Mycroft and Sherlock
The new novel by NBA All-Star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, starring brothers Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes. Now a force to be reckoned with in the War Office, the young Mycroft Holmes is growing his network of contacts and influence, although not always in a manner that pleases his closest friend, Cyrus Douglas. A Trinidadian of African descent, Douglas has opened a home for orphaned children, while still running his successful import business.When a ship carrying a cargo in which Douglas was heavily invested runs aground on the Dorset coast, Mycroft convinces his brother Sherlock to offer his services at the orphanage while Douglas travels to see what can be salvaged. Sherlock finds himself surprisingly at home among the street urchins, but is alarmed to discover that two boys show signs of drug addiction. Meanwhile Douglas also finds evidence of opium use on two dead sailors, and it becomes clear to Mycroft that the vile trade is on the ascent once again.Travelling to China on the trail of the drug business, Mycroft and Douglas discover that there are many in high places willing to make a profit from the misery of others. Their opponents are powerful, and the cost of stemming the deadly tide of opium is likely to be high...

Mycroft and Sherlock Details

TitleMycroft and Sherlock
Author
ReleaseOct 9th, 2018
PublisherTitan Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Historical Mystery, Historical, Historical Fiction

Mycroft and Sherlock Review

  • Mahlon
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been anticipating the publication of this book for about a year and it did not disappoint! Another rip-roaring, page turning, almost literally heart-stopping adventure of Mycroft Holmes and his friend Douglas. Although I found the story underwhelming, it’s the depth of the writing and the characters that will keep readers coming back to this series. I agree with other reviewers that there was a little too much Sherlock for a Mycroft adventure, but I think Sherlockians will enjoy being there I’ve been anticipating the publication of this book for about a year and it did not disappoint! Another rip-roaring, page turning, almost literally heart-stopping adventure of Mycroft Holmes and his friend Douglas. Although I found the story underwhelming, it’s the depth of the writing and the characters that will keep readers coming back to this series. I agree with other reviewers that there was a little too much Sherlock for a Mycroft adventure, but I think Sherlockians will enjoy being there with Sherlock as he matures, when he is discovering the joy that investigation brings him and beginning to hone his craft. I also appreciated seeing the more vulnerable side of Mycroft in this book and learning the reasons why he developed into a more cerebral and less physical person than Sherlock became even though they have roughly the same set of skills. I only hope I don’t have to wait three years for the next adventure!
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  • Deb Jones
    January 1, 1970
    As long as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and co-writer Anne Waterhouse continue to write books in the Holmes' series, I will be ready and waiting to read them. I thoroughly enjoyed "Mycroft Holmes," the pair's first book; their second offering is no less dynamic. Although the timeline of the second book, "Mycroft and Sherlock" follows that of "Mycroft Holmes," these books could just as easily be read as stand-alones for the adventures in each of them. Reading them in sequence adds to the understanding of As long as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and co-writer Anne Waterhouse continue to write books in the Holmes' series, I will be ready and waiting to read them. I thoroughly enjoyed "Mycroft Holmes," the pair's first book; their second offering is no less dynamic. Although the timeline of the second book, "Mycroft and Sherlock" follows that of "Mycroft Holmes," these books could just as easily be read as stand-alones for the adventures in each of them. Reading them in sequence adds to the understanding of some of the main characters' developments, something I personally enjoy.
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  • Andrea Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    The 2nd of Jabbar’s books about Mycroft & Sherlock Holmes is well-written and entertaining. He does a good job of bringing the characters to life and letting the readers get to know them better. Thoroughly enjoyable read.
