Putting the Science in Fiction
Science and technology have starring roles in a wide range of genres--science fiction, fantasy, thriller, mystery, and more. Unfortunately, many depictions of technical subjects in literature, film, and television are pure fiction. A basic understanding of biology, physics, engineering, and medicine will help you create more realistic stories that satisfy discerning readers.This book brings together scientists, physicians, engineers, and other experts to help you:Understand the basic principles of science, technology, and medicine that are frequently featured in fiction.Avoid common pitfalls and misconceptions to ensure technical accuracy.Write realistic and compelling scientific elements that will captivate readers.Brainstorm and develop new science- and technology-based story ideas.Whether writing about mutant monsters, rogue viruses, giant spaceships, or even murders and espionage, Putting the Science in Fiction will have something to help every writer craft better fiction.Putting the Science in Fiction collects articles from "Science in Sci-fi, Fact in Fantasy," Dan Koboldt's popular blog series for authors and fans of speculative fiction (dankoboldt.com/science-in-scifi). Each article discusses an element of sci-fi or fantasy with an expert in that field. Scientists, engineers, medical professionals, and others share their insights in order to debunk the myths, correct the misconceptions, and offer advice on getting the details right.

Putting the Science in Fiction Details

TitlePutting the Science in Fiction
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 16th, 2018
PublisherWriter's Digest Books
ISBN-139781440353383
Rating
GenreLanguage, Writing, Nonfiction, Science

Putting the Science in Fiction Review

  • Dan Koboldt
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: I'm the editor of (and a contributing author to) this book. Putting the Science in Fiction is a reference for genre fiction writers that was developed from my "Science in Sci-fi, Fact in Fantasy" blog series. Each week, I invite engineers, scientists, doctors, and other experts to discuss common misconceptions about their field and to offer advice for writers who want to get the details right. Now we've collected much of that knowledge into a book with Writers Digest.This book contai Disclosure: I'm the editor of (and a contributing author to) this book. Putting the Science in Fiction is a reference for genre fiction writers that was developed from my "Science in Sci-fi, Fact in Fantasy" blog series. Each week, I invite engineers, scientists, doctors, and other experts to discuss common misconceptions about their field and to offer advice for writers who want to get the details right. Now we've collected much of that knowledge into a book with Writers Digest.This book contains 59 chapters, including several never-before-published entries. There's also a foreword by bestselling author Chuck Wendig that, in my opinion, is worth the price of the book by itself. The 40 or so expert contributors to this book have collectively endured more than 200 years of graduate study in their chosen fields. They know what they're talking about. But don't worry, we've kept the mansplaining to a minimum (in fact, two thirds of our contributors identify as female).We can't teach you everything there is to know about these highly technical subjects, but we can show you enough to be dangerous. Armed with this book, you'll be able to avoid common pitfalls and create more realistic, more compelling stories.
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received a galley of this book from the editor.Dan Koboldt's Science in Sci-fi blog series has a fantastic online resource for years. This book, published by Writer's Digest, collects some forty of those pieces to create a fantastic print and ebook resource for writers or inquisitive readers. The diversity of material is absolutely fascinating. From proper lab technique to touring the human genome to correctly depicting mental illness to computer hacking to building spaceships--this has it all I received a galley of this book from the editor.Dan Koboldt's Science in Sci-fi blog series has a fantastic online resource for years. This book, published by Writer's Digest, collects some forty of those pieces to create a fantastic print and ebook resource for writers or inquisitive readers. The diversity of material is absolutely fascinating. From proper lab technique to touring the human genome to correctly depicting mental illness to computer hacking to building spaceships--this has it all. Each piece is fairly short, too, just a few pages. That makes it easy to read in snippets while on the go. While the target audience is fantasy and science fiction writers, the subject matter is relevant to anyone since the writers often cite popular movies, TV shows, and books as they discuss what is done right and wrong.I sincerely hope this continues as a book series. I learned a lot as I read, and I'd love to keep learning. As I wait and hope for the next book, this one is definitely staying on my reference shelf.
