientists have gone up to a space station to live for the rest of their lives, have children, and survive because something has happened on Earth. Something disastrous.The children are all free-wheeling, making love all over the place with whomever they want, and don't have any idea why their parents are still only sleeping with each other, as per this discussion of the adult children below.But, be What did one reviewer say about this book? Banging in space? There is a slight plot here, in that scientists have gone up to a space station to live for the rest of their lives, have children, and survive because something has happened on Earth. Something disastrous.The children are all free-wheeling, making love all over the place with whomever they want, and don't have any idea why their parents are still only sleeping with each other, as per this discussion of the adult children below.But, beyond the story of the world below them having troubles, most of the book is of the 20-somethings having sex.Below is the PG version of one of the men that  Rigo likes about to get dinner at the "y" in zero gravity.I presume the next volume will get more into the plot, with a little less boinking, not that there is anything wrong with zwaftig, latina women getting it on with all and sundry.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Polyamory - in space! It's only a little over 100 pages long, and another 40 or 60 might have given room for a bit more depth - we see that the Earthborn parents consider it all a bit odd and think one at a time is easier, but is the shift an explicit rejection of the possessive attitudes which messed up the planet? A response to the conditions of station life? There are hints of both, but more exploration would have been more satisfactory. As is, it's a sweet and simple little story - protagoni Polyamory - in space! It's only a little over 100 pages long, and another 40 or 60 might have given room for a bit more depth - we see that the Earthborn parents consider it all a bit odd and think one at a time is easier, but is the shift an explicit rejection of the possessive attitudes which messed up the planet? A response to the conditions of station life? There are hints of both, but more exploration would have been more satisfactory. As is, it's a sweet and simple little story - protagonist wants to move in with one of her lovers but doesn't want to impose on everyone else, communication is important, yay, the end. I mean, I love that Oni are making a niche as purveyors of off-centre romance comics, but it's no My Boyfriend Is A Bear (and now I've thought of the poor bears down on Earth and am sad). Couple of annoying glitches in the art which an editor should have caught - like one panel where a sleeve/skin line is in the same place as a background line, for which I've forgotten the technical term but I know you don't do it. And a BDSM scene where the sun has clearly taken at least one blow between arse and ribcage, for which the technical term is 'bloody dangerous' and I know you don't do it.(Netgalley ARC)
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  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Love in Panels was excited to announce this title back in February (www.loveinpanels.com/comics/open-eart...), so you can imagine how thrilled I was to see it on NetGalley for early review. I have a lot to say about it, so if you don't feel like reading on - here's the TL;DR - I adored OPEN EARTH.The book focuses on Rigo, a young Latina woman born on the California space station, and her relationships with several other "First Generation" people on the ship. The plot is given a kick when one of Love in Panels was excited to announce this title back in February (www.loveinpanels.com/comics/open-eart...), so you can imagine how thrilled I was to see it on NetGalley for early review. I have a lot to say about it, so if you don't feel like reading on - here's the TL;DR - I adored OPEN EARTH.The book focuses on Rigo, a young Latina woman born on the California space station, and her relationships with several other "First Generation" people on the ship. The plot is given a kick when one of her partners, Carver, has an opening in his room. Space on the station is at a premium, and more than one of Carver's partners wants to move in. I'm using the word "partner" here to mean sexual partner, but it soon becomes apparent that the First Generation to be born in space uses it to mean a more committed relationship among a polyamorous and largely open group of friends.One of the aphorisms built into California protocol is "Honesty Keeps Us Alive," and that's mentioned a few times, as Rigo struggles with her feelings vs. her expectations of herself. She may have grown up in space, but she's dealing with the same things most of us here on Earth think about. It's a given that she and Carver will continue to have sexual relationships and close friendships and romantic relationships with others, but within that context, what does it mean to commit to someone? Their other partners express concern that Rigo and Carver will couple up and exclude everyone else, which is a reasonable thing to worry about. (Also a valid life choice, as shown by a few other couples on the ship.) It's not how Rigo and Carver want to do things, however, and the way they come to finally talk