  • Seregil of Rhiminee
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Risingshadow.Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse's Mycroft and Sherlock is the second novel in the Mycroft Holmes series. The first novel, Mycroft Holmes, began to flesh out the life of Sherlock Holmes' older brother, Mycroft. Now, this second novel continues to reveal more things about Mycroft Holmes in a thrilling way and a spotlight is also given to his younger brother, Sherlock Holmes.Because I enjoyed reading Mycroft Holmes, I could hardly wait to get my hands on Originally published at Risingshadow.Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse's Mycroft and Sherlock is the second novel in the Mycroft Holmes series. The first novel, Mycroft Holmes, began to flesh out the life of Sherlock Holmes' older brother, Mycroft. Now, this second novel continues to reveal more things about Mycroft Holmes in a thrilling way and a spotlight is also given to his younger brother, Sherlock Holmes.Because I enjoyed reading Mycroft Holmes, I could hardly wait to get my hands on this novel. I'm pleased to say that this novel - just like its predecessor - is a genuine page-turner. Mycroft and Sherlock has been written so well that it's pure joy for those who love Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's original Sherlock Holmes stories and want to find out more about the Holmes brothers. It's a highly entertaining and extremely gripping novel - once you start reading it, the pages just fly by and you'll hardly notice the passing of time.Although Mycroft and Sherlock is not speculative fiction, I can highly recommend it to speculative fiction readers, because it will be of interest to many readers due to its Victorian atmosphere, excellent prose and fascinating story that has a few elements that border on the line of being horror elements. Regardless of what you normally read, I strongly urge you to take a look at this novel, because it's excellent escapism.The story begins in November 1872. Mycroft Holmes is now twenty-six years old and has become a special consul in the War Office. News about nude and mutilated bodies have spread among people and have become the talk of London. Mycroft Holmes is not interested in the murders, but his brother, Sherlock, has become fascinated by them and all things macabre... Cyrus Douglas, a friend of Mycroft, runs an orphanage. When a shipment belonging to him runs aground on Chesil Beach in Dorset, Sherlock is persuaded to serve as a tutor in the orphanage so that he will learn compassion. Sherlock notices that one of the boys has punctures in certain places and becomes interested in what has happened to him. Soon Mycroft, Sherlock and Cyrus find themselves investigating opium trade and Sherlock visits London's opium dens...In this novel, Mycroft and Sherlock are on the verge of becoming the people that readers know they will eventually become. It's satisfying and exciting to follow their development, because their lives are explored well.The characterisation is simply excellent, because the protagonists are fascinatingly vivid and the secondary characters are intriguing. The authors write well about Mycroft, Sherlock and Cyrus Douglas by giving them believable voices.Here's a bit of information about the protagonists:- Mycroft Holmes has done well for himself. Although he is young, he has a good position in the War Office. He has a weak heart and must not exert himself too much.- Sherlock Holmes is Mycroft's younger brother. In this novel, he begins to grow up a bit more. He notices that he enjoys investigating things.- Cyrus Douglas is Mycroft's friend, who runs an orphanage, Nickolus House. He also owns a tobacco shop, Regent Tobaccos. He has two bullets lodged near his heart.The differences between Mycroft and Sherlock are deftly explored and fleshed out in this novel. It's intriguing to read about what Mycroft thinks of his younger brother, because Sherlock is different from him and has youthful energy that annoys him. Mycroft doesn't approve of certain things that his brother does. It was interesting to read about how many secrets they kept from each other, because they both had something to hide.It's great that the authors have included Cyrus Douglas in the cast of characters, because his character allows them to explore elements that bring depth to the story. Because Cyrus Douglas is a Trinidadian businessman who has come to London, his life is different from the lives of the Holmes brothers.I enjoyed reading about how Sherlock interacted with the boys at the orphanage, because he was able to find a way to talk to them and knew how to teach them things. Although he was not much older than the boys, he was capable of maintaining authority over them. His behaviour and thoughts were perfectly described.Dark and macabre elements are handled masterfully by the authors. It's great that the authors don't shy away from unsettling details, because their descriptions about the dead bodies are sufficiently creepy and disturbing.When I read this novel there I got the impression that Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a devoted Holmesian. There's no question about his enthusiasm towards Sherlock Holmes stories, because this novel is stunningly good and entertaining. He is a talented author whose fiction is a pleasure to read.I was delighted by the quality of the prose, because the prose is excellent and nuanced. I like the authors' writing style a lot, because the atmosphere in this novel is spot-on. They beautifully bring the Victorian age to life with their gripping and vivid prose. Their depictions of the various places, people and happenings feel atmospheric and realistic.One of the best things about this novel is that it's utterly fresh. Although most readers fully well know who Mycroft and Sherlock are, this novel is something new, because it tells about the brothers when they were young.If you've ever read any Sherlock Holmes stories, you owe it to yourself to read Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse's Mycroft and Sherlock (I also recommend reading the previous novel, Mycroft Holmes). This novel is without any kind of doubt the best Victorian mystery novel of the year, so please make sure that you don't miss it. It's a welcome and impressive addition to the Sherlock Holmes canon of mystery fiction.Highly recommended!
