The Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1)
Mists of Avalon meets Philippa Gregory in the first book of an exciting historical trilogy that reveals the untold story of Languoreth—a powerful and, until now, tragically forgotten queen of sixth-century Scotland—twin sister of the man who inspired the legendary character of Merlin.Intelligent, passionate, rebellious, and brave, Languoreth is the unforgettable heroine of The Lost Queen, a tale of conflicted loves and survival set against the cinematic backdrop of ancient Scotland, a magical land of myths and superstition inspired by the beauty of the natural world. One of the most powerful early medieval queens in British history, Languoreth ruled at a time of enormous disruption and bloodshed, when the burgeoning forces of Christianity threatened to obliterate the ancient pagan beliefs and change her way of life forever.Together with her twin brother Lailoken, a warrior and druid known to history as Merlin, Languoreth is catapulted into a world of danger and violence. When a war brings the hero Emrys Pendragon, to their door, Languoreth collides with the handsome warrior Maelgwn. Their passionate connection is forged by enchantment, but Languoreth is promised in marriage to Rhydderch, son of the High King who is sympathetic to the followers of Christianity. As Rhydderch's wife, Languoreth must assume her duty to fight for the preservation of the Old Way, her kingdom, and all she holds dear.The Lost Queen brings this remarkable woman to life—rescuing her from obscurity, and reaffirming her place at the center of the most enduring legends of all time.

The Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1) Details

TitleThe Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherTouchstone
ISBN-139781501191411
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fantasy, Fiction

The Lost Queen (The Lost Queen Trilogy #1) Review

  • Mellie Antoinete
    January 1, 1970
    “War is not about victory. War is about survival.”This book was vividly amazing. Equal parts Outlander, Camelot and Game of Thrones, the characters are vibrant, the settings surround you and the story draws you right in. There were many a moment I felt like I was sitting on a hill learning from Cathan or in the yard training with the knife father gifted me all those moons ago. “In times such as these, when the people need a hero, so are such heroes made.”It’s funny how circular Langoureth’s st “War is not about victory. War is about survival.”This book was vividly amazing. Equal parts Outlander, Camelot and Game of Thrones, the characters are vibrant, the settings surround you and the story draws you right in. There were many a moment I felt like I was sitting on a hill learning from Cathan or in the yard training with the knife father gifted me all those moons ago. “In times such as these, when the people need a hero, so are such heroes made.”It’s funny how circular Langoureth’s story is. It all pinpoints to singular moments, unspoken choices, longed for dreams of a different life. Darkness colors the edges of the parchment just waiting to swallow the ink, and yet there is so much life, love and light keeping the darkness at bay that in the end, it boils down to a good story, woven in the richest of inks, and set with the sands of time. “We may not always have the choice we would like. But we always have a choice.”The book boyfriends in this novel are insatiable - be it the winter-eyed Rhydderch or the emerald richness of Maelgwn’s peepers. I would choose either equally and live out my days in happiness. Nope - I’d choose Maelgwn! His destiny is his own. Rhydderch’s “pulse is reserved for politics,” which often leaves him between a rock and a weak-assed coward of a hard place. But he’s got grit to him! I like it! Let’s meet, grab a coffee, see where there show leads! 😉 I believe you’re bound to surprise me in the end, Rhydderch my love (don’t let me down Signe!) “All leadership is blood.”Of course, I’m going to leave this with the desperatist of tones - This is by far the best #arc I’ve received and had the pleasure to consume to date! Could not put it down! The history burns from the page in all its bitter glory as if it only happened yesterday and I loved it. I loved every minute of it! Signe Pike is now an instant buy author for me! Bless you #netgalley!Preordered, place of honor, the whole nine stars! 💋 mwah 💋
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  • Patti Henry
    January 1, 1970
    An extraordinary historical page-turner. Pike brings a creative eye, unique voice and immaculate research to the world of historical fiction - the people and lands of this novel will not leave me. The Lost Queen is more than a book; it is a profound experience. Languoreth has emerged from the mists of Scotland to assume her rightful place on the throne where she belongs.I can not tell you how much I love this book -- I devoured it; I dreamt about it; I love it!!!
