Kingdom of the Blind (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #14)
The new Chief Inspector Gamache novel from the #1 New York Times bestselling author.When a peculiar letter arrives inviting Armand Gamache to an abandoned farmhouse, the former head of the Sûreté du Québec discovers that a complete stranger has named him one of the executors of her will. Still on suspension, and frankly curious, Gamache accepts and soon learns that the other two executors are Myrna Landers, the bookseller from Three Pines, and a young builder.None of them had ever met the elderly woman.The will is so odd and includes bequests that are so wildly unlikely that Gamache and the others suspect the woman must have been delusional. But what if, Gamache begins to ask himself, she was perfectly sane?When a body is found, the terms of the bizarre will suddenly seem less peculiar and far more menacing.But it isn’t the only menace Gamache is facing.The investigation into what happened six months ago—the events that led to his suspension—has dragged on, into the dead of winter. And while most of the opioids he allowed to slip though his hands, in order to bring down the cartels, have been retrieved, there is one devastating exception.Enough narcotic to kill thousands has disappeared into inner city Montreal. With the deadly drug about to hit the streets, Gamache races for answers.As he uses increasingly audacious, even desperate, measures to retrieve the drug, Armand Gamache begins to see his own blind spots. And the terrible things hiding there.

Kingdom of the Blind (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #14) Details

TitleKingdom of the Blind (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #14)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 27th, 2018
PublisherMinotaur Books
ISBN-139781250066206
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Cultural, Canada, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Kingdom of the Blind (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #14) Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately I have finished. I tried to make it last as long as possible, reading it slowly, even though I wanted to rush to the end. Three Pines, such picturesque village, I would love to live there, if it was real of course. I mentioned that to someone and they said, Yes, but they have alot of murders for such a small town. True, I had to laugh, but it is the characters, the the people that live there, and the way they care for each other, even the demented poet Ruth. Well, this time no murd Unfortunately I have finished. I tried to make it last as long as possible, reading it slowly, even though I wanted to rush to the end. Three Pines, such picturesque village, I would love to live there, if it was real of course. I mentioned that to someone and they said, Yes, but they have alot of murders for such a small town. True, I had to laugh, but it is the characters, the the people that live there, and the way they care for each other, even the demented poet Ruth. Well, this time no murder in the village. Instead Gamache and Myrna, arrive separately, not knowing the other was coming, at a tumbled down farmhouse. They are tasked, along with another new arrival, with a very strange request. Despite their doubts, they are intrigued and accept. This brings them into a mystery over 160 years old and bearing a famous name. Also of course, are the remnants from the last novel, missing drugs and a suspended Gamache.This may well be my favorite entry, so far in this series. Trademark humor, tenderness, and of course some great investigative ability is shown. Gamache and his complicated character is fully displayed. A few new characters too, and one that attaches to another, will be very surprising indeed. At books end, just when explanations are given, the cases wrapped up nicely or in some cases not, we are presented with a most unexpected zinger. Now I wonder just where the next book will take us. So I wait.ARC from Minotaur books.
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  • James Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    Just got done reading an advance copy of Kingdom of the Blind by Louise Penny. It's a fantastic book that had me guessing the entire way. You're not going to want to miss out on this one.