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  • Marlene
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Reading RealityCombine “portrait of the detective as a young truant” with “portrait of the spider at the heart of the British government as a young bureaucrat” and you get a couple of the parts of Mycroft and Sherlock.This is also a story where we begin to see our heroes becoming the people that we know they will become. Not merely Sherlock the intelligent, intolerant, sociopathic detective, but also Mycroft as the rather bloated and nearly agoraphobic spider at the heart Originally published at Reading RealityCombine “portrait of the detective as a young truant” with “portrait of the spider at the heart of the British government as a young bureaucrat” and you get a couple of the parts of Mycroft and Sherlock.This is also a story where we begin to see our heroes becoming the people that we know they will become. Not merely Sherlock the intelligent, intolerant, sociopathic detective, but also Mycroft as the rather bloated and nearly agoraphobic spider at the heart of the government’s web – a web that he himself will spin in the decades to come.And part of what makes this work, both the first book in the series, Mycroft Holmes, and this latest, is that the authors tell a story about these much-beloved brothers that is new to our eyes while still fitting into the canon that we already know – the world that they will eventually inhabit but that for them is yet to come.But this story is a followup to the authors’ Mycroft Holmes – a book that was published in 2015 but that I didn’t get around to until earlier this year. I enjoyed it so much that I actually bought Mycroft and Sherlock when it came out – there were no ARCs and I really wanted to see what happened next.Not that we don’t know what happens eventually to the Holmes Brothers, but I wanted to see the next steps that this story would take to get from here to there.This is both a sequel and not. The events of the first book do have consequences in this one, but not the case itself. And it’s fascinating and if you enjoy Holmes’ pastiches I definitely recommend it.Those consequences are rather surprising – because they revolve around the health of the protagonists and not further involvement in that particular case. At the end of the first story Douglas survived a near-fatal gunshot wound, resulting in a couple of slugs sitting uncomfortably near his heart. For the man of action that he has been, his need to either restrict his actions or attempt to protect his vulnerability is not easy.Mycroft is just not feeling well – surprisingly unwell for a healthy young man in his mid-20s. That last messy case included an untreated bout of malaria, resulting in a weakened heart. So both Mycroft and his friend Douglas suffer from similar ailments, albeit from different causes.And with different results. Mycroft (and Sherlock) both know about Douglas’ condition. But Mycroft, secret-keeper that he is, keeps his condition to himself – even when it would behoove him to reveal it. He can’t stand to admit to a weakness – particularly when he feels that his work is not yet done.But his reticence adds to the distance in his relationship with his brother -a distance that will continue to have consequences for the rest of their lives.There is a case here, and it’s a typical Holmesian farrago of convoluted means and hidden motives, with the addition of the right hand (in this case Mycroft) not knowing what the left hand (in this case Sherlock) is doing – and vice versa. With nearly fatal results – multiple times.It is also a case where the story explores conditions at the time. As the saying goes, “The past is another country, they do things differently there.” The heart of this case is the drug trade – which is surprisingly legal for the most part yet still has aspects that are hidden in dark shadows.But the soul of the case is about family, and the infinite number of ways in which trying to help can go oh so terribly wrong.Escape Rating A-: I liked this every bit as much as the first book. Which was a lot. This was certainly another case of right book, right time. I was just in the mood for more Holmes (I have another one in the queue as well) but this was just right.Part of what makes these two books so good is the addition of Cyrus Douglas. For the most part, the original canon dealt with the Victorian era from an upper-middle class white point of view. The addition of Douglas as a main character forces Mycroft and Sherlock to deal with the parts of the world that men of their race and class generally ignored.At the same time, Douglas also serves as the adult in the room. In his mid-40s by this point in the story, he has a wealth of real-life experience – and the scars to go with it – that the Holmes boys lack. Douglas can be a voice of reason that makes the brothers stop and think for a minute – or at least make Mycroft stop and think for a minute – in ways that they wouldn’t otherwise do.Both of the Holmes are a bit melodramatic at this point in their lives. We never think of them as young because they were not in the canon, but in these stories, with Mycroft in his mid-20s and Sherlock in his late teens, they are very young indeed – and it shows in their actions as well as their thought-processes.At the same time, we are able to see the elements of what will become their known personas beginning to gel. Mycroft is beginning to retreat from the wider world, becoming more focused on his governmental duties and on the forces that only he can see. While this case brings him temporarily out of himself, we can also see that it is temporary.Sherlock’s methods are clearly under development in this case, but his personality is nearly set. And we see both happen as he learns how to handle disguises and starts the seeds that will become the Irregulars while at the same time he is still wearing his heart on his sleeve – and learning to hide it.If you want to find yourself up to the neck in the Victorian era and several steps behind two of the most famous detectives in history, this book is a really fun read. I hope there will be more!