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  • Quirkybookworm
    January 1, 1970
    When I first read the excerpt of this book, I was expecting this to be boring, dull, monotone. I was wrong! I was quite suprised! Pleasantly surprised which I wanted to read more, so I signed up for the drawing of this book and I won! Thank you, Bookish First! By the way, while I read the first couple of chapter, Sheldon and Penny from The Big Bang Theory television series popped in my head. I can actually see Sheldon handing Penny this book for her to learn about science and writing! I had to c When I first read the excerpt of this book, I was expecting this to be boring, dull, monotone. I was wrong! I was quite suprised! Pleasantly surprised which I wanted to read more, so I signed up for the drawing of this book and I won! Thank you, Bookish First! By the way, while I read the first couple of chapter, Sheldon and Penny from The Big Bang Theory television series popped in my head. I can actually see Sheldon handing Penny this book for her to learn about science and writing! I had to chuckle at my visualization.When the book arrived, I was pleased to see a beautiful big big book with 260 or so pages. It easy to read. Very enjoyable and entertaining. I even laughed out couple of times. I'm really tempted to write a sci fi novel myself!If you're truly interested in writing a good science fiction novel and need help in some or all aspect of ideas, this is the book for you. It basically covers everything from hospitals, labs, microbiology, brains, earth, Skynet, computers, researches, ocean, planets, astronomy, space, and much, much more. This book would be an excellent tool to add to your other tools for writing your own science fiction novel. Take advantage of it. You won't regret it.I won this excellent entertaining ARC from Writers' Digest Books though Bookish First. Thanks you!
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  • Audrey Adamson
    January 1, 1970
    Putting the Science in Fiction is an engaging look into how to write science fiction realistically. I learned things, questions things and even had a laugh. I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone writing science fiction.The book is comprised of essays by different experts telling of things in pop culture that makes them cringe. The majority of the essays then tell you how to fix that in your own writing. Many of these have a sense of humor making education fun without having the feelin Putting the Science in Fiction is an engaging look into how to write science fiction realistically. I learned things, questions things and even had a laugh. I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone writing science fiction.The book is comprised of essays by different experts telling of things in pop culture that makes them cringe. The majority of the essays then tell you how to fix that in your own writing. Many of these have a sense of humor making education fun without having the feeling that people are yelling at you.I thought some of the essays were too short; I wanted to know more! But each writer was given a certain amount of space to explain a variety of topics including FTL speed, contained ecosystems, lab work and how to grow organs. The majority of the essays are easy to understand and if they weren't to begin with, the authors made the ideas clear to use amateurs. There was only one or two that I truly didn't understand.This collection is a fun and educational experience into the world of science and how it can enrich your fiction. I received an ARC from the publisher; all opinions are my own.
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Are you an aspiring author of Science Fiction? Want to sound like you know what you are talking about when your character launches into an explanation of the psychology of the alien squid-like beings they discovered on that distant planet they arrived on after just a four week trip, thanks to an advanced engineering break-through? Then read Dan Koboldt's book. It's packed with great insights from a host of experts. Their knowledge and tips are informative and digestible for the layperson.Nothing Are you an aspiring author of Science Fiction? Want to sound like you know what you are talking about when your character launches into an explanation of the psychology of the alien squid-like beings they discovered on that distant planet they arrived on after just a four week trip, thanks to an advanced engineering break-through? Then read Dan Koboldt's book. It's packed with great insights from a host of experts. Their knowledge and tips are informative and digestible for the layperson.Nothing ruins the suspension of disbelief necessary in the author-reader relationship faster than plot or characterization that reads as phony or unbelievable. Putting the Science in Fiction can give you a big head start towards avoiding many of the pitfalls writer's can find themselves being guilty of.As this is a real area of interest for me, I did a Q&A with Dan regarding the book and the issues it raises. Give it a read
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  • ☠Kensley​✍
    January 1, 1970
    As a writer, this book is ESSENTIAL to any writer's arsenal. I don't care if you write science fiction or you don't, you NEED this book to go on your personal bookshelf or your reference pile for future stories. I am not a sole writer for science fiction, but let me tell you, this book helped me with a recent science fiction story that I did have to write. Whether or not you regularly write or read science fiction, this book will let you apply its contents into your stories and books for other g As a writer, this book is ESSENTIAL to any writer's arsenal. I don't care if you write science fiction or you don't, you NEED this book to go on your personal bookshelf or your reference pile for future stories. I am not a sole writer for science fiction, but let me tell you, this book helped me with a recent science fiction story that I did have to write. Whether or not you regularly write or read science fiction, this book will let you apply its contents into your stories and books for other genres. Trust me when I say this is one of those reference type booke that you don't want to miss out on. And, you don't have to be a writer to read this either! this is a book that can also be read for enjoyment, whether you're wanting to learn about new or possible technology from experts to make your story more realistic or whether you're just wanting to expand your mind because you're hardcore into science.
