This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us
From the New York Times bestselling author of Meddling Kids comes a brilliantly subversive and comic thriller celebrating noir detectives, Die Hard, Fast & Furious, and the worst case of sibling rivalry.In a dingy office in Fisherman's Wharf, the glass panel in the door bears the names of A. Kimrean and Z. Kimrean. Private Eyes. Behind the door there is only one desk, one chair, one scrawny androgynous P.I. in a tank top and skimpy waistcoat. A.Z., as they are collectively known, are twin brother and sister. He's pure misanthropic logic, she's wild hedonistic creativity. A.Z. have been locked in mortal battle since they were in utero...which is tricky because they, very literally, share one single body. That's right. One body, two pilots. The mystery and absurdity of how Kimrean functions, and how they subvert every plotline, twist, explosion, and gunshot--and confuse every cop, neckless thug, cartel boss, ninja, and femme fatale--in the book is pure Cantero magic.Someone is murdering the sons of the ruthless drug cartel boss known as the Lyon in the biggest baddest town in California--San Carnal. The notorious A.Z. Kimrean must go to the sin-soaked, palm-tree-lined streets of San Carnal, infiltrate the Lyon's inner circle, and find out who is targeting his heirs, and while they are at it, rescue an undercover cop in too deep, deal with a plucky young stowaway, and stop a major gang war from engulfing California. They'll face every plot device and break every rule Elmore Leonard wrote before they can crack the case, if they don't kill each other (themselves) first.This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us is a mind-blowing, gender-bending, genre-smashing romp through the entire pantheon of action and noir. It is also a bold, tautly crafted novel about family, being weird, and claiming your place in your own crazy story, that can only come from the mind of Edgar Cantero.

This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us Details

TitleThis Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 31st, 2018
PublisherDoubleday
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Lgbt, Science Fiction, Fantasy

This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us Review

  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)
    January 1, 1970
    4.0 Stars Smart, funny and incredibly well written, this was a darkly comical noir thriller. With the two private investigators existing in the same body, the author played with themes of both gender and identity. Unlike so many classic noir stories, this one avoided the sexism of the femme fatale and instead offered a story that felt fresh.I would recommend this unique PI detective story to fans of the classic genre looking to read about some highly intelligent and entertaining detectives with 4.0 Stars Smart, funny and incredibly well written, this was a darkly comical noir thriller. With the two private investigators existing in the same body, the author played with themes of both gender and identity. Unlike so many classic noir stories, this one avoided the sexism of the femme fatale and instead offered a story that felt fresh.I would recommend this unique PI detective story to fans of the classic genre looking to read about some highly intelligent and entertaining detectives with excellent deduction skillsI received a copy from DoubleDay.
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    A comedic noir with snappy lines, pop culture references, and the obligatory femme fatale (sort of), This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us crosses genres with ease.Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known together as A.Z.) are twin brother and sister Private Eyes sharing an office in Fisherman's Wharf ...and also a body. As chimeric twins (the only known occurrence in the world), they are two separate people living in the same body. What some people mistake for schizophrenia is really sibling rivalry A comedic noir with snappy lines, pop culture references, and the obligatory femme fatale (sort of), This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us crosses genres with ease.Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known together as A.Z.) are twin brother and sister Private Eyes sharing an office in Fisherman's Wharf ...and also a body. As chimeric twins (the only known occurrence in the world), they are two separate people living in the same body. What some people mistake for schizophrenia is really sibling rivalry. Adrian is the intellectual/calculating twin with a sharp eye for observation and Zooey is the free-spirited/passionate twin with a sharp eye for trouble (especially causing it).When the sons of the San Carnal drug cartel boss are murdered one by one, A.Z. speed into town to solve the case before a gang war spills out on the streets. Looking for clues, they also manage to rescue an undercover cop and a sassy 11-year-old girl along the way, while dodging bullets and fighting ninjas (and each other).A unique gender and genre bending novel with wildly entertaining characters!Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Caidyn (BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    After the hot, transphobic mess that Meddling Kids was? Nah.
