Phoenix Goes to School
My Mommy tells me I'm perfect and to be brave."You know who you are," she says,"Just be yourself and always listen to your heart."With those words of encouragement from her Mom, Phoenix is preparing for her first day of school. She is excited but scared of being bullied because of her gender identity and expression. Yet when she arrives at school she finds help and support from teachers and friends, and finds she is brave enough to talk to other kids about her gender!This is an empowering and brightly-illustrated children's book for children aged 3+ to help children engage with gender identity in a fun, uplifting way. It supports trans children who are worried about being bullied or misunderstood.

Phoenix Goes to School Details

TitlePhoenix Goes to School
Author
ReleaseJul 19th, 2018
PublisherJessica Kingsley Publishers
ISBN-139781784509248
Rating
GenreLgbt, Nonfiction, Transgender

Phoenix Goes to School Review

  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Jessica Kingsley Publishers for this early release copy.What a cute and simple way to help children learn, understand and accept transgenderism. I found the talking points at the end of the story especially wonderful. Giving ideas for both kids and grown-ups on how to open up a dialogue into likes, dislikes, feelings and help reveal any unanswered questions was a fantastic inclusion!This is certainly a book I hope everyone picks up and discusses.
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  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. This was a very short kids' book written (as far as I understood) by a mom together with her transgender daughter, Phoenix, who's seven years old.It talks about Phoenix's first day of school wearing a dress. Her mom is very supportive and she tells her that she's perfect the way she is, just like the flowers that Phoenix likes so much, all beautiful in their different sha I was sent this book as an advanced copy by the publisher via NetGalley for reviewing purposes, but all opinions are my own. This was a very short kids' book written (as far as I understood) by a mom together with her transgender daughter, Phoenix, who's seven years old.It talks about Phoenix's first day of school wearing a dress. Her mom is very supportive and she tells her that she's perfect the way she is, just like the flowers that Phoenix likes so much, all beautiful in their different shapes and colors. She makes friends and she feels welcome in her school.I don't usually read children's books but I'm always here to read books about and for LGBTQIAP kids and their parents. This one has two sections at the end, one for kids (simple questions to talk about their own experiences and the experiences that Phoenix went through in the book) and one for grown-ups, with info about transgender kids and tips on how to talk about these topics. I think this is very useful for parents and/or teachers. I'm a cis reviewer so definitely make sure to find ownvoices reviews once more people read this, but I really thought this was well done!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Melanie Gillman, a queer cartoonist who wrote "As the Crow Flies", was asked by a white, heterosexual man, what the point of reading her LGBTQ comics was for him. At the time, she said, she gave him a pat answer of "well, it is good to read about people that are different than you", but what she really wanted to say was "I'm not writing this for you."This is how I feel about this book. While it is important for straight cis gendered people to read about transgendered children, this book is reall Melanie Gillman, a queer cartoonist who wrote "As the Crow Flies", was asked by a white, heterosexual man, what the point of reading her LGBTQ comics was for him. At the time, she said, she gave him a pat answer of "well, it is good to read about people that are different than you", but what she really wanted to say was "I'm not writing this for you."This is how I feel about this book. While it is important for straight cis gendered people to read about transgendered children, this book is really written for those children out there that feel they are all alone. That feel that no one else feels the way they do, and there must be something wrong with them. That is who this book is for, as well, as the cis gendered folk out there.This is a gentle picture book, written on a little transgender girl named Phoenix. It is a very straightforward explanation of how she feels, and how scared she is about her first day of school. And as her mother says to her, only you know yourself.Good book to have in the classroom. Good for Cis and gender fluid children. Bright colors and easy to read story.Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.#PhoenixGoesToSchool #NetGalley
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  • Paul Decker
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book as an eARC from Jessica Kingsley Publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*This picture book is a cute, short story about a girl being nervous about how people will react when she wears a dress to school. A young girl and her mother wrote this story together about their own personal experiences. In addition to the story, there are also resources included with the book. There are questions to use to initiate a conversation with children about gender. There ar *I received this book as an eARC from Jessica Kingsley Publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*This picture book is a cute, short story about a girl being nervous about how people will react when she wears a dress to school. A young girl and her mother wrote this story together about their own personal experiences. In addition to the story, there are also resources included with the book. There are questions to use to initiate a conversation with children about gender. There are also resources for adults and parents about trans issues.There is plenty of colorful artwork in this picture book. Phoenix is relatable to any child. The fact that this book was written by a daughter and her mother makes it even more adorable. I give this picture book a 5/5.