Family Trust
Meet Stanley Huang: father, husband, ex-husband, man of unpredictable tastes and temper, aficionado of all-inclusive vacations and bargain luxury goods, newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. For years, Stanley has claimed that he’s worth a small fortune. But the time is now coming when the details of his estate will finally be revealed, and Stanley’s family is nervous.For his son Fred, the inheritance Stanley has long alluded to would soothe the pain caused by years of professional disappointment. By now, the Harvard Business School graduate had expected to be a financial tech god – not a minor investor at a middling corporate firm, where he isn’t even allowed to fly business class.Stanley’s daughter, Kate, is a middle manager with one of Silicon Valley’s most prestigious tech companies. She manages the capricious demands of her world-famous boss and the needs of her two young children all while supporting her would-be entrepreneur husband (just until his startup gets off the ground, which will surely be soon). But lately, Kate has been sensing something amiss; just because you say you have it all, it doesn’t mean that you actually do. Stanley’s second wife, Mary Zhu, twenty-eight years his junior, has devoted herself to making her husband comfortable in every way—rubbing his feet, cooking his favorite dishes, massaging his ego. But lately, her commitment has waned; caring for a dying old man is far more difficult than she expected.Linda Liang, Stanley’s first wife, knows her ex better than anyone. She worked hard for decades to ensure their financial security, and is determined to see her children get their due. Single for nearly a decade, she might finally be ready for some romantic companionship. But where does a seventy-two year old Chinese woman in California go to find an appropriate boyfriend?As Stanley’s death approaches, the Huangs are faced with unexpected challenges that upend them and eventually lead them to discover what they most value. A compelling tale of cultural expectations, career ambitions and our relationships with the people who know us best, Family Trust skewers the ambition and desires that drive Silicon Valley and draws a sharply loving portrait of modern American family life.

Family Trust Details

TitleFamily Trust
Author
ReleaseOct 30th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow
ISBN-139780062855251
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Adult Fiction

Family Trust Review

  • leslie hamod
    January 1, 1970
    Stanley is a very successful man. He came to this country poverty stricken, but look at him now! Very rich! As a Chinese man, he has been obstinate, easy to anger. Frightening his wife and children until, unable to cope with his predefined expectations, His wife divorces him.What to do? Mary comes along to rub his feet, cook his favorite food. She is described as a placid cow but she knows it isn't so. This is just the life of a good Chinese woman. Now that Stanley has suddenly been diagnosed wi Stanley is a very successful man. He came to this country poverty stricken, but look at him now! Very rich! As a Chinese man, he has been obstinate, easy to anger. Frightening his wife and children until, unable to cope with his predefined expectations, His wife divorces him.What to do? Mary comes along to rub his feet, cook his favorite food. She is described as a placid cow but she knows it isn't so. This is just the life of a good Chinese woman. Now that Stanley has suddenly been diagnosed with cancer, she is even more doting.Linda, wife number one, doesn't want to know anything about it. She has her own life now. Divorced for ten years! But they have two children, or shall I say grasping adults. She begins to worry about his will. Oh, yes, and indulge in a little internet dating.Great story, intricately woven, with characters that are so easy to hate! Watch the family dynamics change as the patriarch uses his illness to manipulate. See what happens when an inheritance becomes suddenly relevant. Sometimes funny, occasionally sad, you become part of this family. As Linda worries about the new will, she also wonders if men really want to date her. Her son Fred, is much less successful than people know. Daughter Kate seems to love to complain while her husband is starting up a business that seems to be nonexistent!Also a great insite into the Asian community, including expectations, marriage, motherhood, and the perception this family has of the American culture. A very admirable book.