through everything is both realistic and romantic. Moving on from the plot! A few things put this book into my "READ IT NOW" list. Let's talk about them, shall we?First - the sex. The book is 107 pages, but there are at least 4 sexual encounters depicted on page. They appeared to be heterosexual in nature, but I have no reason to think any of the characters identify as heterosexual and it's on page that Franklin (nonbinary) and Carver have a relationship, as well as Atwood (femme) and Rigo. There certainly aren't gender-assigned jobs, only pronouns and attraction. The sex is more humorous more often than not, especially a certain scene in a zero-gravity chamber that made me laugh out loud.The creators give enough time to the history of the California space station without bogging down the narrative. We learn that California seceded from the United States and aggressively pursued enviro-tech. We also learn that things went downhill quickly for the rest of Earth as "the oceans rose and the rains stopped." The space station was launched with a few lucky scientists on board before things truly went to hell, but since the station on Earth stopped responding to their transmissions, the folks on the ship don't know what happened. Is everyone dead? We don't know. We do see a view of the Earth from space and it's clearly a very different topography. Rigo has a conversation with her father about maintaining Earth culture and traditions for when they go back, but Rigo says that it sounds like that culture was responsible for the destruction of Earth... It's a very interesting conversation and, given the fact that California opened borders to Mexico after the secession and declared Spanish the national language, it's reminiscent of diaspora discussions. There's a lot of code-switching in the book, with Spanish and English mixed in a seamless way. Not everyone code-switches, however, which again, feels like a conscious choice and a piece of overall characterization.The last thing I want to talk about is how a lot of the cultural changes are subtle but so clearly intentional. Rigo has hairy underarms because um... they're on a spaceship. It makes total sense that they're not shaving, because wouldn't water be at a premium? Who cares about shaving your groin or underarms when resources are scarce? I also appreciated that Rigo is fat, even though everyone on the ship is eating the same carefully developed vegetarian diet. Some bodies are always going to be fat, regardless of diet. It's about time that we populated our sci-fi and post-apocalyptic worlds with all kinds of bodies.Last, to my garden-loving delight, plants are special. There's an incredibly sweet romantic gesture near the end of the book and it's got to do with the giving of a plant and... my heart. It's a succulent, of course, because of low water needs, and it's similar to the plant on the cover of the comic, tying everything together nicely.As I said, I adored this book. I could keep talking about it forever, but probably shouldn't so that you can get your copy and not be completely spoiled. This is what I want to see in the future of romance comics - thoughtful characterization, intricate worldbuilding, cute/hot sex, and characters to cheer for.Find us at www.loveinpanels.com for more romance comic goodness!
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  • Kimberly Carrington-Fox
    January 1, 1970
    I think it has a great starting point -a sci-fi comic with multicultural cast, mixed languajes, open minded sex and an ecological message. However it seems a little too simple for me. It's well developed but it's too short and the story, too rush. The art is very simple too but I find it colorful and funny. It's a pity since I really think it's a great idea but to me it needs more pages and more development.Nevertheless I praise the creators' work and I think they have a brilliant future.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars! I loved the diversity and portrayal of polyamorous relationships in this graphic novel. However, I felt it was a little lacking in terms of plot and overall development, and I would have liked to see more about life on the space station. Open Earth was still a really fun (and sexy! This is an erotic graphic novel so there’s a lot of sex and nudity) read, and if you’re intrigued by the premise I’d definitely recommend picking it up!
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    I am fascinated by the backstory in this book, the actual story not so much. It just wasn’t my thing, but I would love a graphic novel that gives more detail on how everyone got to the space station and why it was needed. I enjoyed the artwork, but it was just a bit too much for me tbh. I am a fan of the polyamory though and wish that it was explored more in a greater depth, but it was a change from what I normally read.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    *I received an egalley from Netgalley in return for an honest review.***Graphic Adult Graphic Novel**Interesting look at life in space after we have to abandon Earth about the generation that was born in space and their views on relationships. I found the story of what happened on Earth interesting and hope they will explore it more (I'm assuming there will be a sequel) as well as how the First Generation will shape life in space.
