In an Absent Dream (Wayward Children, #4)
This is the story of a very serious young girl who would rather study and dream than become a respectable housewife and live up to the expectations of the world around her. As well she should.When she finds a doorway to a world founded on logic and reason, riddles and lies, she thinks she's found her paradise. Alas, everything costs at the goblin market, and when her time there is drawing to a close, she makes the kind of bargain that never plays out well.For anyone . . .

In an Absent Dream (Wayward Children, #4) Details

TitleIn an Absent Dream (Wayward Children, #4)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherTor.com
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult

In an Absent Dream (Wayward Children, #4) Review

  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Tor in exchange for an honest review.Friends, I am weeping with happiness. 1.) Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★ 2.) Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★ 3.) Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★★ Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
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  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    dear Seanan McGuire, thank you for understanding that trilogies are never enough.
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    THERE'S A COVER YALL
  • ✨ jamieson ✨
    January 1, 1970
    IT HAS A COVERAND IT'S GONNA BE ABOUT LUNDY*shakes*YESSSS SEANAN MCGUIRE IS WRITING MORE WAYWARD CHILDREN BOOKS BLESSMOVEDGRATEFUL
  • destiny ☠ howling libraries
    January 1, 1970
    #1 Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★#2 Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★★★#3 Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★★#4 In An Absent Dream ???Don't mind me, I'll just be over here hyperventilating a lotAll quotes come from an advance copy and may not match the final release. Thank you so much to TorDotCom for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Marisa
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone else hoping for like 15 million more of these books (as well as a book about Cora's mermaid world)??? I sure as hell am!!! Gimme!!!
  • Julie Zantopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    "To be a child is to be a visitor from another world."In In an Absent Dream we follow Lundy, the child psychologist and therapy session guide at the school for wayward children. She looks eternally young despite her wisdom and in this book, we learn her backstory, her doorway world, and how she came to work for Eleanor West. This is a particularly unique story for the series because it follows Lundy and only Lundy unlike other stories which have had a host of characters (or in Down Among the Sti "To be a child is to be a visitor from another world."In In an Absent Dream we follow Lundy, the child psychologist and therapy session guide at the school for wayward children. She looks eternally young despite her wisdom and in this book, we learn her backstory, her doorway world, and how she came to work for Eleanor West. This is a particularly unique story for the series because it follows Lundy and only Lundy unlike other stories which have had a host of characters (or in Down Among the Sticks and Bones two). I loved the singular nature of it and how well we got to know this amazing character. "Your name is your heart, and you don't give your heart away."This is a story of a lonely child who learned much too young that you can only count on yourself, and that books and your own imagination are fantastic but you still miss actual friendships with children your age. It's a cruel world when you aren't included in your peer group and Lundy, the daughter of the local elementary school Principle knows that all too well. "...it's a wonder we don't all walk around with ledgers in our hands, measuring our breaths to be sure we've contributed enough to the world we live in to justify them."In the Goblin Market, there is a fantastic discussion to be had about economic status and bartering/paying with fair trade...making sure that you give as much as you take from the world and people around you. It was beautiful, pure, and scary at times because a value is subjective and it comes down to how much you value the people and the world you live with/in. I loved this aspect of the story so so much. "Still, there is a magic in the word "sister", a magic which speaks of shared roots and hence shared branches, of a certain ease that is always to be pursued, if not always to be found."There is also a focus on family, both found and blood and Lundy's relationship with both Moon and Diana are precious and should be protected at all cost. Reading this right before my baby sister's wedding got me all teary eyed. I love my sisters, both blood and found, and I value their love, trust, and friendship so much. "There are many good things in the world, and each of them happens for the first time only once, and never again."All of these stories are richly woven, dark and dangerous but also hopeful and beautiful, much like the world we actually live in. Nothing is ever all good or all bad and this story is no different. There are prices to be paid for mistakes and nobody is immune to them, not even children. As in any world, you learn quick or you face the consequences but there's a beauty in the symmetry of this book and the market. As always, another fantastic read and a great addition to the series.*All quotes taken from an arc copy and subject to change. Arc provided by TOR in exchange for an honest review.*