  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    I've never read anything by Louise Penny before, and I've definitely never read her Chief Inspector Armand Gamache series, but you don't need to in order to follow along with Kingdom of the Blind. The author provides a lot of developments along the way for the reader to quickly get up to speed about the characters and their mishaps. While Armand Gamache is under suspension from the Sûreté du Québec, he receives a letter summoning him to preside over the execution of a will of a woman he's neve I've never read anything by Louise Penny before, and I've definitely never read her Chief Inspector Armand Gamache series, but you don't need to in order to follow along with Kingdom of the Blind. The author provides a lot of developments along the way for the reader to quickly get up to speed about the characters and their mishaps. While Armand Gamache is under suspension from the Sûreté du Québec, he receives a letter summoning him to preside over the execution of a will of a woman he's never met in his life (her name is Bertha, but is nicknamed The Baroness). When he arrives to this woman's house, he notices that there's two other people who have been included as co-executors of the will as well—Myrna Landers, a bookseller residing in Three Pines, and Benedict, a builder who also resides in Three Pines. Neither Myrna nor Benedict have ever met this woman, but the three are intrigued by this mystery and decide to distribute this woman's estate to her family. When the trio start allocating the estate to the Baroness's family, they stumble across a murder, linking them to this family's dark history. Armand's skeletons of the past also become a factor in this tale, leading to an ultimate showdown between the police force in Quebec, the estate of this deceased woman, and the trio themselves.I questioned whether or not my low rating was given because I've never read anything in this series. I may be in the minority, but I just wasn't a fan of how the story was written. It's a very dialogue-based novel, reminiscent of the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith (JK Rowling's pseudonym). If you've enjoyed that series, then please ignore me and pick up this novel! There's enough action throughout the story to entertain, but the driving force in this tale is the dialogue between Armand, Myrna, Benedict, Armand's wife, and the family of the Baroness. While the story had entertaining moments, I was bored to death by the dialogue. It could be because I haven't grown to care for the characters, as I would've if I read the series from the beginning, but I'm not confident enough in that statement to really confirm that theory. If you have read this series before and are curious, I do think it's worth a try in reading—prove me wrong!
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Penny continues to show her incredible mastery -- whereas so many series would have long begun to disappoint by book 14, the Three Pines/Gamache series just keeps getting better and better. In KINGDOM OF THE BLIND, we have the storylines of the continuing investigation (and suspension) of Gamache following the incidents of GLASS HOUSES, the hunt for the drugs the Surete failed to capture at the end of that last book, and the curious events surrounding Gamache and Myrna being asked to be liquidat Penny continues to show her incredible mastery -- whereas so many series would have long begun to disappoint by book 14, the Three Pines/Gamache series just keeps getting better and better. In KINGDOM OF THE BLIND, we have the storylines of the continuing investigation (and suspension) of Gamache following the incidents of GLASS HOUSES, the hunt for the drugs the Surete failed to capture at the end of that last book, and the curious events surrounding Gamache and Myrna being asked to be liquidators (or executors) of a will for a woman neither of them knew. To keep these multiple storylines in balance and full of intrigue: that's one of the reasons why the Gamache series is such a pleasure.Longtime fans know that what sets the books in this series apart is the unique combination of Penny's skill at writing incredible, real characters that readers feel they truly know; the way in which she captures the spirit of southern Quebec and Montreal's surroundings, inviting us into small towns, bistros, and homes, sharing the spirit of friendship, family, and food, without seeming the least bit trite; and the complex mysteries that hinge often only on a small detail that would seem forced in the hands of someone less talented. Each of the last several books has ended in such a way that I couldn't help but wonder if it would be our last adventure with Gamache, and this is no exception. I both shudder to think of the series ending and having the book I've just finished be the last and also hope each time Gamache will be honored in perpetuity by the fantastic story I have just read.
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  • Joe Jones
    January 1, 1970
    If you have read this far into the series you know what to expect. Louise Penny is one of those authors who I will put down any book I am currently reading to start hers. She never disappoints and this was not the exception! Get this as soon as you can!
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    More like a 4.5; could not quite give it a 5, much as I love Louise Penny and think she can do no wrong. I was in a reading slump - nothing was holding my interest - and then someone gave me an ARC of Kingdom of the Blind. Goodbye reading slump - could not put it down, as usual. Her books make me laugh, make me cry, make me think, make me smile, make me roll my eyes, make me marvel at her way with words and her observations about life and everything else... they are the full package. Perhaps whe More like a 4.5; could not quite give it a 5, much as I love Louise Penny and think she can do no wrong. I was in a reading slump - nothing was holding my interest - and then someone gave me an ARC of Kingdom of the Blind. Goodbye reading slump - could not put it down, as usual. Her books make me laugh, make me cry, make me think, make me smile, make me roll my eyes, make me marvel at her way with words and her observations about life and everything else... they are the full package. Perhaps when the final version comes out I will move it up to a 5 - some small things might get tightened up. I always read her books at least twice, and she is the only author that I preorder the hardcover (and often the Kindle, too). After I read one of her books I am spoiled for a while, and have trouble reading other authors - so I often go back and reread one or two or more of her books. She is just amazing, and I hope she writes for a long time!