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  • Leah Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    A cute, positive story of polyamory and a new generation of earthlings—the first to be raised in space—a diverse group of friends who like to have sex, and one woman who wants to make one of her relationships a little more stable. Simple and cute. Definitely teen/adult content—there are a lot of butts and breasts.I got this book free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Mirk's emails are great. This was cute. Sweet, a little hokey but nothing offensive or obnoxious. Just like...basic information on being a cool human regardless of your body shape or gender expression.
  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    ( 1 ) 19/5/18 - 19/5/18I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Honestly, I'm in two minds about this. There were good points and bad points, and some were in an indescribable grey area.Let's start with the art. It's simple with nice colouring, which gets the job done. But I feel like, as acceptable as it is, it's also lacking in some ways. This is a story set upon a space station in the future, so obviously the world is different to that which we know, and there ( 1 ) 19/5/18 - 19/5/18I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Honestly, I'm in two minds about this. There were good points and bad points, and some were in an indescribable grey area.Let's start with the art. It's simple with nice colouring, which gets the job done. But I feel like, as acceptable as it is, it's also lacking in some ways. This is a story set upon a space station in the future, so obviously the world is different to that which we know, and therefore I feel like more details in the art would have given it more of a tone rather than it just being another place where characters exist. If that makes sense? There's no real feel to the location, nothing that expresses life there beyond what we're told in clumpy info dumps scattered throughout. It would have been nice for there to be more detail in the backgrounds rather than the majority being mere blank spaces of one colour or another. The shots from outside of the space station aren't detailed, either, though you can get the gist of what the ship looks like, there's nothing that stands out, that gives it any particular vibe. It really is just there, where the characters are, and that's that. So, yeah, I mean, there's nothing wrong with the art - it's whole, and it's simplistic, but I just feel that, given the setting, more detail would have been better, whereas if it had been set on Earth where we know how most places look, then our imaginations can fill in the rest, but here we're not prompted with all that much to trigger the imagination into filling in the blanks. Good art, but room for improvement given the setting, basically, because it is nice art overall. Also, I understand that this is considered an erotica graphic novel, though I'm not sure there's enough detailed sex in the content for it to truly count, if I'm honest, it seemed overly tame overall on that front, but I also think the plot was left by the wayside. There were a fair few info dumps, but they more or less all gave us the same information - something happened to the Earth, though it's not specifically noted as to what, just, something (global warning plays a part, at a guess, but it never states it, and there appears to be more to it than that), California opened the 'gates' to Mexico to make Spanglish the main language (not only is it American-focused, as always, no mention of the rest of the world as per, but also there's no real mention of the rest of the states, either, which seems odd - what happened to everyone else? If global warming flooded California, surely the middle of the county survived, or, did it? No one knows, because there's nothing given to us), the 'first generations' of the station love freely, apparently, without question, except for those who lived on Earth and their monogamous coupling. Erotica it may be, but come on, there's potential for a great plot here, the setting is interesting, what we are told is also interesting, though it might be more so because of how little is given and how much there is to find out, and yet so little plot. The characters aren't given much in the way of character development, either, because there's little we know about any of them beyond the fact that there appears to be a group of five friends (two female, three male) who all like to have sex with one another, and we don't even know if there's any romantic feelings between any of the characters, if it's purely sex, or a mixture of both - the main character, however, does choose to partner with someone come the end of the story, but even then it doesn't clearly state it has a romantic bond between them, just that it's something special, and their relationship will remain as open as before amongst the five of them. I feel disappointed in that, because there's no real connection to the space station part of the plot, and there's also no room for much connection between the characters, either, and I do love to discover characters, to see them stand out as individuals, but they all seem to be the same with different faces, if I'm honest, and that's a little sad when the potential is there. So, no real plot to speak of, and it seems like being in space in the future is an excuse not to have to look at polyamorous as a 'problem', which it isn't, anyway, and the characters aren't developed well, I could barely keep up with matching the names to the faces since two of the males appear