The Unteachables
A hilarious new middle grade novel from beloved and bestselling author Gordon Korman about what happens when the worst class of kids in school is paired with the worst teacher—perfect for fans of Ms. Bixby’s Last Day.The Unteachables are a notorious class of misfits, delinquents, and academic train wrecks. Like Aldo, with anger management issues; Parker, who can’t read; Kiana, who doesn’t even belong in the class—or any class; and Elaine (rhymes with pain). The Unteachables have been removed from the student body and isolated in room 117.Their teacher is Mr. Zachary Kermit, the most burned-out teacher in all of Greenwich. He was once a rising star, but his career was shattered by a cheating scandal that still haunts him. After years of phoning it in, he is finally one year away from early retirement. But the superintendent has his own plans to torpedo that idea—and it involves assigning Mr. Kermit to the Unteachables.The Unteachables never thought they’d find a teacher who had a worse attitude than they did. And Mr. Kermit never thought he would actually care about teaching again. Over the course of a school year, though, room 117 will experience mayhem, destruction—and maybe even a shot at redemption.

The Unteachables Details

TitleThe Unteachables
Author
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherBalzer + Bray
ISBN-139780062563910
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fiction, Young Adult, Realistic Fiction, Contemporary

The Unteachables Review

  • Blodeuedd Finland
    January 1, 1970
    Oh I did not realise this was MG before reading the synopsis. I thought it was YA since they were 13. But hey it works for everyone!This is THE class. The one everyone avoids and where the school puts the kids they do not know wht to do with, and forgets them.Mr Kermit just wants to retire. The school really messed him up. A scandal destroyed his life and the school blamed him. And he had nothing do do with it. So now he hates teaching. Ok yes 27 years of not caring is hard to forgive, but I rea Oh I did not realise this was MG before reading the synopsis. I thought it was YA since they were 13. But hey it works for everyone!This is THE class. The one everyone avoids and where the school puts the kids they do not know wht to do with, and forgets them.Mr Kermit just wants to retire. The school really messed him up. A scandal destroyed his life and the school blamed him. And he had nothing do do with it. So now he hates teaching. Ok yes 27 years of not caring is hard to forgive, but I really liked him in the end. He is an amazing teacher that was forgotten about too.And then there there kids. Parker who can not read, and has a driver's license. Eeek.Kiara who wandered into the class and never left. And who is not even in this school.Aldo who is always angry.Barndoor who was the star of the school and then he broke his leg and forgotten about.All with great personalities, and different problems. That all can be solved if someone just cares for two seconds.There are also more. Rahim who falls asleep all the time. Elaine who everyone fears. And Matteo who is the biggest nerd and therefore the school finds him weird.They will raise hell and at the end I wanted them to succeed. This is the class from hell and I cheered them on.Really uplifting when I think about it! Yes it made me happy. It was fun, short and good.NarratorsOk so obvi there are LOT. But it works well, every big person gets her or his POV. Lots of narrators for that. But they ll have their own chapters so no one has a special own voice
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  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    [I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.]Fantastic! I loved the characters and the heart of this story. I was inspired by this story of the transformation that can happen when students have teachers and other adults who believe in them. Mr. Kermit, the teacher, changes the most over the story. The core of his character is to be a voice and an advocate for students and that makes a difference for this group of kids especially.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    It seems as though fictional educators are either cruel taskmasters or incredible human beings who turn children's lives around. The eighth grade class of unteachables boasts a teacher who begins as a mere time card puncher yet becomes a SUPERSTAR! before novel's end. It's the sort of transformation teen movies are made of. You know the ones where an already good looking outcast simply sheds his or her glasses and dresses up a bit and, what do ya' know he or she was beautiful the whole time! Mr. It seems as though fictional educators are either cruel taskmasters or incredible human beings who turn children's lives around. The eighth grade class of unteachables boasts a teacher who begins as a mere time card puncher yet becomes a SUPERSTAR! before novel's end. It's the sort of transformation teen movies are made of. You know the ones where an already good looking outcast simply sheds his or her glasses and dresses up a bit and, what do ya' know he or she was beautiful the whole time! Mr. Zachary Kermit (seriously, what kind of fool wouldn't think to use an alternate name? A class full of middle school students and he chooses to be known as Mr. Kermit? No sympathy, dude, one ought to know better than that.) may have begun the school year counting the days until he can take early retirement but a class of seven misfits manages to reawaken his hardened little heart. (Kind of like the Grinch, eh? What am I Canadian now?) The book grew on me. It is a little zany and sometimes relies too heavily on caricatures (like the "large" girl stealing cookies) but I do think upper elementary children would enjoy the story. Some of the things we, as readers, are asked to believe were too far fetched for my taste but, I was the kid who shunned Saturday morning cartoons so what do I know?Teachers might suggest this one for reluctant readers or struggling students as it is both an easy read and a champion for those not in the Honor Society.