  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    A comedic noir with snappy lines, pop culture references, and the obligatory femme fatale (sort of), This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us crosses genres with ease.Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known together as A.Z.) are twin brother and sister Private Eyes sharing an office in Fisherman's Wharf ...and also a body. As chimeric twins (the only known occurrence in the world), they are two separate people living in the same body. What some people mistake for schizophrenia is really sibling rivalry A comedic noir with snappy lines, pop culture references, and the obligatory femme fatale (sort of), This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us crosses genres with ease.Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known together as A.Z.) are twin brother and sister Private Eyes sharing an office in Fisherman's Wharf ...and also a body. As chimeric twins (the only known occurrence in the world), they are two separate people living in the same body. What some people mistake for schizophrenia is really sibling rivalry. Adrian is the intellectual/calculating twin with a sharp eye for observation and Zooey is the free-spirited/passionate twin with a sharp eye for trouble (especially causing it).When the sons of the San Carnal drug cartel boss are murdered one by one, A.Z. speed into town to solve the case before a gang war spills out on the streets. Looking for clues, they also manage to rescue an undercover cop and a sassy 11-year-old girl along the way, while dodging bullets and fighting ninjas (and each other).A unique gender and genre bending novel with wildly entertaining characters!Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    This is a strange-but-good read. It started off choppy, but the mystery was well done and the action fast paced. If you like genre tropes this book will appeal to you. I thoroughly enjoyed it, especially the last third and the ending which were great. Thank you to the publisher for the arc.
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  • Devin Scott Yarbrough
    January 1, 1970
    In a side-splittingly vulgar detective story that breaks all the mystery genres clichés with protagonists unlike any other, Edgar Cantero has twisted something truly original. Danny Mojave, an officer for the San Francisco Police Department, has been undercover for the past eighteen months, slowly infiltrating and climbing the ladder of an infamous drug cartel in San Carnal, California. When Mikey Lyon, the hot-tempered, irrational son of the cartel boss is found murdered with signs pointing to In a side-splittingly vulgar detective story that breaks all the mystery genres clichés with protagonists unlike any other, Edgar Cantero has twisted something truly original. Danny Mojave, an officer for the San Francisco Police Department, has been undercover for the past eighteen months, slowly infiltrating and climbing the ladder of an infamous drug cartel in San Carnal, California. When Mikey Lyon, the hot-tempered, irrational son of the cartel boss is found murdered with signs pointing to a nearby Japanese cartel as the culprits, Danny knows that a gang war is imminent. There is only one man he hopes to prevent it, even if “man” isn’t necessarily the right noun to use. Adrian and Zooey Kimrean are twins that share everything; an office, a desk- and the same body. Adrian is “the internet with Asperger’s”. He is logical, brilliant, yet apathetic to nearly everything and everyone. He is the left side of the brain. Zooey is creative, emotional, impulsive, and depraved to her core. She is the right side of the brain. These siblings are in constant battle, each trying to control their body and struggling to subdue their counterpart. Danny must rely on A.Z. Kimrean, or particularly Adrian, to prevent a gang war that will sweep through the San Carnal area before it even starts.
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  • Sergiy
    January 1, 1970
    Given that "meddling kids" was my favorite book of 2017, you can probably imagine I was pretty excited for Edgar Contero's latest novel. I did get a free copy from the publisher, however any bias in my review is due solely to already liking the author's work to begin with.The book is about AZ Kimrean a detective/PI who is really two people in one body. Hilariously, or sadly depending on your point of view the two people are complete polar opposites. Adrian Kimrean is the logical somewhat OCD ant Given that "meddling kids" was my favorite book of 2017, you can probably imagine I was pretty excited for Edgar Contero's latest novel. I did get a free copy from the publisher, however any bias in my review is due solely to already liking the author's work to begin with.The book is about AZ Kimrean a detective/PI who is really two people in one body. Hilariously, or sadly depending on your point of view the two people are complete polar opposites. Adrian Kimrean is the logical somewhat OCD anti-twin to Zoey's ADHD hypersexual and impulsive personality. This is hard to explain, and I'm not going to try, but take my word for it that the book does a good job doing so.One of the things I liked the most about meddling kids was the writing style. At first I confused it for