The Geography of Lost Things
In this romantic road trip story perfect for fans of Sarah Dessen and Morgan Matson, a teen girl discovers the value of ordinary objects while learning to forgive her absent father.After Ali’s father passes away, he leaves his one and only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—to his daughter. But Ali doesn’t plan on keeping it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. So when she finds a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast willing to pay enough money for the car to save her childhood home, Ali can’t wait to get going. Except Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift. But guess who does?Ali’s ex-boyfriend, Nico. And Nico has other plans.He persuades Ali that instead of selling the car, they should “trade up” the items they collect on their trip to eventually reach the monetary amount Ali needs. Agreeing with Nico’s crazy plan, Ali sets off on a unique adventure that is unlike anything she ever could have expected.And it’s through Ali’s travels, through the strangers she meets and the things that they value—and why they value them—that Ali eventually comes to understand her father and how his life may not have been as easy and carefree as she previously thought. Because just like the seemingly insignificant objects Ali collects, not everything is exactly as it appears.

The Geography of Lost Things Details

TitleThe Geography of Lost Things
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781481499217
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Travel, Road Trip

The Geography of Lost Things Review

  • Camila Roy ••RoyIsReading••
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 4/5e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewAnother fun, romantic yet insightful novel by Jessica Brody. Having read and loved both A Week Of Mondays and The Chaos Of Standing Still, I had high expectations. Fortunately, this book did not disappoint. Jessica Brody is now an auto-buy author for me. Ali Collins doesn’t have room in her life for clutter or complications. So when her estranged father passes away and leaves her his only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird con RATING: 4/5e-ARC provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest reviewAnother fun, romantic yet insightful novel by Jessica Brody. Having read and loved both A Week Of Mondays and The Chaos Of Standing Still, I had high expectations. Fortunately, this book did not disappoint. Jessica Brody is now an auto-buy author for me. Ali Collins doesn’t have room in her life for clutter or complications. So when her estranged father passes away and leaves her his only prized possession—a 1968 Firebird convertible—Ali knows she won’t keep it. Not when it reminds her too much of all her father’s unfulfilled promises. And especially not when a buyer three hundred miles up the Pacific coast is offering enough money for the car to save her childhood home from foreclosure. There’s only one problem, though. Ali has no idea how to drive a stick shift.But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, does. The road trip leads Ali to an unknown truth about her father. A truth that will finally prove to Ali that some things—even broken things—are worth saving.In some cases, a synopsis can make a book sound better than it actually is. The premise of this book, however, doesn't do it justice. You might get the impression that this is just another romantic YA. But I promise you, it is more than that. Characters: (There’s only two relevant ones)Ali: I loved her. Sometimes it's hard for me to get attached to the story's narrator. I either find them annoying or uninteresting. But connecting with Ali was effortless. She felt like an actual person with strengths and flaws, not a made-up fictional character. We get to witness her grow and develop emotional throughout the book and I enjoyed her self-reflection journey immensely. Nico: He is so sweet, understanding and supportive of Ali's struggles. He's also really smart and patient. God, where can I find a guy like that? *sigh*Plot: Most of the events take place during the road trip. Nico suggests an alternative way of getting the money Ali needs. They begin to trade cheap objects for more expensive ones. it starts with a hair net and it escalates to chess sets, among other things. Eventually, Ali realizes that these objects are somehow connected to her father and his life (the life he lived apart from Ali and her mother when he abandoned them). The road trip was entertaining. It was fast-paced, so I never felt bored. I finished it a lot sooner than I anticipated.Themes and moral of the story:Forgiveness, love, family, shame, regret and nostalgia.I think the moral of the story is that, no matter how broken something or someone seems to be, saving them is worth a shot. Ali liked to dispose of things that brought back painful memories, but she learned that it is better to embrace those memories and let them shape you into a better person. The things we lose in the past might find us again in the future. ...every once in a while, if we're lucky, a road can lead us right to where we need to go. Straight towards the things we lostOverall, a great novel. I will keep it close to my heart. It definitely taught me an important life lesson. Would recommend!
