Dry
The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers.Until the taps run dry.Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbours and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.

Dry Details

TitleDry
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781481481960
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopia

Dry Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    Only now do I see how dry his lips are. Not just dry but parched and chapped to the point of bleeding. None of these kids look right. Their skin is thin and almost leprous gray. The corners of their mouths are white with dried spit. And the look in their eyes is almost rabid. It's unsettling how utterly convincing this book is. Maybe it works so well because the concept is so relevant and believable - a severe drought in Southern California is hardly fantastical - but it also has a lot to do wi Only now do I see how dry his lips are. Not just dry but parched and chapped to the point of bleeding. None of these kids look right. Their skin is thin and almost leprous gray. The corners of their mouths are white with dried spit. And the look in their eyes is almost rabid. It's unsettling how utterly convincing this book is. Maybe it works so well because the concept is so relevant and believable - a severe drought in Southern California is hardly fantastical - but it also has a lot to do with the way the Shusterman duo writes. In a style somewhat reminiscent of storytellers like Stephen King, the authors paint this dystopian picture slowly, gradually, introducing a fairly large cast of characters along the way. The horrors creep quietly into a world that very closely resembles our own, making them easy to believe in. What is first a subdued desire for water becomes a pressing need, which in turn becomes an obsessive frenzy.You can tell a lot of thought has gone into how people would behave when their lives (or worse-- the lives of their families) become threatened by a lack of water. When the people in Dry become desperate, it’s amazing and terrible what can be seen as a source of water. And let me tell you: the authors and the characters in this book get VERY creative on that front. Could we be so desperate for drinkable water that we're willing to destroy the very machines that could create it, just to get that first sip? The way the characters are used to tell the story here might not suit everyone. The Shustermans bring in many different perspectives in order to capture all angles of the water craze rather than focusing on one or a few individuals. I can pinpoint the main characters as Alyssa, Kelton, Garrett and Jacqui (who is freaking awesome, by the way) but I would still say this is more a book about the bigger picture, which includes many people's perspectives across the course of the novel. The characters are left racially ambiguous, some described as "olive-skinned" but of indeterminate race.It's a standalone and so a whole lot is covered in these 350 pages. We see how a survivalist family first thrives but then becomes a target; we see how kind neighbours become enemies; we see an entrepreneurial few try to capitalize on the new hot commodity; we see the ugliness that can quickly rear its head when people are desperate.I thought it worked really well at creating a sense of desperation and paranoia. It made ME want to go stock up on emergency supplies (I swear I'm not even joking. I found myself on this page after reading it.) Very convincing and discomfiting.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
    more
  • Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about Southern California running out of water. The situation is dire, but good fucking god, the main (female) character in this book is so mind-numbingly dumb that I don't want some water after drinking book, I want some fucking vodka, dammit. Yeah. I know the kids in this book are teenagers, but OH MY GOD THEY ARE SO STUPID. I am not exaggerating. I was literally gritting my teeth at the questionable decisions that were made in this book.First off, the premise. I liked it. This ne This book is about Southern California running out of water. The situation is dire, but good fucking god, the main (female) character in this book is so mind-numbingly dumb that I don't want some water after drinking book, I want some fucking vodka, dammit. Yeah. I know the kids in this book are teenagers, but OH MY GOD THEY ARE SO STUPID. I am not exaggerating. I was literally gritting my teeth at the questionable decisions that were made in this book.First off, the premise. I liked it. This near-future situation is pretty damn terrifying. I've lived in SoCal for almost all my life. First Orange County, now Los Angeles proper. For the past...10? years or so, we've had terrible droughts. People make fun of Southern Californians because we freak out at:1) cold weather (read: less than 60 degrees)2) rainHere's my bunny in a raincoat. He has never actually needed it because, again, we don't get rain.I'm not kidding. I love it here but it is absolutely hilarious how all the TV stations are like STORM WATCH every time a dark cloud rolls in. Every damn winter. But in any case, we freak out so much over rain because WE DON'T GET ANY OF IT. We've been under a water conservation order for so long now I can't even remember. Our lush green hills have been brown for the better part of a decade.So yeah, the threat of NO WATER is very, very real, and very, very terrifying. I feel like the situation in the book could actually happen, down to the riots for water. BUT THE CHARACTERS IN THE BOOK ARE SOOOOOOO STUPID. I absolutely abhorred the idiotic main character, who just so conveniently lived next to a dorky next door neighbor whose entire family are hardcore survivalists, who talk like this... Then he meets my gaze, but rather than his typical bone-chilling glare, his eyes are different. Shimmering and glassy. Vulnerable. An honest display of emotion that I’ve never seen before. And in this single look I feel as if I’ve opened his personal .zip file; suddenly years of compressed emotional information comes bursting out, and I’m hit with an overwhelming truth. OH MY GOD PERSONAL ZIP FILE!!!!!!!!!! REALLY?!But he wasn't terrible. The main character is terrible. Her entire POV is a series of regrettable situations that put not only her, but her friends, and neighbors in danger. I wanted to strangle her. Yes, I have many feelings about this book. I cannot stand an annoying, stupid narrator. So as much as I liked the premise, this book is not for me.
    more
  • April
    January 1, 1970
    I can definitely see this becoming a movie.
  • Korrina (OwlCrate)
    January 1, 1970
    My favourite thing about Neal Shusterman’s books is that they really make me think and see the world differently. This was such an intense survival story!
