The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom
In the fairy-tale kingdom of Wanderly, everyone has a role.Birdie Bloom is a Tragical—an orphan doomed to an unhappy ending.Agnes Prunella Crunch is a witch. The wicked kind.In Wanderly, a meeting between a witch and a Tragical can only end one way: tragically. But lately, Birdie and Agnes have both been searching for something more. And with the help of some mysterious Winds, a few wayward letters, and a very unusual book, they might just find the kingdom’s unlikeliest friendship—and together, rewrite their story for good.

The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom Details

TitleThe Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom
Author
ReleaseMar 26th, 2019
PublisherHarperCollins
ISBN-139780062835857
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Paranormal, Witches

The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom Review

  • Mrs. Europaea
    January 1, 1970
    I can relate to Birdie Bloom. Birdie is an eight year old orphan stuck in this awful house, with awful adults training her for the day she will have to sacrifice her life for a triumphant. That is, until the Winds of Wanderly step in and Foulweather's Home for the Tragical is thrown into utter chaos. I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE this book. What Beltz does well is she really knows how to write an engaging story for young children without using crude and gross language that I see all too often with I can relate to Birdie Bloom. Birdie is an eight year old orphan stuck in this awful house, with awful adults training her for the day she will have to sacrifice her life for a triumphant. That is, until the Winds of Wanderly step in and Foulweather's Home for the Tragical is thrown into utter chaos. I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE this book. What Beltz does well is she really knows how to write an engaging story for young children without using crude and gross language that I see all too often with books in this genre for this age range. Instead, Beltz created a wondrous world full of magic and friendship that teaches bravery, kindness and positivity.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Whimsical adventure in a land ruled "by the book." If you're an orphan, you'll have a gloomy life and come to a tragical end. If you're a witch? You're definitely wicked. Because that's how things are in books! But what if you . . . don't want to die a tragic orphan? Alone and friendless? What if you're a witch who is tired of doing the same stupid spells over and over? That's where this book comes in. Also, the book within this book. Because orphan Birdie Bloom isn't going to take her Tragical Whimsical adventure in a land ruled "by the book." If you're an orphan, you'll have a gloomy life and come to a tragical end. If you're a witch? You're definitely wicked. Because that's how things are in books! But what if you . . . don't want to die a tragic orphan? Alone and friendless? What if you're a witch who is tired of doing the same stupid spells over and over? That's where this book comes in. Also, the book within this book. Because orphan Birdie Bloom isn't going to take her Tragical ending lying down! Nor is Agnes Prunella Crunch, Wicked Witch! But they're going to need help: help from new friends, from one-eyed cats, gassy blue dragons, blueberry mush, and wayward winds! PS: I don't know if this book is meant to be the first in a series, but I really hope it is. I have more things I want to see Birdie and Agnes do!
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    DNF @ Page 72I had high hopes for this. Now, I didn't not enjoy this. The writing style was amazing and I loved the footnotes. This book lacked one thing, in my opinion. A plot. I hope others enjoy this more than I did! 😊😊
  • VIBookCrate
    January 1, 1970
    Birdie Bloom lives under the iron fist of Mistress Octavia at Foulweather’s Home for the Tragical, where she is constantly reminded that she will meet a horrible and tragical death when she’s finally released from the Home. But, unbeknownst to Mistress Octavia, Birdie has found something very special, and very secret: a book about friendship, that has no ending. Agnes Prunella Crunch is the wickedest of wicked witches. She has spent an entire year combing for the vilest of spells and magic, but Birdie Bloom lives under the iron fist of Mistress Octavia at Foulweather’s Home for the Tragical, where she is constantly reminded that she will meet a horrible and tragical death when she’s finally released from the Home. But, unbeknownst to Mistress Octavia, Birdie has found something very special, and very secret: a book about friendship, that has no ending. Agnes Prunella Crunch is the wickedest of wicked witches. She has spent an entire year combing for the vilest of spells and magic, but soon she realizes that there is no more for her to find. So, she sends letters to her witching comrades, asking them what to do next. But one of her letters is swept up by the mystical Winds of Wanderly, and lands in the possession of Birdie Bloom. I liked how this book was written from two different perspectives, the witch and the Tragical. It gave the story a lot of depth that would’ve been hard to grasp if it had been only one point of view telling the story. Both protagonists have their own subplots but still morphed into one seamless series of events, each affecting the other. Though it was a speed-read for me, I enjoyed it a lot. It was heart-warming and quite interesting, even suspenseful at times.I would recommend this book for junior fiction or middle-grade readers. There is no coarse language or sexual interactions or references, and though they hint toward gruesome situations (such as Mistress Octavia warning the Tragicals of their horrifying ends), it is always vague and never occurs.