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    ( 1 ) 15/05/18 - 15/05/18I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is a beautiful little book, as I hoped it would be, and it didn't disappoint at all. The story is told through the mother of a transgender girl using her own words to tell it, which makes it far more valid than anything someone other than trans could have written. Most children fear their first day of school, but children know more than they're given credit for, as I remember well, and when th ( 1 ) 15/05/18 - 15/05/18I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is a beautiful little book, as I hoped it would be, and it didn't disappoint at all. The story is told through the mother of a transgender girl using her own words to tell it, which makes it far more valid than anything someone other than trans could have written. Most children fear their first day of school, but children know more than they're given credit for, as I remember well, and when they know they don't conform to the traditional ways society unfortunately clings to, they are often aware of it, which makes this child's fears and anxieties so very valid.The story itself is short and simple, it doesn't explain the concept of being transgender beyond that of what a seven year old would understand and experience, which makes it more authentic, and although it is written and aimed for children of a similar age, many adults would learn a lot from it as well. So, short and sweet, and straight to the point, which is that this little girl may have been assigned male at birth, as her physical sex is that of a male, but as far as her gender goes, as her own identity goes, she is very much female. She's not confused, not going through a passing phase, though it's possible her gender identity will change a little as she grows, not because she's not what she knows she is now, but because as we grow and learn and experience, we discover new words for things, to describe how we feel, and society insists we must label every aspect of it, though we get to choose the right words for ourselves, whether they're pre-determined labels or ones we use for ourselves, it doesn't matter. But, for the time being, she knows who she is, perhaps more than a lot of adults ever will, and she's happy with that person. All she longs to do is start school along with the other children and to fit in and be accepted for who she is, and not simply seen as the boy in the dress when she's clearly anything but. It's written well, clear enough for young children to understand and follow, and it touches on the subject in the right way rather than throwing words and terms and labels around that a child that young may or may not understand. It works. And the pictures are beautifully drawn with bright, vibrant colours during much of the story, for the positive moments, and pale, drained colours on the brief moments of fear and anxiety expressed, and the gender negative moments, which is a nice touch - it shows the artist also understands how this little girl is feeling. Plus, there's a lot of diversity in the friends Phoenix makes as well, the skin tones and appearances, the names, they all show diversity of race and culture, which adds to how amazing this book already is. It suggests that everyone can and should be accepted, no matter how different they are from everyone else or what those differences are, and it's a strong, positive message to send out there.The imagery is beautiful as well, the flowers a nice touch, differing in colours, like the colours of the rainbow, and although it's not explicitly worded, that's the image I got in my mind, of the rainbow, a symbol for everyone no matter where they fall within the LGBTQ+ community, and I liked that, it was a nice touch.And despite the fact there's not supposed to be too much of a personal touch to these reviews, I would like to add that, as a genderqueer/non-binary person myself, and as someone who always knew that I was different as far as gender was concerned even if I didn't have the words for it, I wish a book like this could have been around at the time I was starting school in the early nighties. I was put in dresses as a child, but I only tolerated them up to the age of five before I began to defile them in the hopes of never having to wear another, and eventually my mum caught on to that message. I rebelled against the fact I was AFAB from day one, but there were no names and labels to put into words to describe why I felt and thought and did those things, and something as simple as access to a book like this, that I could have shown to people and gone, 'Look, this is how I feel, this is why I am the way I am, and I want to be accepted this way', but instead I've more or less lived a life being referred to as a female and treated like a female, and I've never felt that way once in my life. A book like this could have prevented many years of thinking and feeling like I'm broken, that there's something wrong with me, as I know many others experience. It took me until I was twelve and in my second year of secondary school before I switched skirts for trousers despite it not being the code, and I took the orders and detentions, and all the hateful comments from the teachers who saw me as a problematic troublemaker who enjoyed breaking rules - I didn't enjoy breaking rules, just the stupid ones, and only the ones that prevented me from feeling comfortable in my own skin, that forced me to dress as something I've never been. So, yes, something as simple as a book at a young age could have a huge impact on someone experiencing those thoughts and feelings, who are said to be one thing, but who know that they're another. Whether transgender, genderqueer, non-binary - it doesn't matter, the world needs access to more information on gender, and children as young as Phoenix should be taught that sex and gender are two different things, as are gender and sexual orientation, information that should reach parents to help teach the younger generations of these differences and the tolerance of them to go with it, as well as learning a thing or two themselves, and