  • Yusra ✨
    January 1, 1970
    release day TOMORROW i’m so ready for thisssss
  • Iryna (Book and Sword)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars Well I started this book in the late morning and now it’s late afternoon and I have finished. The fastest I’ve ever read 390 pages. ___________________So I resolved to dedicate the rest of 2018 to reading only fantasy books (adult mostly, with one or two YA thrown in). But for Dry I made an exception because when Shusterman writes a new dystopian I must read it! This was an impossible to put down read, definitely, but it wasn't as good as I thought it would be, unfortunately. Which k 3.5/5 stars Well I started this book in the late morning and now it’s late afternoon and I have finished. The fastest I’ve ever read 390 pages. ___________________So I resolved to dedicate the rest of 2018 to reading only fantasy books (adult mostly, with one or two YA thrown in). But for Dry I made an exception because when Shusterman writes a new dystopian I must read it! ​This was an impossible to put down read, definitely, but it wasn't as good as I thought it would be, unfortunately. Which kind of doesn't makes sense said together like that, but hear me out. The writing, the pace and the subject were gripping, but the character development together with some plot holes definitely put a damp into it. The beautiful and also scary thing about Shusterman's books, is that they feel so real. So freaking real. This might as well have been a news report on TV - it was so believable. And that is the scary part of it. Sure, Dry is just a book, today. But tomorrow, or 2 years from now it might as well be a reality. California draught is a real thing that has been happening, and as far as I can tell will only get worse. But will it come to the events that this fiction book portrayed? I think it will. And I also think that it will come to even worse of an outcome. ​Environmental tendencies and using is the real reason why I love Neil Shusterman so much. Scythe was full of them , and Dry has even more. And I truly think that it's just way we need. We need to read about what might happen to us if we keep living the way we live now. We need to see the ugly side of humanity, if only so we can prevent it in the future. Hopefully. The sad part is, the natural disaster wasn't a true problem in this book. The true problem were the people who created the disaster in the first place. And who handled it so terribly wrong. I don't think that the planet will eventually kill us. I think that we will kill each other first.The writing was superb. The pace made this book read like a movie - which I loved. The characters .... Ehh. They were good, or they had good potentials but I don't think any of them reached it. They just weren't flushed out enough. It may have to do with too many POV's throughout the book. The reader never got a chance to fully attach to a specific character, really. ​The plot also had quite a few holes and things that weren't explained well enough (why was a 13 year old home alone for weeks? Were there two helicopters at the end? and many more...). I honestly kept wishing for more water shortage related facts - how they got there, how other states near the lake managed to be okay, but only California crashed and burned. I just wanted more science behind the disaster. But nook instead focused largely on the characters and how they were navigating it, which is fine, but I wanted more of a background. Also, I thought it was quite comical that when we finally get a sensible YA main character it feels very weird at first. I couldn't understand why this girl was so mature and why wasn't she boy crazy and drowning in puberty? Which is embarrassing to admit, but it is what I've come to expect from YA books. But I seemed to forget that this is Shusterman we are taking about. And his girl characters rock hard (looking at you Citra!).​In the end, while I do think that the book could use a bit more flushing out and a bit more plot development I still absolutely recommend it to everyone. If only for the topic that it covers. It's so important. And we need more books like this. Real life dystopian books (is that a genre?Can it be one?)​Big thanks to the Simon TEEN publishing and Simon and Schuster books for young readers for sending me an advanced copy for the review. All opinions are my own, honest and come from the heart.My WEBSITEMy INSTAGRAM
    more
  • Alexandria Ang
    January 1, 1970
    A book about the harrowing effects of climate change? Fuck yeah. Finally, even modern Young Adult literature is calling attention to the most important environmental issue of our decade that won't just affect one certain group of people. Oh no, climate change is coming for us all. Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman's all-too-real portrayal of the amplified effects of climate change is horrifying and upsetting. You will feel mad. You will feel sad. But most importantly you will feel so helples A book about the harrowing effects of climate change? Fuck yeah. Finally, even modern Young Adult literature is calling attention to the most important environmental issue of our decade that won't just affect one certain group of people. Oh no, climate change is coming for us all. Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman's all-too-real portrayal of the amplified effects of climate change is horrifying and upsetting. You will feel mad. You will feel sad. But most importantly you will feel so helpless while reading this book because you realize how much we as humans have no control of a situation that we are responsible for causing. You will also come to realize how some forces, such as water, have power over humans.While reading this book, I realized how small I was in this whole wide world. You want to believe that when things go downhill, the government will be looking out for you. But yet, how can they help you when they can't even help themselves. The authors expose this startling fact in the most brutal way possible- by following the POV of a group of teens who must fend for themselves in a world without water.I went into this book with the knowledge of Neal Shusterman's world-building mastery. He can create worlds with such a complex and well-developed foundation, and it feels like the world actually exists. In this case, he didn't really create a new world but it's like he created a new reality in our world. A reality in which our environment has been devastated by climate change and the resources that we thought would be around forever have been completely exhausted. It is a world in which we cannot comprehend right now, but one that is in our near future if we continue on this path. He has essentially predicted the near future in such great detail and precision, thinking of every single thing. If I were you, the world-building alone is a reason to pick up this book.What I loved most about this book was how it was written. It is written in multiple points of views, however, these characters' perspectives are often interrupted with what the authors call 'snapshots'. These snapshots, ranging from about a page to two pages in length, were glimpses into the lives of other people who were also being affected by the Tap-Out. I think this was an ingenious idea on the authors' part because when you're writing a story like this that has such an incredible impact and call to action, it's important to illustrate the stories and testimonies of as many people as you can.Reading this book was like living through the apocalypse, which is something I hope and pray I'll never have to experience in this lifetime. Dry has to be one of the most terrifying books I've ever read. None of the horror books I've read compare to the amount of dread you'll feel while reading this book (and I've read multiple Stephen King books .-.). For me personally, the idea of living without water, a basic necessity, scares me more than any zombie apocalypse.This title is very relevant to what's been happening around the world. Because of the subject matter and the authors' ability to tell this story, Dry will be one of the most memorable books you read this year. I implore you to read this not because I am an environmentalist, and I strongly want to share my fear of climate change with you but because I think that this is what the world needs right now in order to make a change. Sometimes people need a scare to push them in the right direction. If you've read Scythe and enjoyed it, I am positive you will enjoy this one too. Please check out my page on Instagram (@thebooksbuzz) because I will be giving away a copy of this wonderful book!