the same, more or less. But, moving on.For all its failings, the diversity within this graphic novel is refreshing, even if it does seem like that's all the story cares about focusing on without developing anything else to make it stand out that much more or make it overly special. More than half of the characters we know of, and those in passing, are people of colour, mostly of Mexican decent, or, of a Latin origin, at least, with one main black character, though it is lacking any signs of Native, Asian and/or Middle Eastern representation amongst others, unless I blinked and missed it somehow. I think if there's a point to make everyone diverse, it's only fair to include as many peoples as possible, though I understand it's a kind of 'write what you know' thing. Also, the fact that it's people in a committed relationship between two people that are the ones to be frowned upon, who are looked at as standing out and being different rather than everyone else considered 'first generations' who fuck anything that moves. See, I'm all for representing polyamorous relationships, to paint them as nothing out of the ordinary, but, like with bisexual characters, implying that it automatically means freely swinging towards anyone and everyone is a little questionable to me. It's the future, they're in space, I get it, things change, life is different, though clearly not too far away from the last of the born-Earthlings, and it kind of leaves the impression (to those too ignorant to know any better) that anyone who is open to and able to partake in a polyamorous relationship is sex mad and incapable of giving it a rest for five minutes. As a bisexual, and therefore someone who's had to live with that kind of attitude around me whether I've been out to people or not, it leaves me feeling a little uncomfortable - for all the good messages, that one isn't the best - it would have been nice to see more romantic feelings behind some of the relationships involved, and to those who don't have romantic desires, then to state it clearly. That's another thing, nothing is stated, it's all left wide open and swinging freely, and I think that's unrealistic considering it's only one generation after the last Earth-born generation. Sexual orientations? None mentioned. Romantic orientations? None of those stated, either. Gender identities? Definitely not. Asexuals? Forget those, everyone is addicted to sex. Transgender? Also, no. It's making a point to be diverse, but it paints polyamorous relationships in a bad light by making it seem like no one shares anything even remotely romantic, no clear lines on who is attracted to who and in what way or why. Also, and, if I'm honest, this is my biggest issue - the main character is shown having sex with two of the three males, implied she's been with the third, and walks in on the other naked female, but the closest to a same-sex relationship is a kiss on the cheek from one male to another. Are the same-sex relationships depicted? No, they are not. Does the main female character find the secondary female character attractive in a sexual and/or romantic way? We'll probably never know. It's sad, that for something focusing on diversity, the biggest issue of the lot is same-sex relationships amongst the mess of the five main characters, and we're given one chaste kiss on the cheek with implications that there may or may not be something sexual between the two men. If this is purely about polyamorous relationships of the heterosexual kind, then why paint it has a LGBTQ+ graphic novel without any clear representation of it that stands out? Perhaps it was left out because some of them would land in the bisexual category, and it might (would) have come across in a poor light with everyone doing anything that walks by? Perhaps it wasn't considered at all. Perhaps it's written by heterosexuals who don't want that in their graphic novel (and yet didn't not want to give us something, so obviously a chaste cheek kiss will do)? Again, if that's the case, don't paint it as an LGBTQ+ story when it's clearly not. Anyone of any orientation, sexual or romantic, or any sex or gender, can be in a polyamorous relationship, but if there are no LGBTQ+ relationships clearly shown and/or stated, then I don't think it's fair to label it as such, and one blink-and-you'll-miss-it kiss on the cheek hardly counts. Why should we see several other opposite-sex people having sex, but no sign of same-sex receiving the same treatment? I find this questionable. As always, the queers are ignored, erased, bar one brief scene, which is no doubt there only to keep us 'satisfied'.On the whole, it does give a positive message about diversity, but it's also careless in the way that it attempts to show the differing people of the world all the while excluding those most likely to read something like this, especially when it's claimed to be aimed towards them. Certain people of colour get a great deal out of this, as does the polyamorous population, which is shown to be 'normal' to these 'first generation' twenty year olds, and the message that 'honesty is what keeps us alive' is a clear one, the only clear one beyond the variations of skin colour across the pages, because to be in a polyamorous relationship, communication is vital in making it work, but the fact that these kids don't appear to have any other motive beyond pleasuring each other sexually, it also falls on its own sword a little. How hard would it have been to portray the varying forms of love? All relationships take different forms, and this would have been the perfect platform to express that, to enlighten those who