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    These books are ones you want to hurry through to find out what happens, and then should probably read again slowly to enjoy the writing.
  • Bloss ♡
    January 1, 1970
    Louise Penny is an absolute treasure. I am chuffed beyond belief that we get another Gamache story!
  • Beth Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free advance copy of the book from the publisher. All opinions are my own. This is probably my favorite current detective series, and it always feels a bit like meeting up with friends I haven’t seen for a while to start one of these books. I made myself read slowly to savor the book in part, but also because of the way Penny always writes. Small details are important, and she takes such care as an author to be very purposeful with her characters, her setting, and all of the little I received a free advance copy of the book from the publisher. All opinions are my own. This is probably my favorite current detective series, and it always feels a bit like meeting up with friends I haven’t seen for a while to start one of these books. I made myself read slowly to savor the book in part, but also because of the way Penny always writes. Small details are important, and she takes such care as an author to be very purposeful with her characters, her setting, and all of the little details in between.This was not the strongest book in the series, especially on the heels of the previous two books which were both near the top of the series for me. But I always felt like these characters I love were in safe hands and that I trusted where Penny was taking me throughout.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    As the latest in one of my favorite series, I found this book easy to get into, like catching up with old friends. I didn't want to put it down and knew it was easily a 4-star rating. Then I got to the end. I don't read these books for the mystery aspect so much as for the characters, and I'm good with red herrings, but if you give us what a person is thinking and then that turns out that makes no sense they were thinking that because of what is revealed 300 pages later, I have a problem with it As the latest in one of my favorite series, I found this book easy to get into, like catching up with old friends. I didn't want to put it down and knew it was easily a 4-star rating. Then I got to the end. I don't read these books for the mystery aspect so much as for the characters, and I'm good with red herrings, but if you give us what a person is thinking and then that turns out that makes no sense they were thinking that because of what is revealed 300 pages later, I have a problem with it. I'm also curious if this is the last in the series; I'm not sure where she can go from here (I'll be asking this when she comes in Syracuse in November). Out November 27, 2018. Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for the advanced reader copy.
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  • Edwin Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Do yourself a favor and start at the beginning of this remarkable series (with Still Life). I thoroughly enjoyed this book - as I have the entire Gamache series - but it definitely marks a change in the narrative arc of the story. If you've invested in the other books in the series, the end of this novel will pack an emotional wallop!
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    All good writers have themes they like to re-explore and think through in many of their books. In Kingdom of the Blind Louise Penny returns to a theme that has long been of interest to her, that of the unreliability of mere appearances. The pleasant facade masking rot within. As she focuses thematically on the yin and yang of her characters and thoughts – at one point, Gamache thinks to himself “that conversation had gone both well and badly. Was comforting and nauseating. Successful and humilia All good writers have themes they like to re-explore and think through in many of their books. In Kingdom of the Blind Louise Penny returns to a theme that has long been of interest to her, that of the unreliability of mere appearances. The pleasant facade masking rot within. As she focuses thematically on the yin and yang of her characters and thoughts – at one point, Gamache thinks to himself “that conversation had gone both well and badly. Was comforting and nauseating. Successful and humiliating”, she forces the reader to examine his or her own preconceptions.And she forces the reader, while reading, to carefully consider each character as they are introduced onto the canvas of her story. This particular installment begins with Gamache and Myrna heading to an appointment at a rundown, secluded farmhouse near Three Pines, where they meet two strangers. One is a notary