My Girls
A revelatory and touching tribute to the lives of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds written by the person who knew them best, Todd Fisher’s poignant memoir is filled with moving stories of growing up among Hollywood royalty and illustrated with never-before-seen photos and memorabilia.In December 2016, the world was shaken by the sudden deaths of Carrie Fisher and her mother Debbie Reynolds, two unspeakable losses that occurred in less than twenty-four hours. The stunned public turned for solace to Debbie’s only remaining child, Todd Fisher, who somehow retained his grace and composure under the glare of the media spotlight as he struggled with his own overwhelming grief.The son of "America’s Sweethearts" Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, Todd grew up amid the glamorous wealth and pretense of Hollywood. Thanks to his funny, loving, no-nonsense mother, Todd remained down to earth, his own man, but always close to his cherished mom, and to his sister through her meteoric rise to stardom and her struggle with demons that never diminished her humor, talent, or spirit.Now, Todd shares his heart and his memories of Debbie and Carrie with deeply personal stories from his earliest years to those last unfathomable days. His book, part memoir, part homage, celebrates their legacies through a more intimate, poignant, and often hilarious portrait of these two remarkable women than has ever been revealed before.With thirty-two pages of never-before-seen photos and memorabilia from his family’s private archives, Todd’s book is a love letter to a sister and a mother, and a gift to countless fans who are mourning the deaths of these two unforgettable stars.

My Girls Details

TitleMy Girls
Author
ReleaseJun 5th, 2018
PublisherWilliam Morrow
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography

My Girls Review

  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsWhen I brought this home I expected a lightweight tribute to his mother, Debbie Reynolds, and sister, Carrie Fisher, perhaps told with a bit of condescension and thought it would be something I'd skim to pick out the "juicy" parts. Well, turned out it wasn't at all lightweight and was much more candid and detailed about the family's life, but it was also a lovely homage to his family. Debbie had a core of steel but it was Todd who kept this family together and resilient, even though he 4.5 starsWhen I brought this home I expected a lightweight tribute to his mother, Debbie Reynolds, and sister, Carrie Fisher, perhaps told with a bit of condescension and thought it would be something I'd skim to pick out the "juicy" parts. Well, turned out it wasn't at all lightweight and was much more candid and detailed about the family's life, but it was also a lovely homage to his family. Debbie had a core of steel but it was Todd who kept this family together and resilient, even though he suffered through his own setbacks. The most interesting parts were the descriptions of his privileged childhood in the glamorous world of 1950s Hollywood and his various relationships (can you imagine a mother allowing her 16-year-old son to bring home an older woman from Europe as a “playmate”? I would lay odds there are many who didn’t know that side of Debbie Reynolds.). The details of their many financial setbacks were horrifying, which leads readers to wonder how on earth the scammers (including ex-spouses, managers, accountants) got away with what they did.If I had any issues with the book, it was that the sections outlining building a museum for Reynolds' memorabilia got a little too detailed and was a bit painful to read as I knew it was never going to happen. But the inside info on both his mother's and Carrie's life was fascinating and at times, sad, and I left the book thinking they both deserved better lives.I highly recommend this heartfelt and touching memoir to anyone who is familiar with the stars, and if you're like me, will be touched by the deaths of two beloved movie stars. This is also a good bet for those who don’t want a lot of crude content and profanity that has been appearing in many recent celebrity memoirs. Also recommended for anyone who has read Debbie Reynolds’ Make 'Em Laugh: Short-Term Memories of Longtime Friends (or read it after this), and Carrie Fisher’s memoirs such as Shockaholic and Wishful Drinking. Readers of Reynolds’ memoirs may find some repetition but Todd has included information not included in her books.
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  • Marie
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely riveting. I literally couldn't put this down. And very heartfelt too.
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Once I started this I couldn't stop reading. One of the better celebrity "tell-all" memoirs published this year. More to come.