magical realism, then I realized that it stems from an extremely vivid world view. Minute details are emphasized, and mundane day to day things such as motes of dust can be personified. This way of writing comes back in spades in his latest book. If anything the author has really matured and perfected the style. The other aspect of the writing is the nearly constant breaking o of the fourth wall, where the narrative is basically having a conversation with the reader. There's a hilarious joke aimed at advance reader copy reviewers, which pretty nearly hit the mark. There was also an amazing scene where the action is stopped for a split second, and the reader is asked to take a step back and imagine the absurdity of the situation by placing it in the context of where they are currently. About 10 hours into a trans-pacific flight and groggily imagining an automobile materializing in the cabin was pretty trippy, thanks Edgar!The change in genre had me worried at first, as I'm not much of a detective mystery reader [aside from the obligatory(?) read through of all Sherlock Holmes] I thought maybe this really wouldn't be my thing. Certainly all the noir stuff mostly flew over my head, my only experience with this aspect of the genre comes from listening tot he Guy Noir private eye skits on prairie home companion. True fans of the genre may either find more references to their liking, or find aspects of the book to be lacking. This is something I can't comment on, what i can say is that the book basically transcends the genre. As Io mentioned earlier the unique writing style is something that really appealed to me from the start. If I had to compare it to another author I would say it is vaguely reminiscent of Douglas Adams.One thing that seemed to bother a lot of people in the previous book were the made up words, these seem to be gone as far as I can tell, however I don't think any of those people were going to like the book anyway. Hopefully this was an independent creative choice and not influenced by some of the online comments I saw following the previous book. Perhaps made up words don’t fit as well with the slightly more "serious" themes in this book. The book is filled with humor, a lot of it dark. If you didn't like meddling kids, or you don't like dark and/or overtly sexual humor you will probably not enjoy this book. Otherwise I really think this is worth a shot, I certainly had immense enjoyment from reading it.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Fisherman’s Wharf is home to private eyes A. Kimrean and Z. Kimrean. The door to their rundown office shows both names, but when you look inside there is only one desk, one chair, and one androgynous P.I. decked out in a tank top and waistcoat. Collectively known as A.Z., this body holds twin siblings, Zooey and Adrian. Adrian is the brains, while Zooey is the hedonistic free spirit. Together they are locked in one body as chimeric twins. The combination is strange, but it has won the hearts of Fisherman’s Wharf is home to private eyes A. Kimrean and Z. Kimrean. The door to their rundown office shows both names, but when you look inside there is only one desk, one chair, and one androgynous P.I. decked out in a tank top and waistcoat. Collectively known as A.Z., this body holds twin siblings, Zooey and Adrian. Adrian is the brains, while Zooey is the hedonistic free spirit. Together they are locked in one body as chimeric twins. The combination is strange, but it has won the hearts of the local San Francisco police department.In their latest case, Kimrean is working to find out who is killing off the sons of local drug cartel boss, Victor Lyon. On the outside it appears the murders are a result of a turf war with another local gang, but Kimrean doesn’t believe that to be true. They will use their unique detective style and out of the norm antics to discover the truth. Just when they think they have their hands full with the case, they realize they also need to save an undercover cop, deal with an eleven-year-old stowaway, and stop an all out gang war from happening in the streets of San Carnal. Can Zooey and Adrian put their differences aside and focus on the task at hand? Will they stop the murderer before it’s too late for everyone involved?Last year I fell in love with Edgar Cantero’s unique and quirky writing style after reading MEDDLING KIDS. This year, I’m remembering where that love came from through the pages of THIS BODY’S NOT BIG ENOUGH FOR BOTH OF US. This book is downright fun! For starters, the premise of A.Z. Kimrean is a unique one I haven’t read about before. The idea of both Zooey and Adrian controlling one body and the struggles between their polar opposite personalities adds to the entertainment value of this book. Not to be outdone by the main characters, Cantero adds in secondary characters who are interesting and make the reader want to care about what will happen to them. I guarantee you’re going to love spunky, eleven-year-old Ursula! The actual case that Kimrean is working to solve is a gangster battle straight out of a movie. This book is action-packed, addictive, and easily one of the most fun and exciting titles I’ve read all year! If you’re looking for a crime fiction tale riddled with comedic relief and out-of-the-box main characters pick this one up!