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  • Nicole Swinson
    January 1, 1970
    The story starts off by introducing us to the patriarch of the family Stanley Huang, divorced father of two and remarried to Mary who is twenty-eight years his junior. Stanley has recently been diagnosed with cancer and his family must now deal with the reality that his time is limited. The story is told in point of view from each character in the book; Fred the son who is a Harvard Business School graduate who comes across whiney and unfulfilled with his life. Kate who works for a successful co The story starts off by introducing us to the patriarch of the family Stanley Huang, divorced father of two and remarried to Mary who is twenty-eight years his junior. Stanley has recently been diagnosed with cancer and his family must now deal with the reality that his time is limited. The story is told in point of view from each character in the book; Fred the son who is a Harvard Business School graduate who comes across whiney and unfulfilled with his life. Kate who works for a successful company in Silicon Valley manages to balance work and her family life, that includes supporting her husband as he tries to get his so called start up company off the ground. Mary who married Stanley because he had a home and money to take care of her, she in turns dotes on his every need. Then my favorite character Linda, Stanley’s first wife who finds herself trying to find love in the online dating world. Stanley always alluded he was a wealthy man and now family is all wondering what is going to be left to them when Stanley’s time comes.I felt the book lacked some luster, reading through chapters I felt I could not connect with the characters, except for Linda. It also bother that the word ostentatious was used more than I care for within the first 50-60 pages. The story line is good, I just was hoping for more energy and excitement, after reading the Crazy Rich Asian series, Pachinko and If You Leave Me, I think I set my hopes high for this one.
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  • Margo Littell
    January 1, 1970
    When Huang family patriarch Stanley receives a harrowing diagnosis from his doctor, his family is forced to confront the reality that he has very little time left. They accept the news with varying degrees of grief. Stanley’s children, Fred and Kate, can’t fully forgive his transgressions from their childhood. Stanley’s ex-wife, Linda, still resents how badly he handled the money she made for them when they were married. And Stanley’s much younger second wife, Mary, accepts that caring for an el When Huang family patriarch Stanley receives a harrowing diagnosis from his doctor, his family is forced to confront the reality that he has very little time left. They accept the news with varying degrees of grief. Stanley’s children, Fred and Kate, can’t fully forgive his transgressions from their childhood. Stanley’s ex-wife, Linda, still resents how badly he handled the money she made for them when they were married. And Stanley’s much younger second wife, Mary, accepts that caring for an elderly man is exactly what she signed up for--as long as a windfall is on the other side. But no one knows exactly how much Stanley is worth, or the contents of his will. They can’t say it outright to each other, but each wonders obsessively: How much will I get when Stanley is gone?Fred’s disastrous personal and professional choices, Kate’s marital implosion, and Linda’s unexpected connection with an internet love interest heighten their fixation on Stanley’s will, which comes to represent a measure of freedom--if any money exists at all. Set in a Silicon Valley that is as monstrous and absurd as it is true to life, Family Trust examines the nature of family loyalty and obligation, as well as the choices that set lives on seemingly irreversible courses. ***Review originally written for the City Book Review. I received a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.***
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Well written book that she’s trust as a noun and a verb. When a parent is dying, what happens with relationships? I liked the storyline yet it felt a little empty to me.
  • J
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing.If you come from a family with no money, this will fascinate you. If you come from a family with tons of money, this will fascinate you too. And make you cringe. And laugh. And yell “OMG NO” in response to some of this wild dialog.Anyway I really enjoyed it, so. Highly recommend.