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  • Robin Blankenship
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It was interesting and fun. It really explained so much of the science I have been wondering about. It was not stuff and boring like some technical books can be. I would definitely recommend this resource to anyone looking to write a novel or who just loves the science behind it all. It was well composed and well written from top experts in the field. I very much enjoyed this and think this is a handy guide for writers of science fiction to keep handy. I also keep thinking my I loved this book. It was interesting and fun. It really explained so much of the science I have been wondering about. It was not stuff and boring like some technical books can be. I would definitely recommend this resource to anyone looking to write a novel or who just loves the science behind it all. It was well composed and well written from top experts in the field. I very much enjoyed this and think this is a handy guide for writers of science fiction to keep handy. I also keep thinking my brother would love this. He loves science fiction and we often has conversations back and forth about if something would work or arguing when we think that it wont. I also like that it has a medical section. Medical stuff often loses me cause it seems so unreal.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I was very excited to get a chance to read and review this book. As someone with forensic psychology experience, I am often annoyed when fiction writers get psychology wrong and clearly have done littleness to no reaesarch in an area that their book has a large focus. This resource has 59 chapters written by science experts in the field aimed at educating writers, busting common myths, and with some ideas of how to get the writing to be as accurate as possible even in a fictional or fantasy worl I was very excited to get a chance to read and review this book. As someone with forensic psychology experience, I am often annoyed when fiction writers get psychology wrong and clearly have done littleness to no reaesarch in an area that their book has a large focus. This resource has 59 chapters written by science experts in the field aimed at educating writers, busting common myths, and with some ideas of how to get the writing to be as accurate as possible even in a fictional or fantasy world. I would like to note that this book can also be read by young aspiring writers as my middle grade son (reads and comprehends at a high school level) was able to read it for application to his own creative writing.
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  • Carolyn McBride
    January 1, 1970
    I have been following Dan Koboldt's blog for some time and learning a lot. So I was excited to see this book and hopeful at the same time. I'm pleased to report that I learned even more from the book! No matter if you write with a lot of sci-fi in your work or even just a little, there's bound to be something in here you'll find yourself using. Much of it is written in a conversational style, very easy to read. (Although I confess to reading the genetics section twice in order to understand part I have been following Dan Koboldt's blog for some time and learning a lot. So I was excited to see this book and hopeful at the same time. I'm pleased to report that I learned even more from the book! No matter if you write with a lot of sci-fi in your work or even just a little, there's bound to be something in here you'll find yourself using. Much of it is written in a conversational style, very easy to read. (Although I confess to reading the genetics section twice in order to understand parts of it)If you write sci-fi of any stripe, you need this book!
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    What an utterly fascinating book! I love reading 'the truth behind the fiction' and this book was perfect for that. I did skim a few - very few - chapters that got a little too technical for me, but overall, this book was easily understood and extremely interesting. HIGHLY recommended for sci-fi writers.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Stephanie Sauvinet
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I am one of the contributors for this book.This book is a great resource for writers, particularly SF writers. We cannot possibly be knowledgeable in ALL fields of science in order to write SF and this book is the perfect answer. It covers an array of scientific topics and gives you the skinny on the science behind them. It allows for someone unfamiliar with those scientific topics to understand some basics, and best of all, prevent glaring mistakes. It debunks a lot of the myths fic Disclaimer: I am one of the contributors for this book.This book is a great resource for writers, particularly SF writers. We cannot possibly be knowledgeable in ALL fields of science in order to write SF and this book is the perfect answer. It covers an array of scientific topics and gives you the skinny on the science behind them. It allows for someone unfamiliar with those scientific topics to understand some basics, and best of all, prevent glaring mistakes. It debunks a lot of the myths fiction has built over the years and sets the record straight, allowing authors to write believable, science-based novels.