that it's all right not only to be a different gender to the sex you were assigned at birth. But that it's all right to be different in other ways, too, that everyone is different in one way or another, even if some differences aren't as obvious as others, or some are more accepted than others, and I think this book is a beautiful way to start. I do hope that Phoenix writes more books, either adding to her journey as the years go by, or expressing other diversities she understands and wants her friends to, too, and I hope that others are inspired to write stories of their own - it would be nice to see a story from a trans boy's perspective, or a child or young person who sits somewhere else along the gender spectrum. And books similar to this expressing the different kinds of love people experience, inclusive of all sexual orientations, but told in a way that a young child would be able to understand and follow, so that when they get older, they don't see anything out of the ordinary if a same-sex couple are being openly affectionate in one way or another around them. It's small gestures like those this book offers that make a huge difference in the long-run, and I think Phoenix is brave for taking that huge leap into the world, so well done, Phoenix, and to everyone who's supported her and others like her.People within our community don't often get a lot of representation, and when we do it's rare that it's in a positive light, which is damaging to us and to the way the world looks upon us. But this is a beautiful and brave book from someone so young, and I'd like to share with you my appreciation for allowing this to be published, because I think this book and others similar to it are what the world sorely lacks - positive representation, first-hand representation, and general representation that spreads information into the world for those who don't know or understand can learn and, hopefully, accept us for human beings rather than this or that. So, thank you, for allowing this book to be, and for putting it out into the world. It's perfect.
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  • laurel [suspected bibliophile]
    January 1, 1970
    Phoenix is about to start a new school, but she's worried if the other kids will make fun of her for wearing a dress.This children's picture book is short and compassionate. The story is told by Phoenix, a trans girl, with help from her mother (the two authors). The text is simplistic but deep in emotions, particularly as Phoenix worries about the other kids bullying her and not accepting her, but she is surprised to find that the other kids treat her exactly like the others, are really nice to Phoenix is about to start a new school, but she's worried if the other kids will make fun of her for wearing a dress.This children's picture book is short and compassionate. The story is told by Phoenix, a trans girl, with help from her mother (the two authors). The text is simplistic but deep in emotions, particularly as Phoenix worries about the other kids bullying her and not accepting her, but she is surprised to find that the other kids treat her exactly like the others, are really nice to her, and compliment her dress. She's able to be herself. Sharon Davey's whimsical illustrations compliment the text and emphasize the metaphor running throughout the book: Flowers (children), are all different and beautiful in their own way, and should be loved as they are. It's a lovely message, even if it's a bit simplistic (although this is a children's book).Most helpful for children (and grown-ups) are the resources provided at the end of the book. There are talking points and questions adults/storytellers can ask their audience after the book is finished that can help children understand gender diversity, and learn compassion and empathy for their friends.There're some resources for adults too—honestly, I felt like this was the most important part of the book, since it's generally the adults who have the hang-ups on gender identification and it is their preconceptions and bias that taint their children—which emphasize gender as a social construct that changes as social norms change. The biggest takeaway for parents is that the best way to raise transgender children (really, any child), is to bring them up in a loving and supporting environment where they can "express themselves in a manner consistent with their gender identity."I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story of Phoenix, a little girl who is nervous about going to school. Phoenix was born a baby boy but has always known she is really a girl. She does all the things that young children do - she plays drums, races cars, draws, dances, builds towers and loves flowers. "I like to sparkle and shine in the sun." And she does. She is worried about going to school, being bullied or not making friends. Her mother reminds her she is perfect the way she is. Luckily, her first day of school isn This is the story of Phoenix, a little girl who is nervous about going to school. Phoenix was born a baby boy but has always known she is really a girl. She does all the things that young children do - she plays drums, races cars, draws, dances, builds towers and loves flowers. "I like to sparkle and shine in the sun." And she does. She is worried about going to school, being bullied or not making friends. Her mother reminds her she is perfect the way she is. Luckily, her first day of school isn't what she worried about. The illustrations are very cute and matched the story so well. I read this with my children and they loved the pictures and the story. The book was written by Michelle and Phoenix Finch, a real life seven year old transgender girl who was assigned male at birth. At the end of the book there are comprehension questions and some open-ended critical thinking questions that as a teacher I appreciated. Possibly even better, there is an informational section at the end for grownups. I loved the story of Phoenix going to school but more importantly, I hope that transgendered and gender diverse children will read this and know they are not alone, they are perfect just the way they are.