who is executing a will, and to the surprise of Gamache, Myrna and Benedict, a young builder from Montreal, they are the liquidators (in the states we’d refer to them as the executors) of a stranger’s will.The stranger, who called herself the Baroness, is eventually recalled by Ruth Zardo to have been a cleaning woman. Someone who is seen, but overlooked. She has left her three children fifteen million dollars, and there seems to be no possible way she has left them even fifteen dollars, much less fifteen million. The three children – two men and a woman – seem unfazed by their mother’s claims but neither do they expect to inherit anything other than the falling down house where they were raised.When one of the three is killed in an accident – or is it a murder? – the real investigation into the Baroness’ estate begins.Meanwhile Inspector Beauvoir is dealing with the fallout of Gamache’s final actions in the last book (Glass Houses), which released a large quantity of an incredibly powerful opioid onto the streets of Montreal. Gamache is suspended but desperately attempting to find the drugs before they hit the streets and start killing people. He’s also being asked to assist in the murder investigation by Inspector Beauvoir.In keeping with the theme of the novel, there are two metaphorical “streets” in the narrative. There’s the “street” of the financial world, where the Baronesses’ two sons are employed and where much of the murder mystery takes place; and there are the streets of Montreal, the ones populated by junkies, prostitutes and in general, the desperate and poor. Penny does not seem to find one “street” less important than the other, and I think that is her point. A junkie may have goodness hidden underneath, just as a financial broker may have evil hidden underneath the surface. ‘Appearances don’t matter – at least to this author, though not always, alas, to the rest of the world – so keep that in mind as you read. As always all these themes are wrapped up in a well paced and plotted mystery that will have you flipping pages faster and faster as you reach the end of the book. This is another fine installment in one of the greatest mystery series being written at the moment.
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  • Hella
    January 1, 1970
    Ik ben een hele slechte detective-lezer. Tijdens het lezen kan ik de plot al niet volgen, laat staan dat ik hem zou kunnen navertellen. Het gaat mij dan ook helemaal niet om de plot. Het gaat mij om de sfeer, om de personages, om de thema's op leven en dood. De serie van Louise Penny over Armand Gamache voldoet daar helemaal aan. Vanaf het eerste boek volgen we Gamache, en zijn opklimming tot hoofdcommissaris. We volgen ook verschillende van zijn agenten, voor wie hij een mentor en een leermeest Ik ben een hele slechte detective-lezer. Tijdens het lezen kan ik de plot al niet volgen, laat staan dat ik hem zou kunnen navertellen. Het gaat mij dan ook helemaal niet om de plot. Het gaat mij om de sfeer, om de personages, om de thema's op leven en dood. De serie van Louise Penny over Armand Gamache voldoet daar helemaal aan. Vanaf het eerste boek volgen we Gamache, en zijn opklimming tot hoofdcommissaris. We volgen ook verschillende van zijn agenten, voor wie hij een mentor en een leermeester is, en soms een geduchte tegenstander. Het gaat heel vaak over loyaliteit, en hoe mensen elkaar verschrikkelijk teleurstellen daarin. Sommige delen zijn echt om te huilen zo aangrijpend. (Sommige zijn ook iets minder goed, te onwaarschijnlijk of té veelomvattend.)In Kingdom of the Blind draait het om een testament dat tot een moord leidt, en om een partij carfentanil (harddrugs) die elk moment kan worden losgelaten in de stegen van Montréal. Dat laatste gegeven borduurt voort op het vorige boek, het eerste is het detective-element specifiek voor dit boek. Het eindigt allemaal tot-diep-in-de-nacht-doorlezig spannend (zoveel heb ik er dan nog wel van begrepen).Maar het leukst (en dat vond ik ook al bij de Havank-serie over de Schaduw) zijn toch al die andere personages, al die excentrieke inwoners van Three Pines, een verborgen dorpje ergens in Quebec, dat geen bereik heeft en maar één weg er naartoe. Je gaat van ze houden, je ziet het hele dorp voor je, je smult mee van de (soms vreemde) heerlijke maaltijden, je ziet ze voor je, de stokoude dichteres met haar eend onder de arm, de schilderes met altijd klodders verf in haar haar, de twee homo's die de dorpsbistro runnen … Het is elke keer weer thuiskomen. En hoewel de plots ingewikkeld zijn, en de ontknoping elke keer bloedspannend, heb je aan het eind datzelfde gevoel als bij Asterix: ze zitten allemaal om de tafel, te smullen en te drinken en elkaar vliegen af te vangen. Soms staan ze even verdrietig stil bij iemand die gewond raakte … maar dat is voor het volgende boek. Ik kan niet wachten!