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  • Nicole Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tough book to characterize, but I loved it. There are so many misconceptions about the wealthy. This book pokes and prods those, revealing that some clichés have merit and others are more complex than one may imagine. The Bay Area/Silicon Valley is sort of a hotbed of new money and hungry business startups, and the story takes place there. This book is ironically funny, tentatively tender, and entirely fascinating.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    Stanley is dying. All any of his family are concerned about is whether he has set up a Family Trust and named them as trustees.Stanley is the domineering and occasionally abusive father of Kate and Fred. Their mother and Stanley’s ex-wife, Linda, is concerned that Stanley will leave his substantial estate to his new younger wife Mary rather than their children. Linda, Kate and Fred have romantic issues. The siblings work in the high stress Silicon Valley. Kate as a manager in an Apple clone and Stanley is dying. All any of his family are concerned about is whether he has set up a Family Trust and named them as trustees.Stanley is the domineering and occasionally abusive father of Kate and Fred. Their mother and Stanley’s ex-wife, Linda, is concerned that Stanley will leave his substantial estate to his new younger wife Mary rather than their children. Linda, Kate and Fred have romantic issues. The siblings work in the high stress Silicon Valley. Kate as a manager in an Apple clone and Fred in corporate venture capital.Family Trust is Crazy Rich American Asians set in San Francisco rather than Singapore. There is still the need for children to attend Ivy League schools, to have the best job titles and to leave a legacy behind. This book had more emphasis on careers, which I enjoyed. I especially liked Linda’s story of what it was like to be divorced later in life in Taiwanese-American culture. All the characters had intricate personalities that were totally believable and were well-matched to their actions.Family Trust is perfect for fans of family pathos or anyone who wants to immerse themselves in a different culture than that which is in most books. 4 stars!Thanks to the publisher, William Morrow, and Edelweiss+ for an advanced copy.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    When Stanley Huang is diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, his family must face their life choices. Told from the points of view of Stanley, his two children Fred and Kate, his ex-wife and mother of his children Linda, and Mary his new wife, this is a story about a family coming to terms with the reality of aging, deathand life in Silicone Valley. Linda, has embarked on a new online dating service that may not be on the up and up. Fred, a graduate of Harvard business school, is struggling When Stanley Huang is diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, his family must face their life choices. Told from the points of view of Stanley, his two children Fred and Kate, his ex-wife and mother of his children Linda, and Mary his new wife, this is a story about a family coming to terms with the reality of aging, deathand life in Silicone Valley. Linda, has embarked on a new online dating service that may not be on the up and up. Fred, a graduate of Harvard business school, is struggling to find the job he believes he deserves. Kate is a successful working mother of two who faces the ultimate betrayal in her marriage. Mary is struggling to keep Stanley alive while dealing with the relatives who tell her to get his will settled. Everyone is interested in Stanley's money but in the end they find instead the incentives they need to move on and change their lives for the better.
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  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    This book was well written, and you can almost feel the energy and time put into each character. Each of the characters took on a certain stereotype and explored the inner thought processes of each. This book took me longer to read than most, and I'm sure that is probably because I couldn't relate well to any of the characters as individuals. However, the situations they went through were able to grasp onto me and I felt their pain. Good book! After writing this review (a few hours ago) I just d This book was well written, and you can almost feel the energy and time put into each character. Each of the characters took on a certain stereotype and explored the inner thought processes of each. This book took me longer to read than most, and I'm sure that is probably because I couldn't relate well to any of the characters as individuals. However, the situations they went through were able to grasp onto me and I felt their pain. Good book! After writing this review (a few hours ago) I just didn't like what I said about it. I enjoyed the book, I wouldn't want my review to scorn a reader against it. I have been thinking about this book all day and perhaps that's the purest desire for a reader to experience.
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  • Melissa Rothman
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and was very excited to read this book but for me this book was a rough read I know that the author wanted to introduce each character however I through it was way over done I felt like I was reading the autobiographies of each character rather than a introduction . By half way I got frustrated with waiting to find the point of the book and had to dnf it instead sorry to say the cover of the book which was very eye-catching was the only thing I ended up li I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and was very excited to read this book but for me this book was a rough read I know that the author wanted to introduce each character however I through it was way over done I felt like I was reading the autobiographies of each character rather than a introduction . By half way I got frustrated with waiting to find the point of the book and had to dnf it instead sorry to say the cover of the book which was very eye-catching was the only thing I ended up liking.