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealityI have served on various book judging committees over the years. Recently I was part of a group picking the best science fiction for the year. I’m not going to say where or when, but it’s a list where the jury is still out.But it made me think about what makes good science fiction – and conversely what doesn’t. Which led me to not one but two books in the virtually towering TBR pile, Putting the Science in Fiction and The Science of Science Fiction, both of Originally published at Reading RealityI have served on various book judging committees over the years. Recently I was part of a group picking the best science fiction for the year. I’m not going to say where or when, but it’s a list where the jury is still out.But it made me think about what makes good science fiction – and conversely what doesn’t. Which led me to not one but two books in the virtually towering TBR pile, Putting the Science in Fiction and The Science of Science Fiction, both of which have been released this month.It seemed like a golden opportunity to do a compare and contrast instead of a more traditional review.I thought that these books would work together well. Putting the Science in Fiction was all about the inputs. It is exactly what I expected it to be. Much fiction, both written and filmed, includes some science in some form. Police dramas and mysteries deal with forensic science. Medical dramas – and not a few mysteries – deal with medical science. Science fiction, of course, is all about taking science out to the nth degree and then playing with it.But lay people often get things wrong. There are lots of things about science that get shortchanged or simplified in order to make better drama. Anyone who is an expert in whatever has just gotten completely screwed up will cringe and just how far off-base the writer or director has just taken the science in their story.We all do it for our own fields. And when it happens it throws the knowledgeable reader out of the story – no matter how good the rest of it might be.Putting the Science in Fiction turns out to be a surprisingly readable collection of essays by science and engineering experts explaining the very, very basics of their fields to those of us whose expertise is somewhere else. It serves as a terrific guide for any writer who wants to follow the dictum of “write what you know” by learning more so they know more so they have more to write about.On my other hand, The Science of Science Fiction is not what I expected it to be. I was kind of expecting it to be about SF that did well – not necessarily in the science aspect at the time so much as in the way that it captured the imagination – even to the point where the SF created the science it postulated.There is a famous story about Star Trek: The Original Series and the invention of the cell phone that comes to mind.But that’s not where this book went. Although that would be a great book and I hope someone writes it.Instead, The Science of Science Fiction reads more like a history of SF written thematically rather than chronologically. It takes some of the basic tenets and tropes of SF and lays out where they began – sometimes surprisingly long ago – to where they are now.It’s an interesting approach but it didn’t quite gel for this reader.By way of comparison, both books talk about the science and the influences of Michael Crichton’s classic work of SF, Jurassic Park.Putting the Science in Fiction does two things, and it does them really well. First, it conveys that “sensawunder” that SF does when it is at its best. The author of the essay is a microbiologist, who puts the science of the book in context – both the context of what was known at the time it was written (OMG 1990!) and what has been discovered since, and comes to the conclusion that he didn’t do too badly based on what was known at the time. Discoveries since have made his science fictional extrapolation less likely than it originally seemed. It’s hard to fault the author for that.But what the author of the essay also does is to show how the book not only grabbed his interest and attention but continues to hold it to the present day, even though he knows the science isn’t remotely feasible. The book does a great job of taking just enough of the science in a direction that we want to believe is possible.After all, who wouldn’t want to see a real live dinosaur? Under very controlled conditions. Much more controlled conditions than occur in the book, of course.The Science of Science Fiction also discusses Jurassic Park. (A classic is a classic, after all) But instead of talking about the science of cloning the author goes into a couple of other directions. First he sets Jurassic Park within the context of other “lost world” works of science fiction. That’s a tradition that goes back to Jules Verne and even further. But it feels like the fit of Jurassic Park as part of that lost world tradition doesn’t quite fit.The other part of this Jurassic Park discussion has to do with the way that scientists are portrayed in SF. Science makes the story possible. Scientists in fiction tend to work toward proving they can do something – in this particular case proving they can clone dinosaurs from preserved DNA. It takes a different kind of scientist, someone dealing in chaos theory, to posit that just because it CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be done. That’s a discussion I would love to see expanded. And I’d have liked this book more if it had been expanded here.Reality Ratings: These two books struck me completely differently. Putting the Science in Fiction is both readable and does what it sets out to do – excellent points for a work designed to help writers do a more informed job of including science in their fiction. I therefore give Putting the Science in Fiction a B+.Howsomever, The Science of Science Fiction doesn’t work nearly as well. It reads much more like a history of SF than it treats with the science of SF. That it breaks that history up into themes rather than treat it chronologically makes it jump around a bit. As SF history, it’s not nearly as readable as Astounding or An Informal History of the Hugos or What Makes This Book So Great?. While I will be tempted to dip back into Putting the Science in Fiction again when I need some explanatory material on a particular science in SF, I won’t be inclined to go back to The Science of Science Fiction. I give The Science of Science Fiction a C+One final recommendation. Do not read the chapter in Putting the Science in Fiction about plausible methods for kicking off the Zombie Apocalypse at breakfast. Or any other meal!