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  • Kate Downey
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 rounded up to 5 (How I wish we could have -and-a-half-star ratings!)This was my first Armand Gamache although I had heard many good things of Louise Penny's detective series but crime just is not my 'thing'. This was fine entertainment. I might easily become an addict. It is a sign of great writing that you can dip in to the fourteenth in a series and not lose the plot. Gamache is an endearing sort of detective on many levels: kind to people, affectionate and loyal to family and friends, the 4.5 rounded up to 5 (How I wish we could have -and-a-half-star ratings!)This was my first Armand Gamache although I had heard many good things of Louise Penny's detective series but crime just is not my 'thing'. This was fine entertainment. I might easily become an addict. It is a sign of great writing that you can dip in to the fourteenth in a series and not lose the plot. Gamache is an endearing sort of detective on many levels: kind to people, affectionate and loyal to family and friends, the sort of bloke you'd like as a friend so I was off to a good start. Penny sets up a backdrop of easy camaraderie in this novel, against which the bleakest of narratives can be set without unduly distressing the reader. While focussing the reader on the two main objectives facing Ganache i.e. sorting out rather convoluted family legacies, and recovering a lethal new drug from the streets, Penny inserts food for thought exploring moral behaviour, the sacrifice of one for the benefit of many, the justification of choices, the loyalties we owe, prejudice, privilege, to name but a few. Some of these issues make up a portion of the very natural, effortless dialogue, some the internalisations of Penny's characters. And her hand is both light and sure. I will now find the other thirteen of her books, read and recommend them to everyone.
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  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    As always, Penny's plotting is tight and even minor characters have breath and life. There is blindness, both physical and emotional, but not as much as the title implies. Gamache is normally clear-eyed; he has had to be in this long game he has been playing.This makes the secrets (blind spots) the principal characters create and keep from each other feel forced. Gamache has made, and continues to make, decisions for what he considers the greater good. But the ends that justify the means he uses As always, Penny's plotting is tight and even minor characters have breath and life. There is blindness, both physical and emotional, but not as much as the title implies. Gamache is normally clear-eyed; he has had to be in this long game he has been playing.This makes the secrets (blind spots) the principal characters create and keep from each other feel forced. Gamache has made, and continues to make, decisions for what he considers the greater good. But the ends that justify the means he uses may leave us with an unfamiliar, and much less interesting, Gamache. The blindness in the book was mostly caused by Gamache, and it was those nearest and dearest to him who were blinded.
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  • Lynne
    January 1, 1970
    RTC
  • Margene
    January 1, 1970
    Happily, I will receive a copy of this book from Minotaur Books. Can't wait to read this next book in the Chief Inspector Gamache series!
  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    Received my advance copy yesterday. Penny's characters continue to draw me in and her ability to make me feel deeply is unparalleled (6 stars). I had some issues with the plot this time (4 stars), but still stayed up all night reading (5 star average).
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  • Ilyssa Wesche
    January 1, 1970
    SO GOOD. Some tears. Maybe the best one yet.
  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    reading an advance copy of this book. Thanks. Find yourself on a bitter winter day in Three Pines. All your favorite people. I cannot think of a better way to spend a weekend than with this book. Coming out just after Thanksgiving. Get this book, a cuppa tea and a warm blanket and spend some time in three pines. All the books in this series are really great. This one is no exception. Starts you out on a cold winter day and keeps you on your toes until the end. This will make a great Christmas gi reading an advance copy of this book. Thanks. Find yourself on a bitter winter day in Three Pines. All your favorite people. I cannot think of a better way to spend a weekend than with this book. Coming out just after Thanksgiving. Get this book, a cuppa tea and a warm blanket and spend some time in three pines. All the books in this series are really great. This one is no exception. Starts you out on a cold winter day and keeps you on your toes until the end. This will make a great Christmas gift for all you Louise Penny fan friends. but you may have to give it to them early.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    As with all of Louise Penny's work this is a mystery within a mystery within a mystery. Quite a lot to follow, but it makes for quite the page turner. As always lots of heart, sometimes joyful sometimes breaking.