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  • Tlwinky
    January 1, 1970
    This story is the middle school equivalent to the Island of Misfit Toys. Mr. Kermit and his class of misfits are lovable and endearing and hilarious. Each character has a unique reason for being in the "Unteachables" classroom, which makes the book hard to put down. Gordon Korman will always be a favorite of mine because of his characters and his humor and his positive messages throughout each tale he tells.
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  • Theresa Grissom
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Edelweiss plus for an ARC of this book.Another hit from Gordon Korman! I simply adored this middle grade story. Loved the characters and couldn't put this down. The students at my school will love getting their hands on this one. Can't wait to share it with them.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Mr. Kermit (AKA Ribbet) has been burned out from teaching, ever since the cheating scandal incident some 30 years ago. What made the whole episode worse is that it was one of his students who was accused of cheating, and Mr. Kermit knew nothing about it, yet still ended up being blamed for the whole thing. Ever since that day, Mr. Kermit has lost his spark for teaching. Now he just seems to go through his day doing crossword puzzles, drinking monster amounts of coffee and biding his time until h Mr. Kermit (AKA Ribbet) has been burned out from teaching, ever since the cheating scandal incident some 30 years ago. What made the whole episode worse is that it was one of his students who was accused of cheating, and Mr. Kermit knew nothing about it, yet still ended up being blamed for the whole thing. Ever since that day, Mr. Kermit has lost his spark for teaching. Now he just seems to go through his day doing crossword puzzles, drinking monster amounts of coffee and biding his time until he can take his early retirement. But this year the superintendent has plans for Mr. Kermit, plans that might just derail Mr. Kermit being able to get his pension. Mr. Kermit is being assigned to teach the kids in room 117, kids with such horrible behavioral or educational issues that they're called the "Unteachables." The Unteachable reminded a lot of the movie The Breakfast Club. A group of kids from varied backgrounds holed up in a classroom each day. There's Barnstorm who symbolizes the jock with the busted up knee; Rahim or the artist if only he could stay awake long enough; Mateo the brainiac or the encyclopedia especially when it comes to the Klingon language; Parker, the struggling student, and the wheels, having received a provisional drivers license so he can drive his elderly grandma to the senior center and run errands for his parent's farm; Elaine (rhymes with pain) who's the muscle and has been known to throw a kid around just for looking at her funny; there's Aldo who has the temper of "the hulk;" and last but not least there's Kiana, who is like the invisible women, and is only supposed to be a "short-timer." Or at least that's what she keeps telling herself. She's only here until she can move back in with her mom. She's not even registered for school yet and only ended up in room 117 by accident, but still, she keeps coming back each day. Or maybe The Unteachables is more like the book Ms. Bixby's Last Day. Ms. Bixby is what you would call one of the good teachers, the kind that is thoughtful, compassionate and cares deeply about her students. Well, Mr. Kermit, he's the exact opposite, he lost his will for teaching a long time ago. When the school bell rings, he goes into autopilot handing out worksheets and inching his way toward his early retirement. That is until the moment that he shows an inkling of interest in one of his students being included in the school pep rally. Does his demanding that his students be treated fairly show that he actually cares? Like Ms. Bixby's Last Day, the story is told in the alternating perspectives of the students from room 117 and Mr. Kermit. Minus chapters from Elaine or Rahim. I really liked this style, Korman gives each character a distinctive personality and well thought out backstory. Each chapter provides more information about how the kids relate to one another and with their teacher. There's even a chapter from the perspective of the school principal and Jake Terranova (Mr. Kermit's former student involved in the cheating scandal). It's humorous, heartwarming and makes me nostalgic for 80's movies. A truly entertaining story that I can't wait to purchase when it's released in January.