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  • Angela Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from a goodreads giveaway hosted by William Morrow Books! And here is my honest review: The first thing that caught my attention was this cover. Is it not beautiful? The gold and red contrast in such a gorgeous way and the gold floral design weaves in and out of the text.When I held this book, the best description I could come up with was meaty. It felt thick, it felt like there were a lot of words, a lot of story to tell.I wasn't disappointed. This is a family drama. Charact I received this ARC from a goodreads giveaway hosted by William Morrow Books! And here is my honest review: The first thing that caught my attention was this cover. Is it not beautiful? The gold and red contrast in such a gorgeous way and the gold floral design weaves in and out of the text.When I held this book, the best description I could come up with was meaty. It felt thick, it felt like there were a lot of words, a lot of story to tell.I wasn't disappointed. This is a family drama. Characters and characteristics you'll both love and hate. Situations that we've all heard about on the news, or more intimately through friends or family, or maybe even experienced. The trials and tribulations of relationships: marriages, parenthood, childhood, working relationships, friendships. I felt satisfaction as I finished this book. The format was something I particularly find alluring in novels. 4 different point of views, alternating between. It keeps the story from getting stale, or too involved, it gives you breaks. It gives you cliff-hangers and then lets you forget about that character just long enough to be jolted when you turn the page and it's back to their chapter. This book follows the Huang family: Stanley & Linda and their two grown children Kate and Fred. Stanley and Linda are divorced and have been for about a decade when the book begins. Stanley has since remarried to Mary, a woman very much his "junior." Kate is married with two small children of her own. Fred is in a relationship with an angling saleswoman, Erika, and he's already been married and divorced.Some of the quotes in this book just left me wanting to read and re-read the lines over again. For example "Instead, life just seemed to be a series of small mistakes, which you continued to make over and over again." Isn't that just so perfectly true and insightful?One underlying theme I noticed was that the Huangs were all a little angry - they may have shown it in different avenues, but they all were nursing feelings of injustice, whether valid or not. Sometimes it cast bit of a cynical view on people and life, but realistic, and not overwhelmingly so, just honest.Another aspect of author, Kathy Wang's writing that I really enjoyed was her set up. Sometimes I'd be reading a chapter and think "wait... where is this taking me?" but every anecdotal memory a character recalled had a point and played out immediately after. It was a very satisfying feeling to have the question (where is this going?) answered almost always so immediately. It was an insight into a world I don't know much about, nor am that interested in (financial industry - investing, stocks, venture capitalism, etc). But it didn't beat you up with industry vernacular or bog you down in too many details. It was enough that the reader could understand the situation without drowning in acronyms or numbers. My favorite character was definitely Kate. When you read it, let me know who your favorite was, too!I'd recommend this novel. It comes out in October of 2018! Further, the author has been active on instagram and interacted with my posts, which I always find especially endearing.
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  • Jenny Lehnhoff
    January 1, 1970
    When Stanley Huang develops life threatening pancreatic cancer, the successful twice married father of two must put his affairs in order. Can Stanley pass on his legacy while his family: Linda, ex-wife of 34 years, Fred and Kate, his adult children, and second wife Mary of 9 years squabble on who gets the fair share of the inheritance? I really enjoyed Family Trust because of its strong character development and its ability to make me think of my own family dynamics. Although some of the passag When Stanley Huang develops life threatening pancreatic cancer, the successful twice married father of two must put his affairs in order. Can Stanley pass on his legacy while his family: Linda, ex-wife of 34 years, Fred and Kate, his adult children, and second wife Mary of 9 years squabble on who gets the fair share of the inheritance? I really enjoyed Family Trust because of its strong character development and its ability to make me think of my own family dynamics. Although some of the passages about the corporate world dragged for me, I would definitely recommend this book as a must read for lovers of fiction. Although I gave this book a five star rating, I would have enjoyed the story more if there was fewer content on the business world. However, I did recognize the elaborate set up the author created in order to make the ending fantastic (which is why it is five stars). In terms of potentially offensive content, Family Trust is an adult novel with adult themes. There are a few swear words sprinkled here or there and the occasional mention of sexual content. However, these things are few and only mentioned when necessary for content. I felt the story was especially strong in the area of character development. The author focused on only a handful of main characters. Each main character was given their own chapters in order to advance the narrative in their point of view. This paid off especially well at the end because I thoroughly understood where each character was coming from in their actions. In conclusion, I highly recommend that this book be a must-read. It really is an enjoyable experience.