    more
  • Robin (Bridge Four)
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on Books of My Heart 3.5 StarsDry is a dystopian ecological disaster story based a little in fact and a lot in what if.  It loosely reminds me of one of those blockbuster movies like 2012 and San Andreas where some things are just a smidge too over the top but you let it go because that is the movie you knew you came to see.As usual, Shusterman’s writing is really great.  The pacing is good and I was engaged the entire book.  It was hard to put down and I finis This review was originally posted on Books of My Heart 3.5 StarsDry is a dystopian ecological disaster story based a little in fact and a lot in what if.  It loosely reminds me of one of those blockbuster movies like 2012 and San Andreas where some things are just a smidge too over the top but you let it go because that is the movie you knew you came to see.As usual, Shusterman’s writing is really great.  The pacing is good and I was engaged the entire book.  It was hard to put down and I finished it in record time.  I did have to suspend some disbelief for the initial situation of the story but the parts about human nature in a crisis situation seemed spot on.The ‘Tap Out’ has come to California.  Water rationing and fines for overuse haven’t worked and after water negotiations with Arizona break down the water is just turned off with no warning, leaving the residents in multiple counties in California with no water to their homes. Society starts to break down almost immediately.The reader follows a group of people via shifting PoVs through this crisis.  Alyssa is the typical girl next door who is like most people. She has the normal family life with parents, a little brother and dog.  Kelton is the neighbor whose dad has been planning for catastrophe forever so this crisis is like Christmas to them. It might even be the chance to get the girl.For example, winning the affection of a girl is a lot like shooting a deer. It’s pretty important that you approach slowly and with caution—and preferably from a posterior angle, where they have little to no vision. Women, like deer, can be scared away by a strong musk, which is why it’s important to always wear deodorant. Dressing in camouflage doesn’t hurt either, because in my experience, girl find camouflage really cool. But all of that aside, I think the most important aspect of obtaining a girl of the opposite sex is knowing when to pull the trigger. Metaphorically, that is. You gotta make your move when it feels right, or else you’ll come off as creepy. This I know from experience, too.Most of the story is set around these two characters but we pick up more stragglers along the way including street wise Jacqui and future fortune 500 company CEO Henry.   The secret to a successful group collaboration is a dynamic, responsive leader, and the key to being a good leader is acute observation and subtle manipulation—so subtle that no one knows they’re being manipulated. Come to think of it, that’s also the key to a successful government. This cast of characters compliment each other well in that they are all pretty different but in this new crisis each brings something into the survival game.  On a general day, they would pass each other by with no interaction, but desperate times makes for strange bedfellows.The struggle was intense and I felt desperate for the characters as one thing after another goes wrong for them and they are driven farther down the rabbit hole of humanity to see what they would do to save the people they are with.  Hard choices will be made and there is a reason survival of the fittest is a saying.I debated on how to rate this because the writing is really great overall but there are plot holes.  Or things just glossed over. Like the initial set up and premise of the Tap Out was really unbelievable to me.  I could take a global catastrophe but to have it completely isolated to just this area for the reasons given was a little bit of a stretch. Don’t get me wrong, this made me want to make sure I have a month's supply of water at my house and a disaster readiness plan ready to go.  It was a bit scary when reading because while I didn’t buy into the reasons for the Tap Out that didn’t mean I questioned society’s response.  I’m just not sure some of the other survival tactics were explored. So many canned goods would have had water in them, fruits also are a good source of the water you need for a day.  There are some great out of the box thinking things going on but I thought some true opportunities were missed. Still like all of Neal Shusterman’s (I haven’t read Jarrod Shusterman before) books it makes me think about people and what I would do in the same situation.  I like the social interactions that are created with this writing and the exploration of various situations through the Tap Out. It is a book that makes me think and want to plan ahead a little in case of an emergency.Overall: Engaging un-put-down-able writing with some room for growth on a few things I just couldn’t buy into.Review copy was received from Publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
    more
  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars “It’s so quiet now,” I say. “It almost makes you forget what’s out there.” “Nothing out there but people,” Henry points out. “People can be monsters. Whether it’s just their actions, or whether it’s who they really are, it doesn’t matter. The result is the same.” … “Sometimes you have to be the monster to survive.” Southern California is desperate for water, but there’s nothing left and the tap has officially run dry. Neighbors begin to turn on each other and chaos is rising across t 4.5 Stars “It’s so quiet now,” I say. “It almost makes you forget what’s out there.” “Nothing out there but people,” Henry points out. “People can be monsters. Whether it’s just their actions, or whether it’s who they really are, it doesn’t matter. The result is the same.” … “Sometimes you have to be the monster to survive.” Southern California is desperate for water, but there’s nothing left and the tap has officially run dry. Neighbors begin to turn on each other and chaos is rising across the state. Alyssa’s desperate to keep herself and her brother safe after her parents don’t return from a mission to get water. She pairs with with unlikely allies in hopes of surviving. Dry is a gripping story of the lengths you’ll go to survive, and if it’s possible to life with yourself in the aftermath. Things I Liked I really loved that we got so many different POVs throughout the story, not only with the main characters, but also the snapshot chapters that showed what was happening around other parts of Southern California. The writing felt so personal, like a journal. It made it easy to feel like you were in the story. The whole book is really a warning for global warming, climate change, and the inaction that doomed an entire state. And I loved that they addressed how the media decides what’s newsworthy and important enough to get coverage. I don’t know if I’ve ever been so anxious while reading a book. It was so eerie and thrilling it felt like a horror movie, waiting for other shoe to drop. And the overwhelming relief when you get some semblance of safety was this high that made this book a true rollercoaster. Things I Didn’t Like I didn’t really love or connect with any of the characters. And it’s a testament to the incredible writing that I was still so emotionally invested in the story. I thought Jacqui was kinda just mean and abrasive - I get it’s literally an end-of-the-world situation, but I didn’t necessarily want to root for her. Kelton had his moments, but he definitely did some sketchy things. Henry was a bit of a know-it-all and a try-hard. Overall, I didn’t really latch onto anyone. I appreciate their selfishness and self preservation, but it just didn’t really connect to the characters. I had so many intense emotions while reading this that I actually had to pause a few times to collect myself. Neal and Jarrod Shusterman infuse drama and intensity into this collapsing world in a way that puts your heart in an aching state of desperation. Dry is really like no other book I’ve ever read, and it a truly unique experience. I received a copy of the book from Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • ⇢Eryn
    January 1, 1970
    I really want to read this. I can just tell it's going to be phenomenal.