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    If I ever doubted that I am not a hard science fiction reader/writer, this book definitely convinced me.On the science fiction/fantasy spectrum, I definitely lean more toward the fantasy end. As long as the science is "close enough" (even for things I KNOW are wrong), the story is more important to me. I'm okay with some hand waving and "comic book science" as long as the characters and integrity of the plot carry the story. Overall, this book definitely served that end. It provided just enough If I ever doubted that I am not a hard science fiction reader/writer, this book definitely convinced me.On the science fiction/fantasy spectrum, I definitely lean more toward the fantasy end. As long as the science is "close enough" (even for things I KNOW are wrong), the story is more important to me. I'm okay with some hand waving and "comic book science" as long as the characters and integrity of the plot carry the story. Overall, this book definitely served that end. It provided just enough information on the various scientific topics for an author to sound like they know what they're talking about or to spark some creative ideas for incorporating science realism into their books without needing a PhD in a dozen different specialties. The best chapters were the ones where the contributor acknowledged that a good story with fantastical "science" is still a good story, but showed some simple ways to tweak that science to make it even more realistic.Where the book fell apart for me is the small handful of chapters where the contributors were downright condescending. Those contributors, including the one on pregnancy/delivery and nanotechnology, seemed to forget that no matter how important the science is, the "fiction" part will still what readers are looking for. Otherwise, they'd just go read a textbook. The popularity of entertainment like Jurassic Park, the Bourne series or Marvel movies show that as long as it "looks good on paper," most readers/viewers don't really care that the science is suspect. Insulting those readers or the writers who did the hand waving doesn't really make me give a crap about your science. And telling me that just because my delivery went a certain way doesn't mean I should write it that way in a book because it isn't the norm makes me think you forgot that this is f-i-c-t-i-o-n. Speculative or otherwise, fiction is limited only by the author's (and reader's) imagination.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Whether you write mysteries, fantasy or science fiction, Putting the Science in Fiction is an exceptional way to avoid factual errors. But it is also just a great way to catch up with current technology trends.When your spaceship dramatically explodes into a fiery cataclysm, scientists everywhere are screaming (with laughter). Of course, in space no one can hear you scream. However, you should also know that without oxygen, you know like in outer space, fiery explosions can’t occur. To avoid gig Whether you write mysteries, fantasy or science fiction, Putting the Science in Fiction is an exceptional way to avoid factual errors. But it is also just a great way to catch up with current technology trends.When your spaceship dramatically explodes into a fiery cataclysm, scientists everywhere are screaming (with laughter). Of course, in space no one can hear you scream. However, you should also know that without oxygen, you know like in outer space, fiery explosions can’t occur. To avoid giggling scientists, read this book.The range of subject matter within Putting the Science in Fiction is impressive. From simple lab protocols to poisons, genetic engineering, mental health issues, disasters, rocket science, biology, computer science and more, this book has something for everyone. Each story is written by an expert in their field. Most are less than ten pages long.Even for non-writers, some of the misconceptions exposed are fascinating. Walt Disney probably wasted his money freezing his head. Most of the Terminator series is impossible. However, the storm trooper’s pulse (really an intermittent laser) cannon has already been tested successfully by the US Navy. Unfortunately, Luke’s lightsaber is a non-starter as are all of the rebel’s ships. I guess we know who really would have won the (star) war.Okay, I admit it: I am a total nerd. I absolutely loved this book. I am planning to use it at parties to debunk (okay, maybe ruin) popular movies. However, even as a non-writer, Putting the Science in Fiction gave me at least five great plots for a future bestselling novel. Unfortunately, it won’t be written by me. Perhaps you will write it so I can have the pleasure of seeing my idea in print. 5 stars!Thanks to the publisher, Writer’s Digest, and NetGalley for an advance copy.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a copy from BookishFirst **This book is amazing! I am so happy to find that there is someone out there informing writers to get behind the real science in their story subjects. I see so many books where one little thing is wrong that messes up the whole story to me. The biggest, and it’s like a stab in the heart, is for example, there’s a really popular book out now about a nurse working in an ER and a vampire is raiding the bloodbank. First of all, ERs don’t have bloodbanks, labs d **I received a copy from BookishFirst **This book is amazing! I am so happy to find that there is someone out there informing writers to get behind the real science in their story subjects. I see so many books where one little thing is wrong that messes up the whole story to me. The biggest, and it’s like a stab in the heart, is for example, there’s a really popular book out now about a nurse working in an ER and a vampire is raiding the bloodbank. First of all, ERs don’t have bloodbanks, labs do. Second, WE ARE NOT NURSES! We are laboratory technicians or technologist. Or clinical lab scientists. We are the ones who type blood and crossmatch it then sign it out to the nurse. We get no credit. We are called phlebotomists or nurses. No one sees us or know we exist. Sorry to rant. But one little google would’ve helped this author. Books I would read, if I see that, I won’t buy. I think this book would be invaluable to authors. I love how it’s laid out and organized. This makes me want to write a book. Who knows, maybe I will.