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusMr. Kermit is entering his 30th year of teaching, and he's already put in for early retirement. He started his career full of grand ideals and enthusiasm, but a testing scandal over 25 years ago sucked the life out of him, and he spends his days handing out worksheets and doing the crossword while drinking coffee from a huge cup called "the toilet bowl". In order to push him to quit even earlier, the evil superintendent assigns him to a special class with a handful of st E ARC from Edelweiss PlusMr. Kermit is entering his 30th year of teaching, and he's already put in for early retirement. He started his career full of grand ideals and enthusiasm, but a testing scandal over 25 years ago sucked the life out of him, and he spends his days handing out worksheets and doing the crossword while drinking coffee from a huge cup called "the toilet bowl". In order to push him to quit even earlier, the evil superintendent assigns him to a special class with a handful of students who are "unteachable". These include Elaine and Aldo, who both have anger management issues, Parker, who has severe dyslexia, and Rahim, who is artistically inclined but often sleeps in school because his father has band practice in the garage until late. Enter Kiana, who is staying with her father and his new family while her mother works on a movie, and who blunders into the class by accident and stays because she is intrigued. Next door, a perky new teacher, Emma Fountain, alarms Mr. Kermit because she is the daughter of his former fiancé, and she is filled with all sorts of warm and fuzzy classroom plans. She brings in Jake Terranova, who started the cheating scandal but who is now a successful car salesman. He invites the class to visit his dealership and repair shop, and the class starts to take off and actually learn things. Some of Mr. Kermit's old fire returns, but when the superintendent makes the numbers look like he is ineffective, his job is on the line. The students try to rally and enter a project for the science fair hoping to save their now beloved teacher, but they are not successful. Will something happen to save the day?Strengths: This had a nice ensemble cast, and portrayed students struggling with different issues realistically. Kiana was an especially fun character. I really did adore Mr. Kermit, and could completely sympathize with his burnout (I'm only in year 20, but I can still understand), and the backstory with him and Ms. Fountain's mother was sweet. The use of Mr. Kermit's car was particularly intriguing. Parker and his ability to drive on a provisional license to help with his grandmother and the family farm will be interesting to students. A solid, funny novel with deeper issues. Weaknesses: I love Korman's work, but the tone and topic of this seemed like it was from the 1990s and strained my credulity. I can't believe a teacher would get away with such classroom behavior today, and if he was that ineffectual, the superintendent could have built a case and fired him long ago. I was glad that the principal was a decent human being. Also, the incident with the vuvuzelas (plastic party horns) was okay, but the word was overused. It sounded to me more like a climbing vine and distracted me!What I really think: I will probably buy this anyway, as it will appeal to readers who like school stories from multiple perspectives, like Wonder and Because of Mr. Terupt.
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect 'Mr Chips'-like uplifting fare for KS2/3.A good teacher gone to seed. A class of misfits the system has given up on. While you might guess how the story is generally going to unfold, it was an absolute pleasure listening to the multiple narrators tell their story of a year in the Unteachables.The protagonist arguably is Kiana, only registering at the school for a few weeks while her mum is away working, and due to her stepmother's preoccupation with a baby, finds herself in a 'special cl Perfect 'Mr Chips'-like uplifting fare for KS2/3.A good teacher gone to seed. A class of misfits the system has given up on. While you might guess how the story is generally going to unfold, it was an absolute pleasure listening to the multiple narrators tell their story of a year in the Unteachables.The protagonist arguably is Kiana, only registering at the school for a few weeks while her mum is away working, and due to her stepmother's preoccupation with a baby, finds herself in a 'special class' with only six other students. And trying to survive his last year before early retirement is teacher Mr Kermit, still jaded from a decades-old scandal he was unfairly implicated in. Doing the time, set the Unteachables class by a superintendent keen to force him to resign, his teaching methods include completing the puzzles in the newspaper every day and setting worksheets he never marks. He's just waiting for June and he's out of there...But the seven students in his class - with anger issues, bad attitudes, the inability to read - they may still have something to teach themselves. Multiple actors voice the roles of the children and adults who share the story, making it very clear who is speaking. I loved the structure, hearing everyone's own take on the class and how gradually they all start to affect each other. It's an ideal novel to listen to, first person with lots of voices that are easily identifiable and an easy-to-follow story. The oft-utilised 'problem child' scenario is very nicely developed with several different issues experienced by the Unteachables cast, each humanised and shown to be someone who needs the right help, the right guidance... and just maybe so does their teacher.Mr Kermit is made very sympathetic, and the story manages to fit in without issue an arc for each major character, bringing in business from years past. Readers will be cheering by the end (I was smiling broadly) and warmed.No issues with language or violence, no mature themes, this is perfect material for ages 9-14. With thanks to Nudge Books for providing a sample Audible copy.