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  • Margaret Sankey
    January 1, 1970
    Now that I can no longer re-read The Mists of Avalon, and because I really liked the Sarmatian take on the Arthurian legends embedded in Gillian Bradshaw's Island of Ghosts, this is a very promising new series centered on an interpretation of the Arthurian stories originating in Strathclyde above the wall rather than Wales. Pike uses the freedom of a novel to reconstruct from a handful of mentions in historical documents, the life of a 6th century high queen at the center of transition between C Now that I can no longer re-read The Mists of Avalon, and because I really liked the Sarmatian take on the Arthurian legends embedded in Gillian Bradshaw's Island of Ghosts, this is a very promising new series centered on an interpretation of the Arthurian stories originating in Strathclyde above the wall rather than Wales. Pike uses the freedom of a novel to reconstruct from a handful of mentions in historical documents, the life of a 6th century high queen at the center of transition between Christianity and suprisingly unromanticized Druidic practice, and the piecemeal invasions of Angles and Saxons.
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  • Stacie
    January 1, 1970
    To say that I devoured this book would be a gross understatement. I read this book in record time and am left sitting here, wishing that I had more...so much more...from this author! The story itself was utterly incredible. The plot moved at a quick pace, with the story building upon itself seamlessly. The characters however...oh my goodness, the characters. The characters were created so beautifully. They were complex, human, raw, emotional and unique, and made their way into my heart permanent To say that I devoured this book would be a gross understatement. I read this book in record time and am left sitting here, wishing that I had more...so much more...from this author! The story itself was utterly incredible. The plot moved at a quick pace, with the story building upon itself seamlessly. The characters however...oh my goodness, the characters. The characters were created so beautifully. They were complex, human, raw, emotional and unique, and made their way into my heart permanently. Dear Signe Pike: You have a new forever fan!
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful! Sagas usually confound me but this is also a historical fiction based on the legend of Merlin. The story has an excellent pace and the characters are lively. A great start to a trilogy!Thanks to the publisher for access to the review copy.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Of course it's a trilogy, and of course the next book doesn't come out anytime soon. So here I wait for the next part of this amazing historical fiction. Knowing only what I've seen in the Disney's version Sword in the Stone, this was an amazing history and an incredible tail. The histories of Author and Merlin will always entice us, but this new story, this new telling of Languoreth, will keep you wanting to learn more about her and her adventures and her life.
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Another DNF. The writing here was good, but I just felt like the plot tension wasn't personal enough to the characters to make me really care what was going on. I made it 150 pages before lemming it. DNF, so no rating.
  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    A classic pre-Arthur period novel about lineage, politics, love, and king-making. This is the first of what I hope will be multiple novels which explore the very early history of the British Isles and the Pendragon name. Men may lead others into battle and hold all the power but it is the women like Lanuoreth who make decisions that will save the family. A doomed love affair between Languoreth and Maelgwn will pit families against each other and test political alliances. Languoreth will wed the A classic pre-Arthur period novel about lineage, politics, love, and king-making. This is the first of what I hope will be multiple novels which explore the very early history of the British Isles and the Pendragon name. Men may lead others into battle and hold all the power but it is the women like Lanuoreth who make decisions that will save the family. A doomed love affair between Languoreth and Maelgwn will pit families against each other and test political alliances. Languoreth will wed the powerful man to whom she is pledged but must also save her brother and continue the line of seers from which she came. For all fans of British history, this story also has just enough politics and drama to satisfy those hungry for more "Game of Thrones" and "The Last Kingdom. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    This book left me with pretty mixed feelings. First, the good: it's a pleasure to read something set in this early medieval period- a time that can seem so obscure- which really does make it a living, tangible, vivid place. The scenes of festivals in particular are wonderful: you are right there with Languoreth, smelling, seeing, and feeling all the magic, darkness, light, and nature. There were some inaccuracies that bothered me, given the author's claim to extensive research (whiskey being men This book left me with pretty mixed feelings. First, the good: it's a pleasure to read something set in this early medieval period- a time that can seem so obscure- which really does make it a living, tangible, vivid place. The scenes of festivals in particular are wonderful: you are right there with Languoreth, smelling, seeing, and feeling all the magic, darkness, light, and nature. There were some inaccuracies that bothered me, given the author's claim to extensive research (whiskey being mentioned frequently when distilled liquor came much later than the time period of this book, for example; Rome being discussed as though it were still a unified entity), but they didn't really interfere with the story.The plot was oddly paced sometimes (especially at the end), but generally clipped along; I read the book quickly. There were many vivid characters, though it was mostly the secondary ones that grabbed me. I didn't much care for Languoreth herself, but that's partly because the book builds up expectations for her that are never really fulfilled. It is constantly implied that she is clever, but in fact she is mostly foolish; she trains with a knife, but then fails spectacularly every time she tries to use it, and so forth. Still, you do get a strong sense of her feelings, especially her love for her family.However, in the end, despite the new setting for Arthurian stories, this is a very traditional fantasy, and I don't especially mean that as a compliment. It has some common tropes that really need to die. For starters, everyone good is slender and attractive, or, if they are men, very muscled, and every villain is fat, not able-bodied, or has some defect (an underbite, for example). We are even told that noble breeding is visible in peoples' faces. People are extremely gender normative. Even the people you might think would inhabit more ambiguous spaces- the Wisdom Keepers- are slender and beautiful (if women) or strong and muscled and sexy (if men).Second, hierarchy is rigid and constantly invoked. Noblemen are the only people that matter: slaves (who are usually called "servants," but occasionally referred to as slaves) are fawningly devoted if meant to be "good" characters, and disloyal if meant to be "bad." The noble characters spout lines saying that one can never trust a servant, because they are always envious, etc. You could say that since this book is told in the first person from a noble's perspective, we couldn't expect otherwise....and yet. There are ways the author could have avoided uncritically reproducing these attitudes, by having slaves that are real characters. The entire storyline of Desdemona infuriated me. She is introduced suffering and having suffered immense trauma, and she suffers this trauma seemingly for no other reason than to make us think she should be grateful to Languoreth. She is used and abused from then on; her desire for equality is presented as evil, and her desire for love as something to be mocked. Ugh, all around.So, an entertaining read in many ways. But I'm not sure I'll read the next two, because I don't think I want these same old fantasy tropes anymore.
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  • Magic History
    January 1, 1970
    I waited a few days to review The Lost Queen, by Signe Pike. It’s a story of the Arthurian legend in sixth-century Scotland, and it’s told from the point of view of Langoureth, the “lost queen” who also happens to be the twin sister of the man who originated the Merlin myth. In this book, he’s called Lailoken. I honestly didn’t realize until I finished the book and read the author’s note that this was a book about Merlin. I suppose that’s to the author’s credit, because the story is intriguing o I waited a few days to review The Lost Queen, by Signe Pike. It’s a story of the Arthurian legend in sixth-century Scotland, and it’s told from the point of view of Langoureth, the “lost queen” who also happens to be the twin sister of the man who originated the Merlin myth. In this book, he’s called Lailoken. I honestly didn’t realize until I finished the book and read the author’s note that this was a book about Merlin. I suppose that’s to the author’s credit, because the story is intriguing on its own. But it added to my interest to learn, also from the author’s note, that there is documented evidence that Langoureth existed. But the story in the book, she explains, is almost completely invented because little information is available about her.The story begins when Langoureth is very