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    Brother and sister P.I. team Adrian and Zooey Kimrean are on the case. Dealing with femme fatales and neckless thugs is just Tuesday for them, which is why the police are calling them in to help with the drug war that is exploding in town. Because their undercover guy, Danny Mojave, needs help before he ends up as collateral damage in the hostile takeover of the top drug cartel. Danny asks for the Kimreans, and his superiors decide to go along so as not to destroy the 18-month undercover investi Brother and sister P.I. team Adrian and Zooey Kimrean are on the case. Dealing with femme fatales and neckless thugs is just Tuesday for them, which is why the police are calling them in to help with the drug war that is exploding in town. Because their undercover guy, Danny Mojave, needs help before he ends up as collateral damage in the hostile takeover of the top drug cartel. Danny asks for the Kimreans, and his superiors decide to go along so as not to destroy the 18-month undercover investigation and everything that they've uncovered so far. Pretty typical private eye story so far, right? Nope. Zooey and Adrian work together because they have to, not because they want to. Adrian is the scientific one, depending on facts and figures, rational and unemotional. Zooey is a wild child, excited by food, alcohol, sex, and driving like a banshee. It would seem like they have nothing in common, but they actually have a lot in common--their body. Both Adrian and Zooey occupy the same body, and they spend their time fighting against each other at least as much as they fight criminals. With the sharp eye of Sherlock Holmes and the snarky wit of an entire writer's room full of comedians, Zooey and Adrian fight crime with intensity, intelligence, and more than a little insanity as they try to figure out who is trying to start a war so they can make sure their friend Danny can get out alive. Edgar Cantero follows up last year's incredibly clever Meddling Kids with this intense lunacy disguised as a hard-boiled P.I. story. This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us is another brilliant send-up filled with unexpected one-liners, gigantic action sequences, and sarcasm to spare. If you're needing a high-octane, blow-soda-out-of-your-nose funny novel teeming with pop culture references flying faster than bullets, then this is the book for you. Huge fun and very highly recommended! Galleys for This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us were provided by Doubleday Books through NetGalley, with many thanks. 
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  • Emily Moore
    January 1, 1970
    Edgar Cantero's newest novel flies by at hyperloop speeds. A.Z. Kimrean is a private detective in San Francisco living in a noir film but really in a self-aware book that flies through action and mystery while also trying not to run too many people over. A.Z. Kimrean is like anyone else except that they're actually two distinctly different people (different DNA and everything) sharing one body. Adrian represents the left half of the brain — analytical and strategic and socially inept. Zooey is t Edgar Cantero's newest novel flies by at hyperloop speeds. A.Z. Kimrean is a private detective in San Francisco living in a noir film but really in a self-aware book that flies through action and mystery while also trying not to run too many people over. A.Z. Kimrean is like anyone else except that they're actually two distinctly different people (different DNA and everything) sharing one body. Adrian represents the left half of the brain — analytical and strategic and socially inept. Zooey is the right brain — all passion and creative and slightly addicted to everything. Together, they are a cyclone of shifting moods and abilities of two siblings constantly stuck together. As a private detective newly released from psychiatric hold with only a slightly expired license to work, Kimrean gets a job helping an undercover cop find who exactly is murdering a crime boss's children. From the second the story starts, we're set on an insane ride culminating in a literal insane car ride.If you've read any of Edgar Cantero's other work you'll find his sarcastic, fast-paced writing style and dialogue familiar. It fits the content of emulating an old style noir film well while being completely self-aware. As the first in what appears to be a series, I'm excited to see where these characters will go. I will say my only complaint is that there is so much action and movement we don't get a moment to get to know the characters or get invested in what's going on. At the end of the book it was hard for me to even remember how we even got there with giant leaps being made with no explanation. Since this is satire though, it's a lot easier to forgive. I’m providing this review in return for an ARC through NetGalley.
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  • Jessica Rentcome
    January 1, 1970
    This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us by Edgar Cantero is a raunchy, vulgar, hilarious take on the hard-boiled detective/noir mystery with a Jekyll and Hyde twist. Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known as AZ Kimrean) are chimeric twins that share the same body but control different hemispheres of the brain (Adrian is the logical one and oftentimes reminds me of Sherlock Holmes, while Zooey is the emotional one and is often easily distracted and a self-diagnosed nymphomaniac). The story kicks off w This Body's Not Big Enough for Both of Us by Edgar Cantero is a raunchy, vulgar, hilarious take on the hard-boiled detective/noir mystery with a Jekyll and Hyde twist. Adrian and Zooey Kimrean (known as AZ Kimrean) are chimeric twins that share the same body but control different hemispheres of the brain (Adrian is the logical one and oftentimes reminds me of Sherlock Holmes, while Zooey is the emotional one and is often easily distracted and a self-diagnosed nymphomaniac). The story kicks off when San Francisco PD calls in a favor and AZ are asked to investigate the murders of 2 sons of a local mobster/gang boss. From there, the story takes on a life of its own as the fourth wall is frequently broken, dozens of pop culture references are made, and archetypes and tropes of the noir genre are played out for laughs. Despite the heavy humor elements of the novel, it remains a deeply satisfying case to investigate and the balance between Adrian’s Sherlockian observations and Zooey’s outrageous people skills combine for the best of both detective worlds. I loved this book so, so much and spent more time laughing out loud than I probably should have during a murder investigation. I cannot wait to read it again.