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    I always enjoy Brody's books, but usually there's a little something that keeps it from getting those all-the-stars. That was not the case with The Geography of Lost Things! Seriously, this is what I looked like when I finished reading this book:I was crying. I was smiling. I was crying AND smiling. I just loved this story.Five things I really loved about The Geography of Lost ThingsBrody really took me on a fantastic road trip. I got to travel through the picturesque Pacific Northwest, and Brod I always enjoy Brody's books, but usually there's a little something that keeps it from getting those all-the-stars. That was not the case with The Geography of Lost Things! Seriously, this is what I looked like when I finished reading this book:I was crying. I was smiling. I was crying AND smiling. I just loved this story.Five things I really loved about The Geography of Lost ThingsBrody really took me on a fantastic road trip. I got to travel through the picturesque Pacific Northwest, and Brody even took a little time out to visit some sights along the way. This was both a physical and emotional journey. Ali learned a lot about her dad and herself. She discovered there were things were holding her back, and recognized that figuring out her relationship with her dad and her past was the key to her future. Who knew Craig's List trading up could be so addictive. I found myself eager to see what they would barter for next, and even if it was fictional, I found the trades quite thrilling. I liked the additional characters these deals brought into the story as well. They all seemed to have some interesting personal stuff to add, which always had some sort of tie-in to Ali's situation. I also loved the idea of how an object can have multiple meanings depending on the person. This experience helped Ali see things in a different way, and each bit of progress she made was so gratifying for me. There were two pieces of information Brody made me work for, which I was worried she wasn't going to reveal. One was Ali's legal name. It wasn't the name, but rather the origin of the name that got me right in the feels. The second thing was about Nico. It was forever before we found out his story, but it definitely made me understand and love him more. And seriously, Nico ❤️There were all these little flourishes, which enhanced my enjoyment, such as: The Everything About Everything podcasts, all the little quizzes embedded in the narrative, the multitude of love for The Goonies, and the dogs! I believe I smiled every time one of these things popped up. And I have to do a BONUS shoutout for the ending. Brody knows how to do an ending. I was so happy at that point in the books, I was bouncing up and down. Not only was it an ending that left me elated, it also answered a lot of questions, and for that, I am grateful.Overall: A fun and emotional journey, which allowed Ali to untangle her past to make room for her future. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Juliana
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely LOVE this book. It was enjoyable from beginning to end. Ali is in financial trouble and is losing her childhood home if she can't come up with a hefty sum of money. Her father recently passed away and has left her a 1968 firebird convertible. She puts it up on Craigslist and a car collector offers more than enough money for it. There's just one problem. She can't drive stick and her ex-boyfriend can. Thus begin I received a digital arc from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.I absolutely LOVE this book. It was enjoyable from beginning to end. Ali is in financial trouble and is losing her childhood home if she can't come up with a hefty sum of money. Her father recently passed away and has left her a 1968 firebird convertible. She puts it up on Craigslist and a car collector offers more than enough money for it. There's just one problem. She can't drive stick and her ex-boyfriend can. Thus begins an adventure of a lifetime, which starts out at a 5 hour road trip and turns into so much more.I found so much of this story to be enthralling and I was zipping through the pages to see where Ali and Nico were headed next. Ali is very hesitant to start the trip with her ex-boyfriend because they left so much up in the air when they broke up. You discover so much on their road trip, including why they broke up and that they clearly still have feelings for each other. Of course, there's a lot to the story that could be fixed with better communication but I'm not going to hold it against them. There's a nice simmering tension that lasts through much of the book that doesn't disappoint, Nico suggests that they begin trading up items to make the tip more interesting and to see if they can get more money. This part is probably my favorite part of the story. It's a unique adventure and I loved seeing what they traded, where they had to go, and just how far it got them. They run into big problems and you feel their pain right along with them. The reveals make your heart crack just a little bit and you want to reach through the pages to comfort them. Intertwined with the current story are flashbacks of Ali's time with her father. He was not the greatest man and it's clear she was conflicted in her feelings for him with her memories. It wasn't my favorite part of the story, only because it detracts from the present adventure. I did also find that while there was a deadline to needing money, there wasn't as much of a sense of urgency as I had hoped. We have one conversation from the mother in the beginning and we never hear from her again. It seems odd that she never checks in on her daughter once throughout the story. Ali has only one change of clothes and Nico has none but they never talk about needing other clothes. They're on the road for a few days and I definitely would want to change. This is nitpicking because I enjoyed everything else enough for it to earn 4 stars.
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  • Grace {Rebel Mommy Book Blog}
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe 4.5? I really enjoyed my first Jessica Brody book!
  • Kath (Read Forevermore)
    January 1, 1970
    An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Pulse (Simon Teen) in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.Rating: 3.5 / 5The Geography of Lost Things is a fun, cute and quick contemporary read. It has the fun road trip setting, something I’m completely obsessed with. However, I found the book to be a wee bit boring in terms of the plotting. Don’t get me wrong, it was a pretty good book. It’s just I didn’t find it to be overly interesting.— writingWhen it comes to rati An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Pulse (Simon Teen) in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.Rating: 3.5 / 5The Geography of Lost Things is a fun, cute and quick contemporary read. It has the fun road trip setting, something I’m completely obsessed with. However, I found the book to be a wee bit boring in terms of the plotting. Don’t get me wrong, it was a pretty good book. It’s just I didn’t find it to be overly interesting.— writingWhen it comes to rating the writing style in contemporaries, I’m always quite lost. But this book was definitely cute, swoon worthy *coughs “Nico” coughs*, and cliché. What more could you ask for in a contemporary?— charactersThere are two main characters, Ali and Nico. They were super cute, and I LOVED THEM! Ali, also the narrator, was super relatable and I had an amazing time reading about her and watching her develop as a character. Nico, the ex, was super sweet and understanding of Ali. And geez was he patient with that girl. But seriously, where can I find a guy like that? 😭— plotThis book takes place on a road trip. I found the first half of this to be super fast-paced, while the ending half to be slow and confusing. I also found the second half to be super predictable, but I kind of liked it? But I did find this book to be super entertaining and I highly recommend it if you like books set on road trips.
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  • alice (arctic books)
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this one! RTC!