young. Her mother dies, and Langoureth and her brother run to a creek where they spent time with their mother. There they see a stag, and watch it in wonder. The wisdom-keeper who advises their father, the king, tells Langoureth the stag is a sign, a sign of a journey. Langoureth and her brother are to travel to Partick, a larger town some miles away. It’s a troubled place, where Christianity is rearing its head, threatening the “old way” of following nature, the way the wisdom-keeper and Langoureth’s mother followed.Lailoken is fated to become a wisdom-keeper and Langoureth longs to follow in this way, but she is fated to marry as the daughter of a king. After her mother dies, a female wisdom-keeper aproaches her father to become her counselor, and he accepts. She advises Langoureth and helps her grow into a woman. When she is sixteen, Langoureth is prepared for marriage.But before that happens, she falls in love. Emrys Pendragon comes to her father’s door, and with him a fellow warrior with green eyes –Maelgwyn. She has already been contracted in marriage, but Langoureth’s wisdom-keeper urges her to act on her feelings.She weaves a spell so Langoureth and Maelgwyn can escape those who would see them apart. So she and Maelgwyn make love, and then she marries two weeks later, to Rhydderch, the son of a Christian king. Sure enough, she soons realizes she is pregnant, and magically knows Maelgwyn is the father.So begins the tale of Langoureth. It is long and somewhat heart-rending, and the worst part is, books two and three have yet to be written, so we have wait to find out what happens in the end. Still, the author sums up the book well, with Langoureth having a vision of the bloody future England has yet to experience.One reviewer criticized some of the cliched characters: everyone who is good is slender and beautiful, and those who are bad are overweight and ugly. I suppose there’s some merit to that criticism. But it’s still a good tale, if you like this kind of book. Another thing I liked is that the author did not paint Christianity as terrible across the board. But there is still the cliched evil priest, only this time he’s a monk.But the author can make some improvements in the second and third books and I think I will read them.Grade: B
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  • VIBookCrate
    January 1, 1970
    The story starts with twins Languoreth and Lailoken shortly after their mother has passed away (they are approximately 9 years old). They are children of a King and a Wisdom Keeper and thus their futures are set. Languoreth must give up her dreams of following in her mothers footsteps as a healer and Wisdom Keeper so that she may marry and strengthen their family alliances, while her brother Lail does all the things that she wishes she could – embracing the Old Way and training to become a Wisdo The story starts with twins Languoreth and Lailoken shortly after their mother has passed away (they are approximately 9 years old). They are children of a King and a Wisdom Keeper and thus their futures are set. Languoreth must give up her dreams of following in her mothers footsteps as a healer and Wisdom Keeper so that she may marry and strengthen their family alliances, while her brother Lail does all the things that she wishes she could – embracing the Old Way and training to become a Wisdom Keeper.As Languoreth grows she learns that she must give up so much of herself for those around her, but she does it because of the love that she has for her family, her duty and the ways that she was raised. She falls madly in love with a warrior who loves her just as deeply, right before she is to marry another. She makes the decision to take whatever happiness that she can in the moments given to her by the Gods and commits her heart to the love of her life while giving her hand and body to another. She holds tight to the stolen moments she had and carries on with her duty and her destiny.From the moment this story begins we are drawn into the mysteries and the magic of ancient Scotland. We are show bits of the Old Ways and the lives of those who were bound by it. Signe Pike paints such an amazing picture with her words. She makes you feel what the characters are feeling and you truly care about what happens to them.There were a few things that I did feel were out of place – primarily in one section where a certain word is used, which happens to be a word that I hate and truly wish another was used in its place.The book starts when they are quite young (starting a 9 years old to 32 years old), but as the ages of our characters progress I found that the violence and the sexual nature does as well.I think that this book would be suitable for older teens – adults.I have not read many historical fiction novels but I think I will start. This book is the first of a proposed trilogy and I can not wait to see where the other books will take us.