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Gordon Korman just keeps on bringing heart-warming and humorous fabulousness to my middle grade readers... and to the adults who read along with them. I enjoyed his more action-filled MasterMinds trilogy as well as the Swindle books with problem-solving Griffin and his friends, but Mr. Korman has really found his element with books like Slacker, Ungifted, Supergifted and now The Unteachables. SPS-8 is a class of difficult students, hard to manage and even harder to teach, but when they get a bur Gordon Korman just keeps on bringing heart-warming and humorous fabulousness to my middle grade readers... and to the adults who read along with them. I enjoyed his more action-filled MasterMinds trilogy as well as the Swindle books with problem-solving Griffin and his friends, but Mr. Korman has really found his element with books like Slacker, Ungifted, Supergifted and now The Unteachables. SPS-8 is a class of difficult students, hard to manage and even harder to teach, but when they get a burned out, “has been” teacher who has a target on his back with a bitter superintendent taking aim, everyone seems to find a reason to band together and even comes out the better for it. Readers will cheer and chuckle at students like Elaine Whose Name Rhymes With Pain, Aldo with his extremely short fuse, the former football star who finds that once he can’t score points he is a nobody, and others just as “unteachable.” Highly recommended for grades 5-8 with no warnings for language, violence, or sexual content. Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.
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  • Judith
    January 1, 1970
    Omg, I loved this adorable little story. As an educator, I could relate to the teacher and recognized the kids as having been my own students at one time or another.Being an educator is difficult, especially with all the media bashing of teachers, difficult contract negotiations, and all of the social media and tech devices we have to compete with for our students attention. On top of all of that, educators also have to deal with the baggage students bring into the classroom that definitely affe Omg, I loved this adorable little story. As an educator, I could relate to the teacher and recognized the kids as having been my own students at one time or another.Being an educator is difficult, especially with all the media bashing of teachers, difficult contract negotiations, and all of the social media and tech devices we have to compete with for our students attention. On top of all of that, educators also have to deal with the baggage students bring into the classroom that definitely affects their motivation to learn. This book was a good reminder of why we get up every day to do our work with students. Thanks, Gordan Korman for not only delivering a fun, and many times true story of what goes on in the education world, but also for capturing the spirit of why educators become educators in the first place.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    Very similar vibes to Ungifted and I'm not thrilled about the alternating POVs every single chapter but! It was a very sweet and inspiring story without getting too bogged down in itself or taking itself too seriously.
  • Books on Stereo
    January 1, 1970
    A quaint, charming story of a bunch of misfits that is muddled by the egregious amount of different point of views.
  • JoScho
    January 1, 1970
    Middle grade book about a burnt out teacher and a class of misfits. Some of the characters were more developed and more like able than others. As a teacher, there were some very relatable moments. Overall this was a cute little story about redemption and finding the people you need at the right time. 3.5 stars ⭐ Middle grade book about a burnt out teacher and a class of misfits. Some of the characters were more developed and more like able than others. As a teacher, there were some very relatable moments. Overall this was a cute little story about redemption and finding the people you need at the right time. 3.5 stars ⭐️
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  • Yasmeena
    January 1, 1970
    I mean......this is by Gordon Korman of course it's gonna be good
  • Rustin Verret
    January 1, 1970
    Another amazing Gordon Korman book! I was rushing to finish this because Gordon Korman is going to our school TOMORROW. I'm so exited. This book is about a group of kids who have anger issues, can't read or constantly fall asleep in class. One year, they get stuck with the one teacher who ignores them.Still reading: HEARTLESS by Marissa Meyer and DUMPLIN' by Julie Murphy
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute story about how we can influence each other’s lives positively if we just show that we care.
  • Anita Eti
    January 1, 1970
    For someone who officially qualifies as an adult, I enjoyed this way more than I should have. Obviously, it's for younger readers and the writing seems juvenile at times, but it's a story that can touch the heart of a lot of people who might have been considered "unteachable" in school. Very funny in sections and sad in others, I think this is a book that will appeal to a lot of kids!Thanks Edelwiess+ for an ARC of this book!