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  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    A tale narrated by a book about a fairy-tale world where everyone has a role written into their "story" and it must be followed. But when Birdie Bloom, a Tragical orphan doomed to an unhappy ending, discovers an unfinished book she is given something she has never had before - hope. This was a very unusual tale that I think was paced perfectly for MG readers. In Wanderly, all is determined by the Chancellor and all books must get his official seal of approval. Orphans are Tragicals and witches a A tale narrated by a book about a fairy-tale world where everyone has a role written into their "story" and it must be followed. But when Birdie Bloom, a Tragical orphan doomed to an unhappy ending, discovers an unfinished book she is given something she has never had before - hope. This was a very unusual tale that I think was paced perfectly for MG readers. In Wanderly, all is determined by the Chancellor and all books must get his official seal of approval. Orphans are Tragicals and witches are evil. The Triumphants live beautiful happy lives, but we never get to see them. Tragicals are told from early on that no one cares for them, that they have no friends, and they will die a tragic death. When Birdie finds a book without a seal that isn't even finished which talks of "friendship," Birdie has to know more. Then she winds up getting a magical letter from one Agnes Prunella Crunch, a witch who is completely bored by her own existence, and the fun begins.Of course we know from the get go that Birdie Bloom's life isn't really tragical. But the book is meant to show how she and Agnes make changes to their lives by putting pen to paper and by testing the new waters of friendship, with each other and some of the other Tragicals. The children learn of the power that they have when they work together and Agnes learns that doing good actually feels better than doing evil and perhaps that is why she was so bored for so long.The story is engaging, funny, and different. Young readers will get a kick out of how Beltz takes the traditional fairy tale story line of heroes, villains, and doomed characters and turns it on its head. A real show of creativity that shows how we are all in charge of writing our own stories.As an aside - the story reminded me of Matilda the Musical and the song "Naughty." When Matilda decides to take her fate into her own hands, she decides she has to be a little bit naughty. "I wonder why they didn't just change their story?We're told we have to do what we're told but surelySometimes you have to be a little bit naughty."
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  • Keshia
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partner Thanks to the #kidlitexchange network, publisher @harpercollinsch, and author #temrebeltz for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own. I finished this book in the sunshine this week, which would seem to contradict the title of this book! But, as the book tells us itself, this is not an entirely tragical tale. Birdie is an orphan, and in Wanderly orphans are destined for tragic endings. This seems to be the path that Birdie and the other children will follo @kidlitexchange #partner Thanks to the #kidlitexchange network, publisher @harpercollinsch, and author #temrebeltz for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own. I finished this book in the sunshine this week, which would seem to contradict the title of this book! But, as the book tells us itself, this is not an entirely tragical tale. Birdie is an orphan, and in Wanderly orphans are destined for tragic endings. This seems to be the path that Birdie and the other children will follow until the day Birdie finds a book. A book about friendship, a term that puzzles Birdie at first. As she begins to explore what being and having a friend means, Birdie’s life begins to change bit by bit. One of the events that sparks these changes is a mysterious letter blowing in on the wind. When Birdie responds to the letter, she finds out she’s writing to a witch! A with named Agnes Prunella Crunch. Although she has her hesitations, Birdie decides to write back and begins a regular correspondence with Agnes. This is a tale about unexpected friendships, what it means to be a friend, and venturing outside of your comfort zone. Witches, magic, and dragons also feature in this tale, as well as a rat, a kitten, and wolves. It really has a little bit of everything 😉 Look for this book on Tuesday, March 26!
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  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*
    January 1, 1970
    The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom by Temre Beltz, 368 pages. Harper Collins, MAY 2019. $17.Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG (some scary scenes)BUYING ADVISORY: EL - ADVISABLEAUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGEBirdie Bloom knows her lot in life is to be a tragical figure with a short life, in order to protect the rest of the citizens from bad ends to their tales. Agnes Crunch has been an evil, smelly, warty witch for a very long time, but now she is feeling discontented – bored, you might say. B The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom by Temre Beltz, 368 pages. Harper Collins, MAY 2019. $17.Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG (some scary scenes)BUYING ADVISORY: EL - ADVISABLEAUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGEBirdie Bloom knows her lot in life is to be a tragical figure with a short life, in order to protect the rest of the citizens from bad ends to their tales. Agnes Crunch has been an evil, smelly, warty witch for a very long time, but now she is feeling discontented – bored, you might say. But witches are solitary creatures; they could never be friends with someone. But the Winds of Waverly have a mind of their own and they have other things in mind for our two characters – something very much outside the pages of the tales the citizens of Waverly have been following all these centuries.An evil witch who maybe isn’t all that evil; a tragic orphan who has room in her heart for enough hope for everyone. The makings of a fantastic tale about exploding through the boundaries others have set for you. Cindy, Middle School Librarian, MLShttps://kissthebookjr.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusThis reminded me a bit of Ruth Chew or Glovach's The Little Witch's Black Magic Cookbook in its depiction of witches. (Agnes has a wart on her nose, smelly socks, etc.) Some shades of Lemony Snicket, with Birdie at the orphanage. This had a more elementary tone and set up. My readers want to think of themselves as having magic, so want the witches to read about be powerful or glamorous. Books like Nichols The Apprentice Witch or Little's Bliss are more what I'm looking f E ARC from Edelweiss PlusThis reminded me a bit of Ruth Chew or Glovach's The Little Witch's Black Magic Cookbook in its depiction of witches. (Agnes has a wart on her nose, smelly socks, etc.) Some shades of Lemony Snicket, with Birdie at the orphanage. This had a more elementary tone and set up. My readers want to think of themselves as having magic, so want the witches to read about be powerful or glamorous. Books like Nichols The Apprentice Witch or Little's Bliss are more what I'm looking for, or Delaney's The Last Apprentice for a darker take on witches.Perfectly fine, just a bit too twee for my readers.