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  • Georgianne Georgiadis
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about a Chinese American family but it could be about any family. Stanley Huang is the patriarch of the family, his wife Mary is 26 years younger, his ex wife Linda, and his children Stanley and Kate. As I read I discovered that each chapter is about a different family member. With each chapter we learn more about that family member and their relationship with Stanley.Mary wants to make sure that gets her share of Stanley estate/money. Linda wants her and Stanley kids to get their s This book is about a Chinese American family but it could be about any family. Stanley Huang is the patriarch of the family, his wife Mary is 26 years younger, his ex wife Linda, and his children Stanley and Kate. As I read I discovered that each chapter is about a different family member. With each chapter we learn more about that family member and their relationship with Stanley.Mary wants to make sure that gets her share of Stanley estate/money. Linda wants her and Stanley kids to get their share. She also started online dating which her children do know about. Fred has his own share of problem from not being as successful as his father and his girlfriend who wants him to be a certain type of man, successful and rich. Kate is married and her husband is working on a startup or at least that is what he says he is doing.The issues that this family deals with could be the same ones that any family deals with, health, love, money, older parents, online dating, infidelity, shady business activities and dealings. There were moments while reading that I laugh and moments that i cried.
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  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    I received Family Trust as part of a Goodreads giveaway.Family patriarch Stanley Huang has been diagnosed with a terminal case of pancreatic cancer. For years he has reassured his family that they will be taken care of when he passes with a generous inheritance. Now that that time is near, those closest to him becoming increasingly concerned with their features as they face an array of personal and professional crises. Stanley's son Fred, despite an Ivy League education, struggles to rise to the I received Family Trust as part of a Goodreads giveaway.Family patriarch Stanley Huang has been diagnosed with a terminal case of pancreatic cancer. For years he has reassured his family that they will be taken care of when he passes with a generous inheritance. Now that that time is near, those closest to him becoming increasingly concerned with their features as they face an array of personal and professional crises. Stanley's son Fred, despite an Ivy League education, struggles to rise to the heights of success he feels he deserves. Meanwhile, Stanley's daughter Kate manages a fairly successful career, though her family life is imploding before her eyes. His ex-wife (and Stanley and Kate's mother) Linda wades into the world of online dating while staying intent on making sure her children get their due from Stanley's estate. Finally, all three are suspicious of Stanley's much younger second wife, Mary, who they suspect of neglecting his care so that she might live the life of a rich widow once Stanley is gone.I loved this book. Not because you're cheering for any of the characters--by and large they're not terribly likable people. But it's a fascinating world, a privileged family aspiring to even higher echelons of wealth and power, all while battling expectations and racism tied into their identities as Asians and Asian-Americans. Couldn't put it down.
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  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    Family Trust is an entertaining family drama that reflects on its title as both a noun and a verb. As Stanley, patriarch of the Huang family, is dying of pancreatic cancer, his children Kate and Fred from his first marriage, his ex-wife Linda, and his young second wife Mary squabble over the contents of his will. Meanwhile, their own lives are all imminent train wrecks from finance frauds to dating disasters. Wang expertly navigates family loyalties as she examines who (if anyone) truly wants th Family Trust is an entertaining family drama that reflects on its title as both a noun and a verb. As Stanley, patriarch of the Huang family, is dying of pancreatic cancer, his children Kate and Fred from his first marriage, his ex-wife Linda, and his young second wife Mary squabble over the contents of his will. Meanwhile, their own lives are all imminent train wrecks from finance frauds to dating disasters. Wang expertly navigates family loyalties as she examines who (if anyone) truly wants the best for Stanley’s final days. Family Trust is well-written and engaging, and I enjoyed the astute social commentary. It could have used some serious trimming though, as I felt it was at least 100 pages too long
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  • Virginia Gavin
    January 1, 1970
    I love,loved,loved this book!Funny,sad,poignant-you will find yourself drawn in to this family's story.I'd give it 10 stars if I could.One of my favorite books this year!
  • Valerie
    January 1, 1970
    First off I was sent this ARE by Shelf Awareness (I think) and it is not due out till October 2018.I enjoyed the read with a glass of wine in the evenings but it is not a book I rushed to find out what happened. A good tale of a family trying to find its way and all but it just didn't grab me.
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  • James M
    January 1, 1970
    Got an advance copy of this book. Really entertaining but also very intelligently written. The writer develops characters really well and draws you into the story. Lots of different threads that intersect in unexpected and funny ways. Loved it!