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Meet the Unteachables of the Self-Contained Special Class (SCS-8) at Greenwich Middle School: Kiana, the short timer, who only plans to be at Greenwich Middle School until her mother finishes shooting a movie in Utah. Parker Elias, a 14-year-old with a provisional driver’s license, who thinks his teacher’s car is called a Coco Nerd. Rahim Barclay, falls asleep in class because his father’s rock band practices until all hours of the night. Aldo Braff, the fiery red head with anger management issu Meet the Unteachables of the Self-Contained Special Class (SCS-8) at Greenwich Middle School: Kiana, the short timer, who only plans to be at Greenwich Middle School until her mother finishes shooting a movie in Utah. Parker Elias, a 14-year-old with a provisional driver’s license, who thinks his teacher’s car is called a Coco Nerd. Rahim Barclay, falls asleep in class because his father’s rock band practices until all hours of the night. Aldo Braff, the fiery red head with anger management issues. Barnstorm Anderson, who used to be at top of the world, a jock in three sports, worshipped by all, until he hurts himself and can no longer play ball. Now no one has the time of day for him. Mateo Hendrickson, the Sci Fi nerd that “lives his life through fictional characters.” And finally, Elaine (rhymes with pain) Ostrover, who has a string of rumored violence and mayhem following her around the school, causing everyone to give her a wide berth.Now meet the teachers who spend their days with the Unteachables. First, there’s Mr. Kermit. Once one of the best teachers ever, but pulled into a cheating scandal by a student who sold test answers. It was a black eye to the school district and the superintendent has never forgiven Mr. Kermit. So, he sentences him to teach SCS-8. Then, next door, there’s Miss Emma Fountain, former kindergarten teacher, now applying her teaching strategies with 7th graders. Circle Time? Goodbunnies? Really? “Hey! Miss Fountain isn’t weird. She’s a teacher.”Knowing that it is his last year and early retirement awaits him, Mr. Kermit starts the school year unmotivated and afraid to care again. His mantra: “They can only hurt you if you try to teach them. But underneath, almost imperceptibly, he does care. Why else would he be fighting for his students to be treated fairly. He questions and insists that Barnstorm should be able to sit on the bench with his teammates. Then, he insists that SCS-8 is allowed to attend pep rallies and wonders why they aren’t included in spirit week? (Even though personally he detests spirit week and those awful vuvuzelas they always order. Besides “There’s no spirit switch in your brain that can be flipped on or off.)That’s the turning point, when the students begin to notice that Mr. Kermit is in their corner. “Mr. Kermit has come back from the Lost Land of Crossword Puzzles.” Suddenly, all of Miss Fountain’s crazy ideas don’t seem so crazy. The kids in SCS-8 are doing reading groups and for the first time, Aldo connects emotionally with a character from Where the Red Fern Grows. They are going on field trips to Terranova Motors - that’s right, Jake Terranova, the cheating scandal student - and they are learning about business and internal combustion engines. “If there’s a chance for them to have a real education, we have to take it.” But what if all of this isn’t enough? What if it’s too late? What if the superintendent still wants to get rid of Mr. Kermit?A humorous novel that still gives the reader a lot to think about and discuss. Probably best for 5th grade and up. Spoiler Alert! Aldo discusses what happens at the end of Where the Red Fern Grows
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Zachary Kermit has been teaching for a long time. He’s in his last year before he can take early retirement, and he’s just cruising with his giant coffee mug until June, when he can finally hang it all up and live a life of leisure. But the school’s superintendent has different plans for Mr. Kermit. He’s still mad at the cheating scandal that embarrassed him all those years ago, as it was Mr. Kermit’s student who masterminded the whole thing. So now, he’s trying to get Mr. Kermit to quit before Zachary Kermit has been teaching for a long time. He’s in his last year before he can take early retirement, and he’s just cruising with his giant coffee mug until June, when he can finally hang it all up and live a life of leisure. But the school’s superintendent has different plans for Mr. Kermit. He’s still mad at the cheating scandal that embarrassed him all those years ago, as it was Mr. Kermit’s student who masterminded the whole thing. So now, he’s trying to get Mr. Kermit to quit before he can take early retirement. And he figures he’s got just the group of students to send him running—The Unteachables. The Self-Contained Special Eighth Grade Class at Greenwich Middle School, aka The Unteachables, is a class of eighth graders who other teachers haven’t been able to reach. Between the emotional outbursts, the reading issues, and the general lack of social skills, these are kids who have slipped through the cracks and have been dubbed the worst in the school. But they’re just kids. And in this funny and touching novel, you get a chance to meet them all and hear their own stories of how they got where they are. Gordon Korman has written a charming story of a teacher who desperately needs the right kids to remember why he fell in love with teaching and the kids who need a teacher to see them, listen to them, and help them find their paths. Written in alternating points of view, the story of a school year gone right is uplifting, sweet, smart, and it draws you in from the very first chapter. I highly recommend this book for anyone who struggled in school, who felt like a misfit or an outsider, or who wants to remember what a gift a truly caring teacher can be. The Unteachables is not to be missed! Galleys for The Unteachables were provided by HarperColins Publishers (Balzer & Bray), with many thanks.