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    Ali's father has done nothing but take and take from her mother. When he dies, he leaves her with his vintage convertible, which he always seemed to care about more than her. When she finds out what it's worth, she decides to sell it so she can save her house from being repossessed. But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, is the only one who can drive a stick shift with her up the coast... and he's not sure that selling it is a good idea.I raced through The Geography of Lost Things, much like Ali and Nico i Ali's father has done nothing but take and take from her mother. When he dies, he leaves her with his vintage convertible, which he always seemed to care about more than her. When she finds out what it's worth, she decides to sell it so she can save her house from being repossessed. But her ex-boyfriend, Nico, is the only one who can drive a stick shift with her up the coast... and he's not sure that selling it is a good idea.I raced through The Geography of Lost Things, much like Ali and Nico in her 1968 Firebird-- enthralled by the flurry of emotions and understanding Ali goes through. Between memories (both good and bad) of her father, her childhood, and her short lived love with Nico, pieces of what make Ali who she is are revealed in a beautiful, sharply orchestrated way. A gorgeous coming of age novel. I'm so thrilled that I got to take this journey, too.
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  • Trianna
    January 1, 1970
    This was a cute book that I flew through in one sitting. It had a fun road trip element (which I am always trash for) which was my favorite part. Other than that, it wasn't amazing and I am probably going to forget everything that happened quite soon.
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  • Shreya
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Simon and Schuster for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.AAAAAAAAHHHHHHH???????!!!!!!!!!!!! Honestly, I think any review I write will have to contain a lot of excited screaming, but I'm going to try to write cohesive sentences anyways. Coming soon, I promise!
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  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    The Geography of Lost Things is a fun road trip novel about learning to forgive and starting over. Jessica Brody weaves together a compelling story of second-chance romance and father-daughter relationships, family financial difficulties and learning to see again the value in little things. Ali has just days until the bank will reclaim her family home and she and her mother must find somewhere else to live. Years of paying the debts of her flaky father, of learning that his promises can’t be tru The Geography of Lost Things is a fun road trip novel about learning to forgive and starting over. Jessica Brody weaves together a compelling story of second-chance romance and father-daughter relationships, family financial difficulties and learning to see again the value in little things. Ali has just days until the bank will reclaim her family home and she and her mother must find somewhere else to live. Years of paying the debts of her flaky father, of learning that his promises can’t be trusted and knowing he will never come home have made Ali angry for everything she has lost. So, when a knock on the door reveals her father has left her his most prized possession - a 1968 Firebird convertible - Ali is quick to list it for sale, hoping the money can save her home. The only problem is the buyer is miles away and she can’t drive stick. Her ex-boyfriend Nico can, though, and when he wiggles his way into her road trip Ali is sure it’s going to be a disaster. What will a car, miles of road, too many secrets, lies and broken dreams to count and a possiblity of a redo bring?The Geography of Lost Things is a lighthearted, fun-to-read novel with some compelling themes about relationships, abandonment, and debt. Flashbacks are used throughout the book, both to reflect back on childhood memories of time Ali spent with her father and to moments in Ali’s relationship with Nico. Sweet, happy, sad, these memories build up a clear picture of why Ali responds to mentions of her father and relationship triggers as she does. Why she is so quick to sell her father’s car and why she has so much anger and distrust for her father are all made clear through memories of forgotten birthdays and broken promises. There is some mystery about why Nico and Ali broke up. While the flashbacks describe the time and place of the breakup and little hints are given - glove boxes, rain and comets- the final pieces of the puzzle don’t fall into place until much later in the story. This mystery becomes tied up with Ali’s relationship with and feelings towards her father. As Nico and Ali travel they begin to see each other in a fresh light. They also have the opportunity to reflect on their past relationship, the good times and the mistakes they made. The road trip allows Ali to explore her relationship with Nico and her father. It brings her into contact with people she never could have imagined and it gives her a chance to re-evaluate and start over.The Geography of Lost Things is a fresh and fun exploration of love, family and relationships.The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library
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  • Skye ~ A Court of Binge Reading
    January 1, 1970
    **Thank you to NetGalley and to Simon and Schuster for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review** The Geography of Lost Things was the contemporary book I didn’t know I needed. I truly loved this story. I think anyone who has a strained relationship with a parent should read this book. The author writes such a raw, realistic interpretation of an estranged child and parent relationship. She also expertly conveys how this estrangement can affect the child and their behavior. At its co **Thank you to NetGalley and to Simon and Schuster for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review** The Geography of Lost Things was the contemporary book I didn’t know I needed. I truly loved this story. I think anyone who has a strained relationship with a parent should read this book. The author writes such a raw, realistic interpretation of an estranged child and parent relationship. She also expertly conveys how this estrangement can affect the child and their behavior. At its core, this story is about how the relationships between us and our parents can shape us in positive and negative ways. Ali’s father, Jackson, left her and her mom for the first time when she was 9 years old. The second time he left was when she was 12 years old. At first, she was too young to understand what his leaving meant. She believed him when he