  • Nanette
    January 1, 1970
    If this novel were written by someone who wasn't Asian, I would call the book racist. Unbeknownst to me, Asians are apparently obsessed with money and status. Perhaps the book was intended as satire. But not being familiar with the stereotype, it hit me wrong. Having said that, the story does have a couple of interesting twists at the end. Not one I'd recommend.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed every minute of this book.This story touches on the Chinese family dynamics and culture, sibling rivalry, frugality, friendships, morality, biracial relationships, myths, superstitions... and pokes humor at every angle. It's like an expose on what happens behind the scenes in a real upper middle class Chinese American family.I loved the biting humor that the author injects into many scenes, and it made me laugh out loud many times. I loved the Bay Area references, and could picture man I enjoyed every minute of this book.This story touches on the Chinese family dynamics and culture, sibling rivalry, frugality, friendships, morality, biracial relationships, myths, superstitions... and pokes humor at every angle. It's like an expose on what happens behind the scenes in a real upper middle class Chinese American family.I loved the biting humor that the author injects into many scenes, and it made me laugh out loud many times. I loved the Bay Area references, and could picture many places that were mentioned in the book. I loved the character dynamics which reminded me of my own family and my parents’ friends. I realized through this book that the family dynamics that I thought were unique to my family are similar among other families within the same culture.Books like The Nest and Crazy Rich Asians have been mentioned as similar to this book. This book is a more realistic version of the amped up glitz, glamour, and money of the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy, but readers will enjoy it just the same. Family Trust is a double entendre in this book. Do these family members trust each other? How much is really in the family trust? I think it's brilliantly intentional.
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  • Chaya Nebel
    January 1, 1970
    The first quarter of the book dragged, and I had to convince myself to stick with it in the hopes that the plot picked up. It is definitely a character-driven novel, as very little actually happens over the span of the book. The author delves into the minds of each character at length, at the great expense of action. In addition, because each section delves into the psychology of a different character, if one character's section ends with a sort of mild cliffhanger, leaving you wondering what ha The first quarter of the book dragged, and I had to convince myself to stick with it in the hopes that the plot picked up. It is definitely a character-driven novel, as very little actually happens over the span of the book. The author delves into the minds of each character at length, at the great expense of action. In addition, because each section delves into the psychology of a different character, if one character's section ends with a sort of mild cliffhanger, leaving you wondering what happened after that, the reader feels a bit of a letdown, knowing that in order to return to this particular plot line, she's going to have to slog through 3 more in-depth and lengthy interior monologues and inner workings of the other 3 characters before the writer will return to the story at hand.I wouldn't say this is a well-written book. The author has some grammatical challenges, most notably for me the fragment, which she overuses to the point of confusion many times. I understand that a character-driven novel will present character-infused styles, but the narrator clearly has these challenges as well. The author also misuses certain words, which is quite frankly frightening for a published author. She uses the word "suffrage" to mean the state of suffering, for example (the word actually refers to voting rights) and puts "who" when any decent writer would use "whom." (And no, I'm not being a grammar snob; this misuse is so obvious a high-schooler would catch the mistake.) She has a penchant to make up words that are just similar enough to real words to make the reader wonder if the author just isn't that familiar with English. Examples: more than once the author uses "pricklish" when she means "prickly"; the word "spattering" is used when the word "smattering" is intended. It's a little bizarre. If you enjoy character-driven family-drama stories (especially if you're enjoying the "look how crazy my Asian Family is" trend (a la "The Wangs Against the World" and "Crazy Rich Asians") this is for you.