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  • Tiffany Reynolds
    January 1, 1970
    This story has been done before, in movies and books: unteachable class gets unexpectedly inspired by a teacher. However, this book has interesting twists on that plot, and it never feels predictable. The "unteachables," as they are called by students and staff alike, are a self-contained classroom of seven 8th graders. Their teacher is Zachary Kermit, a once-brilliant teacher who has never recovered from a cheating scandal and is riding out his last year toward early retirement. The superintend This story has been done before, in movies and books: unteachable class gets unexpectedly inspired by a teacher. However, this book has interesting twists on that plot, and it never feels predictable. The "unteachables," as they are called by students and staff alike, are a self-contained classroom of seven 8th graders. Their teacher is Zachary Kermit, a once-brilliant teacher who has never recovered from a cheating scandal and is riding out his last year toward early retirement. The superintendent assigns him to the Unteachables, hoping to drive him out before the year is up. The point of view alternates between the teacher and several of his students, so that I got to know and love their quirky ways. There's Kiana, whose stepmother dropped her at the office without registering her, so Kiana wanders into the special day class and stays there; Parker, the bright but dyslexic boy who has a "provisional" driver's license because his parents own a farm; Aldo, who's constantly furious; and other students. Parts of this story are hilarious, especially when Mr. Kermit walks into a bonfire in the waste basket of his new classroom, where students are roasting marshmallows, and he simply empties his coffee cup onto it and sits down with a crossword puzzle. There were also depressing parts, especially when we see how bleak Mr. Kermit's life has been since the scandal 27 years ago: he lost his self-respect, his passion for teaching, and his fiancee, and has been driving around a wreck of a car that she chose for them all those years ago. The characters we meet in this book are surprising, funny, and likeable, and I don't think there was a single unnecessary one. I love this book!
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  • Tasya Dita
    January 1, 1970
    I received an e-ARC of this book through Edelweiss Plus in exchange for an honest reviewWhen I first requested this book, I was hoping for a funny yet touching read. This book fulfills both.In Greenwich Middle School, there's a class of 6 kids called The Unteachables- basically, your class of delinquent. This is where Kiana, a newcomer, stumbled into and got herself placed, and where Mr. Kermit, a veteran teacher with a scandal that still haunted him, got placed. Everyone in the school had alrea I received an e-ARC of this book through Edelweiss Plus in exchange for an honest reviewWhen I first requested this book, I was hoping for a funny yet touching read. This book fulfills both.In Greenwich Middle School, there's a class of 6 kids called The Unteachables- basically, your class of delinquent. This is where Kiana, a newcomer, stumbled into and got herself placed, and where Mr. Kermit, a veteran teacher with a scandal that still haunted him, got placed. Everyone in the school had already given up on the class, and Mr. Kermit already given up on his professional career. Yet over the course of the year, these group of people helped each other and became a kind of found family that is magical to read. The writing is very easy to read and the language really surprises me. It sound young, but it doesn't sound juvenile. The author managed to nail each pov, the children and adults have different quality, none of them are a caricature of character, and each pov adds something to the story. It's a rarity to see a book where the teacher is good instead of portrayed as boring or tyrant, and this one really warms my heart.This review is a mess ahaha so full, official review to come!