  • Callum McLaughlin
    January 1, 1970
    'I happen to think that growing up in the shadow of Debbie Reynolds was a safe, beautiful, privileged place to be, and I thrived in it.'This is a wonderfully touching and bittersweet tribute to two remarkable women, from the man who knew them best. It's written with love and warmth, in a relaxed, friends-gathered-round-the-table kind of way, but it never shies away from the darkness that visited them often in their stranger-than-fiction lives. As such, it's packed full of fun, charming anecdotes 'I happen to think that growing up in the shadow of Debbie Reynolds was a safe, beautiful, privileged place to be, and I thrived in it.'This is a wonderfully touching and bittersweet tribute to two remarkable women, from the man who knew them best. It's written with love and warmth, in a relaxed, friends-gathered-round-the-table kind of way, but it never shies away from the darkness that visited them often in their stranger-than-fiction lives. As such, it's packed full of fun, charming anecdotes highlighting their unique relationship, as well as poignant insights into Carrie's struggles with bipolar, addiction, and a distant father; Debbie's various betrayals at the hands of money-hungry men, and ailing health in later years; and Todd's own encounters with heartache.I'd venture to say that pretty much everyone who picks this up will do so because they're fans of Carrie and/or Debbie, and want to know more about them. Though they absolutely form the heart of the book, it's worth pointing out that this is in fact Todd's memoir. It's not Todd writing a biography of his mother and sister, but rather an account of his own life, branching off from and ultimately leading back to ‘his girls’, whilst also covering many of his own exploits along the way.The book definitely shines best when he is writing about them directly, however. He does so with such a sense of love, honour, and even protectiveness, that it's hard not to feel moved.I’ll leave the last word with Carrie herself though (I don’t think Todd would mind). Todd shared part of the beautiful message his sister wrote when his wife died, and I think it has proven oddly prescient for how we all feel about her and her mother now; a feeling which Todd captures with grace and fervour in My Girls:‘Christi didn’t just visit this world – she filled it with her humor and her own particular spirit. And she hasn’t left this world yet, nor is she likely to. We have lost her in one way, but in knowing her we gained in so many others… I’ll love you, Christi, as long as I’m alive… and that love will keep you living in all of us for the duration of our particular forever.’
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  • Phil
    January 1, 1970
    As the world's preeminent Leia-ologist, there is a dearth of literature regarding our princess, so I knew I had to read this book when I saw it announced a few months ago. It did not disappoint. Todd Fisher has a relaxed, easygoing style in his sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking stories about his sister and his mother. Unlike certain mainstream celebrities today, Todd and Carrie grew up privileged, but they most certainly did not grow up spoiled. Carrie faced her addictions and her men As the world's preeminent Leia-ologist, there is a dearth of literature regarding our princess, so I knew I had to read this book when I saw it announced a few months ago. It did not disappoint. Todd Fisher has a relaxed, easygoing style in his sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking stories about his sister and his mother. Unlike certain mainstream celebrities today, Todd and Carrie grew up privileged, but they most certainly did not grow up spoiled. Carrie faced her addictions and her mental illnesses with bravery and poise, and Todd was by her side as strong and hopeful as any brother could be. Their mother Debbie Reynolds was nothing if not hardworking, and Todd, loyal to a fault but the furthest imaginable from a "momma's boy," was there every step of the way, and it made for an incredible story. Todd deserves only the best life has to offer, and despite the difficult hand he has, at times, been dealt, he comes through with bravery, intelligence, kindness, and perseverance. This is a book I would recommend to anyone. I would love to shake your hand someday, Mr. Fisher.