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  • Allyson Grove
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of the book from Doubleday Books, so thank you to them. Overall I really enjoyed this book. Noir is not typically something I read so I can not say how well this is in that aspect, but as a detective story it kept me guessing. The book was action packed and always moving. Adrian and Zooey Kimrean are not your average P.I.'s and that makes them all the better. It was a fun, quick read and my only complaint was that sometimes the dialogue and action jumped around so much it I received a free copy of the book from Doubleday Books, so thank you to them. Overall I really enjoyed this book. Noir is not typically something I read so I can not say how well this is in that aspect, but as a detective story it kept me guessing. The book was action packed and always moving. Adrian and Zooey Kimrean are not your average P.I.'s and that makes them all the better. It was a fun, quick read and my only complaint was that sometimes the dialogue and action jumped around so much it took a couple rereads of the page to catch myself up. Overall though, I'm recommending it to all my friends that want an quick moving mystery.
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  • Angel Hench
    January 1, 1970
    Ah, I have now found one of my favorite P.I.s of all time. A. Z. Kimrean is both a fast-talking, drug-loving con artist and a hard-boiled, Sherlock-Holmsian detective. "They" are twins that just happen to share the same body. The left side belongs to Zooey, the right to Adrian. One is a right-brained, creative and emotional crazy person. The other is a left-brained methodical, analytical crazy person.Not only is this novel full of smart, funny, sassy characters, the mystery is solid as well. (An Ah, I have now found one of my favorite P.I.s of all time. A. Z. Kimrean is both a fast-talking, drug-loving con artist and a hard-boiled, Sherlock-Holmsian detective. "They" are twins that just happen to share the same body. The left side belongs to Zooey, the right to Adrian. One is a right-brained, creative and emotional crazy person. The other is a left-brained methodical, analytical crazy person.Not only is this novel full of smart, funny, sassy characters, the mystery is solid as well. (An assassin is killing off members of a crime family one by one all while an undercover cop is trying to prevent a turf war and the collapse of his case.)I promise you will enjoy this book. Really, really.
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  • Bethany McPherson
    January 1, 1970
    I fear people will look at the main characters and turn away without giving this delightful poke at noir fiction a chance. That would be a mistake, for while there is humor enough (many of the jokes self deprecating) to fill the pages there is also a strong heart that beats throughout the novel giving purpose and pose to the zainy hijinks.
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  • Shanna Hale
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing! Cantero once again manages to tell a story that completely defies genres. His stories are simply wonderful. Do yourself a favor and read one.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    What if Sherlock Holmes and Harley Quinn shared custody of the same body? A High octane private eye action comedy mystery that I only paused reading long enough to visit with the neighbor's cat.Edgar Cantero writes the best mashups. Every book I'v read so far has been totally unique and pure fun.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    * It's a thriller and it's funny. Excellent sniping characters sharing a single body. Look forward to more from this author.* I received a free copy of the book in a Goodreads giveaway.
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 stars - full review to follow
  • Bob Reiss
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely adored this book. It was twisted and obscene in all he ways I love. it’s like the put Phillip K Dick and Phillip Marlowe in a blender, mixed them together on high speed and baked them in a cupcake tray. The uniquely bizarre premise and style didn’t detract from a solidly plotted mystery. January LaVoy handled the gender fluidity of the novel perfectly and pushed the narrative with a kinetic pace. I absolutely adored this book. It was twisted and obscene in all he ways I love. ‪it’s like the put Phillip K Dick and Phillip Marlowe in a blender, mixed them together on high speed and baked them in a cupcake tray.‬ The uniquely bizarre premise and style didn’t detract from a solidly plotted mystery. January LaVoy handled the gender fluidity of the novel perfectly and pushed the narrative with a kinetic pace.