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  • Grady
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Just be yourself and listen to your heart.’Michelle and Phoenix Finch live in California’s Bay Area – Phoenix is 7 and Michelle is a working mom as well as an active member of the Parents of Transgender Kids community in Marin County. She trains parents and faculty at Phoenix’s school on gender diversity. This is their first book and it is beautifully illustrated by British artist Sharon Davey. Opening this sensitive and heartwarming story Phoenix states ‘When I was born, the doctor told my par ‘Just be yourself and listen to your heart.’Michelle and Phoenix Finch live in California’s Bay Area – Phoenix is 7 and Michelle is a working mom as well as an active member of the Parents of Transgender Kids community in Marin County. She trains parents and faculty at Phoenix’s school on gender diversity. This is their first book and it is beautifully illustrated by British artist Sharon Davey. Opening this sensitive and heartwarming story Phoenix states ‘When I was born, the doctor told my parents they had a baby boy. But I know I am really a girl. I’ve always been this way.’ And so we meet Phoenix, waking early in the morning to play with drums and drawing moons and stars and twirling and dancing - and loving dresses. On her first day of school she is afraid to wear a dress, fearful of what the older kids will say. But she dons a dress, goes to school with support from her mom, and feels at ease wearing a dress. She makes friends and they accept her for who she really is.Not only is this a well written and very important story about gender diversity in children, it is a terrific teaching guide to share with friends who are dealing with similar issues – both children AND teens and adults. Brava to the Finches!
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  • Shelby Wasey
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of this book from the Publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The book follows a young transgender child on her first day at school. I read this book with a 7 year old tutee who is encouraged to learn about different lives and experiences. The language in the book was easy to read and it was very easy for a 7 year old to follow. The pages were beautifully illustrated in a cartoony fashion with a lot of colour. However, I would say that the highlight of th I received an ARC copy of this book from the Publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The book follows a young transgender child on her first day at school. I read this book with a 7 year old tutee who is encouraged to learn about different lives and experiences. The language in the book was easy to read and it was very easy for a 7 year old to follow. The pages were beautifully illustrated in a cartoony fashion with a lot of colour. However, I would say that the highlight of this book is the information and questions for adults and children at the back of the book. We spent a lot of time discussing the book, answering the questions, and asking our own with the help of this section of the book.I have given this book 4 stars as we both thoroughly enjoyed the writing and illustrations and the opportunity it gave to ask questions. It is a brilliant read for children to learn about LGBT+ issues in an easy to understand and realistic way. I would definitely recommend this to teachers, parents and carers.
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  • Etienne
    January 1, 1970
    A strange subject which I have difficulty to understand. This book is «based» or inspired by a real person so I just want to be careful and respectful in it, because this person probably have a hard life with all that and doesn't want to had to it or be disrespectful in any way. I just think it's strange to think that a person think that is gender is not the right one at a very young age. I think that gender identity is in construction for a while in your life and that just accepting the fact th A strange subject which I have difficulty to understand. This book is «based» or inspired by a real person so I just want to be careful and respectful in it, because this person probably have a hard life with all that and doesn't want to had to it or be disrespectful in any way. I just think it's strange to think that a person think that is gender is not the right one at a very young age. I think that gender identity is in construction for a while in your life and that just accepting the fact that not it's okay you may not be a boy or a girl but you are the other one so young is weird. But I.m not living it, maybe when you live that you just feel it and it's all too clear for you. Anyway... the book present the subject very well and aboard it in a good and easy way for explaining or talking to other kids about it. So in that sense the book is very good even if I still feel a bit weird about this «problematic».
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  • Jenni Frencham
    January 1, 1970
    Finch, Michelle. Phoenix Goes to School. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018.Phoenix is going to school for the first time, and she is wearing a dress. She is nervous about the way her classmates will react to her since she is transgender, but she need not have worried. She has support from her family, her teacher, and her new friends.This is a cute book to introduce young children to the concept of gender diversity. Co-written by a transgender child and her parent, this book is appropriate for it Finch, Michelle. Phoenix Goes to School. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2018.Phoenix is going to school for the first time, and she is wearing a dress. She is nervous about the way her classmates will react to her since she is transgender, but she need not have worried. She has support from her family, her teacher, and her new friends.This is a cute book to introduce young children to the concept of gender diversity. Co-written by a transgender child and her parent, this book is appropriate for its age level, although the story tends to go a big longer than many children would have patience for. Colorful illustrations grace every page. This would be a good book to use in a classroom situation along side I Am Jazz or Red: A Crayon's Story. Recommended.Recommended for: kidsRed Flags: noneOverall Rating: 4/5 starsI received a complimentary copy of this book through Netgalley for the purpose of review.