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  • Jack Stark
    January 1, 1970
    This has got to be Kade's story. Right? RIGHT?!Wait, I got it! This is Lundy's story. In EHaD Lundy states: "I’ll live a long, long time. Longer, maybe, than I would have had I continued aging in the usual way. But they threw me out anyway, because I had broken the rules. I’ll never marry, or have a family of my own, and my daughters will never find their way to the door that once led me to the Goblin Market. So I suppose I’ve learnt the danger of making importune bargains with the fae, and can This has got to be Kade's story. Right? RIGHT?!Wait, I got it! This is Lundy's story. In EHaD Lundy states: "I’ll live a long, long time. Longer, maybe, than I would have had I continued aging in the usual way. But they threw me out anyway, because I had broken the rules. I’ll never marry, or have a family of my own, and my daughters will never find their way to the door that once led me to the Goblin Market. So I suppose I’ve learnt the danger of making importune bargains with the fae, and can now serve as a warning to others."Kade tells Nancy how Lundy visited a high logic world. A world that kicks people out once they turn 18. Lundy tried to remain a child to stay in her world. This is her story! So excite! :D
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  • rachel • typed truths
    January 1, 1970
    #1 Every Heart a Doorway ★★★★★#2 Down Among the Sticks and Bones ★★★☆☆#3 Beneath the Sugar Sky ★★★★★
  • Rian *fire and blood*
    January 1, 1970
    HOLY MONKEYS! This honestly was the best one yet. I can’t do a proper review yet because that would be against the rules (Lundy would be so proud of me!) and I don’t wish to anger the great people of Edelweiss. I will however say this one was honestly my favorite one yet. “Be Sure” is the motto for these books and I am sure Lundy’s story is my favorite. She is THE MOST LOYAL woman-child ever. I can’t wait for y’all to meet Moon. Come back Halloween time for my review! 🎃
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    I am absolutely obsessed with this series and don’t know how I am going to survive until January.
  • celeste
    January 1, 1970
    me after reading "goblin market" in the synopsis and hoping it will feature the goblin king
  • Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~
    January 1, 1970
    Oh shit this sounds like it's reminiscent of The Labyrinth which is one of my ALL TIME FAVORITE FILMS I am so ready. 🙌🏽
  • Eryn✵
    January 1, 1970
    This MC sounds like me & the cover is lovely -- I need this book.
  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    Kade! Is this your story!?
  • Haadiya // Hiatus
    January 1, 1970
    THE COVER IS HERE AND ITS PRETTY AND ITS ABOUT LUNDY AND IM DEAD
  • j
    January 1, 1970
    I'm working on this idea that the Goblin Market is metaphor for the injustice of the U.S. health insurance system. In the meantime: this is another fantastic installment of this series. I appreciate the two forward-moving tales set at Miss Eleanor's Home for Wayward Children, but I love the two self-contained portal fantasy backstories.
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  • lauren ♡ (wonderless reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    the fact that i have to wait until 2019 for this book is a Crime
  • Caidyn (BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Tor in exchange for an honest review.
  • I.S.
    January 1, 1970
    Lundy's story?
  • Kira
    January 1, 1970
    The Wayward Children series is fabulous. I've never read anything quite like it. It's a world of other worlds. Each child finds their way into a world perfectly suited to them. Although the world suits them, there is always something bizarre about it, sometimes even downright disturbing.Lundy was the MC in this. She was extremely mature for her age. Nevertheless she was still a child, thinking she knew it all, not realizing that there was much she wasn't capable of comprehending yet. The world s The Wayward Children series is fabulous. I've never read anything quite like it. It's a world of other worlds. Each child finds their way into a world perfectly suited to them. Although the world suits them, there is always something bizarre about it, sometimes even downright disturbing.Lundy was the MC in this. She was extremely mature for her age. Nevertheless she was still a child, thinking she knew it all, not realizing that there was much she wasn't capable of comprehending yet. The world she wandered into was a logic world. It was all about bargaining and fairness in the Goblin Market. The problem with logic is that it's emotionless, which makes it cruel in it's own way. The problem with fairness is that it's all in the eye of the beholder. I received this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    THE COVERRRRRRRRRR
  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    Cover!! This is my favorite in the series so far, I hope I like the book as much.This is good news.