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  • Emily Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    HOLY SHIT, Edgar Cantero is a new auto-fave for me. (What can I say – weird, edgy, and problematic is part of my brand.) I could wax poetic on and on about this man's style, except I did enough of that tonight directly in his face at a signing in Brooklyn. Thanks for indulging your first Kimrean cosplayer. 🙏
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  • Jill Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Oh. My. Goodness. I LOVE EDGAR CANTERO'S BOOKS!!Seriously, he has the most incredible imagination. And he pairs that with an impeccable writing style/sense of pacing and comedy AND a seemingly endless (and absolutely brilliant) collection of literary and pop-culture allusions that he sprinkles throughout his stories like marshmallows in Lucky Charms. Honestly, you couldn't ask for more!This book brings us the most phenomenally tragically hip protagonist in recent times - A.Z. Kimrean is a marvel Oh. My. Goodness. I LOVE EDGAR CANTERO'S BOOKS!!Seriously, he has the most incredible imagination. And he pairs that with an impeccable writing style/sense of pacing and comedy AND a seemingly endless (and absolutely brilliant) collection of literary and pop-culture allusions that he sprinkles throughout his stories like marshmallows in Lucky Charms. Honestly, you couldn't ask for more!This book brings us the most phenomenally tragically hip protagonist in recent times - A.Z. Kimrean is a marvelous creation and Cantero manages the duality/singularity with aplomb and panache (of course). The tale is wild and unusual and fascinating - as much so as Adrian and Zooey themselves - and I flew through it, skimming pages on my kindle so fast I'm surprised I still have fingerprints.I know this is a tragically short review for such a phenomenal book, but that's because I don't even know where to begin in explaining it without spoilers and I wouldn't want to ruin an ounce of this read. You need to discover Cantero's stories on your own, line by line - he is a master storyteller with a genius for imagery and wordplay that is phenomenal. If you like your stories original, perfectly paced, and with a spot-on sense of the darkly comic absurdity of life, you can do no better than Edgar Cantero.My review copy was provided by NetGalley.
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  • Kat Royale
    January 1, 1970
    If Marvel anti-hero, Deadpool, wrote a noir, Dick Tracy-esk adventure in modern day L.A., “This Body Isn’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” would be it, featuring a detective who’s single body is shared by two siblings, Adrien and Zooey Kimrean, whom have been fighting for dominance since before they were born. Because of their constant rivalry, both sister and brother have been pushing themselves to be the best they can be in their particular fields of expertise, hardening Adrien into a sharp, ob If Marvel anti-hero, Deadpool, wrote a noir, Dick Tracy-esk adventure in modern day L.A., “This Body Isn’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us” would be it, featuring a detective who’s single body is shared by two siblings, Adrien and Zooey Kimrean, whom have been fighting for dominance since before they were born. Because of their constant rivalry, both sister and brother have been pushing themselves to be the best they can be in their particular fields of expertise, hardening Adrien into a sharp, observant, logical, analytical genius and Zooey into an endlessly creative wildcard who’s addicted to life. It’s a promising concept with plenty of sequel material, but, as the first book to ever feature these characters, it’s a little rocky in places and the first rock is a big one. The writing style. The most glaring example of what I mean sits right at the beginning of the book. Just before chapter one, there’s an opening (that’s unlabeled, so let’s just call it the prologue) that’s a great, big ball of “huh?”. Our introduction to our main character, who definitely merits some explanation, is told though some messy, jarring shifts in perspective. It’s meant to be a funny interrogation scene with many winks to the audience, but that’s a rough way to introduce the reader to new material. Maybe it would have made for an interesting movie opening, but as the introduction of this book, it’s a blind, dizzying stumble into an uncertain world. Zooey’s ‘oh-so-random’ humor falls flat and I entered chapter one having no idea what was going on since everything in the prologue has no bearing in the rest of the book. If you can get used to the odd narrative flow, the book has a fairly interesting plotline involving assassination, gang wars and undercover cops. The Kimreans make for a unique duo and, at their best, the pair are written well enough to be put alongside any classic love/hate buddy cop team. However, there are places where the story just doesn’t work. Most of the time, the success of Adrien’s deductive reasoning and Zooey’s crackpot, spontaneous schemes are too contrived and rely heavily on Deus Ex Machina. Honestly, the entire investigative side of this “detective” novel is downplayed drastically for the sake of comedy, so don’t go into this expecting Agatha Christie. Without spoilers, all I can say is that the most important clues needed to solve this mystery appear AFTER the final confrontation. There is no conceivable way to predict the twist at the end and if anyone tells me they saw it coming, I’m going to have to call BS. That said, I did enjoy the ride. It’s less of a deep, psychological, mystery/thriller and more a fun, crude, romp with a band of likable characters and, oh yeah, there happens to be a murder. Set your expectations to ‘fun’ and you’ll like TBIBEFTBOU just fine. Three stars. Worth the read. If there are sequels featuring the Kimreans, I’d happily give them a try.