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  • Gina Denny
    January 1, 1970
    If you are a writer, you NEED this book. Dozens of subject matter experts share quick tidbits about what writers get wrong about their area of expertise. Not only are a lot of your assumptions wrong, but the truth can give you more ideas than you know what to do with. Psychology, psychiatry, genetics, biochemistry, environmental science, and the list just goes on and on. Every essay is organized in an easy-to-read format with headlines to catch your attention and help you find that interesting t If you are a writer, you NEED this book. Dozens of subject matter experts share quick tidbits about what writers get wrong about their area of expertise. Not only are a lot of your assumptions wrong, but the truth can give you more ideas than you know what to do with. Psychology, psychiatry, genetics, biochemistry, environmental science, and the list just goes on and on. Every essay is organized in an easy-to-read format with headlines to catch your attention and help you find that interesting thing you read but can't remember the exact details of. Even if you aren't a writer, if you're the sort of person that is constantly indulging their curiosity and chasing down wikipedia rabbit holes, this book is a fantastic hit. I wanted to read it because I write science fiction and fantasy and I want my stories to be rooted in reality, but eventually I was reading it just because it's COOL. I just WANTED to read it. It's rare that a research book ends up being this interesting.
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  • Philip Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    ***Disclosure: I am a contributing Author in this book.***While I contributed a short article to this book, the vast majority of it was not written by me, so this is my review of those other articles. I became a Hard SciFi writer about the same time I became a scientist. During that time, I realized how difficult it was to spot inaccuracies on TV and in books without being well-educated on the subject. While reading through this book, I found I had made a number of inaccuracies in my own works o ***Disclosure: I am a contributing Author in this book.***While I contributed a short article to this book, the vast majority of it was not written by me, so this is my review of those other articles. I became a Hard SciFi writer about the same time I became a scientist. During that time, I realized how difficult it was to spot inaccuracies on TV and in books without being well-educated on the subject. While reading through this book, I found I had made a number of inaccuracies in my own works of fiction. We can't be experts at everything. That's where this book comes in, by bringing the expert advice to you. It gives writers an overview of a number of common SciFi subjects, allowing them to avoid common inaccuracies. Accurate portrayal of science and other technical subjects in your book will minimize the number of readers who put it down out of sheer disbelief. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to add a bit more authenticity to their writing.
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  • KatiZee
    January 1, 1970
    I won an ARC from BookishFirst.com, thank you to them and the Publisher.This was incredibly informative and quite humorous as well. There’s a ton of information in this book to help you write a science fiction book or to simply learn in general, as in my case. So many topics are covered in this book from how to properly use lab equipment to correctly presenting mental illness, and yes, even lightsabers. I would think anybody would enjoy this book that likes to read or watch science fiction as it I won an ARC from BookishFirst.com, thank you to them and the Publisher.This was incredibly informative and quite humorous as well. There’s a ton of information in this book to help you write a science fiction book or to simply learn in general, as in my case. So many topics are covered in this book from how to properly use lab equipment to correctly presenting mental illness, and yes, even lightsabers. I would think anybody would enjoy this book that likes to read or watch science fiction as it will give you a whole new understanding on how things work in space, how science gives us new applications for things, how to design a spaceship, and a whole lot more. There are a lot of tips on how to write about these topics in a knowledgeable manner. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about all these things and found myself chuckling frequently too, which made all the information seem much less dense and overwhelming.