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  • Mediaman
    January 1, 1970
    I've read 5 books about this family and this is by far the best. And I'm surprised--I almost passed it up, thinking Todd would have the least to say of all the Fisher/Reynolds books. Boy was I wrong! This book is jam-packed with inside stories about Hollywood. This is not a dull read--he jumps from story to story with a glee that is catchy and made me want to read the book even faster. By the end I decided I can't wait to read the book again some day!If you know anything about the family history I've read 5 books about this family and this is by far the best. And I'm surprised--I almost passed it up, thinking Todd would have the least to say of all the Fisher/Reynolds books. Boy was I wrong! This book is jam-packed with inside stories about Hollywood. This is not a dull read--he jumps from story to story with a glee that is catchy and made me want to read the book even faster. By the end I decided I can't wait to read the book again some day!If you know anything about the family history it's all here--but it has been covered before by mom Debbie, sister Carrie, absent dad Eddie, and even stepsister Joely. It's hard to put into words what Todd adds that makes this so entertaining, but his perspective is different from the rest. He seems functional and level-headed, as well as bluntly honest. Mostly he doesn't seem to care about all the bad things he or his family members were famous for.What is most shocking is the bombshell in the middle of the book that he is a born-again Christian, and that he started a church in California that was liberal evangelical, a precursor to what many evangelical churches are today where they intentionally don't hold to dogma. The problem with that is that anyone who claims to be a Christian can do whatever they want. So while he pledged his life to Christ (giving up his heavy drug usage) he had no problem continuing to sleep around with women from his own church! That included his second "wife" of 20 years who he met at the church, but despite Wikipedia claiming they were married (unable to locate a wedding date!) he admits in the book that they considered themselves married even though they never got around to it! Some of his post-conversion behavior is hard to defend (the same for the Christian women who cheated on him), and the fact that he was a follower of prosperity gospel Kenneth Copeland shows that he didn't have his head on straight but was the child of wealth. Yet it offers insight into what Hollywood values from those that claim to be followers of Christ--sexual purity and living a simple lifestyle aren't among them.The book is pretty well written but in his excitement he'll often go off on a tangent and lose some of the storytelling chronology. It also gets to be a bit long, with way too much detail about Debbie's horrible husbands, their failed businesses, and her Hollywood memorabilia. But the book is a great read. He provides plenty of details about the death of both stars and he was next to both of them when they passed away. It's the first half, where he details his youthful I-don't-care attitude toward celebrities, that is the most detailed and refreshing. More memoirs need to have this level of packing pages with eye-opening stories and downright fun. And, yes, my jaw literally dropped a couple of times to read about the amazing twists in a family life story that has been told many times before but never this well.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    "My Girls: A lifetime with Carrie and Debbie" is a homage from Todd Fisher to his "Girls" sister Carrie Fisher, and mother, Debbie Reynolds. It was about a year and a half ago that Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds died 24 hours apart. This memoir from Todd Fisher gives a loving tribute to his family. He shares what his life was like growing up with his sister Carrie and living with his mother Debbie Reynolds. In spite of rough times growing up he says he had a happy childhood. He writes about h "My Girls: A lifetime with Carrie and Debbie" is a homage from Todd Fisher to his "Girls" sister Carrie Fisher, and mother, Debbie Reynolds. It was about a year and a half ago that Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds died 24 hours apart. This memoir from Todd Fisher gives a loving tribute to his family. He shares what his life was like growing up with his sister Carrie and living with his mother Debbie Reynolds. In spite of rough times growing up he says he had a happy childhood. He writes about his father abandoning the family when he was an infant. then his mother's second marriage to a man who eventually gambled his mother's money away. Having to start all over. Todd talks of his own life while growing up with Carrie and his mother Debbie. he married three times. Helping his mother in Las Vegas when she was trying to start up a museum and hotel. he was there to help her when her third husband betrayed her and took her money. He writes of his sister Carrie and her bipolar illness. There is so much more to describe in this nicely written book about his family. I can see he was a devoted son and brother. A good memoir. would be good for those who may be a fan of Debbie Reynolds and/or Carrie Fisher.
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  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    I grew up with the stories of Debbie Reynolds, Eddie Fisher and Elizabeth Taylor. Reading the background of what happened through the eyes and memories of Todd Fisher, (Debbie's son) was wonderful. Debbie Reynolds really was like the Unsinkable Molly Brown. No matter how many times she was taken advantage of; she continued to fight to keep herself and her children going. She had so many unfortunate men in her life. Men that she trusted and men that always, always, let her down.She had her moment I grew up with the stories of Debbie Reynolds, Eddie Fisher and Elizabeth Taylor. Reading the background of what happened through the eyes and memories of Todd Fisher, (Debbie's son) was wonderful. Debbie Reynolds really was like the Unsinkable Molly Brown. No matter how many times she was taken advantage of; she continued to fight to keep herself and her children going. She had so many unfortunate men in her life. Men that she trusted and men that always, always, let her down.She had her moments with her daughter, Carrie Fisher. But in the end, the little family always took care of each other. She truly was a big factor in saving plenty of old Hollywood.One of the best parts was learning that Debbie and Elizabeth made up and remained dear friends throughout their lives.Todd Fisher was also very close to his sister, Carrie. He honestly discusses Carrie's many personal issues and how he and Debbie did their best to keep Carrie safe. They always had her back and took care of her needs. Carrie was brilliant and very talented. She was a bright light in Hollywood and was loved by many.
