Caring for One Another
There are hurting people everywhere. As Christians, it can be tempting to think that care should be left up to those who are more "qualified" pastors, leaders, or counselors. But in this book, experienced biblical counselor Ed Welch encourages readers to see that anyone who has trusted in Jesus is equipped to care for others, even--or maybe especially--those who feel weak and needy themselves. With discussion questions and short chapters meant to be read with others, Welch guides individuals and small groups through 8 lessons aimed at helping ordinary Christians create a community where people are free to be open, admit weakness, ask for help, and bear one another's burdens--a community that cares for each other in times of trouble.

Caring for One Another Details

TitleCaring for One Another
Author
ReleaseJul 31st, 2018
PublisherCrossway Books
ISBN-139781433561092
Rating
GenreChristian

Caring for One Another Review

  • Wayne Falgout
    January 1, 1970
    Short Christian oriented course format. An easy read and especially loved the follow up questions at the end of each chapter. Backed by Scripture. Focuses on building fellowship. Anyone in a leadership role or non-leadership role could learn a lot from this, I did. If you truly want to start caring for one another this book takes you step by step and gives you a good starting foundation.
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  • Bjørn
    January 1, 1970
    Simple but Very challenging
  • Doreen
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated this book. It has eight short chapters that talk about how we engage with other people. It is gentle in tone and very winsome. It has discussion questions and the chapters could easily be read in a small group setting. This book reminds us that God uses ordinary people to bless, encourage, exhort, and minister to each other. We are called to do that for each other and this book gives ideas on how we can do that. It is very practical and doable and built on a I thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated this book. It has eight short chapters that talk about how we engage with other people. It is gentle in tone and very winsome. It has discussion questions and the chapters could easily be read in a small group setting. This book reminds us that God uses ordinary people to bless, encourage, exhort, and minister to each other. We are called to do that for each other and this book gives ideas on how we can do that. It is very practical and doable and built on a solid, biblical foundation.I was especially convicted by the chapter on moving toward others. Just as God takes the initiative and moves toward us, we are to take initiative and move toward others. “Because of Jesus, you no longer look for the easiest person to talk to when people gather. Instead, you move toward the quieter ones, the new person, and the outliers. Imagine a group of people who move toward each other–active more than passive, loving more than fearing rejection” (location 90). I want to grow in that. It’s easy to go to church or any gathering and wait for someone else to come to us instead of seeking out others. This is an easy thing to do but takes strength, grace and humility.This book is about ordinary things like learning someone’s name and asking questions, and praying for each other. Nothing is earth shatteringly new, but this book is powerful. I am blessed to go to a church where people care for each other like this. Yet it still challenged, convicted and encouraged me. There is always more room for growth. This book is one I could see rereading every year as a checkup on how I’m caring for others. I would highly recommend this book.Thank you to Crossway for providing me with an e-copy of this book. I was not required to leave a positive review. All opinions are my own.
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  • David Steele
    January 1, 1970
    Each Christmas, like most families, we gather around the Christmas tree. After telling the story of the birth of Jesus and celebrating his incarnation, we open presents. When I was a child, I remember gravitating toward the big presents. After all, bigger is better. “The bigger the package, the better the present,” I reasoned in my seven-year-old mind.Sometimes people approach books with the same mentality. “How could a small book influence anyone’s life?” So goes the conventional mentality. But Each Christmas, like most families, we gather around the Christmas tree. After telling the story of the birth of Jesus and celebrating his incarnation, we open presents. When I was a child, I remember gravitating toward the big presents. After all, bigger is better. “The bigger the package, the better the present,” I reasoned in my seven-year-old mind.Sometimes people approach books with the same mentality. “How could a small book influence anyone’s life?” So goes the conventional mentality. But consider, one of the greatest speeches in American history was the Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln. But this short speech only contains 272 words. The Declaration of Independence only has 1,458 words. Clearly, bigger is not always better. Indeed, these two documents help forge the history of America!Edward T. Welch’s newest book is no exception. Caring for One Another is an exceedingly short book. The book is compromised of a mere 71 pages. But like the Gettysburg Address and the Declaration of Independence, this book packs a powerful punch.Dr. Welch describes eight ways to cultivate meaningful relationships. Each lesson begins with a biblical principle. The principle is explored and expanded and practical suggestions are offered that are specifically designed to care for the needs of people. Finally, the author includes helpful questions at the close of each chapter for personal and group discussion.Caring for One Another is a small book with a big message. The central message is the gospel of Jesus Christ which fuels willing souls and equips them for a lifetime of ministry.
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