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  • James Love
    January 1, 1970
    I was given access to an Advanced Reading Copy, by Netgalley, in exchange for an honest opinion before publication. I gave the book three stars because there were 4 star moments but the strange and morally contraversial subject matter was presented in a manner that I found hard to grasp and difficult to get through which made me want to give it 2 stars... so, I split the difference. While I do demand moral certainty from my reality, I do admit enjoying moral uncertainty in my fantasy. https://yo I was given access to an Advanced Reading Copy, by Netgalley, in exchange for an honest opinion before publication. I gave the book three stars because there were 4 star moments but the strange and morally contraversial subject matter was presented in a manner that I found hard to grasp and difficult to get through which made me want to give it 2 stars... so, I split the difference. While I do demand moral certainty from my reality, I do admit enjoying moral uncertainty in my fantasy. https://youtu.be/00w1HGqyxTM I loved the first sentence. It made me think of Richard Stark's Parker pimp-slapping Elmore Leonard with a copy of Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules to Writing. The flashback within flashbacks made the start clunky and hard to follow the action. The use of the graphic novel format seems more appropriate for the author's intention. The style is a mash up of different genres. It was like Michael Palin and Terry Gilliam placed the scripts of Brazil, Pulp Fiction and The Maltese Falcon into a cocktail shaker with William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch and The Nova Express Trilogy, then added Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 and Gravity's Rainbow and then added Samuel Beckett's Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable and shook it up with nitroglycerin and LSD. If this were a movie it would star either RuPaul or Bruce Jenner & Kaitlyn Jenner as the main character, a dual personality, hermaphrodite literally split down the middle. A Two-Face minus the double-headed coin and Batman. A Two-Face that uses a rubber butt-plug instead of a gun. If this had been a graphic novel like Dave Sim's Cerebus or Neil Gaiman's Sandman; then I would have given it a 5 star review. I do recommend that others read it and make their own decisions. I will most likely give the author's other works my attention.
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  • Patricia
    January 1, 1970
    Disclosure: Thanks for the free book @doubledaybooks.I am a fan of noir, so when this book opened with a reference to Elmore Leonard, I expected that a fun read was ahead. And the idea that the private eye was two persons inhabiting one body would have to be unique entertainment for sure. But then the author buried the story in what seems like every cliche he could think of, and then added to the mix a senseless overabundance of vulgarity, thus spoiling what could have been amusing otherwise. Al Disclosure: Thanks for the free book @doubledaybooks.I am a fan of noir, so when this book opened with a reference to Elmore Leonard, I expected that a fun read was ahead. And the idea that the private eye was two persons inhabiting one body would have to be unique entertainment for sure. But then the author buried the story in what seems like every cliche he could think of, and then added to the mix a senseless overabundance of vulgarity, thus spoiling what could have been amusing otherwise. All this jumble of cliche and smut made the story very confusing and tedious. As for rating stars, I start by giving all five because I am so impressed with the talent and effort that goes into making a book. If there is something about a book that I really do not like or find terribly offensive, then I will start to take stars away. After all, I am a book lover, not a critic. I am sad to say that this book ended up with no stars from me. Well, I tried.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a blast. It's fast paced, funny, and at least I didn't see the ending coming. Essentially its a story about Private Detective Adrian and Zooey Kimrean, who happen to be 2 separate people who both inhabit the same body. They are essentially split down with Zooey controlling the left hemisphere (artistic side) and Adrian controlling the right (logic side). They get brought in help solve this case involving the death of a mob-boss's son and to try to stop a full scale mob war. Now, th This book was a blast. It's fast paced, funny, and at least I didn't see the ending coming. Essentially its a story about Private Detective Adrian and Zooey Kimrean, who happen to be 2 separate people who both inhabit the same body. They are essentially split down with Zooey controlling the left hemisphere (artistic side) and Adrian controlling the right (logic side). They get brought in help solve this case involving the death of a mob-boss's son and to try to stop a full scale mob war. Now, this book is crazy so those who like books grounded in realism will not like this book cause things that defy the laws of reality occur. However, if you can get past that, then you will enjoy this fun and short book. While this book is short and that is a good thing as it doesn't outstay its welcome, it is really pricey for such a short book. Also a few annoyances, where Zooey is all fun and free and Adrian kinda hates having the same body can get a bit wearing, but luckily the book is quick.