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Stanley is dying. Stanley has not been a good man. He has a bad temper. He was a bad father and a bad husband. As he learns he is dying, his ex wife Linda tries to get him to update his will. She doesn’t see Stanley as particularly smart and she is afraid that he will fail at this too and that his second wife Mary will get everything.Ironically, Linda is the reason Stanley became wealthy. She was smart and savvy enough with investing Stanley’s money. And when she finally left him, he was rich be Stanley is dying. Stanley has not been a good man. He has a bad temper. He was a bad father and a bad husband. As he learns he is dying, his ex wife Linda tries to get him to update his will. She doesn’t see Stanley as particularly smart and she is afraid that he will fail at this too and that his second wife Mary will get everything.Ironically, Linda is the reason Stanley became wealthy. She was smart and savvy enough with investing Stanley’s money. And when she finally left him, he was rich because of it.Linda and Stanley’s children have their own (believable) dramas. Kate is in a bad marriage. Fred is in a dead end job and dead end relationship.And then there’s Mary, the second wife. She felt lucky when she married Stanley because he had his own home and could provide for her. She is much younger and she cares for him in her way.I had a lot of trouble sticking with this book. I won an early edition from a Goodreads giveaway so I didn’t want it to be a DNF. I found that all the characters other than Stanley were likable and somewhat relatable. But the story just wasn’t that exciting. At a certain point I wondered what I was waiting for. Was the whole book going to wrap up with Stanley dying? Was there a morale to this story.At the end, I decided that the moral must be that all of the characters could take care of themselves just fine whether Stanley left them nothing or a fortune.So, self sufficiency?I respected that but it didn’t make more the most intriguing of stories, for my personal taste of course.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    Set in California, this is the story of the Huang family, Chinese Americans living the dream. Stanley and Linda married and had two children, now grown, Kate and Fred. Linda divorced Stanley; he remarried. When Stanley is diagnosed with cancer he wants everyone to "play" nice and Linda wants him to put his millions in trust so his children are secure and it all doesn't go to his new wife, Mary.The store revolved around the will in the story. One ha ha happy family, their relationships, their wan Set in California, this is the story of the Huang family, Chinese Americans living the dream. Stanley and Linda married and had two children, now grown, Kate and Fred. Linda divorced Stanley; he remarried. When Stanley is diagnosed with cancer he wants everyone to "play" nice and Linda wants him to put his millions in trust so his children are secure and it all doesn't go to his new wife, Mary.The store revolved around the will in the story. One ha ha happy family, their relationships, their wants , needs and things that go on in families makes for the Huang story and the family trust. (Depending on the way you say family trust gives it two meanings - w ill or a feeling of trust in each other - you decide.) Everyone in the family had their own set of issues, needs, disappointments and troubles. Told in multiple voices, all in first person, after headed name titles for each chapter made the story easy to follow.The author put in what some would think to be humorous situations but lacked hilarity for me; they were all subtle. I think that Wang had much opportunity to insert some blatant humor and failed to do so. It would have made a better read for me - family obsession over Stanley's money and making his will could have been more comedic. After all, in real life these times can be trying or pretty darn funny. Although well written and well sequenced, the story got tiresome about 3/4 through and could have been shortened a bit but Wang did tie the story up nicely.(a Likely Story Bookstore ARC)
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  • Patricia Baker
    January 1, 1970
    received advance reader's edition to read and reviewinteresting story about Asian family that centered around Stanley and his reported money. Stanley has long been divorced from Linda, now married to Mary who is on the lookout for a comfortable life once Stanley is dead. He just learnt that he has cancer and Mary caters to him in the hope of extending his life until she gets a new will signed by him..at the same time his daughter finds out her husband is seeing another women. she is in the corpo received advance reader's edition to read and reviewinteresting story about Asian family that centered around Stanley and his reported money. Stanley has long been divorced from Linda, now married to Mary who is on the lookout for a comfortable life once Stanley is dead. He just learnt that he has cancer and Mary caters to him in the hope of extending his life until she gets a new will signed by him..at the same time his daughter finds out her husband is seeing another women. she is in the corporate world making more money than him. she too wants Stanley's money. Son Fred had one divorce behind him and a name dropping shop clerk girlfriend. she wants an engagement ring..it seems that the only one who does not want any of Stanley's money is Linda, the exwife. think it would have been nice at the end of the book to find out where the seven million dollars were.