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  • Jennifer S
    January 1, 1970
    Birdie Bloom is a Tragical, a doomed orphan living with 17 others in a miserable fortress awaiting some choice of miserable endings. Agnes Prunella Crunch is a bored witch who has just gotten to the disappointing end of her book of spells. These are an unlikely pair to become friends, which they do through an exchange of magical letters, learning as they go about what it means to be "friends."Delightful story, just begging to be read aloud. I wish I still had someone to read it to!
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  • Shari
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars for THE TRAGICAL TALE OF BIRDIE BLOOM! What a fun and fantastical story Temre Beltz has woven! I love this adorable twist on the traditional fairy tale! The story begins with the "typical" sad orphan/ mean witch, but with delightful footnotes, and many dramatic and hilarious twists and turns, this tale shows how hope, courage, and especially friendship can beat the odds and change one's "fate." Reading this book is truly like watching an artist sketch and then color in a beautiful work o 5 stars for THE TRAGICAL TALE OF BIRDIE BLOOM! What a fun and fantastical story Temre Beltz has woven! I love this adorable twist on the traditional fairy tale! The story begins with the "typical" sad orphan/ mean witch, but with delightful footnotes, and many dramatic and hilarious twists and turns, this tale shows how hope, courage, and especially friendship can beat the odds and change one's "fate." Reading this book is truly like watching an artist sketch and then color in a beautiful work of art. The reader is given more details little by little, filling in the blank spaces and adding more and more color. This is perfect for young readers who can't process all the details at once. There is so much RIGHT with this book - beautiful character development, plot twists, humorous scenes, heartwarming relationships, triumph, tragedy, and at the end, a wish for more of the story to be told!I read an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Susie Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps the most creative book I have ever read. Incredible vocabulary and use of language. Characters come to life, as we see unlikeliest of friendships develop. Use of footnotes fills this book with creative sidelines. I loved it!
  • Deanna
    January 1, 1970
    CUTE STORY, THE CHILD IS THE HERO, BUT LEARNS A FABULOUS LESSON.
  • R.K. Cowles
    January 1, 1970
    4 1/2 stars. A goodreads giveaway. A whimsical, wicked and delightful tale.
  • Anna Bright
    January 1, 1970
    an absolutely perfect middle grade. heartfelt, whimsical, and absolutely hilarious. i highly recommend!
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I adore this book with my whole heart. I hope you will, too! <3
  • OjoAusana
    January 1, 1970
    The best magical fantasy book I’ve read since The School of Good and Evil! A original twist on fairytale worlds and the people who live in them. I loved everything about this book, the footnotes are adorable and useful, the characters were great, the plot is good and it’s an overall cute, adventurous and humorous book!
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  • Lisa Schmid
    January 1, 1970
    The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom is magically delightful! I love the fresh take on fairy tales and the spunky spirit of Birdie Bloom. This is a fun, whimsical story that will surely entertain middle-grade readers in search of a tragically good time! More, please!
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  • Kate Waggoner
    January 1, 1970
    @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to the @kidlitexchange network for the advance copy of this novel. All opinions are my own. The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom is a fun, whimsical, and not so tragical story of magic and friendship. Birdie is a nine-year-old orphan living with seventeen other orphans at Foulweather’s Home for the Tragical in the word of Wanderly. Wanderly is ruled by the “by the book.” This means that your endings are already pre-determined. Tragicals will die horrible deaths, Tr @kidlitexchange #partnerThank you to the @kidlitexchange network for the advance copy of this novel. All opinions are my own. The Tragical Tale of Birdie Bloom is a fun, whimsical, and not so tragical story of magic and friendship. Birdie is a nine-year-old orphan living with seventeen other orphans at Foulweather’s Home for the Tragical in the word of Wanderly. Wanderly is ruled by the “by the book.” This means that your endings are already pre-determined. Tragicals will die horrible deaths, Triumphants will live happily ever after, and wicked witches can only perform curses and dastardly deeds. Books and words have power in Wanderly which is one reason why Tragicals aren’t allowed to have books. Birdie, however, finds a book that teaches her about friendship and leads her to try to create a friendship (actually, Agnes prefers Barely Foul Foe, or BFF) with a wicked witch (that’s Agnes). This attempted friendship causes multiple characters to re-evaluate who they are and what they are possible of. This book was fun and engaging. The theme of friendship is well-developed and clear enough for a younger reader to understand. One of my favorite things about the book is that the narrator is the book. There are several delightful and witty footnotes (from the book’s perspective) that give insight not only into the characters of the book, but also into books and readers. This book does read a little young and I would recommend it for grades 5-8.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    It's perfect: funny, heartfelt, poignant, and smart. I want to time-travel backwards and give this book to my 9-year-old kid self to read because she would have loved it with her whole heart. I guess I'll settle for sharing it with every kid I know now instead.
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