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  • Randi Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    First thoughts: FUN.Full disclosure: received a free ARC from @doubledaybooks Thank you!So, I asked for this because I read Cantero's Supernatural Enhancements and, while I enjoyed almost all of it, I HATED the ending. The twist felt cheap, largely because it seemed to come out of no where. I pretty much wanted to hate-read it.I admit it: I was wrong! I didn't hate it, I LOVED it. I might even reread The Supernatural Enhancements. With this crime noir satire, you know that you're getting a send- First thoughts: FUN.Full disclosure: received a free ARC from @doubledaybooks Thank you!So, I asked for this because I read Cantero's Supernatural Enhancements and, while I enjoyed almost all of it, I HATED the ending. The twist felt cheap, largely because it seemed to come out of no where. I pretty much wanted to hate-read it.I admit it: I was wrong! I didn't hate it, I LOVED it. I might even reread The Supernatural Enhancements. With this crime noir satire, you know that you're getting a send-up of the genre from the beginning, so you can just sit back and laugh your ass off at the quips and absurdity.While some of the comedy felt a bit heavy-handed, this book was overall a fun romp through noir tropes.
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  • Nick Spacek
    January 1, 1970
    the most hilarious descriptive scenes since terry pratchett -- who, himself, took on the mantle from douglas adams. it's a book that gleefully plays with genre conventions, throwing rules out the window, all while maintaining the unique voice cantero's been improving upon with each successive book.it's absurdly fun, while still managing to emote in a heartfelt manner. when you have two people in one body, the humorous possibilities are endless, and while cantero ably mines the concept for all it the most hilarious descriptive scenes since terry pratchett -- who, himself, took on the mantle from douglas adams. it's a book that gleefully plays with genre conventions, throwing rules out the window, all while maintaining the unique voice cantero's been improving upon with each successive book.it's absurdly fun, while still managing to emote in a heartfelt manner. when you have two people in one body, the humorous possibilities are endless, and while cantero ably mines the concept for all it's worth, the moments where adrian and zooey's real problems come to light are handled in a way which demonstrates a true ability to render pain and frustration with equal aplomb.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    Some basic thoughts before my full review comes:This book as unique. The main character is actually two people in one body and they each represent a side of our brain, one methodical and no emotion while the other is all instinct and pleasure. The rest of the story is just as interesting. It examines just about everything and throws it at you without sugarcoating anything. Which is amazing and I really do appreciate it!4.5 right now because it was cliched as all heck but it was raw and intellige Some basic thoughts before my full review comes:This book as unique. The main character is actually two people in one body and they each represent a side of our brain, one methodical and no emotion while the other is all instinct and pleasure. The rest of the story is just as interesting. It examines just about everything and throws it at you without sugarcoating anything. Which is amazing and I really do appreciate it!4.5 right now because it was cliched as all heck but it was raw and intelligent and didn't hold anything back
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  • Brad Kirk
    January 1, 1970
    I always look forward to a new release from Cantero. I really enjoyed Supernatural Enhancements; felt that Meddling Kids didn't quite get to the same level of awesomeness; and really enjoyed this latest one. This book is entertaining, weird like only Cantero can do, funny, and enjoyable.
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  • Leah Remy
    January 1, 1970
    This was SUCH an enjoyable read. Makes fun of the detective genre will also being heartwarming! A.Z. are so great in so many ways. I love Zooey's antics and the dynamic she has with Adrian is AWESOME!
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