Not All Dead White Men
A disturbing exposé of how today's alt-right men's groups use ancient sources to promote a new brand of toxic masculinity online.A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online that treats women's empowerment as a mortal threat to men and to the integrity of Western civilization. Its proponents cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims--arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege.Donna Zuckerberg dives deep into the virtual communities of the far right, where men lament their loss of power and privilege, and strategize about how to reclaim them. She finds, mixed in with weightlifting tips and misogynistic vitriol, the words of the Stoics deployed to support an ideal vision of masculine life. On other sites, pickup artists quote Ovid's Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women's boundaries. By appropriating the Classics, these men lend a veneer of intellectual authority and ancient wisdom to their project of patriarchal white supremacy. In defense or retaliation, feminists have also taken up the Classics online, to counter the sanctioning of violence against women.Not All Dead White Men reveals that some of the most controversial and consequential debates about the legacy of the ancients are raging not in universities but online.

Not All Dead White Men Details

TitleNot All Dead White Men
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 8th, 2018
PublisherHarvard University Press
ISBN-139780674975552
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Politics, Writing, Books About Books, Sociology, Gender

Not All Dead White Men Review

  • Colin
    January 1, 1970
    A cogent, readable defense of the field of Classics from those who would appropriate, or rather, misappropriate, our studies for the promotion of foul agendas in service of white nationalism and the "Alt-Right" . . . a must-read for anyone in the field of Greek, Latin, and Classical Humanities!
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  • Jackson Hager
    January 1, 1970
    A very good read. While the focus was primarly on how the far-right and /r/redpill communities used classics to justify their horrible views on gender, I thought Zuckerburg's book in general serves as a good entrance into understanding the confusing and horrifying world of the "manosphere". One point I particularly enjoyed and agreed with was Zuckerburg's final argument that just because the classic texts are at best problematic when it comes to the treatment of women, she doesn't believe that j A very good read. While the focus was primarly on how the far-right and /r/redpill communities used classics to justify their horrible views on gender, I thought Zuckerburg's book in general serves as a good entrance into understanding the confusing and horrifying world of the "manosphere". One point I particularly enjoyed and agreed with was Zuckerburg's final argument that just because the classic texts are at best problematic when it comes to the treatment of women, she doesn't believe that justifies discarding the whole field or canon, because if we do that, classical studies will remain a field dominated by white men. Rather, Zuckerburg argues that pointing out what is problematic or wrong about a text doesn't stop a person from appreciating its beauty nor acknowledging its positive aspects. To her, a "vibrant, radical, intersectional feminist Classics" is what is needed to help improve our understanding of the world today.
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  • Mills College Library
    January 1, 1970
    320.53 Z942 2018
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