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  • Sharon Kolodziej
    January 1, 1970
    I was a young girl when Debbie Reynolds was first popular and would read everything I could about her. This book is a wonderland of information about her and her daughter Carrie Fisher. Being written by son and brother Todd Fisher makes it authentic. Loved all the stories, good and bad, the friendships, troubles and all. Would highly recommend this to any movie fan.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I love Carrie Fisher so much that it's hard to review this book objectively, but after reading the last 2 chapters first (and crying like a baby), I found the book utterly engrossing and heart warming in how their family always stood together despite widely published issues. (And I especially love the reveal of who's who among some of the characters in "Postcards From The Edge!")
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    A True Voice Fisher's voice shines through in his autobiographical account of life with his "girls ", mother Debbie Reynolds and sister Carrier Fisher. He uses tact discussing his absentee father and their brief, shallow reunions. Fisher is a bit syrupy where his mother is concerned, but it's authentic syrup. This was a delightful read overall!
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    His Girls: Todd, Debbie & CarrieBeautiful memoir by Todd Fisher about “his girls”, his mom Debbie Reynolds and his sister Carrie Fisher. Loving yet brutally honest. A must read for every fan that also helps bring us all a little closure.
  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    Fun celeb book about a Hollywood family. Out there at times, but don't we expect that from celebrities? I loved how they were fiercely protective about each other. Nicely done.
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    This was just okay to me. While I admire and appreciate the bond Debbie, Carrie, and Todd had, some of it bordered on “mommy issues”. Also: how could this family make SO MANY bad financial decisions?
  • Billy
    January 1, 1970
    What a pleasurable story!I was hooked! I knew so little about their lives, but now feel like part of their family! What a sad tale of addiction, and dysfunction. But given their sudden fame and many tales of being taken advantage of, it's certainly part of our heritage. I loved it!
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  • Laurel-Rain
    January 1, 1970
    A revelatory and touching tribute to the lives of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds written by the person who knew them best, Todd Fisher’s poignant memoir is filled with moving stories of growing up among Hollywood royalty and illustrated with never-before-seen photos and memorabilia.In December 2016, the world was shaken by the sudden deaths of Carrie Fisher and her mother Debbie Reynolds, two unspeakable losses that occurred in less than twenty-four hours. The stunned public turned for solace A revelatory and touching tribute to the lives of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds written by the person who knew them best, Todd Fisher’s poignant memoir is filled with moving stories of growing up among Hollywood royalty and illustrated with never-before-seen photos and memorabilia.In December 2016, the world was shaken by the sudden deaths of Carrie Fisher and her mother Debbie Reynolds, two unspeakable losses that occurred in less than twenty-four hours. The stunned public turned for solace to Debbie’s only remaining child, Todd Fisher, who somehow retained his grace and composure under the glare of the media spotlight as he struggled with his own overwhelming grief.The son of "America’s Sweethearts" Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher, Todd grew up amid the glamorous wealth and pretense of Hollywood. Thanks to his funny, loving, no-nonsense mother, Todd remained down to earth, his own man, but always close to his cherished mom, and to his sister through her meteoric rise to stardom and her struggle with demons that never diminished her humor, talent, or spirit.Now, Todd shares his heart and his memories of Debbie and Carrie with deeply personal stories from his earliest years to those last unfathomable days. His book, part memoir, part homage, celebrates their legacies through a more intimate, poignant, and often hilarious portrait of these two remarkable women than has ever been revealed before.With thirty-two pages of never-before-seen photos and memorabilia from his family’s private archives, Todd’s book is a love letter to a sister and a mother, and a gift to countless fans who are mourning the deaths of these two unforgettable stars.My Thoughts: As a big fan of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds and their books and movies, I was eager to read My Girls…and enjoy the numerous photos, many never seen before.I enjoyed Todd Fisher’s narrative voice, which should not have been surprising, given his family origins. He very creatively added to the stories I have already heard with some of his own…and anecdotally shared more of Carrie’s and Debbie’s, fresh with his perspective.My plan was to pick up the book, read a few chapters and look at the photos…and then set it aside for another time. Instead I was glued to the pages all day, ignoring the thriller I had started earlier.I liked that Todd and his “girls” had a great philosophy they had gleaned from Debbie’s parents: “There is no such word as can’t.” Refusing to give up came to be their strength, as there were so many obstacles to overcome along the way, from Debbie’s efforts to overcome financial difficulties caused by her second and third husbands, and Carrie’s constant battles against addiction and the effects of her bipolar disorder. Each of them was there for the others, making the battles winnable. A loving tribute that spotlights a Hollywood family, warts and all, this story earned 5 stars.