  • Deborah Embury
    January 1, 1970
    "Dry" has solid writing and a very timely premise, dealing with current environmental issues pertaining to water use. There are some good family aspects I enjoyed; it's nice to see a YA novel where the families feel thought-out and realistic. I read this book in just a couple of days, and I think that is a true testament to both Shusterman's ability to keep a reader interested in the overall outcome. That being said, "Dry" is...well...a little bit dry. The book plays out exactly how the synopsis "Dry" has solid writing and a very timely premise, dealing with current environmental issues pertaining to water use. There are some good family aspects I enjoyed; it's nice to see a YA novel where the families feel thought-out and realistic. I read this book in just a couple of days, and I think that is a true testament to both Shusterman's ability to keep a reader interested in the overall outcome. That being said, "Dry" is...well...a little bit dry. The book plays out exactly how the synopsis promises- drought happens, population goes crazy, parents go missing, kids embark on journey to find water. It's very predictable; I wasn't surprised at any of the plot points. Additionally, despite the fact that the characters were well-written ones, I just felt fairly detached from all the main characters except for Garrett. I think there were just far too many POVs spread too thinly for me to truly get attached to anyone. I also think the environmental aspects could have been pushed a little more. There are some pretty good arguments about it at the very beginning and end of the novel but other than that I think the core issues got a bit glossed over. All in all, a solid read but nothing outstanding. If you liked "Life as We Knew It" by Susan Beth Pfeffer or similar titles then I would recommend "Dry".
    more
  • Amber (The Book Bratz)
    January 1, 1970
    In all honesty Dry freaked me out. It is so scary real and if you look at climate change this book can one day be a scary reality for many parts of the world. I got a copy of this book at BookExpo and I quite honestly knew nothing about it butt I saw the cover and was really intrigued. Though I didn't love this book I am still glad that I read it, it was extremely thought provoking and really got into my head.
    more
  • Lisa Brennan
    January 1, 1970
    Compelling and captivating. Profound and prophetic. DRY is a first-rate survival story perfect for fans of LIFE AS WE KNEW IT, THE RULE of THREE, and MONUMENT 14. Set in the not-too-distant future, a drought reaches cataclysmic proportions government-promised work-arounds lead to epic failures. While the story is grim, it is equally gripping. Shusterman constructs characters who are affable, interesting, and relatable to unravel a portrayal of how various personalities cope and struggle with ove Compelling and captivating. Profound and prophetic. DRY is a first-rate survival story perfect for fans of LIFE AS WE KNEW IT, THE RULE of THREE, and MONUMENT 14. Set in the not-too-distant future, a drought reaches cataclysmic proportions government-promised work-arounds lead to epic failures. While the story is grim, it is equally gripping. Shusterman constructs characters who are affable, interesting, and relatable to unravel a portrayal of how various personalities cope and struggle with overwhelming conflict. Sidebar “Snapshots” give readers a glimpse of how the story is developing on a broader scale.Chapters move swiftly, and intriguing connections between characters unfold. Fans of UNWIND will welcome similarities experienced by DRY’S band of teens who are “on the run” to survive.An outstanding choice for thrill-seeking adventure fans; certain to be a top consideration for classroom teachers to highlight for novel studies as well.~ Review of Netgalley ARC ~ Lisa Brennan @noveltalk
    more
  • Tabea Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    So this was everything I wanted and more! Absolutely fantastic. Naturally I had high hopes after Scythe and Thunderhead and man did this book go above and beyond to fulfill those.My favorite thing (other than the great writing) was: the plot starts on page one. No 350 page setup without any story happening (hello three dark crowns...), no getting to know the characters so deeply you think you‘d recognize their colon in order to confuse the readers into not noticing that zero stuff is actually ha So this was everything I wanted and more! Absolutely fantastic. Naturally I had high hopes after Scythe and Thunderhead and man did this book go above and beyond to fulfill those.My favorite thing (other than the great writing) was: the plot starts on page one. No 350 page setup without any story happening (hello three dark crowns...), no getting to know the characters so deeply you think you‘d recognize their colon in order to confuse the readers into not noticing that zero stuff is actually happening (hello Patrick Rothfuss) and no stupid 20 year old named Summer or Sage living in her car while going to college where meeting a bad guy which she then „fixes“ (hello every mind numbingly stupid new adult book ever and welcome Colleen Hoover). No! The book starts, the water turns off and everything just goes from there. You get to know the characters while everything is happening which was basically my favourite thing. Neal Shusterman knows how to write a story and characters. And he seems to have been a great teacher to his son.I had to take many, many breaks between reading because it felt so real, and the threat is so real, specifically in Southern California that is was hard to just continue. I cried a lot. The devastation of you being home, no illness, no Zombie Apokalypse happening, everything being fine and you still dying of thirst and dehydration was so much more frightening than anything else I have read before. My family lives in San Diego and I visit them every few years. In the last years you could see so much damage from the drought, so many lakes dried up. The utterly terrible damages from the wildfires.... this is not Scy-fi or fantasy. This is a very real threat!I highly recommend you read this book and while we’re here: vote!! Vote every single time you can and put the people in power who care about the environment and people and not their own personal wealth.
    more
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.This was amazing. I devoured this book and can not WAIT to get it into the hands of my students. I think they will love this story. All of Shusterman's works are very popular, but this is even more intense since it is a story that could be happening right now.Southern California has been in a drought and it has finally reached a boiling point. The water has been turned off, and the Tap-Ou Many thanks to EdelweissPlus and the publisher for an eARC of this title for review. All opinions are my own.This was amazing. I devoured this book and can not WAIT to get it into the hands of my students. I think they will love this story. All of Shusterman's works are very popular, but this is even more intense since it is a story that could be happening right now.Southern California has been in a drought and it has finally reached a boiling point. The water has been turned off, and the Tap-Out (as it's being called) has begun. Within days things start to break down. And now everyone has to figure out what they are willing to do to survive. Following Alyssa, her neighbor Keaton, Jacqui-a girl they meet on the way, at gunpoint, and Henry, a kid making a killing selling off stockpiled water, this story showcases the lengths people will go to get what they need for basic survival.This is Shusterman at his finest. He takes something that is completely plausible and showcases what humanity will do in a crisis. There will be heroes, of course, but there will also be villains. And many of us don't know what side of the aisle we will fall on until we find ourselves in a situation with no middle ground. Highly recommend.
    more
  • Jordan (pagetravels)
    January 1, 1970
    THIS WAS TERRIFYING AND SO INTENSE. As usual, Neal Shusterman knows how to get in your head and really make you reevaluate so many things.