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  • Blessing
    January 1, 1970
    Korman never fails. He was recommended to me from one of my friends a while back and when this came out I was able to get a hold of it pretty quickly! A very "worth-my-time" read. I enjoyed how each chapter was a different person in this 8th grade class of "Unteachables" POV of what's going on in the classroom against the backdrop of what you see as a whole from the outside. There arise misunderstandings and miscommunications. The perceived ideas we generally have about what a "type" of person o Korman never fails. He was recommended to me from one of my friends a while back and when this came out I was able to get a hold of it pretty quickly! A very "worth-my-time" read. I enjoyed how each chapter was a different person in this 8th grade class of "Unteachables" POV of what's going on in the classroom against the backdrop of what you see as a whole from the outside. There arise misunderstandings and miscommunications. The perceived ideas we generally have about what a "type" of person or "group" of people is supposed to be like vs what really might be there, is included in this book. Simple and creatively woven, the story is both funny and serious, while also being true to life. I really enjoyed how the teacher, Mr. Kermit's coffee mug was nicknamed "the toilet bowl" due to its size, and how his 27-year-old car that has no bottom to the floor in the back. It had me remembering my own experience in 8th grade (but I tried not to think about that for very long, LOL). Recommend to anyone either the ages of junior high/high school; also recommend to anyone who is past that age and/or lived and survived those times.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKThe Unteachables by Gordon Korman was a middle grade novel that had a bit of "Breakfast Club for kids" vibe. Kiana shows up for her first day at a new school, and through some first day chaos, she ends up in Room 117 with a group of students known as the Unteachables. This is a group of students that the school's educators have kind of given up on for one reason or another. This year, the school has assigned Mr. Kermit to class More reviews and book-ish content @ Club Book Mobile & Andrea RBKThe Unteachables by Gordon Korman was a middle grade novel that had a bit of "Breakfast Club for kids" vibe. Kiana shows up for her first day at a new school, and through some first day chaos, she ends up in Room 117 with a group of students known as the Unteachables. This is a group of students that the school's educators have kind of given up on for one reason or another. This year, the school has assigned Mr. Kermit to class. Mr. Kermit is counting the literal days to early retirement. He once had the joy of teaching, but having to take the fall for a cheating scandal wiped that joy from his work. Overall, this was a story of redemption. It was about the power of finding your people to believe in you, so that you can believe in yourself. Sure, there are some aspects of this plot that seem unrealistic when it comes to how schools work, but the sentiment of the emotion is what counts for this read.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    4th&upTeacher Zachary Kermit is just counting out the days until he can retire, but the superintendent (an old nemesis) is not going to make his last year easy. In an effort to make him quit and lose his pension, Mr. Kermit is assigned to teach the Unteachables- a self-contained class containing a handful of students that no one else wants or can deal with. What starts out as a battle between teacher and students turns into something else, something more. This bunch of misfits just might hav 4th&upTeacher Zachary Kermit is just counting out the days until he can retire, but the superintendent (an old nemesis) is not going to make his last year easy. In an effort to make him quit and lose his pension, Mr. Kermit is assigned to teach the Unteachables- a self-contained class containing a handful of students that no one else wants or can deal with. What starts out as a battle between teacher and students turns into something else, something more. This bunch of misfits just might have found the perfect fit.Funny, sweet, heartfelt, & fast paced, this book was a delight!(I loved the flip side resemblance to Ungifted and the shout out to No More Dead Dogs at the end of the book. This is Korman at his finest (which is quite fine!)Thanks to Edelweiss and Balzer+Bray/HarperCollins for allowing access to this ARC, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    I found The Unteachables to be hilariously funny with a depth of character and themes that spoke deeply to my heart. At times I found it to be charming and other times remarkably sad, It brought to the forefront that everyone counts. Everyone is teachable – even the teacher!This book reminds us to look past society’s labels, to get to know the real person right in front of you for who they really are. To not let others define you but to search and find out who you are and what you want to be. Th I found The Unteachables to be hilariously funny with a depth of character and themes that spoke deeply to my heart. At times I found it to be charming and other times remarkably sad, It brought to the forefront that everyone counts. Everyone is teachable – even the teacher!This book reminds us to look past society’s labels, to get to know the real person right in front of you for who they really are. To not let others define you but to search and find out who you are and what you want to be. This book is truly an inspiring book for all ages!I received this book for free. A favorable review was not required and all views expressed are my own. Thank you to Mr. Kroman, Balzer + Bray publishing and Netgalley for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Susie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss for an advanced copy of this book. I really enjoyed it! There are aspects of this that appeal to both students and adults who are tired of some of the shams exaggerated here. Calling one character "Jake Terranova" who was part of a cheating scandal, the "Goodbunnies" that the students call rabbit-butts, and the superintendent who is over the top-- or is he?Sure, much of this is implausible, but what matters is that it is fun! I could see reluctant readers eating this up, a Thank you to Edelweiss for an advanced copy of this book. I really enjoyed it! There are aspects of this that appeal to both students and adults who are tired of some of the shams exaggerated here. Calling one character "Jake Terranova" who was part of a cheating scandal, the "Goodbunnies" that the students call rabbit-butts, and the superintendent who is over the top-- or is he?Sure, much of this is implausible, but what matters is that it is fun! I could see reluctant readers eating this up, and any educator reading this will nod their head at some of the things Korman satirizes. I really liked that helping students become readers was an important part of the transformation. And, the anagrams that Korman made were very clever!