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Another great one! Add it to your to-read list.
  • Elizabeth B
    January 1, 1970
    Another great Louise Penny book. I love Armand Gamache and Three Pines!! #14 did not disappoint!
  • Carolyn Fagan
    January 1, 1970
    As with most Louise Penny books, Glass Houses ended with many unanswered questions. Kingdom of the Blind answers some of them, while at the same time introducing us to a whole new mystery with some parallels. Penny continues to develop her main characters, never letting them become stagnant, as in real live, things happen, people change, life choices are made. And again at the end we are left wanting to know what will happen next in the life of the Gamache family and in Three Pines! Thanks to Ma As with most Louise Penny books, Glass Houses ended with many unanswered questions. Kingdom of the Blind answers some of them, while at the same time introducing us to a whole new mystery with some parallels. Penny continues to develop her main characters, never letting them become stagnant, as in real live, things happen, people change, life choices are made. And again at the end we are left wanting to know what will happen next in the life of the Gamache family and in Three Pines! Thanks to Market Block Books for the ARC!
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Holy cow, Louise Penny! I don't know how you can keep this "each Chief Inspector Armand Gamache book is better than the last" trend. Your mysteries are becoming more intriguing, your characters are deepening and evolving, your writing is absolutely elegant. That's the only way I can describe it. I love the incorporation of art and poetry, history and FOOD, in such a way that I feel like a smarter, more well rounded person for having read your writing. I mean, even the parts about junkies and dru Holy cow, Louise Penny! I don't know how you can keep this "each Chief Inspector Armand Gamache book is better than the last" trend. Your mysteries are becoming more intriguing, your characters are deepening and evolving, your writing is absolutely elegant. That's the only way I can describe it. I love the incorporation of art and poetry, history and FOOD, in such a way that I feel like a smarter, more well rounded person for having read your writing. I mean, even the parts about junkies and druggies and the horrors... oddly entrancing. I already had a hard time putting down your books, but this one? Finished it in 24 hours. My family ate frozen pizza and Eggos. No regrets. (The really odd thing about Louise Penny books is how I'm not totally put off by the occasional expletive. Most authors drop it in the story and I'm completely irritated. But somehow, she makes the rest of the story and writing so GOOD, that I forgive it, even understand it. Weird.)Goodreads Giveaways have filled my shelves with really great books by amazing authors. Books that I can hand to my friends and say "I'm serious! Read it!"
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has just been suspended with nothing to do when out of the blue he is summoned to a broken down farmhouse along with a psychiatrist friend and a young builder and told that they have been named liquidators of a will for a woman none of them have ever met. Even though the three of them can find no connection to the woman who called herself the Baroness, they can't resist the mystery. Winter in Quebec is anything but helpful so when a blizzard keeps all of them toget Chief Inspector Armand Gamache has just been suspended with nothing to do when out of the blue he is summoned to a broken down farmhouse along with a psychiatrist friend and a young builder and told that they have been named liquidators of a will for a woman none of them have ever met. Even though the three of them can find no connection to the woman who called herself the Baroness, they can't resist the mystery. Winter in Quebec is anything but helpful so when a blizzard keeps all of them together, the neighbors give their help as well. Gamache works to solve the mystery of the Baroness maid, solve a murder and clear his name at headquarters by locating a lot of drugs that have gone missing. The characters in this little town are delightful - even the cranky ones and keep you interested in not only the mystery at hand but also Gamache and his careful plodding way. Armand Gamache is Canada's version of Christie's Inspector Poirot but with much more snark and style. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Audrey