  • Griffin
    January 1, 1970
    Did you think you would ever read a dystopian book again after all the ones you plowed through in the earlier part of this decade? I didn't. But here I am, thanks to Neal and Jarrod Shusterman, plowing through a dystopian YA novel in a single sitting, in 2018.What truly sets this apart is that you're watching the world fall into chaos - you don't start after sh*t has hit the fan. You're there as the taps first go dry, as people turn postal, as neighbors turn into crowds turn into mobs. The Shust Did you think you would ever read a dystopian book again after all the ones you plowed through in the earlier part of this decade? I didn't. But here I am, thanks to Neal and Jarrod Shusterman, plowing through a dystopian YA novel in a single sitting, in 2018.What truly sets this apart is that you're watching the world fall into chaos - you don't start after sh*t has hit the fan. You're there as the taps first go dry, as people turn postal, as neighbors turn into crowds turn into mobs. The Shustermans' writing brings it all to life in a a very gripping way; so convincing, actually, that I was taking regular breaks to go fill up a glass of water, consciously thirsty every time I read about a person's dry skin, or exhaustion, or empty canteen.Where this lacked the depth was in the rushed conclusion to the plot, with the almost deus-ex-machina intervention. The first half of the book was five stars to me: anticipation slowly building, dread filling the pit of my stomach. But the latter half was a bit too conveniently resolved and lacking in the emotional depth I expected from these characters.As a thirty year-old, I may not be this book's target audience, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. For teens it will hopefully hit home hard and educate folks on the real and growing danger we face.
    more
  • JM Cabral
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 4.5 stars"As far as authority is concerned, calm people quietly dying is a lot easier to deal with than angry people fighting for their lives."The first time I’ve heard of Dry was only during Book Expo 2018. (I’m not a fan of Neal Shusterman yet and so I don’t really take the time to research him and his books, although I recently purchased Scythe and Thunderhead and am now waiting for them to arrive.) A lot of the people I follow online, my friend Alex from The Books Buzz include Actual rating: 4.5 stars"As far as authority is concerned, calm people quietly dying is a lot easier to deal with than angry people fighting for their lives."The first time I’ve heard of Dry was only during Book Expo 2018. (I’m not a fan of Neal Shusterman yet and so I don’t really take the time to research him and his books, although I recently purchased Scythe and Thunderhead and am now waiting for them to arrive.) A lot of the people I follow online, my friend Alex from The Books Buzz included, kept on hyping up this book everywhere after having read it, and I immediately got intrigued since I trust her for awesome book recs. See, unlike the rest of the reading population, I have never read a book by Neal or Jarrod Shusterman before and I’m hoping that this could hopefully introduce me to them and their writing style.Set against the backdrop of modern-day Southern California, Dry is pitched as a post-apocalyptic story about a time when water literally dries out due to the deathly effects of climate change, told from several points of view, giving readers several angles from which the story can be read.One of the many things that I loved about this book and the way it was written is the multiple POVs. I very much enjoyed my time getting to know the main characters of the story, and I find that the author duo did an amazing job in giving all of them their own voices and individuality. I love how they introduced them into the story one by one, not at all crowding certain scenes. I hate it when at the start of a story, I get to meet hundreds of characters instantly because it makes me hella confused, and this wasn't the case for Dry at all. Through Neal and Jarrod's writing, we get to see how 4 kids (some would say 5) try to navigate through the drought with the use of only their wits and resourcefulness. And I loved seeing how their varying personalities came into play when it came to surviving—some brought out guns, some only made use of their negotiation skills—and it taught me so much as to how even if ALL OF US had one common goal, we all have very different ways of achieving it.Another thing that I creepily adored about this novel is the unflinching way it was written. From the beginning, readers would know that the slow progression of the story’s conflict would instantly feel relatable because of how timely and relevant its central plot is. I don’t know if the authors intended for their readers to feel this, but I felt bad for the way I’ve treated mother nature in the past—I’m not the type of person who doesn’t know how to dispose waste properly, but I’m not an environmentalist either—and my friend Alex wasn’t kidding. This book really did make me feel like I needed to change. Right after reading certain scenes, I wanted to prepare emergency packs, first aid kits, etc. I even wanted to use re-usable straws, and tons of other eco-friendly stuff. It scared me, knowing how close we are to experiencing a real life tap-out, and yet lots of other people still disregard these kinds of issues. And I hope that when we begin to realize our mistakes, it’s not yet too late.I also liked seeing the slow but definitely accurate degeneration of humans as they slowly gave in to their animalistic needs in order to get “that first sip”. To be honest, it was disturbing for me to read about how people could easily turn into wild and savage creatures because of hopelessness. And because of this, it was easy for me to root for and believe the story’s main characters Alyssa, Kelton, Garrett, and Jacqui. I became unsettled and wary every time I picked this book up, and continue reading about their survival and I don’t think I’ll be forgetting my reading experience for this any time soon. It moved me in ways I don’t think I’ve ever been moved before, and what makes it such a unique book is that it made me feel so many emotions while reading it. It made me mad, shocked, downright horrified, and whenever the MCs had small victories, it also made me feel satisfied. And for that, and also for writing such an impeccably horrifying but ultimately realistic story, I have to commend the Shustermans.“Dry is a horrifyingly relevant and ultimately believable survival story that defined the thin line separating human normalcy and animalistic desperation. It’s modern setting and engaging storytelling allows for it to be truthful, believable and an undoubtedly great, unforgettable, and, hopefully, an eye-opening read. With this book, Neal and Jarrod Shusterman gripped my heart and soul with a story unlike any I’ve ever read. No doubt I’ll be reading more from them in the future.”And just in case my review wasn’t enough to get you hooked, check out this aesthetic board that I made that’s inspired by Dry:
    more
  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    This father/son-written novel starts at a point not so foreign to our world today -- a drought in California that's gone from bad to worse. Water restrictions have been in place for a while. Lawns are brown, swimming pools are empty, and the Central Valley, California's agricultural hub, has become a new Dust Bowl.As the story opens in a Southern California suburb, Alyssa's mother turns on the kitchen faucet, and nothing comes out. Is this the result of yet another plumbing mishap on the part of This father/son-written novel starts at a point not so foreign to our world today -- a drought in California that's gone from bad to worse. Water restrictions have been in place for a while. Lawns are brown, swimming pools are empty, and the Central Valley, California's agricultural hub, has become a new Dust Bowl.As the story opens in a Southern California suburb, Alyssa's mother turns on the kitchen faucet, and nothing comes out. Is this the result of yet another plumbing mishap on the part of Alyssa's father? When the family turns on the news, they discover it's the Tap-Out -- there is no more water. Outside of California, the situation is slow to draw attention, as there's a major hurricane wreaking havoc on the East Coast. It doesn't seem so dire at first. Surely, the water will be back soon.A visit to stock up at Costco that afternoon reveals the panic already setting in. The bottled water shelves are already empty. So are the shelves of Gatorade, juices, and anything else to drink. People are intense and possessive, in competition for the remaining liquids. Alyssa and her brother fill a cart with bagged ice, which they then need to fiercely protect from predatory adults. It's only been a few hours, and already kindness is