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  • Brianna
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book.Writer's Digest never fails to impress with their books on writing and this one definitely doesn't disappoint! The information contained in this book is invaluable, especially the section on mental health and neuroscience. It helps with character building, especially in my favorite genre to write in: literary fiction focused on mental states and disorders. I also found the medical section useful. The other more science fiction related sections were Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book.Writer's Digest never fails to impress with their books on writing and this one definitely doesn't disappoint! The information contained in this book is invaluable, especially the section on mental health and neuroscience. It helps with character building, especially in my favorite genre to write in: literary fiction focused on mental states and disorders. I also found the medical section useful. The other more science fiction related sections were interesting and I could see myself using the information if I ever write something in that genre. This book will be out on my desk any time I am writing for quick reference. It is laid out superbly and really promotes accuracy in fiction, which is a passion of mine. Thank you Writer's Digest and all the authors that have articles within this great book!
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  • AR Lucas
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: I contributed an article to this anthology.As someone who likes to "learn without feeling like I'm learning", I'm a fan of this concept, but my biggest compliment is the sheer breadth of topics covered in such a compact volume. Sure, it's not enough to serve as a single source reference on any one topic, but what it does do well is it gives the writer a place to start, a sort of search engine primer.There are numerous references to well-known science fiction books, movies and TV seri Disclosure: I contributed an article to this anthology.As someone who likes to "learn without feeling like I'm learning", I'm a fan of this concept, but my biggest compliment is the sheer breadth of topics covered in such a compact volume. Sure, it's not enough to serve as a single source reference on any one topic, but what it does do well is it gives the writer a place to start, a sort of search engine primer.There are numerous references to well-known science fiction books, movies and TV series, and some of the articles are quite humorous. Overall, it was an enjoyable read and is a book I'll continue to use to inform my fiction research.
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  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    A great resource for budding Science Fiction writers, and others who want their science to be more realistic in their fiction. An approachable and practical guide, laced with humor, on how not to have your book thrown across the room. And for readers, a handy reference if you want to know when you should probably give that book a toss as well.One for the keeper shelf!This review is based on a sample read through Bookish First and may be updated (and star rating adjusted if warranted) when the fu A great resource for budding Science Fiction writers, and others who want their science to be more realistic in their fiction. An approachable and practical guide, laced with humor, on how not to have your book thrown across the room. And for readers, a handy reference if you want to know when you should probably give that book a toss as well.One for the keeper shelf!This review is based on a sample read through Bookish First and may be updated (and star rating adjusted if warranted) when the full, finished book is read. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Lenoire
    January 1, 1970
    Science and technology have always played an important role in movies and books. Many pieces of literature, television, and film that depict science and fiction are purely fictional. This book was compiled with a group of doctors, engineers, scientists, and experts to help provide readers with a basic understanding of technology, science, and medicine.The book is in-depth and informative. It was packed with information from experts to help writers create better science fiction. I found this book Science and technology have always played an important role in movies and books. Many pieces of literature, television, and film that depict science and fiction are purely fictional. This book was compiled with a group of doctors, engineers, scientists, and experts to help provide readers with a basic understanding of technology, science, and medicine.The book is in-depth and informative. It was packed with information from experts to help writers create better science fiction. I found this book to be a great and insightful reference for writers.
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  • Ruth DuCharme
    January 1, 1970
    Love! If you are an author of ANY genre, this book is useful. I thoroughly enjoyed all the advice given by the authors. It is written in each individuals style and their voices come through spectacularly. I was captivated from the very first page and took copies notes, scribbling like a madwoman. I will most certainly be keeping this one handy as I work through my own writing projects. I highly recommend!!!
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  • Donna Huber
    January 1, 1970
    If you write medical dramas or science fiction, then this is a book you will want in your toolbox. As far as something to read cover to cover, I found it to be rather dry. But as a resource for writers, it is excellent (presumably an author would read through the set of essays that pertained to their novel). I'm not sure if this collection of essays appeared on the mentioned blog, but I think some of the articles would have been easier to read online as I don't skim read as easily on my e-reader If you write medical dramas or science fiction, then this is a book you will want in your toolbox. As far as something to read cover to cover, I found it to be rather dry. But as a resource for writers, it is excellent (presumably an author would read through the set of essays that pertained to their novel). I'm not sure if this collection of essays appeared on the mentioned blog, but I think some of the articles would have been easier to read online as I don't skim read as easily on my e-reader. Read my full review at Girl Who Reads.