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    This was an odd book, as it has to be both a prequel to the Sherlock Holmes stories by Doyle, and a sequel to the Mycroft Holmes story by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his co-author. As a result, it reads oddly in places. The characters, both from the previous novel and from this one, are excellent, and the developing personality of Sherlock is shown in interesting detail. On the other hand, the actual mystery in this story is weaker, due to the problem that much of what was going on wasn't actually i This was an odd book, as it has to be both a prequel to the Sherlock Holmes stories by Doyle, and a sequel to the Mycroft Holmes story by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his co-author. As a result, it reads oddly in places. The characters, both from the previous novel and from this one, are excellent, and the developing personality of Sherlock is shown in interesting detail. On the other hand, the actual mystery in this story is weaker, due to the problem that much of what was going on wasn't actually illegal. That made the "funny money" subplot weaker, because the villains didn't need to do that. They could have made less distinct counterfeits in exactly the same way without ever getting caught doing anything illegal.The drug plot was interesting, because there wasn't exactly anything illegal going on, other than selling some of the product to English customers without a pharmacist involved. If they'd kept to selling overseas, again no crime. I assumed that the mysterious drug was a forerunner of what we know as heroin, which was first announced soon after the events of this story. The changes in Sherlock as he realizes how caught up in investigation he has become are very interesting. Also, his interest in science. I didn't understand why he was described as playing a vielle, though, as that antique style of instrument would have been both odd and distinctive, and no reason is given within the plot. Still, the story was interesting, and the characters kept me turning the pages. I look forward to more in this series.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Like the first Mycroft Holmes book, this is a bit of a re-imagining. The focus is on Mycroft as much or more than Sherlock. He's around 25, Sherlock not quite 19. So this is very early days compared to Conan Doyle's stories. Here, I felt like we were learning a bit about the beginning of Sherlock's talent for disguise and the beginnings of the Baker Street Irregulars, among otherthings.One thing that doesn't, for me, fit with the original idea of Mycroft, is that he has a heart issue. For me, th Like the first Mycroft Holmes book, this is a bit of a re-imagining. The focus is on Mycroft as much or more than Sherlock. He's around 25, Sherlock not quite 19. So this is very early days compared to Conan Doyle's stories. Here, I felt like we were learning a bit about the beginning of Sherlock's talent for disguise and the beginnings of the Baker Street Irregulars, among otherthings.One thing that doesn't, for me, fit with the original idea of Mycroft, is that he has a heart issue. For me, that doesn't mesh with Conan Doyle's description of him as very fat, though it does kind of go with him being sedentary. Of course, in this case, he's still fairly active -- I guess the heart issue is meant to hint at why he ends up as he does in the original stories.The case here involves smuggling, murder, and counterfeiting. Mycroft reluctantly 'allows' Sherlock to assist when he realizes there are places he can go that Mycroft can't. Still Sherlock goes a bit beyond what he's told to do. But Mycroft isn't all goodie-two-shoes either. The plot is complex, but overall there's a satisfying conclusion.