evaporating along with the water supply.Alyssa's next door neighbor Kelton and his family are "preppers" -- survivalists in suburbia, with a well-stocked safe room, an armory, and all sorts of defensive perimeter booby traps, as well as a bug-out location in the mountains. But as the neighborhood becomes more and more tense, even this well-guarded and provisioned home won't remain safe for long.As is typical for a YA adventure/survival tale, we eventually end up with the teens cut off from their parents and forced to make life-or-death decisions if they're to have any chance of survival. Things get violent and scary very quickly. Panic leads to riots and death. Martial law is declared and people are herded into evacuation camps -- but even there, there's only enough water for about a tenth of the people cramming into the centers. As people get more and more desperate, safety becomes even more elusive. Finally, Alyssa and Kelton, joined by two other teens, are on the run with Alyssa's younger brother, seeking hydration and safety from the masses, just looking for a place to hole up and wait out the Tap-Out. It can't last forever... can it?Of course, the danger isn't only from desperate mob violence and panic. Dehydration sets in quickly. People find all sorts of inventive ways to find sips of water, just trying to stay alive -- but reading about the early and then more advanced stages of dehydration is plenty horrifying.Dry takes place over little more than a week, and it's fascinating to see how quickly society disintegrates in the face of such a catastrophe. Alyssa's brother Garrett refers to the people so desperate for water that they'll do anything as "water-zombies" -- and it's no surprise that some scenes reminded me of The Walking Dead, as normal life and the moral standards of civilization break down in the face of a very basic threat to survival. I was also reminded in many ways of Mike Mullin's Ashfall series, in which a natural disaster of catastrophic proportions leads to this same type of societal collapse.Dry is a quick, pulse-pounding read -- I finished it over a day and a half of intense reading. I was drawn to this book because I'd just read Scythe and Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman over the summer, and found those books deep and thought-provoking (as well as being outstanding adventures). Dry doesn't provoke the same sort of queries about life and purpose as those books, and it lacks the character development I found so engaging in Scythe. I was absolutely caught up in the story of Dry, but didn't find myself caring deeply about any of the specific characters, who all sort of blended together as the POV shifted from chapter to chapter.An additional minor quibble is that reasons and consequences are glossed over for the sake of moving the action forward. I would have liked to learn more about the events that led to the Tap-Out, and how the water was able to be restored finally. Reading Dry, we just have to accept these developments as fact, but more detail would have helped make it all seem more real.(view spoiler)[A final complaint, and it's spoilery: I found it incredibly frustrating that not once, but two separate times, a perfectly good supply of water was ruined. I particularly hated the scene when Alyssa's brother Garrett accidentally dumped Comet into the family's tub of drinking water. Yeah, they needed to be forced into a more desperate situation, but this was just so dumb! If the water was so irreplaceable and necessary for survival, better precautions should have been taken. Later on, there's a cooler full of bottled water that also gets destroyed -- and it just wasn't necessary to the plot or to convey the dire straits of the characters. (hide spoiler)]I do recommend Dry. It's a scary, intense adventure, as well as a cautionary tale about climate change and the need to pay attention, NOW, before things get so much worse.
    more
  • Claire (bookscoffeeandrepeat)
    January 1, 1970
    AMAZING INTENSE SURVIVAL STORY. I'm sorry, but I have so much to say. So sit tight and grab some popcorn as I try to process everything I just read. I remembered holding my breath during the last few chapters or feeling quite anxious for the characters. While the story had been engaging, the writing can be dry at times. Then again, considering the subject matter, I think the authors did a pretty good job in portraying a dystopian novel where water is scarce in a dry place. I mean, we all know th AMAZING INTENSE SURVIVAL STORY. I'm sorry, but I have so much to say. So sit tight and grab some popcorn as I try to process everything I just read. I remembered holding my breath during the last few chapters or feeling quite anxious for the characters. While the story had been engaging, the writing can be dry at times. Then again, considering the subject matter, I think the authors did a pretty good job in portraying a dystopian novel where water is scarce in a dry place. I mean, we all know that California is a desert. Right? Eventually, the book becomes hard to put down. Just know that when you're reading the short snippets and wanting to get back to the regular chapters just to know what happens to the main characters, sit tight because it will get there (eventually).As someone who live in California, THIS is scary. These characters, for instance, went to Costco (and I also go to Costco) but imagine if everyone in California is in need of water or liquid sustenance and everyone's fighting for it in a supermarket. To most of you who may not know about Costco, it's like a warehouse (I describe it as a HUGE supermarket) that sells food items in BULK. Imagine when this warehouse runs out of items necessary for survival, THIS is essentially that book. The authors wrote about a compelling story with compelling circumstances. Additionally, they talked about environmental issues, its harrowing effects, and how other characters dealt with them. And like real life, some fortunate things just happen because of sheer luck.I think the main character, Alyssa, is supposed to represent (generally) everyone. She's a character who was supposed to represent an ideal person who didn't expect this California drought to affect EVERYONE. And along the way she is joined by her brother (Garrett) and neighbor, Kelton. Kelton's family is kind of unusual who always expects the worst hence they were ready for this natural disaster. They're the most stocked-up house in the neighborhood so naturally their house becomes a target for others who are scarce with supplies. Also, Alyssa, Garrett and Kelton met Jacqui and Henry as they try to make it out alive by reaching a reservoir (that may or may not have access to water). But you know, they desperately tried to keep HOPE alive.This book oddly reminded me of The Twilight Zone because the reader gets to see the ugly side of humanity when lives are threatened. Really compelling stuff, but most of the time the reader doesn't get any conclusion on some of the characters especially minor characters. For instance, there were short snippets on some random characters and some were never heard from again. Others were kind of minor characters and were given a pov (i.e. Henry) but they just weren't compelling enough. I'm not going to elaborate, except Henry sort of represents the business side of things during this drought. He can be infuriating, charming, and deceptive. Definitely how some people are, but his circumstances were unusual. I would be willing to let this go because I liked this book and this book's fiction (or is it?). Kelton reminds me of Rowan (a bit) especially at the last half of the novel. Alyssa can be a bit like Citra at times, shrewd but she still showed some compassion. Then again, the reader also gets to see the ugly side of Alyssa which was something I was expecting to make her character seem believable. I mean, wouldn't you rather help your brother instead of a stranger? what would you do? Then there's Jacqui who was dubbed as someone with "dissociative disorder with nihilistic tendencies." It was either the author/s don't know what they're talking about or Jacqui just has some neglectful and ignorant parents, which is frankly a common trope in YA novels. Then again, I will let this one slide because of her character development. Despite her high IQ, she just learns about "no man's an island" in a literal sense because of their traumatic experience/s.All in all, I would recommend this to absolutely EVERYONE. I hope this inspires people to conserve water because I freak out every time people would leave the water on when washing the dishes. Sometimes I feel like this book's for me. I can't help but feel some sort of connection with it. Haha. This one's such a good dystopian book because the threat is there and people actually suffer, or this book has good world building accompanied with complex characters. This alone should be enough to compel readers to read this one.