said his job as a roadie for his favorite band, Fear Epidemic, was extremely important. But, when he left for the second time with only a post-it on the fridge proclaiming, “I’m sorry, I had to” Ali realized she was not as important to him as the band. Needless to say, as a result of this Ali fiercely guards her heart and she cannot tolerate anyone lying to her as her father did.This book starts after Jackson, Ali’s father, has died. But, even though he may not be physically on the Earth anymore he is still wreaking havoc on Ali and her mom. Over the years, Jackson had taken out credit cards in her mom’s name and maxed them all out. Now, Ali and her mom’s house is going to be foreclosed on in a week--unless they can somehow wrangle 25,000 dollars. Ali’s mom has accepted that they will just have to move to an apartment complex, but Ali refuses to give up her home. So, when a guy comes by with the deed of her father’s most prized possession, his 1968 Firebird 400 Convertible, Ali’s first thought is to sell it. After she puts the ad on Craigslist, she realizes that this car is worth 30,000 dollars. Finally, Jackson is helping her instead of causing her more pain! The only problem is that the seller is 5 hours away in Crescent City and the Firebird is a stick-shift. Ali needs someone who can drive stick-shift...and the only person she knows is her ex, Nico. The Geography of Lost Things is the perfect summer read! It’s a road-trip full of self-discovery, healing, acceptance, grief, and forgiveness. Ali and Nico both let down their guards for the first time with each other. They both learn how to trust each other after that trust has been seemingly broken. Most of all, Ali learns that there is more to her father than she initially thought. Ahhh, word’s can’t accurately describe how much I enjoyed this book. I was surprised by how much I loved it. I connected with Ali and Nico easily; their pain was mine just as their joy was mine. I felt nearly every single emotion possible while reading this book: amusement, joy, sadness, anger, annoyance, and giddy. I cannot recommend this book enough. The message of this book is so important; sometimes the things we believe can be wrong, sometimes we judge someone too harshly, and sometimes we turn into the thing we fear most as a way to protect ourselves from being hurt.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I am sooo thrilled to be part of the tour organized by Fantastic Flying Book Club for this amazing book. You can check out the tour schedule here.You know that feeling when you read the blurb and you think that you already know the story?That’s the impression I had of this book. I thought this would be a light read, complete with all the cliches ever made for road trips and contemporary romance stories. But I was wrong. ABSOLUTELY wrong. Because this book was so, so much more than that.I am sur I am sooo thrilled to be part of the tour organized by Fantastic Flying Book Club for this amazing book. You can check out the tour schedule here.You know that feeling when you read the blurb and you think that you already know the story?That’s the impression I had of this book. I thought this would be a light read, complete with all the cliches ever made for road trips and contemporary romance stories. But I was wrong. ABSOLUTELY wrong. Because this book was so, so much more than that.I am surprised at how much emotion there is in this book. I felt the awkwardness between Nico and Ali, their hurt over how things ended between them, and how they tried so hard to let go of their feelings. There was also one scene which was so shocking and devastating, I felt like their sorrow was my own. At one point, it even made me cry.One of the things that I loved about this book is how the story smoothly transitioned between the past and the present. It only gives you what is needed and will keep you guessing for more. It was unpredictable. It was intriguing. Reading this felt like an adventure on its own.If you think the focus of this book is the romance, you’re wrong. This book is about love, yes. But there are different kinds of love. Ultimately, this book is about trust and forgiveness. It is about how sometimes, we let go of things for fear of getting hurt, when at the end of the day, we’re the ones who end up hurting ourselves. "Sometimes, we throw things away and we never get them back. But sometimes, when we're really lucky, they come back to us." Review can also be found on my blog.
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. One of my favorite themes is grief, and this is a unique approach. We all know what it's like to miss people we love, but I don't know what it's like to lose someone you had a complicated relationship with. And Ali's relationship with her dad is mostly negative. There are positive aspects and memories, but mostly, she remembers him leaving and gone. This book is an emotional roller coaster. A lot of that is due to the presence of her ex-boyfriend, but she's also con I absolutely loved this book. One of my favorite themes is grief, and this is a unique approach. We all know what it's like to miss people we love, but I don't know what it's like to lose someone you had a complicated relationship with. And Ali's relationship with her dad is mostly negative. There are positive aspects and memories, but mostly, she remembers him leaving and gone. This book is an emotional roller coaster. A lot of that is due to the presence of her ex-boyfriend, but she's also confronting her relationship with her dad. There are a lot of unmet expectations, and that's always a hard thing to confront.Like all of Jessica Brody's books, this is an incredibly fast, fun read. But it's also very thought provoking. Highly recommended.
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  • Andrienne
    January 1, 1970
    This book has a lot going for it-great character development, well-defined plot, interesting scenarios, and superb writing. Ali was abandoned as a child by her father and she was left with his dad’s prized possession-a classic car that might be worth a lot of money. The only thing is, she can’t drive stick shift so her ex-boyfriend agrees to go with her to sell it to an interested buyer a few hundred miles away. Lots of adult crossover appeal. Thoroughly enjoyed this one.Thanks to the publisher This book has a lot going for it-great character development, well-defined plot, interesting scenarios, and superb writing. Ali was abandoned as a child by her father and she was left with his dad’s prized possession-a classic car that might be worth a lot of money. The only thing is, she can’t drive stick shift so her ex-boyfriend agrees to go with her to sell it to an interested buyer a few hundred miles away. Lots of adult crossover appeal. Thoroughly enjoyed this one.Thanks to the publisher for providing access to a review copy.