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  • Patrick SG
    January 1, 1970
    The best part of this book is seeing the character of Sherlock as a 18-year old who is rather naive and still learning his craft of detection. He's unsure of himself in many ways and still has much to learn about human nature and human anatomy, both of which will serve him well in his future endeavors. It's also fun to learn more about the character of Mycroft, who we first saw in the initial book of this series.The unfortunate part of the book is the overly complex plot and side avenues through The best part of this book is seeing the character of Sherlock as a 18-year old who is rather naive and still learning his craft of detection. He's unsure of himself in many ways and still has much to learn about human nature and human anatomy, both of which will serve him well in his future endeavors. It's also fun to learn more about the character of Mycroft, who we first saw in the initial book of this series.The unfortunate part of the book is the overly complex plot and side avenues through which the narrative wanders. A bit more editing and tightening of the plot could have improved the story much more, in my opinion.Still, the more familiar landscape of London in this book (the previous one was largely set in Trinidad) comes across quite well in the writing and you feel like you are immersed in that time and place.Readers of the first book in the series will have an advantage with the characters of this novel and I wonder if those picking this book up first will be somewhat lost regarding several key characters and references.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second in the Holmes collection that I hope Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse, his collaborator, keep writing! The duo has a way with words that brings me right to the time and place of the Holmes brothers, carefully evoking sights, sounds and smells, and completely capturing what I imagine a teenaged Sherlock might be like. While the mystery itself was somewhat transparent, it is the setting of the scenes, the strength of the writing to transport me as if I were present, that I so ap This is the second in the Holmes collection that I hope Abdul-Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse, his collaborator, keep writing! The duo has a way with words that brings me right to the time and place of the Holmes brothers, carefully evoking sights, sounds and smells, and completely capturing what I imagine a teenaged Sherlock might be like. While the mystery itself was somewhat transparent, it is the setting of the scenes, the strength of the writing to transport me as if I were present, that I so appreciate in both this and the previous story. It is a pleasure to follow the thought processes of Mycroft and Sherlock, and to see their personas develop. Once a Holmes fan, always a Holmes fan!Upon finishing this book I checked to see my impressions of the first one, Mycroft Holmes, and (no surprise!) I liked it every bit as much as this current tale.
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  • Tori
    January 1, 1970
    Another great mystery! I would love to know how much of the book Kareem Abdul Jabbar actually wrote, and how much Anna Waterhouse contributed. Is it really possible that he could be such a good author AND an amazing basketball player????? I have no idea!Again, I would have given this book five stars except for the inclusion of such graphic violence. The story - and the vocabulary from 1800's London - was original and captivating! We meet Sherlock when he is 18 years old, not especially social, n Another great mystery! I would love to know how much of the book Kareem Abdul Jabbar actually wrote, and how much Anna Waterhouse contributed. Is it really possible that he could be such a good author AND an amazing basketball player????? I have no idea!Again, I would have given this book five stars except for the inclusion of such graphic violence. The story - and the vocabulary from 1800's London - was original and captivating! We meet Sherlock when he is 18 years old, not especially social, not especially interested in academics - and just beginning to solve mysteries. Mycroft's best friend is Douglas - a black man who has to pretend that he is not educated nor an able employer because of discrimination. Interesting characters, amazing historical knowledge, a swift-moving plot - a great read!
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    The young Mycroft Holmes is concerned about his younger brother Sherlock, who can't seem to concentrate on his studies and has a morbid interest in crime. Mycroft is also concerned about his health, and about his best friend, Trinidadian businessman Cyrus Douglas, who has put all his money into a charity school for slum boys. Mycroft volunteers Sherlock to teach at the temporarily short-staffed school, where Sherlock scents a mystery about a recently entered boy who disappears and is found on th The young Mycroft Holmes is concerned about his younger brother Sherlock, who can't seem to concentrate on his studies and has a morbid interest in crime. Mycroft is also concerned about his health, and about his best friend, Trinidadian businessman Cyrus Douglas, who has put all his money into a charity school for slum boys. Mycroft volunteers Sherlock to teach at the temporarily short-staffed school, where Sherlock scents a mystery about a recently entered boy who disappears and is found on the verge of death. Somehow this ties in with the beautiful Chinese woman Mycroft has just met. He's been puzzling about why someone is apparently smuggling drugs, which are legal to transport at that time, and thought relatively harmless if consumed in small quantities. Second in this entertaining series.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    It is fun once again to learn more about Mycroft Holmes and to see the workings of Sherlock's eighteen year old mind. This novel started rather slowly because the authors needed to refresh our memories about Cyrus Douglas and the where the Holmes brothers are at this stage in their lives.Once we are brought up to date the story moves between the small Chinese community in London and the drug addicts who suffer from different degrees of degradation. Drugs are not illegal so the sale of them is no It is fun once again to learn more about Mycroft Holmes and to see the workings of Sherlock's eighteen year old mind. This novel started rather slowly because the authors needed to refresh our memories about Cyrus Douglas and the where the Holmes brothers are at this stage in their lives.Once we are brought up to date the story moves between the small Chinese community in London and the drug addicts who suffer from different degrees of degradation. Drugs are not illegal so the sale of them is not a crime, but murder and mayhem certainly are. Both Mycroft and Sherlock have secrets they do not share with one another. Sherlock is an addict (a lifelong problem as Conan Doyle readers know) and Mycroft is suffering from heart problems.I enjoy this series and think that both of the authors have given Holmes fans a worth prequel. I look forward to the next book.