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the best Three Pines books in recent years. While I always love the story telling and plotting, a few of more recent books bordered on repetitiveness in the actual writing. It was noticeable and a tad irritating to read. But, the character and settings always draw me back.Here, the book release was a couple of months later then usual and that patience paid off. This is such an intriguing mystery with Armand and Myrna assigned with a stranger to be the executors of a will. It also This is one of the best Three Pines books in recent years. While I always love the story telling and plotting, a few of more recent books bordered on repetitiveness in the actual writing. It was noticeable and a tad irritating to read. But, the character and settings always draw me back.Here, the book release was a couple of months later then usual and that patience paid off. This is such an intriguing mystery with Armand and Myrna assigned with a stranger to be the executors of a will. It also continues the ever going plot of the happenings at the Surete and Academy as well as the fate of a promising (borderline dangerous) recruit. There are just so many interesting people throughout, and not just the residents of Three Pines. This was a most satisfying read and I'm really curious as to what will happen next. And, as usual, I am sad that I have to wait another year to visit Three Pines.I received this ARC from the publisher and as always, all opinions are my own.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Four and a half stars. The latest in the series to be released in November. Armand Gamache is still on suspension from the Surete de Quebec when he receives a letter naming him as one of the executors of a will of a woman he has never met. The other two executors are Myrna Landers the bookshop owner in Three Pines and a young builder. The will includes bequests for things the woman didn't have and when a body is found in her now-abandoned house, the circumstances become more menacing. But along Four and a half stars. The latest in the series to be released in November. Armand Gamache is still on suspension from the Surete de Quebec when he receives a letter naming him as one of the executors of a will of a woman he has never met. The other two executors are Myrna Landers the bookshop owner in Three Pines and a young builder. The will includes bequests for things the woman didn't have and when a body is found in her now-abandoned house, the circumstances become more menacing. But along with this situation, Gamache is still desperate to recapture the last of the deadly opioids he allowed to slip thru in order to bring down the cartels. I'm happy to say the ending suggests the series is not yet over and we can look forward to another installment.
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  • Joeyr
    January 1, 1970
    I got an advanced readers copy of Louise Penny newest mystery from Minotaur Books. Kingdom of the Blind.Her pace, characters, location are done with such an amazing ease. Here I am in nearly 90 degrees central California nearly frostbit with reading about Quebec in winter. Experiencing a blizzard because she writes it so well. No, I didn't get the whodunnit for the longest time, though I had my gut going with one of the characters. (Not the eventual killer of course). And the drug set up thing w I got an advanced readers copy of Louise Penny newest mystery from Minotaur Books. Kingdom of the Blind.Her pace, characters, location are done with such an amazing ease. Here I am in nearly 90 degrees central California nearly frostbit with reading about Quebec in winter. Experiencing a blizzard because she writes it so well. No, I didn't get the whodunnit for the longest time, though I had my gut going with one of the characters. (Not the eventual killer of course). And the drug set up thing was amazingly well done, just something happening in the meantime that meant a lot. Hopefully, that's not a spoiler.I want to thank Minotaur Books, because I'd intended to take time off to read the book when it comes out next month. Now my classes are safe.
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  • Chris Markley
    January 1, 1970
    The latest chapter in the Inspector Gamache series does not disappoint. Armand andJean-Guy are dealing with the aftermath from the last time we saw them, the drugs are unaccounted for and their future with the Surete is in jeopardy. A blizzard, an unexpected request to be liquidator of an estate of a woman he never met, a collapsing house, and a decades old mystery surrounding the will and the story is set. Reading it is part a visit to catch up with old friends and part worrying about whether t The latest chapter in the Inspector Gamache series does not disappoint. Armand andJean-Guy are dealing with the aftermath from the last time we saw them, the drugs are unaccounted for and their future with the Surete is in jeopardy. A blizzard, an unexpected request to be liquidator of an estate of a woman he never met, a collapsing house, and a decades old mystery surrounding the will and the story is set. Reading it is part a visit to catch up with old friends and part worrying about whether the mystery will be solved and those involved will survive. Now I am anxious for the next installment.Thanks to Minotaur Books for providing an arc for my honest review.
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