need it and bring together those who live it. But it fell short. And the lack of any true LGBTQ+ characters, for me, lets this down greatly. I admit, as a whole, I read it in one sitting, I read it quite quickly despise being a slow reader, and it was gripping while I was reading it, so the author and artist managed to get that right, but all the messages this is supposed to be putting out there in a positive light all have negativity surrounding them purely because nothing was clearly stated or declared (a lie by omission is still a lie), and because it's aimed at the LGBTQ+ community without any real representation - a guy kissing another guy's cheek and others joking about their possible sexual encounters in passing that one time does not count in the slightest - that's the kind of treatment we've had for years, and I would have thought by now people understood that erasure is just as harmful and damaging as outright negativity directed at one group or another - as a bisexual, again, I know personally how damaging and harmful erasure can be, and therefore where the plot failed to set much of a tone and the characters set one far too much the wrong way, the erasure of queers and genderqueers everywhere is what sets the tone for me. I wanted to like this, I did enjoy it for what it was, but for something supposedly setting out to put across positive messages, it ended up backfiring badly. It seems as if Latin peoples and overly-sexual polyamorous people without any clear sense of relationships one way or another were the only true audience for this, which begs the question why it's aimed at us and not put in the general erotica category where us queers and genderqueers are always erased, anyway, and we expect nothing less. But this, put in the LGBTQ+ category without any real representation and a harmful message of erasure? I'm sorry to say it lets it down for me, greatly, it was thoughtless and careless, and harmful to all those LGBTQ+ people in polyamorous relationships, as well as to all those in poly relationships that have to live with being accused of having sex with anything that moves - erotica it may be, but every time the main character walked into another room, she ended up having sex with someone else. In our reality, she would have been on the Jeremy Kyle show discussing her severe sex addiction since she thought about nothing else of importance; she was nothing else of importance - we knew nothing about her beyond being a 'first generation' while her parents were from Earth, that's literally all we learnt about her apart from all the sex she has non-stop. I'm all for people who are sexually active, I'm pleased for them, but when it becomes the sole purpose of someone's existence and nothing more, then it's crossed the line to being a problem.The only real positives I can take from this? Certain people of colour get a good look in for once, and I liked that, it was nice to see that not only within a story, but also in colour as well, to give it that extra point. And the fact that the main character is on the larger side, which doesn't seem to deter any of her sexual partners has it often does in reality, which was also a refreshing change, and more so that she appeared to be quite happy in and of herself (for all we got to see, anyway). But the LGBTQ+ representation just wasn't there for me, at all, and as several of the characters were drawn in a somewhat androgynous way to the point where I struggled to decide if their sex was male or female until it was stated with pronouns as to their gender, there was a great opening for transgender and genderqueer representation right there just screaming out, which is something I also relate to, but the potential that was so great was wasted so poorly. Basically, larger women of Latin American origins who enjoy sex, sex, and more sex are covered really well, painted in a positive light without any body or slut shaming, and people of colour in general, but nothing else - the potential for gay, bisexual, pansexual, polysexual, asexual, demisexual, transgender, and genderqueer was there, it really was, as was there a great plot background waiting to be told, but it just didn't come, and with each panel I felt the disappointment hit me that little bit more. I so wanted to love this, I do like it, but I can't love it, and as much as I read it with interest, I felt excluded from it, like it was another world of heterosexuals who, even when they were talking constantly about leaving the old ways behind, were merely carrying on the ways all the same. Ultimately, if it were an option, I would like to give this 2.5 stars, and as I did like the concept of this even if the execution was poor, I'll go up and not down, which gives it the full 3 stars. But I do this begrudgingly.
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  • Andrea Way
    January 1, 1970
    An adult sexy time graphic novel that features polyamory. This was done well The characters were interesting and I was invested in their story. I adored the addition of the Spanglish language that is used throughout the novel. Would recommend this graphic novel.
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  • Chinook
    January 1, 1970
    This has some fascinating ideas - the polyamory/pansexual lifestyle as a survival strategy in a small space ship, California breaking off from the US and the rest maybe destructing, etc. But for a short graphic novel, that was a lot of space dedicated to banging and less space dedicated to advancing the plot. I’d be curious to read the next instalment.
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