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Every one of her books centers around heartache, which often makes them hard to read. This was hard to read and frustrating at times, but overall, it was sweet. The ending was much better than I anticipated and I’m glad she got some closure.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Simon Pulse for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review. I loved everything about this book and for being almost 500 pages, it's a fast one. Once I started, I had to keep going to see whether they would reach the goal or not here. Plus, the relationship aspect between Ali and her dad plus Ali and Nico was far too intriguing to me not to be interested by. There's a lot of connected subplots between the father, his My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Simon Pulse for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review. I loved everything about this book and for being almost 500 pages, it's a fast one. Once I started, I had to keep going to see whether they would reach the goal or not here. Plus, the relationship aspect between Ali and her dad plus Ali and Nico was far too intriguing to me not to be interested by. There's a lot of connected subplots between the father, his music connection, and Nico's seeming similarity to him that makes this very well written. Beyond the well written characters, the style it's written also made me fall in love too. Since it's a road trip book, the chapters are broken up by time stamps, locations, and the current inventory of items they have. It keeps that feeling of adventure and journey going even with the breaks between pages, which added to the sensory journey for me.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Real rating: 3.5 stars! It was a bit slow going at first but I ended up liking it!
  • Mina
    January 1, 1970
    **Review originally posted on My Fangirl Chronicles** My Rating: 4I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Initial Thoughts:Despite owning several of Jessica Brody's novels, this is the first YA contemporary of hers that I've read. There were three main reasons why I decided to pick up this book: 1) the cover is absolutely beautiful; 2) I was very interested in the concept of discovering the value of ordinary objects; and 3) I had yet to find a good "road trip sto **Review originally posted on My Fangirl Chronicles** My Rating: 4I received an e-ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Initial Thoughts:Despite owning several of Jessica Brody's novels, this is the first YA contemporary of hers that I've read. There were three main reasons why I decided to pick up this book: 1) the cover is absolutely beautiful; 2) I was very interested in the concept of discovering the value of ordinary objects; and 3) I had yet to find a good "road trip story" that's been able to hold my attention for longer than two chapters - I'm not sure if that's because I get distracted easily or it's just my chronic issue of struggling with the first ten chapters of every book I pick up. Plus, every time I meet Jessica she's always been so lovely and amiable, I felt terrible having not read more of her books; I felt like it was time to finally start changing that!Things I Liked:As always with pretty much any book I read, I become highly invested in the main character and their love interest really early on, sort of right when they're first both introduced. I love seeing how they go through the whole pre-relationship phase, when feelings develop, change, and deepen until they demand to be acknowledged. In this book, however, Ali and Nico are exes right from the get-go and through this road trip we get to find out what caused their breakup and if, through this journey together, they're going to rekindle their romance. I found the whole mystery of the reason for their breakup to be really intriguing. That, and finding out what secret Nico has been hiding compelled me to keep reading.Another mystery that I really wanted to discover the truth to was the reason for Jackson's departure. I felt really sympathetic to Ali, especially during flashbacks to her childhood of all the times Jackson gave her good memories, only to disappoint her later on when she was old enough to realize his unhealthy and destructive pattern. The unveiling of the truth behind her father's constant absence had a more significant impact on me than I anticipated. Despite already having passed away, Jackson's presence and the effects of his decisions were strongly present throughout the entire novel, and acted as the guiding force for Ali's journey to forgiveness. I felt somewhat sympathetic towards Jackson but my heart mainly ached for Ali, especially once the effects and full consequences of his absence became clearer.I admit that I'm the type of person to hang onto things because of their sentimental value, so I really enjoyed seeing what different objects people valued and what they were willing to let go of to obtain something else. The whole trading concept that Nico introduced Ali to was a completely new thing to me, I had never heard of doing such a thing before so it was really interesting to learn about. Personally, I think it was too risky but it was one of the other aspects of the story that kept me enthralled and invested.The writing was engaging and I really enjoyed the list of inventory at the beginning of each chapter, especially during the later parts of the book. It was amusing to see how the labeling of some items in their inventory would change depending on Ali's opinions and emotions.Things I Disliked:I'm not really sure what it was exactly that prevented me from giving this book 5 stars, but I guess there's a few little things that when added up together made me feel 4 stars best conveyed my feelings towards it. I thought it was a little strange that Ali's mom didn't contact her more frequently during her road trip with Nico, and I also wish there had been an epilogue of some sort to give me more closure at the end. I liked how it ended and it felt fitting for the story overall, but I guess I was looking for a more solid ending. I also wouldn't have minded a bit more in the romance department, but I do understand that this story was mainly about Ali and her relationship with her father.Final Thoughts:An insightful exploration of the impact of an absentee parent in a young girl's life, The Geography of Lost Things is equal parts heartbreaking and heartwarming. This book addresses abandonment and addiction while highlighting the importance of forgiveness, family, love, and finding the courage to pave one's own path. This resonated with me more than I anticipated and I am certain that I will always remember the life lessons taught within its pages. I would definitely recommend this if you enjoy heartfelt road trip stories.