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  • Ella Bianchi
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**The current publication date for Phoenix Goes to School: A Story to Support Transgender and Gender Diverse Children is July 19, 20184.5 starsI believe that we need more diverse reads for children, and this one did not disappoint. Not only was it very cute, and I also enjoyed the fact that it was written by Michelle Finch and her daughter, Phoenix Finch, together, but it also holds an important messag **I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**The current publication date for Phoenix Goes to School: A Story to Support Transgender and Gender Diverse Children is July 19, 20184.5 starsI believe that we need more diverse reads for children, and this one did not disappoint. Not only was it very cute, and I also enjoyed the fact that it was written by Michelle Finch and her daughter, Phoenix Finch, together, but it also holds an important message of teaching children about being transgender. It could also be useful for transgender children themselves to read that way they can easily identify with what Phoenix actually experienced. It may be short, but it is a very important read.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    2018 Summer, NetGalley ARC: Thank you to Michelle Finch, Phoenix Finch, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, and NetGalley for this advanced copy of “Phoenix Goes to School: A Story to Support Transgender and Gender Diverse Children” for an honest review. I had to jump at this book as soon as I saw it. I am so glad kids books like this are beginning to come into existence, so that children (as well as parents!) will start seeing support for these situations and choices as soon as children are very small 2018 Summer, NetGalley ARC: Thank you to Michelle Finch, Phoenix Finch, Jessica Kingsley Publishers, and NetGalley for this advanced copy of “Phoenix Goes to School: A Story to Support Transgender and Gender Diverse Children” for an honest review. I had to jump at this book as soon as I saw it. I am so glad kids books like this are beginning to come into existence, so that children (as well as parents!) will start seeing support for these situations and choices as soon as children are very small. This book is frank, forward, full of feelings, and it nearly made me tear up at the end. I absolutely want a copy for all of my nieces and nephews already, and they will be getting it as soon as publication happens.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent this book in advance from net galley and I was not disappointed. This book is easy to read and very beautifully drawn. Phoenix is a girl who was born a boy she does a lot of things like draw and play. She's scared on her first day of school that older kids will make fun of her but when she gets there she makes friends with Mia and the other kids in her class. She ends up having fun me isn't bullied.I found this book easy to read and great for parents and kids to learn about trans and I was sent this book in advance from net galley and I was not disappointed. This book is easy to read and very beautifully drawn. Phoenix is a girl who was born a boy she does a lot of things like draw and play. She's scared on her first day of school that older kids will make fun of her but when she gets there she makes friends with Mia and the other kids in her class. She ends up having fun me isn't bullied.I found this book easy to read and great for parents and kids to learn about trans and gender fluid kids without a lot of the technical stuff. It's easy to understand and a fun read.
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  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    This very sweet book is perfect for school aged children and their parents. With adorable illustrations and tender, loving content, it tells the tale of a child on their first day of school. However, this child is transgender and is a little scared how she will be received by her schoolmates. It is a gently told tale and contains helpful information for parents in the appendix. Such a lovely resource for children to understand how we special and how are all alike!
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    *Big thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the review copy.*This is a short children’s book but it’s importance is HUGE. This book won’t just help kids who are transgendered but all kids. It’s a great way to introduce the idea of gender and being true to how you feel. The illustrations are so wonderful and light and each page made me smile.
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  • Ellie (crackthespine)
    January 1, 1970
    I mostly read this because I very rarely read children's books (mainly because I'm not a child) but I thought this would be an interesting read.
  • Marissa Elera
    January 1, 1970
    There are books about this topic of higher literary value, but this is a sweet, simple, honest account with a touching real life child as its inspiration. The illustrations are lovely.