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  • Danni
    January 1, 1970
    Languoreth is a princess destined for the usual princess things, marriage and children. She longs to be a Wisdom Keeper of the Old Ways like her twin brother Lailoken instead. Her story unfurls in the pages of The Lost Queen by Signe Pike. In this thrilling Fantasy, readers will be enchanted by the magical world and political drama as Languroreth balances her duty with desires. Languoreth is a strong female character that is easy to love. Readers will see her grow up in the novel and constantly Languoreth is a princess destined for the usual princess things, marriage and children. She longs to be a Wisdom Keeper of the Old Ways like her twin brother Lailoken instead. Her story unfurls in the pages of The Lost Queen by Signe Pike. In this thrilling Fantasy, readers will be enchanted by the magical world and political drama as Languroreth balances her duty with desires. Languoreth is a strong female character that is easy to love. Readers will see her grow up in the novel and constantly face challenging decisions when it comes to doing her duty and what her heart wants. Of course, that means there is  a forbidden romance, but it's a realistic one. Most of her challenging decisions come from acting rashly or waiting to see what the best political move should be. At times I found this character to be a bit whiny. She was facing some incredibly difficult decisions; I guess some whining is allowed! I truly appreciated how the author reveals the intricacies of family life in this novel. Languoreth obviously loves her twin brother. She also is compelled to stand up for her warrior father, the family Wisdom Keeper, her foster brother, her lover, and her husband. It can be hard to balance where your time and loyalty belongs in a family like that with so many different ties. The author manages to make all the relationships seem authentic and unique. I think it's what makes this such a good read. Obviously, this is at its heart a prequel to the Merlin and King Arthur stories. Camelot lovers will enjoy it for sure!  It is a unique retelling that will be a joy to read for any Fantasy lover. This book comes out on September 4, 2018. I was provided a free, advance reader copy by Absolutely Fiction Books in exchange for a honest review.
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  • Laurie • The Baking Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This is an exciting new historical series about a little known sixth century queen, who was the twin sister of Lailoken, the man believed to be at the centre of the Merlin myth. It's set during the tumultuous time when Christianity was first getting a strong hold on an area steeped in the Druid faith.The characters are varied and interesting and I have to thank the author for including a character reference list as well as a 'how to pronounce' listing of the names that I would have invariably mu This is an exciting new historical series about a little known sixth century queen, who was the twin sister of Lailoken, the man believed to be at the centre of the Merlin myth. It's set during the tumultuous time when Christianity was first getting a strong hold on an area steeped in the Druid faith.The characters are varied and interesting and I have to thank the author for including a character reference list as well as a 'how to pronounce' listing of the names that I would have invariably muddled up. Languoreth is an interesting main character but, I believe, still a work in progress. I can't say I liked her all the time (she could be whiny and impetuous) but I was fascinated with her position in society and the limitations put upon her (and other women of the time). Some of the secondary characters (Elufed and Ariane) held my interest much more and I hope these characters have a stronger story line in the future books.The only aspects that lowered my rating are the fact that the pacing was a little uneven with some scenes whizzing by and others taking quite a bit to get through. I also needed a bit more to go on in terms of the romantic bond between Languoreth and her beloved. Their bond happens very fast and without a lot of explanation.In the end, this is a strong start to a new trilogy. It's filled with political drama, laced with religious fervour, includes a romance and an interesting look at a long forgotten queen. This book will definitely entice lovers of Camelot. Disclaimer: My sincere thanks to Touchstone Books for providing me with a complimentary digital copy of this book, via NetGalley, in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Sheryle
    January 1, 1970
    Much of what I’ve read about this book compares it with The Mists of Avalon. In fact, that was one of the main reasons I was drawn to it in the first place. Many went on to say that The Lost Queen is a fitting successor to Mists. I’m sorry, but no. While The Lost Queen was fairly enjoyable and had much the same feel to it as The Mists of Avalon, it is really unfair to expect it to replace such a classic. It simply is not in the same league.I found the writing to be extremely uneven with some par Much of what I’ve read about this book compares it with The Mists of Avalon. In fact, that was one of the main reasons I was drawn to it in the first place. Many went on to say that The Lost Queen is a fitting successor to Mists. I’m sorry, but no. While The Lost Queen was fairly enjoyable and had much the same feel to it as The Mists of Avalon, it is really unfair to expect it to replace such a classic. It simply is not in the same league.I found the writing to be extremely uneven with some parts moving at a good pace and others dragging. Also, I wasn’t sure if the book was meant to be YA or adult fiction due to the simplicity of the