    more
  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    😱 my biggest fear 😱Shusterman earned my heart with his Arc of a Scythe series, so I have had my eye on this one since the moment it was announced. The premise of a near-future YA dystopian tale of a water shortage in Southern California is EVERYTHING I want from him......and DRY did not disappoint.Anyone who knows me knows that I have water with me always. I carry a case of bottled water in my car, I have a water bottle in my purse at all times and I never leave the house without my other full 2 😱 my biggest fear 😱Shusterman earned my heart with his Arc of a Scythe series, so I have had my eye on this one since the moment it was announced. The premise of a near-future YA dystopian tale of a water shortage in Southern California is EVERYTHING I want from him......and DRY did not disappoint.Anyone who knows me knows that I have water with me always. I carry a case of bottled water in my car, I have a water bottle in my purse at all times and I never leave the house without my other full 24 oz bottle. I seem to have a case of water insecurity even in dripping-wet-with-fresh-water Wisconsin. However, my mom lives in Buena Vista, CO and shares often the constant issue of water rights and water shortages that plague the western US. And that horrifies me. When our water pump broke a few years ago, we were without running water for only 3 days , and had access to multiple locations to shower and do laundry and unlimited drinking water, but I still have nightmares about it. Shusterman feeds off those fears of mine and brings them to life in Dry, making me swear to start stockpiling bottled water in my basement. For real.What I appreciate about this story beyond the premise and the shock value and the fast-paced nature, is its accessibility for the YA audience all the way down through middle school. Mind you, it could have been written for an adult audience and been a much more cerebral novel, but that wasn’t the intent. I fully admit that the Scythe books are higher level and require more than many early teens are able to give - when my daughter and I discuss them it’s like we’re talking about two completely different books. Dry speaks to its intended audience while also horrifying this adult, in the best literary sense. I loved the constantly changing narrators because they brought a much broader perspective of the crisis than a single narrative could have.Highly recommended for all YA libraries, classrooms and for adult readers who care about our environment and conservation.Now I’m off to buy water. Lots of it. And when the water zombies show up, I can’t honestly say whether I’ll share or not.....
    more
  • Kath (Read Forevermore)
    January 1, 1970
    An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Teen in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.Rating: 3.5 / 5Dry is an intense and terrifying story that takes place in a world very similar to our own. It touches into a real-life problem that might become a reality in our near future. While reading this book, I really thought and saw the world differently and how my decisions might impact the environment.— writingThe authors paint an unsettling and convincing dystopian s An arc of this book was sent to me by Simon Teen in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.Rating: 3.5 / 5Dry is an intense and terrifying story that takes place in a world very similar to our own. It touches into a real-life problem that might become a reality in our near future. While reading this book, I really thought and saw the world differently and how my decisions might impact the environment.— writingThe authors paint an unsettling and convincing dystopian story. Slowly and gradually introducing the characters and the horrors of a world very similar to our own. It truly does a great job describing a real-life problem that we may see become a reality within the next few years. As the story goes on, the pacing of this story was fantastic.— charactersThere were so many characters and honestly I could not connect to any of them. Sure, they were good. But they could be so much better. One of the reasons why it took me so long in reading this book was because I just could not connect with the characters, and that is one of the few things I look for in books. Also, if you don’t like books with too many points of views, this book will be a headache for you.But the great thing about this is that our main girl character was not boy crazy and drowning in hormones. YA books with that aspect is something I very rarely find nowadays and that makes me so happy!— plotI honestly really liked the plot. But I felt that there were a few plot holes in this story. There were a few things in this story that I felt could have been explained better and at some times, there isn’t much that happens in this story. It is very character based, which I kind of enjoyed and kind of loathed. There could have been more development, but I can’t complain too much because I did enjoy this book.
    more
  • Christina (Ensconced in Lit)
    January 1, 1970
    I had high hopes for this one. I love Neal Shusterman, and this is his first co-authored book with his son. The setup was fascinating. What happens when people run out of a necessary resource such as water? It was like a partial dystopian but something that could actually happen, which makes it even more scary. The first third of the book, with the setup of the world and the situation, I was totally in it. The characters were interesting and I wanted to see how it would play out. But eventually I had high hopes for this one. I love Neal Shusterman, and this is his first co-authored book with his son. The setup was fascinating. What happens when people run out of a necessary resource such as water? It was like a partial dystopian but something that could actually happen, which makes it even more scary. The first third of the book, with the setup of the world and the situation, I was totally in it. The characters were interesting and I wanted to see how it would play out. But eventually it just became a messed up road trips (and if you read my reviews, you know how I feel about road trips) and I just completely lost interest. I skimmed the back half of the book and it seemed to resolve too abruptly.Overall, a strong start but didn't satisfy at the finish.