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  • Baker St Shelves
    January 1, 1970
    So this is a sequel to the Mycroft Holmes book a few years ago which was fine, but it wasn’t my favorite of the books featuring the Holmes characters.This book I was looking forward to reading since as the title implies, it was going to feature Sherlock as they work together solving a crime.That would be a fun book to read, but Sherlock has several moments where he doesn’t have any screen time and much of the side characters were bland.Now this is a prequel a few years before Watson met Sherlock So this is a sequel to the Mycroft Holmes book a few years ago which was fine, but it wasn’t my favorite of the books featuring the Holmes characters.This book I was looking forward to reading since as the title implies, it was going to feature Sherlock as they work together solving a crime.That would be a fun book to read, but Sherlock has several moments where he doesn’t have any screen time and much of the side characters were bland.Now this is a prequel a few years before Watson met Sherlock, so the Holmes brothers haven’t grown to their roles that we’re familiar with, but since this is the second book they should be a little closer and they just seemed very off from the usual ways they act. This really was a step backwards.
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  • Meghan
    January 1, 1970
    While very much a sequel to Mycroft, this second book is even better as we get a very close look at the relationship between the brothers, as well as a small glimpse into their mother and father. The authors have a truly unique insight into Sherlock (like how he maneuvers due to his height) that isn’t found in very many places. The moments of humor don’t detract from the seriousness of the crime, they add to the story and make it better. The ending is truly sad and leaves the reader asking when While very much a sequel to Mycroft, this second book is even better as we get a very close look at the relationship between the brothers, as well as a small glimpse into their mother and father. The authors have a truly unique insight into Sherlock (like how he maneuvers due to his height) that isn’t found in very many places. The moments of humor don’t detract from the seriousness of the crime, they add to the story and make it better. The ending is truly sad and leaves the reader asking when the third book is due out.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    Although I enjoyed this quite a bit, I didn't love it like I loved the first one for one simple reason—Sherlock. It's not that I dislike Sherlock (though he is slightly more unpleasant here than usual), but that such a large portion of the book was told from his POV. The first book was all about Mycroft and his life and his friends and that was what I loved about it. To divide that focus does an incredible disservice to Mycroft. As an entertaining mystery, it's fine. As a Mycroft Holmes novel, i Although I enjoyed this quite a bit, I didn't love it like I loved the first one for one simple reason—Sherlock. It's not that I dislike Sherlock (though he is slightly more unpleasant here than usual), but that such a large portion of the book was told from his POV. The first book was all about Mycroft and his life and his friends and that was what I loved about it. To divide that focus does an incredible disservice to Mycroft. As an entertaining mystery, it's fine. As a Mycroft Holmes novel, it falls short.
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  • Nichelle
    January 1, 1970
    It was okAbsolutely enjoyed the first book. Focusing more on Mycroft was a great avenue to explore along with giving us a glimpse of a younger Sherlock and a solidified glimpse into their familial background. However this book was a slow read and just didn't keep my attention. I successfully completed the book because I purchased it and wanted to be done with it.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    As a big fan of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, I was skeptical about this book. Come on, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a basketball player! I was pleasantly surprised at how well written the book is. The story line kept me interested - so much so that I couldn't put it down. For those of you who are Sherlock Holmes fans, this book is worth a read.
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  • Rex A Whicker
    January 1, 1970
    Holmes brothers do it again!Mycroft, Sherlock, and cohorts unravel a murderous and dastardly plot to save Victorian England! Well written and great fun! A must read for any Holmes fans!
  • Sandra Pyeatt
    January 1, 1970
    Great insights into Mycroft and Sherlock Holmes, a great new main character whose African descent and working class origins adds social commentary, great historical research, and a great story. What’s not to love?!
  • Sumit
    January 1, 1970
    An unimaginative and ordinary novel
  • Doreen
    January 1, 1970
    9/29/18 Full review tk. Highly, highly recommended for anyone with even a passing interest in the Sherlock Holmes canon.
  • Patrick Ewing
    January 1, 1970
    Superb!
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