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  • Jeannine
    January 1, 1970
    Another winner for Goron Korman! I just finished The Unteachables by Gordon Korman and loved it. It is a story of a burnt out teacher who is counting the days to an early retirement. He gets stuck with the worst class in the building, but through alternating perspectives, readers come to love and understand this group of misfits as well as their underachieving teacher. Unlike Restart, another one of Korman's books with alternating points of view, this book has adults as well as the students narr Another winner for Goron Korman! I just finished The Unteachables by Gordon Korman and loved it. It is a story of a burnt out teacher who is counting the days to an early retirement. He gets stuck with the worst class in the building, but through alternating perspectives, readers come to love and understand this group of misfits as well as their underachieving teacher. Unlike Restart, another one of Korman's books with alternating points of view, this book has adults as well as the students narrating, which I liked. I will definitely be recommending this book to my 7th graders. Just know there are many characters narrating, so it may get confusing for a struggling reader.
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  • Lonna Pierce
    January 1, 1970
    For all my burned-out teacher friends, this totally fictional, unrealistic, and inspirational mid-grade novel will lift your spirits immensely! Told from various "unteachable" student and faculty viewpoints, each voice will ring true to teachers. Mr. Kermit started teaching with enthusiasm and a bright vision. After a cheating scandal was unfairly blamed on him, he's been barely coasting to early retirement. Punished by a scathing superintendent that wants to see him fail, Mr. Kermit is assigned For all my burned-out teacher friends, this totally fictional, unrealistic, and inspirational mid-grade novel will lift your spirits immensely! Told from various "unteachable" student and faculty viewpoints, each voice will ring true to teachers. Mr. Kermit started teaching with enthusiasm and a bright vision. After a cheating scandal was unfairly blamed on him, he's been barely coasting to early retirement. Punished by a scathing superintendent that wants to see him fail, Mr. Kermit is assigned to teach a group of supposedly unteachable students. With humor and great empathy Gordon Korman tells an enjoyable school story we need to hear.
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  • Tara Carpenter
    January 1, 1970
    Gordon Korman was my first favorite author and is still in my top 5, although I'm very partial to his early stuff (written and published when he was 12-18 and read by me from ages 10-42). Some of Korman's more current books don't have the same spark for me but this one was so great! It hits you in all the emotions, was really funny, had good growth of characters, friendship, redemption, a come-back story, a bunch of underdogs, and wasn't too long. All the makings of a book sure to please ages 10 Gordon Korman was my first favorite author and is still in my top 5, although I'm very partial to his early stuff (written and published when he was 12-18 and read by me from ages 10-42). Some of Korman's more current books don't have the same spark for me but this one was so great! It hits you in all the emotions, was really funny, had good growth of characters, friendship, redemption, a come-back story, a bunch of underdogs, and wasn't too long. All the makings of a book sure to please ages 10-99! I talked to each of my boys about reading it because I know they would love it too.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    This book is indeed hilarious. The cover is a clue to what is contained inside. I was also inspired and touched by the relationship Mr. Kermit built with a group of students that the school had given up on. In alternating chapters we see the story from the seven kids in the classroom as well as Mr. Kermit and other supporting characters. The different POV will give plenty of kids a character to relate to personally. Teachers and kids will enjoy this book -- hopefully as a read aloud. A big thank This book is indeed hilarious. The cover is a clue to what is contained inside. I was also inspired and touched by the relationship Mr. Kermit built with a group of students that the school had given up on. In alternating chapters we see the story from the seven kids in the classroom as well as Mr. Kermit and other supporting characters. The different POV will give plenty of kids a character to relate to personally. Teachers and kids will enjoy this book -- hopefully as a read aloud. A big thank you to HarperCollins and Edelweiss for a digital ARC of this new middle grade novel.
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