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Wm. Morrow for this ARC.I wish I could have liked this more. I really enjoy family books but this one was not the best. I found the whole family whiny and the chapters were long and drawn out and very technical when it came to Kate & Fred's jobs (siblings). They all come together, including Stanley's ex-wife Linda, when he is on his death bed. Mary, his current wife seems to want his money, which we come to find out, he had nothing in the end. She was the most annoying woman. She w Thanks to Wm. Morrow for this ARC.I wish I could have liked this more. I really enjoy family books but this one was not the best. I found the whole family whiny and the chapters were long and drawn out and very technical when it came to Kate & Fred's jobs (siblings). They all come together, including Stanley's ex-wife Linda, when he is on his death bed. Mary, his current wife seems to want his money, which we come to find out, he had nothing in the end. She was the most annoying woman. She was 47 and Stanley was 75. I don't know why but she acted like an older woman. It seemed everyone in the book was Asian except Fred's ex-girlfriend who was Hungarian. There's nothing wrong with that. I've read other ethnic books with various types of people.
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  • Eugenie
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the way this book slowly revealed each of the characters in this story of a family who's patriarch is dying. The ex-wife, Linda, is the strong matriarch whose adult children don't seem to appreciate her capabilities. The female characters in the book are ultimately the strong ones who come out ahead in life after putting up with socially accepted customs for a good part of their lives that make them not quite happy. The matriarch and her daughter understand and accept each other by the I enjoyed the way this book slowly revealed each of the characters in this story of a family who's patriarch is dying. The ex-wife, Linda, is the strong matriarch whose adult children don't seem to appreciate her capabilities. The female characters in the book are ultimately the strong ones who come out ahead in life after putting up with socially accepted customs for a good part of their lives that make them not quite happy. The matriarch and her daughter understand and accept each other by the end of the book.
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  • Marisa Claire
    January 1, 1970
    A story about wealth (perceived and actual) in Silicone Valley and whether you can fully trust the family (see what I did there) youre born with and the family you choose. While some parts seemed verbose and other subplots could have been more developed, I did overall love this book. I loved how much I hated Fred. I loved how much I wanted to smack Stanley. I loved how much I was rooting for Kate.The plot of Family Trust is what The Nest wanted to be with characters who wishes they were Crazy Ri A story about wealth (perceived and actual) in Silicone Valley and whether you can fully trust the family (see what I did there) youre born with and the family you choose. While some parts seemed verbose and other subplots could have been more developed, I did overall love this book. I loved how much I hated Fred. I loved how much I wanted to smack Stanley. I loved how much I was rooting for Kate.The plot of Family Trust is what The Nest wanted to be with characters who wishes they were Crazy Rich Asians. I give it 4 out of 5 and definitely recommend as a fun, quick read.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    After Stanley Huang is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, the Huang family flock to his Silicon Valley home. Some come to lend support, others come to secure their inheritance. Stanley has boasted for years that he is worth a small fortune. Now they all want a piece of the pie.This is a look at both family dynamics and the Silicon Valley culture. This is an enjoyable family drama. It is filled with great characters and will bring you to tears when you aren’t laughing at all the excesses and famil After Stanley Huang is diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, the Huang family flock to his Silicon Valley home. Some come to lend support, others come to secure their inheritance. Stanley has boasted for years that he is worth a small fortune. Now they all want a piece of the pie.This is a look at both family dynamics and the Silicon Valley culture. This is an enjoyable family drama. It is filled with great characters and will bring you to tears when you aren’t laughing at all the excesses and family antics.
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  • Jennifer Wrage
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received a free copy of Family Trust from goodreads.com.I have to admit that this is the first book I haven't completed in dozens of years. To be fair, the topic of Silicon Valley inner drama is not appealing to me. I found that the characters were not well developed and I had difficulty identifying with any of them. There was a lot of detail which I didn't feel developed the story. It just didn't engage me at all.
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  • Cortney LaScola - The Bookworm, Myrtle Beach
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like this book, I really did. I've always been fascinated by Asian culture, and family drama is usually something I eat up, but Family Trust left me unfulfilled. My biggest complaint was the characters... they were all miserable, unhappy, and totally unlikable. At the end of the day, I just didn't care what happened to any of them.
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