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted at www.bickeringbookreviews.com I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Summary: Ali’s father disappeared six years ago. He left her and her mother without a backwards look. He’s only legacy is the huge amount of debt he left. Now, Ali and her mother are just days away from losing their home and Ali is desperate to find a solution and one appears when Ali’s father leaves her his prized 1968 Firebird convertible. Ali Originally posted at www.bickeringbookreviews.com I received an eARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Summary: Ali’s father disappeared six years ago. He left her and her mother without a backwards look. He’s only legacy is the huge amount of debt he left. Now, Ali and her mother are just days away from losing their home and Ali is desperate to find a solution and one appears when Ali’s father leaves her his prized 1968 Firebird convertible. Ali knows the car will save them and she has even found a buyer but there is just one problem. Ali doesn’t know how to drive the classic car’s standard transmission. Ali only knows one person who can drive a stick shift… her ex-boyfriend, Nico. Nico agrees to help Ali get the car to the buyer however Nico has a counter offer. Instead of selling the car Nico thinks they can trade items they find on Craigslist to earn the money Ali needs. Ali reluctantly agrees and the two start a journey up the west coast to try to save Ali’s home and possibly salvage their broken relationship.Review: When I was in college I stumbled across a website about a guy trying to turn a paperclip into a house through a series of trades. This became my favorite guilty pleasure and I checked in on the site at least once a week. All of this is me saying that there is a possibility that I was a little bias to The Geography of Lost Things. The story of two teens trying to make trades on Craigslist to earn enough money to save one of their homes hooked me from the first page. It is the perfect quirky storyline. The items they collect and the people the encounter felt original and gave the book a fresh feel. The plot was also the perfect storyline to compliment Ali’s journey of to forgive her late father and Ali and Nico’s journey back to each other. The two stories fit together perfectly and gave Ali and Nico a complexity which made this book feel more like a character driven family drama than just a fluffy love story. The characters, their histories, and their dreams made the book a perfect combination of realistic family drama, teen romance, and charming road trip story. The entire book comes together to verify that Jessica Brody is becoming a must read in YA realistic fiction.
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  • Arrow Jameson
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 OR 10/10 STARSI HAVE FOUND IT. I HAVE FINALLY FOUND THE PERFECT ROAD TRIP BOOK. I DID NOT THINK I’D FIND ONE THIS YEAR WITH ALL THE MEDIOCRE BOOKS ON-THE-ROAD I’D READ, BUT I DID. I CAN REST IN PEACE NOW.No but seriously, I’m the happiest person on this planet. Road trips are a freaking brilliant concept and the fact that nobody in the YA world seemed to be getting it spot-on was just devastating; finding this book that got it just right is the coolest thing ever.The best thing about this bo 5/5 OR 10/10 STARSI HAVE FOUND IT. I HAVE FINALLY FOUND THE PERFECT ROAD TRIP BOOK. I DID NOT THINK I’D FIND ONE THIS YEAR WITH ALL THE MEDIOCRE BOOKS ON-THE-ROAD I’D READ, BUT I DID. I CAN REST IN PEACE NOW.No but seriously, I’m the happiest person on this planet. Road trips are a freaking brilliant concept and the fact that nobody in the YA world seemed to be getting it spot-on was just devastating; finding this book that got it just right is the coolest thing ever.The best thing about this book was EVERYTHING. I know, this review seems a lot like me just rambling and talking incoherently about it in praise, but it was worth it. I devoured it in half a day, all while admiring how well Brody has got all the aspects of this book.Ali and Nico were both just amazing. The fact that the story revolved around only both of them as protagonists and didn’t have any other unnecessary best friends and random characters was just the best thing. The road trip focused on their development and adventures; neither of them was clingy or cringeworthy or stupid, and I didn’t feel bored of them even though I read about just them for an entire book. That’s some good characters right there.Then, of course, the trades. Oh my god, that sub-plot was freaking awesome!! I mean, it didn’t just have her rough past and their relationship struggles and self-discovery, it also had a super cute, dope other plot that BROUGHT THIS BOOK TOGETHER. Good old Craigslist. Nuh-uh, you gotta read the book, folks.And finally, the infamous depressing-past-plot. I was afraid it was gonna ruin the book because, I mean . . . but it didn’t! Even the depressing past had a super cool twist! I loved how it strung together with the adventure Nico and Ali had with the “barter system”, and there wasn’t anything that seemed forced or WTF.I thought I’d be worn out by the end because it is a comparatively longer book, but I’m still craving more??? I think Nico-Ali is one of the cutest couples I’ve read about. Ever. And The Geography Of Lost Things is one of the bets books I’ve read. Ever.