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  • Sylvia Spruck Wrigley
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent resource! Lots of fascinating information and details that I never even knew I needed to know!
  • Alicia Herrington
    January 1, 1970
    Making sure that science fiction stories portray more science fact than science fantasy can be one of the most difficult things for any writer to do, especially if they aren't a scientist themselves. This book aims to help with that. In it a variety of experts give a bare bones primer on a variety of scientific topics, so at least writers won't get the obvious stuff wrong.Librarian: There are dozens of books on writing published each year. Obviously we can't order all of them. If you are plannin Making sure that science fiction stories portray more science fact than science fantasy can be one of the most difficult things for any writer to do, especially if they aren't a scientist themselves. This book aims to help with that. In it a variety of experts give a bare bones primer on a variety of scientific topics, so at least writers won't get the obvious stuff wrong.Librarian: There are dozens of books on writing published each year. Obviously we can't order all of them. If you are planning on ordering a few though, this one is a good one to consider. It's on a topic, that I haven't seen deeply covered before, and written by people who are actually experts in the field. (Plus, with NaNoWriMo just around the corner, the demand for books like this is up.)Reader: Interesting writing book on a topic that I haven't really studied before. I'm glad I picked it up, it will be a worthy addition to my shelves.
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  • James
    January 1, 1970
    As an aspiring author myself, I’m always interested in titles that might help me develop my craft. I predominantly write crime fiction, but my reading tastes are a little more eclectic – encompassing horror, some science fiction, dystopia and the burgeoning new genre that is Cli-Fi - so I can well envisage writing something along those lines someday. Readers have always sought a certain realism, even in horror and fantasy they expect some consistency in the world the author creates, and this is As an aspiring author myself, I’m always interested in titles that might help me develop my craft. I predominantly write crime fiction, but my reading tastes are a little more eclectic – encompassing horror, some science fiction, dystopia and the burgeoning new genre that is Cli-Fi - so I can well envisage writing something along those lines someday. Readers have always sought a certain realism, even in horror and fantasy they expect some consistency in the world the author creates, and this is especially so since the dawn of the internet age, when facts are so easily checkable. Obviously, the online world is the writer’s friend, enabling as it does swifter and more efficient research, but it can also be a foe, swamping them with facts of dubious veracity and luring with distraction. Putting the Science in Fiction aims to act as an easily accessible resource for writers of any genre whose plots might touch on scientific matters. It is important to note here that “science” is broadly interpreted so as to include all the disciplines from physics through medicine and biological science to engineering. The text addresses cutting edge scientific debates and phenomena, topical debates, as well as the science that routinely reoccurs in fiction. So, we have everything from the human genome and genetic manipulation, through zombies, to the science behind Star Wars weapons.While this book is listed as by Dan Koboldt, in actual fact he is the editor. Each chapter is in actual fact written by an expert in their field. So, we have a chapter on the human genome by Koboldt (who is a geneticist), one on portaying mental health accurately by Kathleen S. Allen, a psychiatric nurse, and another on cyborgs and cybernetics by Benjamin Kinney, a neuroscientist. Other topics I might list are writing convincing death scenes by Bianca Nogrady, a science reporter, and realistic space flight, by Sylvia Spruck Wrigley, a pilot and aviation engineer.As noted, some of the chapters deal with more speculative topics, the chapter on zombies for example tried to answer scientifically how a zombie could theoretically come to pass, while the chapter on Star Wars weapons and space flight is clearly aimed at helping science fiction writers base their fiction in theoretical hard science. Other chapters, such that on the science behind Jurassic Park, aim to answer the question as to the realism of scenarios portrayed in film and firmly embedded in the public’s psyche.This is a really good book with essays penned by an eclectic range of authors on a broad range of subjects. Each has suggestions at the end for resources the reader might want to look at if they want to research the topic in more depth, but on their own they stand as informative summaries, the authors successfully straddling the divide between sufficient detail and brevity. I found this book very helpful and think that as a resource I will be referring to it for a long time to come.
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