  • Chantel (BW Book Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Update: May 4th - THERE'S A COVER!!!!!!!!YAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSSSSS
  • Lexie
    January 1, 1970
    We first met Katherine Lundy (never Kate or Kat or Kitty or Katie or Kathy) in EVERY HEART A DOORWAY where she was the School's Psychologist. We learned a little of why she was so young and growing only younger as time passed by as a cautionary tale. Much like DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES, this is the tale of how Lundy (for that name fit her as well as, if not better, thean Katherine ever did) found herself at Eleanor's side after being forced out of her "door".There is a certain sense of...h We first met Katherine Lundy (never Kate or Kat or Kitty or Katie or Kathy) in EVERY HEART A DOORWAY where she was the School's Psychologist. We learned a little of why she was so young and growing only younger as time passed by as a cautionary tale. Much like DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES, this is the tale of how Lundy (for that name fit her as well as, if not better, thean Katherine ever did) found herself at Eleanor's side after being forced out of her "door".There is a certain sense of...hope in both EHAD and its direct sequel BENEATH THE SUGAR SKY, that DATSAB and IAAD don't have. We know the fates of Lundy, Jack and Jill before we began their respective prequel tales. We know that no matter how hopeful and happy and content they are in their stories in the NOW, something must occur that breaks that happiness and thrusts them back here to "reality".McGuire double downs on that with Lundy's tale.Katherine Lundy is, like I'm sure many of us when we were younger, content with words and books and solitude in a way that most adults find both pleasing and disquieting at the same time. Not so disquieting that she concerns them, just enough that they absently wonder if there's something more that could be done.In Katherine's case she could have lived a much different life if her father - the Principal of her local school - had noticed how his job could negatively effect his daughter, but that's not how Lundy's story goes and in its time its considered and dealt with.The Goblin Market is both a Haven for those of us who prefer structure to their lives and a nightmare to those of us who are in cautious with our words. There is an invisible but defined "line" in the Goblin Market that should be treaded around carefully and which on the face of it should be easy enough to stay on the right side of.It boils down to "treat others as you want to be treated". All this talk of "fair value" is just that really. No one likes feeling like they were cheated and no one should purposely make others feel that way. For Lundy, and honestly for me, this almost made enough sense to feel comfortable. Its when faced with something that is harder to pin down - like say the death of a beloved playmate and friend - when things get...iffy.And that's where Lundy found herself stumbling. The Archivist tried to make her understand, tried to make her SEE, but as Lundy grew older she lost that sense of understanding because let's face it - adulthood makes us lose a sense of "fair value" for tangible things, how much harder is it with the intangible? Does the "fair value" measure emotional value, monetary value, or both?If my younger sister said to me "How is it fair of you to disappear and deprive me of an older sister?" what is the "fair value" there? How do you put a tangible, or at least an agreed upon, value on those lost years? Those lost memories? How do you pay back such a debt?Who knows if that lost time would have made us closer or drive us apart after all. For Diana, who wanted nothing as much as to have an older sister to do things with, Lundy's continual disappearance/reappearance was a horrific crime against her. For Lundy, she barely thought of her sister and rarely considered her feelings if ever, so those lost years meant very little to her until they were brought to her attention as a debt she had to repay. She was warned of the danger of trying to be clever with the rules, she in fact accused her own father of that sort of clever devilry that eventually leads to her ruin...and yet.Young Lundy is nothing like the jaded, bitter realist of EHAD, but in seeing the lessons she has to learn (the hard way in many cases) and the sacrifices she doesn't make, you can understand her actions (and advice) in EHAD far better.Which is so heart breaking all things considered.
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  • Jennika
    January 1, 1970
    JUST LOOK AT THAT COVER! *swoon*
  • Angel
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so so so good, but why can't I stop crying though????[A more coherent review to come closer to release date.]
  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!This is a very rare case where I have absolutely NO series fatigue. Just excitement and the need for more, more, MORE!!!
  • Vignesh Kumar
    January 1, 1970
    *Screams aloud....*Another Wayward children book and it's about Lundy! Excited to read it!
  • Allonsythornraxx
    January 1, 1970
    THIS COVER 😍😍😍
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