story. Everything and everyone was good or bad; there was little question of where everyone stood. I did, however, enjoy the author’s physical descriptions of the characters and the setting. I could see the people so clearly, along with the places they populated. Unfortunately, I never became invested enough in the main characters to really care what happened to them. A number of the secondary characters, such as Ariana and Elufed, were quite intriguing. As I said before, it was a fairly enjoyable book for me but it suffered by comparison to one of my favorites. Perhaps others who have not read The Mists of Avalon will enjoy it more.My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished an advance reader copy of this stunning historical novel and I am enchanted. I'm so, so sad to be leaving the world of early medieval Scotland (never thought I'd be saying that!)... the world of Languoreth (the twin sister of the man who inspired the legend of Merlin)... the world of Wisdom Keepers (druids), healing and magic... the world where women are a quiet, powerful force often overlooked by history. The rhythmic writing, the setting, the historical precision (and creative I just finished an advance reader copy of this stunning historical novel and I am enchanted. I'm so, so sad to be leaving the world of early medieval Scotland (never thought I'd be saying that!)... the world of Languoreth (the twin sister of the man who inspired the legend of Merlin)... the world of Wisdom Keepers (druids), healing and magic... the world where women are a quiet, powerful force often overlooked by history. The rhythmic writing, the setting, the historical precision (and creative license - based on 6 years of research), the wisdom, the strife... I'm already longing for more and the first book hasn't even hit shelves yet!While I do love historical fiction, I'm not typically drawn to Arthurian legend. However, Signe's first book, Faery Tale, is one of my all-time favorite memoirs and I was eager to read whatever she published next. One of the things I most loved about Faery Tale was how Signe writes with such reverence towards the natural world. So you can imagine my delight when that same voice, that same appreciation and sense of wonder came through in the characters -- both the people and the places -- of The Lost Queen.One of the things about this book that I think will give it a broad audience is that it can be read as pure diversion or with a more probing curiosity that uncovers themes so relevant to our world today.
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  • Gina Riccitelli
    January 1, 1970
    From the first page to the last, The Lost Queen is more than just a story, it’s a journey through medieval times in the point of view of a fierce heroine. Languoreth is a princess who is connected to the old ways and dreams of a life she will never get to have because she is a princess and must do what is best for her family and her people. She sacrifices so much and throughout this book I laughed and I cried ( many times ) wishing her life was what she wanted as well. There is loss, love, sacri From the first page to the last, The Lost Queen is more than just a story, it’s a journey through medieval times in the point of view of a fierce heroine. Languoreth is a princess who is connected to the old ways and dreams of a life she will never get to have because she is a princess and must do what is best for her family and her people. She sacrifices so much and throughout this book I laughed and I cried ( many times ) wishing her life was what she wanted as well. There is loss, love, sacrifice, blood shed and the need to preserve tradition that makes this one incredible tale. Pike is an author to watch and I cannot wait for this Trilogy to unfold I read the first 316 pages of this book in 2 1/2 hours. I couldn’t put it down. I didn’t eat, I didn’t drink I didn’t use the bathroom, nothing! What stopped me was I fell asleep! Haha I haven’t stopped thinking about this book since I read it, I have gone back and reread chapters. You MUST read this book! I wish I could give it 10 stars. Any negative review blows my mind. Languoreth made my heart ache in good ways and bad. I connected so deeply to her that I need to know what happens next. I can tell already this trilogy will be one of my all time favorites!
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me completely of The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley almost to the point of retelling the story completely just set in a few years ahead of The Mists of Avalon, but that is my opinion. You will find most of the same characters in this book, but you have to figure out who they are. This books is long and at spots quite slow, but it is worth the read. It gives you another look of how Christianity came and over took (destroyed) the old religion (very unfortunate and crue This book reminded me completely of The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley almost to the point of retelling the story completely just set in a few years ahead of The Mists of Avalon, but that is my opinion. You will find most of the same characters in this book, but you have to figure out who they are. This books is long and at spots quite slow, but it is worth the read. It gives you another look of how Christianity came and over took (destroyed) the old religion (very unfortunate and cruel, in my opinion). The story line was very informative and you really felt you were there with Languoreth and her family fighting for the old religion and trying to work alongside the Christian monks even though the monks wanted nothing but to obliterate the old religion. I highly enjoyed this book and would not have been disappointed if I had purchased it. I can not wait to see the next book in the series.