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  • Emily Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, that was sublime. The Geography of Lost Things was such the right read for me! I have read a few Jessica Brody books before but this is by far my new favorite. I'm so glad I signed up for this blog tour and I can't wait to read what Brody writes next. Okay, first of all, I feel like this is the perfect contemporary book. It feels raw and real, yet still hopeful and cute. Ali is dealing with heavy stuff and I viscerally felt her pain as well. The flashbacks with her father and all the family Wow, that was sublime. The Geography of Lost Things was such the right read for me! I have read a few Jessica Brody books before but this is by far my new favorite. I'm so glad I signed up for this blog tour and I can't wait to read what Brody writes next. Okay, first of all, I feel like this is the perfect contemporary book. It feels raw and real, yet still hopeful and cute. Ali is dealing with heavy stuff and I viscerally felt her pain as well. The flashbacks with her father and all the family issues were executed so well. Also, the tension and issues between her and Nico also felt realistic and nuanced -- not just concocted for teenage drama. I highlighted so many quotes in my copy of the book. Still, despite all the heavy emotion, I laughed and smiled at so many parts. I love the little "quizzes" that Ali gives herself. And her rules for the road while she was driving with Nico made me laugh (although I wanted her to break all of them). Speaking of Nico, I loved the banter between them. However, if I start using Fungicide or Shih tzu as swear words, I'm blaming this book. Also, the most impressive part of this book is that I loved the road trip aspect. I was a little nervous going in because normally road trip books are not for me. However, I felt that the road trip was so vital to the story - to the metaphor of Ali's growth - and it was so fun seeing them go on adventures on the Pacific Coast. As a California-born Oregonian, this coast has been my home my whole life and I loved having a book set where I'm familiar. Pick this book up. I can't recommend The Geography of Lost Things enough. There's a wonderful romance, an excellent look into family dynamics and grief, music, adventure, and a 1968 Firebird. What's not to like? *Received for free in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    From my blog and instagram account - @livereadandprosperYou’ve got a surprise in the mailbox and it’s a book you’ve been so excited to read! You:A. Jump for joy and begin reading it immediately.B. Hide away in your room and don’t come out until your finished reading it.C. All of the above 😍Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review!Past decisions that Ali’s dad has made things quite hard for her and her mom. Now that he’s passed and left Ali and her mom in a lot From my blog and instagram account - @livereadandprosperYou’ve got a surprise in the mailbox and it’s a book you’ve been so excited to read! You:A. Jump for joy and begin reading it immediately.B. Hide away in your room and don’t come out until your finished reading it.C. All of the above 😍Thank you Simon Pulse for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review!Past decisions that Ali’s dad has made things quite hard for her and her mom. Now that he’s passed and left Ali and her mom in a lot of debt, it’s time to figure out what to do. Then comes another surprise – Ali’s dad’s car in mint condition. She puts it up on Craig’s List and someone wants it for a great amount of cash. Ali’s willing to drive the 5 hours to sell it, problem is she can’t drive stick. In comes Ali’s ex-boyfriend. He’s willing to help, but is she willing to survive the trip with all the baggage they’ve left for each other?This book keeps you coming back for more, over and over again! The book references the past multiple times and leaves cliff hangers throughout. Why did her dad leave? What was in Nico’s glovebox that’s driving Ali so crazy? There’s tons of little references like this….Doesn’t make sense to you now, but you’ve just gotta find out for yourself! I felt like I had this uneasy stomach reading it because I felt for Ali so much. She was making such a huge decision to drive so far with her ex just to help her family out. Oh, the anxiety! I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. Honestly, it was everything in me to not read the last chapter of the book to find my missing answers I so desperately needed. It does remind me of other romance adventure novels, but it was still a very loved book by me.4/5 Stars
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  • Ashley Urquhart
    January 1, 1970
    For more reviews, please visit my blog: What's She Reading?If you're looking for a nice road trip book, then this is for you. I, personally, LOVE road trip books and this one checked all of the boxes. It definitely makes me want to take a drive along the Western coastline of the US!Ali and Nico were both likable characters and I thought the pacing of the book was really good. We didn't have to spend too much time in the car with them, but were given just enough as a reader to feel like our chara For more reviews, please visit my blog: What's She Reading?If you're looking for a nice road trip book, then this is for you. I, personally, LOVE road trip books and this one checked all of the boxes. It definitely makes me want to take a drive along the Western coastline of the US!Ali and Nico were both likable characters and I thought the pacing of the book was really good. We didn't have to spend too much time in the car with them, but were given just enough as a reader to feel like our characters were on a journey and not just appearing in different cities.The plot of the book was good as well. I thought it created a really good atmosphere for Ali to grow and develop as a character. I thought the flashbacks were written well and didn't detract from the pacing of what was supposed to be happening currently. I love the idea of trading up for things even if I think it's a tad unrealistic.Overall, I thought this book was great! My only issues really, involved Ali and Nico's relationship. Specifically, I felt like the amount of time we spent in Ali's head thinking about the demise of their relationship was too much. Either tell us what was in the freaking glove box already, or stop bringing it up! Other than that, though, this book was a good read--perfect for summer or maybe just when you wish it felt a little more summery.Overall Rating: 4Language: MildViolence: NoneSmoking/Drinking: MildSexual Content: MildNote: I received this book free from the author/blog tour in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Karla
    January 1, 1970
    I felt like I learned a few things after reading Ali and Nico's story. Especially the ending when Ali finally lets go of her anger and finally admits the truth about life, and it only took a road trip with her ex while trying to trade things on Craiglist at the same time! The road trip as a whole was very amusing and I enjoyed all kinds of adventures they went on and the people they met along the way. It was a little annoying how she always seemed to keep coming back to how she hated Jackson and I felt like I learned a few things after reading Ali and Nico's story. Especially the ending when Ali finally lets go of her anger and finally admits the truth about life, and it only took a road trip with her ex while trying to trade things on Craiglist at the same time! The road trip as a whole was very amusing and I enjoyed all kinds of adventures they went on and the people they met along the way. It was a little annoying how she always seemed to keep coming back to how she hated Jackson and all these memories of hers of when she was little that were tarnished. Ali held the longest grudge and anger for the longest time, and this road trip she took with Nico to sell the Firebird was necessary for her to come and accept things about her father, Nico, who she was a person, and how the future is going to be all right. I'll admit that there were a few things that really annoyed me at first, like how Ali didn't let Nico explain himself when they broke up, and really did seem to push things away from her, especially things that she loves. And she would always be angry, not really trying to understand or even stop and think things through, but I liked how she grew and learned from her actions by the end of the story. It took her realizing that it wasn't the people around her who were going to disappoint her and leave, but she was the one doing what Jackson did to her all those times. After coming to terms with her Jackson and why he did what he did, why he left, thanks to a song he wrote for his favorite band Fear Epidemic, and learning the truth about Nico, she finally faces her fears, about the future, losing her house, whether or not to sell the Firebird, and her dream job of becoming a veterinarian. A great story that keeps you thinking all throughout.