    more
  • Isabel
    January 1, 1970
    love u neal shusterman
  • Jenni Frencham
    January 1, 1970
    Shusterman, Neal. Dry. Simon & Schuster BYR, 2018.California's drought has continued for years now, and when neighboring states block access to the Colorado River, suddenly everyone's water is gone. No water from the tap. No toilets. No showers. And inevitably people begin panicking. The government and the talking heads on the news assure Californians that they will be fine, that help is on the way, but it is taking a very long time for that help to arrive, and in the meantime, this crisis i Shusterman, Neal. Dry. Simon & Schuster BYR, 2018.California's drought has continued for years now, and when neighboring states block access to the Colorado River, suddenly everyone's water is gone. No water from the tap. No toilets. No showers. And inevitably people begin panicking. The government and the talking heads on the news assure Californians that they will be fine, that help is on the way, but it is taking a very long time for that help to arrive, and in the meantime, this crisis is bringing out the worst in people.I lived in California for three years near the beginning of the real drought, and this story is terrifying in how true it reads. I could see things developing in a manner very similar to what is described in this book, and all I can say is that this is exactly why I no longer live in California. This is a compelling page-turning story filled with plenty of action. I can highly recommend this book to readers who enjoy survival stories or dystopian tales that focus on the creation of the dystopia rather than the "tearing down the corrupt government" a la The Hunger Games. Highly recommended.Recommended for: teensRed Flags: language, violence, a character is threatened with rape on at least one occasionOverall Rating: 5/5 starsRead-Alikes: Life As We Knew It, Ashfall, Hungry
    more
  • Dylan
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ 90%.One word I have for this book is dry, which is also the title. Nothing was happening, there were too many POVS, and I just couldn't bring myself to read the last hundred pages.
  • Dany
    January 1, 1970
    I had severe issues reading this.While I appreciate the story and how cinematic it was... I was not able to connect to any of the characters and, honestly, didn't care if they survived or not. I think that the most important aspect of the book is the great call-out it is and it gives an amazing and realistic idea of what can become of us if we ever face a situation like the Tap-Out, which we need to be aware that can happen and will happen if we don't start being careful and mindful of our use o I had severe issues reading this.While I appreciate the story and how cinematic it was... I was not able to connect to any of the characters and, honestly, didn't care if they survived or not. I think that the most important aspect of the book is the great call-out it is and it gives an amazing and realistic idea of what can become of us if we ever face a situation like the Tap-Out, which we need to be aware that can happen and will happen if we don't start being careful and mindful of our use of resources, like water.I did quite enjoy how raw and cruel this world was and how movie-ready this book is.
    more
  • Shayna
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of Dry at Neal and Jarrod's signing at BookCon 2018. I LOVED the cover and the premise and couldn't wait to read it.This book is very different from others I've read from Shusterman (Scythe, Thunderhead, Unwind). Instead of being fantasy-based or crazily dystopian, this is a very realistic view of what might happen if the water supply was cut off to a large population of people. In a panel at BookCon, Shusterman discussed how much research and discussion went into this I received an advance copy of Dry at Neal and Jarrod's signing at BookCon 2018. I LOVED the cover and the premise and couldn't wait to read it.This book is very different from others I've read from Shusterman (Scythe, Thunderhead, Unwind). Instead of being fantasy-based or crazily dystopian, this is a very realistic view of what might happen if the water supply was cut off to a large population of people. In a panel at BookCon, Shusterman discussed how much research and discussion went into this book, so I did find this much more realistic than his other works.To be honest, this book is kind of an eye opener. This is an event I could see taking place during my lifetime, so it was intriguing to read about the reactions and acts people commit in a time of desperation. The book will make you thirsty, though!I think Shusterman covered so many different facets of the crisis: health implications, thought processes, how communities/neighborhoods would react, FEMA/government intervention, media portrayal, how to "bunker down" and create your own water supply, even the reactions of pets. It made for an interesting story and even the ending was pretty realistic although I think I was expecting something else. I'm not sure what, though. Maybe something much more bleak and shocking? But I think that's the point. Media covers crises and then moves on... just look at Puerto Rico. So I think they were going for realism rather than a shock factor or setting up for a sequel.
    more
  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Southern California has been on water restrictions for years, but when the Tap Out starts and millions of people are cut off from water, nobody knows what to do. Almost no one has prepared for a total lack of water, meaning people have roughly 3-4 days before their bodies completely shut down. Alyssa is just trying to keep herself and her brother alive until their parents come home, while Kelton and his family have been prepping for something like this to happen all their lives. But when people Southern California has been on water restrictions for years, but when the Tap Out starts and millions of people are cut off from water, nobody knows what to do. Almost no one has prepared for a total lack of water, meaning people have roughly 3-4 days before their bodies completely shut down. Alyssa is just trying to keep herself and her brother alive until their parents come home, while Kelton and his family have been prepping for something like this to happen all their lives. But when people turn into "water zombies," they're thrown into situations that will test them to their very cores. Can they survive?I was really excited about this latest Shusterman book, and it was a little bit of a letdown. The premise is utterly harrowing, and the exploration of the lengths people will go to in order to survive is fascinating, but I didn't feel a real connection to really any of the characters, and the plot seemed fairly unsurprising. I think a lot of teens will enjoy this, though, and it's always good to see more discussion of the consequences of humanity's destruction of earthly resources.
    more
  • Deah
    January 1, 1970
    This book, coming out in October 2018, is about a "Tap Out" situation in California after they are excluded from a water-rights agreement. The book was written by Neal Shusterman and his son, Jarrod. Having recently read Octavia Butler's "Earthseed" duo, this book reminded me a lot of her work, but without all the pages and pages of her made up religion. I liked the characters in this book and the different takes they had on what it would take to survive not just a drought, but an actual turning This book, coming out in October 2018, is about a "Tap Out" situation in California after they are excluded from a water-rights agreement. The book was written by Neal Shusterman and his son, Jarrod. Having recently read Octavia Butler's "Earthseed" duo, this book reminded me a lot of her work, but without all the pages and pages of her made up religion. I liked the characters in this book and the different takes they had on what it would take to survive not just a drought, but an actual turning-off of the water taps. Remember, a person can go no more than three or four days without water- less, in a hot place like California. When the tap runs dry, and Costco runs out of bottled water- what would you do to survive? And what would the other 40 million residents of your state do?*I received an ARC of this book. It is not out for publication yet.
    more
Write a review