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  • Mrsk Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    If you love stories with headstrong and determined female heroines and you are a fan of early British folklore and legends you will love this novel by Signe Pike. In The Lost Queen, Pike has written a wonderful tale in which her main character, Princess Languoreth, the twin sister of the man who would become Merlin the Magician, fulfills what is expected of her in life but she does so on her own terms. Pike has done her research into the traditions, lifestyles, religions and cultures of sixth ce If you love stories with headstrong and determined female heroines and you are a fan of early British folklore and legends you will love this novel by Signe Pike. In The Lost Queen, Pike has written a wonderful tale in which her main character, Princess Languoreth, the twin sister of the man who would become Merlin the Magician, fulfills what is expected of her in life but she does so on her own terms. Pike has done her research into the traditions, lifestyles, religions and cultures of sixth century warring Britain and has used this knowledge to imagine the tale of Languoreth – a princess who plays politics and feels passion yet possesses a brilliant understanding of how to stay true to herself during a time when women were considered property.In The Lost Queen, Pike has written a wonderful tale which leaves you gasping at the exploits and adventures of Languoreth. The next book of the trilogy can't come soon enough for this reviewer!
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not quite sure what I was expecting, but this book exceeded that nonetheless. Although there were a few time jumps, the story flows nicely and in keeping with the tradition of epics, little events cause bigger ripples in the grand scheme of the whole book. I don't want to give too much away, but I connected to Languoreth: her fears were mine, as well as her stolen moments of joy and peace. (There were a couple of points when I wanted to shake her silly, but that's a whole other issue.) I'm n I'm not quite sure what I was expecting, but this book exceeded that nonetheless. Although there were a few time jumps, the story flows nicely and in keeping with the tradition of epics, little events cause bigger ripples in the grand scheme of the whole book. I don't want to give too much away, but I connected to Languoreth: her fears were mine, as well as her stolen moments of joy and peace. (There were a couple of points when I wanted to shake her silly, but that's a whole other issue.) I'm not sure how 2 more books will add to the overall trilogy, but I look forward to finding out.Book received as part of a Goodreads giveaway for an unbiased review.
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  • Savvy Little Book Club Yvonne M.
    January 1, 1970
    *i received an ARC of this book from NetGalley/Publisher for an honest review *This book was amazing! A M A Z I N G! It’s great from start to finish not a single dull moment. I felt like I was watching a season of Vikings/White Queen it was that good! Languoreth is what I would inspire to be! She is everything and what I wouldn’t give for a love like Maelgwn. It’s a wonderful historical fiction and the way the author draws you into the past and the scenery is perfect! “You burn young and bright. *i received an ARC of this book from NetGalley/Publisher for an honest review *This book was amazing! A M A Z I N G! It’s great from start to finish not a single dull moment. I felt like I was watching a season of Vikings/White Queen it was that good! Languoreth is what I would inspire to be! She is everything and what I wouldn’t give for a love like Maelgwn. It’s a wonderful historical fiction and the way the author draws you into the past and the scenery is perfect! “You burn young and bright. Death comes to steal your breath, your eyes go sightless, and you are snuffed out, a candle burned to its wick. They tell those who loved you, This is the way of the Gods.”