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  • Marina
    January 1, 1970
    I always forget how much I like Jessica Brody's books until I read another one. And this one ticked a lot of my favorite story tropes--road trip, enemies (sort of)-to friends-to lovers (ish), quirky experiences with quirky, random strangers.Ali and Nico had an 88-day relationship end badly. Ali and her father had a contentious relationship for practically her whole life. Those two relationships collide when Ali receives her father's beloved Firebird convertible after he dies and then she needs N I always forget how much I like Jessica Brody's books until I read another one. And this one ticked a lot of my favorite story tropes--road trip, enemies (sort of)-to friends-to lovers (ish), quirky experiences with quirky, random strangers.Ali and Nico had an 88-day relationship end badly. Ali and her father had a contentious relationship for practically her whole life. Those two relationships collide when Ali receives her father's beloved Firebird convertible after he dies and then she needs Nico's help to drive it to a buyer because she doesn't know how to drive a stick. Nico encourages Ali to keep the car as a connection to her father but due to money issues (and unpleasant memories connected to both her father and the car), Ali is firm in her decision. Nico still wants to try and raise the money through an unexpected way--trading up on Craigslist. Which all starts with a hairband.Through-out the journey from Northern California to the Pacific Northwest (and beyond from the end of the book) we learn more about Ali and her relationship with her father and with Nico and her ups and downs with both. One of the few things that frustrated me about this book was how the reasons behind both of the failed relationships (Ali and her dad, Ali and Nico) was drawn out. The reader doesn't get an explanation of the actual root cause--not Ali's suppositions--until the last couple of chapters. It definitely kept me reading but I'm not really one for suspense like that.
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  • Shane
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, so long review coming.*I received this ARC through Bookcon* Pros *The first half of this is 5 stars. *The writing was cute, the plot was interesting and the awkwardness between Nico and Ali was adorable. Cons *The second half of this book was a mess. *The second half of the book didn't need to be there *The subplot which was interesting for the first half, became the main plot and it wasn't even a good plot any longer. Final Thoughts *The first half: cute, adorable, great plot and characte Okay, so long review coming.*I received this ARC through Bookcon* Pros *The first half of this is 5 stars. *The writing was cute, the plot was interesting and the awkwardness between Nico and Ali was adorable. Cons *The second half of this book was a mess. *The second half of the book didn't need to be there *The subplot which was interesting for the first half, became the main plot and it wasn't even a good plot any longer. Final Thoughts *The first half: cute, adorable, great plot and characters. 5-star book. *The second half: messy plot, predictable, unnecessary, but still good characters. 2-star book. *Overall I gave the book 3-stars and that is my early review for The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody which comes out October 2nd.
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  • Mundie Moms & Mundie Kids
    January 1, 1970
    This is another Brody classic. It's fun, romantic, clean cut contemporary that will make you laugh out loud, and swoon in the best possible way. It will emotionally connect you to this story, and it's characters when you least except it to. It's a story that will leave you happy with it's ending, while wanting more of the story, all at the same time. This quick read is definitely worth picking up! FULL REVIEW https://mundiemoms.blogspot.com/2018/...
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  • Vic
    January 1, 1970
    I probably could have given this a higher rating but contemporaries just aren’t my thing 😪with that being said.. this book is pretty good!! I thought the pacing was definitely a strong point, it was so easy to read this in 2 days without getting bored. The plot is a really cool and unique idea and was executed pretty well. I disliked the main character Ali at first- she felt too boring to me. By the end though I was glad to see her develop and mature.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    *****3.5 Stars******I may have to change my rating to 4 stars after some time...just finished it and I have thoughts and questions that haven't quite be fully formed....review to come!Thanks to Simon & Schuster for the ARC!
  • olivia
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars :) very enjoyable and like a nice level of heaviness for a contemporary if you know what i mean. i didn't really get into the romance of nico and ali but that's fine because i think ali's growth was good enough for me
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