  • Jamie Cayley
    January 1, 1970
    Phoenix goes to school is a really short and cute book about a trans girl who is scared of what people will think of her in school and being bullied by older students. I loved the story and the fact that it’s based on an actual trans kid’s experience and I thought the way being trans is explained both in the story and on the back in a for grownups version were really good, definitely recommend this for any fellow children book lovers and it’s definitely going on the top of the list of books I re Phoenix goes to school is a really short and cute book about a trans girl who is scared of what people will think of her in school and being bullied by older students. I loved the story and the fact that it’s based on an actual trans kid’s experience and I thought the way being trans is explained both in the story and on the back in a for grownups version were really good, definitely recommend this for any fellow children book lovers and it’s definitely going on the top of the list of books I recommend to people who either work with trans kids or are thinking about coming out as trans to children. **Disclaimer**I received a copy of the book through netgalley in exchange for an honest review
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  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review.This was a beautiful book, just as I had hoped when I requested it on Netgalley. It is about a girl named Phoenix. She is about to start her new school and is extra scared about going to school and wearing one of her pretty dresses. Now I hear you wonder why this is so scary?Well, Phoenix is not born as a girl, she is actually born as a boy. We know that kids (but also adults) can be cruel, so Phoenix is worried they may bully h I received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review.This was a beautiful book, just as I had hoped when I requested it on Netgalley. It is about a girl named Phoenix. She is about to start her new school and is extra scared about going to school and wearing one of her pretty dresses. Now I hear you wonder why this is so scary?Well, Phoenix is not born as a girl, she is actually born as a boy. We know that kids (but also adults) can be cruel, so Phoenix is worried they may bully her for wearing a dress. She is worried they may call her a boy, or make fun of her. My heart went out to this girl. So I found it very brave that she still wore her dress when she went to school. She could have just dressed up in other clothes, but no this girl wanted to wear her dress and so it shall be. Go girl!Thankfully she also has an amazing mom who motivates her and tells her she is good as she is. So fabulous that the mom is so supportive and sweet. Go mom!I am very delighted with how her first day went, how accepting everyone was and how sweet they were. I am sure she is going to have a wonderful time in school.Of course the book isn't just about going to school, but it also shows us why Phoenix loves dresses, and what else she loves to do.I also loved the art, it was quite pretty.Plus points to the last pages of the book with questions for kids, some information for grown-ups, and also some talking points.All in all, a book I would highly recommend to everyone. This one should definitively be featured in classrooms.Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Moriah Conant
    January 1, 1970
    "Phoenix Goes to School" is highly necessary for children who do not identify with a typical binary gender. This book is affirming for children who struggle with anxiety about the ways that other people will perceive their gender.Bonus: it is also a great informational tool for children and adults to learn more about the transgender and nonbinary population.I received an advance read copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • alex
    January 1, 1970
    thanks to netgalley for the arc!this is a sweet, short book for young children about a trans girl named phoenix. it would be great for kids who are worried about being judged at school for any reason, and a great introduction to trans kids for cis kids (or any kids!)
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  • Madi
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. It’s so cute. I honestly think this a book every kid should read at least once. The fact that her parents were accepting and supportive, that she made friends without any judgment for her being herself. This is the ideal world we all dream of. This is for sure one of my new favorite children’s books.
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  • Luna B.
    January 1, 1970
    This children’s book was written by Michelle Finch, the mother of Pheonix, a real-life young girl who just so happens to be transgender. As the title suggests, it is a tale about this dress-loving child, 7 years-old, and how she battles the anxieties of going to school for the first time.This picture book is cutely illustrated, and I believe that it should be read to every child, gender-nonconforming or not. It teaches a valuable lesson about kindness and acceptance. This story is important beca This children’s book was written by Michelle Finch, the mother of Pheonix, a real-life young girl who just so happens to be transgender. As the title suggests, it is a tale about this dress-loving child, 7 years-old, and how she battles the anxieties of going to school for the first time.This picture book is cutely illustrated, and I believe that it should be read to every child, gender-nonconforming or not. It teaches a valuable lesson about kindness and acceptance. This story is important because it teaches children and parents that being kind to someone and allowing them the space to be themselves can go a long way to how a child perceives herself/himself/themself.Representation matters. It is important for young children to have someone to look up to, someone that will let them know that everything is okay, that what you’re feeling and who you are is normal.The writing in itself is simple. The story is short and sweet. As stated, it follows the anxieties she encounters before going to her first day of school. She is worried about how she will be perceived when she arrives at school, since she was born as male. The reception to her presence is wholly positive. It moves one’s heart greatly.Rating: 4.5 Stars
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