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  • Joy Matteson
    January 1, 1970
    I yelled, "NOOOOOO" and threw the book when I finished the last page. I can't believe I'm going to have to wait for an unknown period of time for the next book. Signe Pike has done decades of research on the Merlin myths of medieval Britain, and this refreshing glimpse at the lives of Languoreth and her twin brother Lailoken will enthrall you from the first page. It's fast paced, fascinating, and immersive into medieval Britain. You won't want to miss this one! (Just try not to throw it if you m I yelled, "NOOOOOO" and threw the book when I finished the last page. I can't believe I'm going to have to wait for an unknown period of time for the next book. Signe Pike has done decades of research on the Merlin myths of medieval Britain, and this refreshing glimpse at the lives of Languoreth and her twin brother Lailoken will enthrall you from the first page. It's fast paced, fascinating, and immersive into medieval Britain. You won't want to miss this one! (Just try not to throw it if you make it til the end.)
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to the curiosity sparking through our young adult patrons and I must say I generally do not respond well to historical Fiction/Fantasy but the The Lost Queen really was engaging and enticing to read. Also I am a huge fan of unique names due to the fact it promotes individuality and I was so ecstatic that the heroine's name is Languoreth. With women empowerment as well our readers along with myself will be even happier to read The Lost Queen. I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to the curiosity sparking through our young adult patrons and I must say I generally do not respond well to historical Fiction/Fantasy but the The Lost Queen really was engaging and enticing to read. Also I am a huge fan of unique names due to the fact it promotes individuality and I was so ecstatic that the heroine's name is Languoreth. With women empowerment as well our readers along with myself will be even happier to read The Lost Queen. An extravagant read that we are proud to give 5 stars!
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  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    A lush historical fantasy mapping an untold part of he Arthurian saga-the story of Merlin's twin sister. Equally gifted in magic but bound by the restraints of her gender and familial expectations, Langoreth nonetheless has a stunning part to play in this origin story. Wonderfully researched and brilliantly imagined, The Lost Queen will appeal to fans of Outlander and The Once and Future King alike.
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  • Jessie
    January 1, 1970
    Comes out 9/4. Part Outlander, part Mists of Avalon, written in a narrative voice not unlike Phillipa Gregory. This is a tale about Languoreth, a real-life queen in early medieval Scotland, who was the twin sister of Lailoken, the man thought to be the inspiration for the Merlin myth. Gosh I really like this one... incredibly readable and great characterization. Signe Pike has a knack for storytelling, and I can't wait for the second installment!
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book as an ARC. I have always been interested in Arthurian legend and this was an interesting and new take on Arthur’s origins and the birth of Merlin. I would recommend this to anyone interested in the Arthurian legend. The characters were well developed with depth and I felt for them. A solid 4 to 4.5 stars.
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  • Brenda Hasse
    January 1, 1970
    Very well written and easy to fall into the scenes of this book as they come alive on its pages. Don't want to leave any spoilers. This is the best book I have read in a long time. It is the first book in a series and I can't wait for the next one to be published.
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  • David V.
    January 1, 1970
    Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 6-30-18. Finished 7-5-18. Loved it. Fictional account of the early Scots about the year 550 AD. Characters you love and those you hate, but they're all interesting. Battles, romance and political intrigue--enough to please every reader, male or female. If you're fed up waiting for the next installment of GOT, this first in a trilogy will certainly grab your interest. I just finished it, and I'm eagerly awaiting the next book. Several times as I read Received as an ARC from the publisher. Started 6-30-18. Finished 7-5-18. Loved it. Fictional account of the early Scots about the year 550 AD. Characters you love and those you hate, but they're all interesting. Battles, romance and political intrigue--enough to please every reader, male or female. If you're fed up waiting for the next installment of GOT, this first in a trilogy will certainly grab your interest. I just finished it, and I'm eagerly awaiting the next book. Several times as I read about the dilemmas facing Languoreth, I was forced to ask myself what I would in that circumstance. It put the story into a personal level for me. The book is very visual and would make a good TV series. Many of the characters are based on real people; great research by the author.
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  • Hillary
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. I thought that the story was fascinating and thought out, the characters were super interesting and I can’t wait to see how it continues in the following two books. Also understanding the backstory behind the novel made me fall more in love with it!
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  • Charlene
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this one! The story was engaging and kept my interest until the very last page! I can't wait to pick up the next one and continue the series!
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