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  • Carrie Griffin
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher since I was a little girl. It was a joy to get the opportunity to review this book for AudioFile magazine this week. Todd's book is filled with his life with his mother and sister, with a lot of heartfelt stories. He does an incredible job reading his book and his story. It was a powerfully moving novel that made me both laugh and cry at times. I can't tell you really how much I enjoyed listening to his take on their lives, through the ups and the d I have loved Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher since I was a little girl. It was a joy to get the opportunity to review this book for AudioFile magazine this week. Todd's book is filled with his life with his mother and sister, with a lot of heartfelt stories. He does an incredible job reading his book and his story. It was a powerfully moving novel that made me both laugh and cry at times. I can't tell you really how much I enjoyed listening to his take on their lives, through the ups and the downs. Whether that be the rough relationships, movies, or just their time together. The strong bond that they all had together as a family is something that I could relate to so much. I loved listening to Carrie and Todd's childhood years together at 813 Greenway Drive (Todd is making a movie about some of this). It was fun hearing about all their adventures together and also the inside jokes and nicknames they had together. This made me think of my own relationship with my brother. All I can say is that this book is everything I wanted it to be. The last two or so chapters were the hardest to listen to and really hit me hard. I'm glad that I got to learn even more about Debbie and Carrie in this book, but I'm also really happy that I got to learn about Todd and his bond with his girls. This bond was really the heart of the book. Todd's story and his take on their lives together was different but also I have heard so much about it over the years. I loved listening to his early obsession with movies and how that has affected his life.I'm going to close this with a quote that he uses in the book. Carrie and Todd went to the premiere for Star Wars: The Force Awakens together, similarly to when they went to the original Star Wars premiere. Carrie said this after the premiere "Remember when I had never been Princess Leia before, now I'm going to be her forever." I don't know why but this made me cry pretty hard just like the rest of the last couple of chapters. He says this powerful line in the book and I'm not sure if it was in this section or in an earlier one, he said that she might be a princess to everyone now but she was always his princess. I really loved getting to see this take and I'm so glad that he wrote this book. It was phenomenal. Please, if you are a fan of Carrie or Debbie, read this book or listen to it. I don't think you'll be disappointed. *I received a copy of the audiobook for an honest review*
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    It's titled "My Girls" but that doesn't mean Todd Fisher spends 300 pages revealing every minute, personal detail about their lives. So please, when you pick up this book don't expect to find out how many nose hairs they collectively had. At the end of the day, Todd has written a wonderful autobiography essentially about HIS life and how his girls shaped it. I'm certain if this was a bare-all kind of book it definitely wouldn't only be 300 pages long, so there's clue number one.I thoroughly enjo It's titled "My Girls" but that doesn't mean Todd Fisher spends 300 pages revealing every minute, personal detail about their lives. So please, when you pick up this book don't expect to find out how many nose hairs they collectively had. At the end of the day, Todd has written a wonderful autobiography essentially about HIS life and how his girls shaped it. I'm certain if this was a bare-all kind of book it definitely wouldn't only be 300 pages long, so there's clue number one.I thoroughly enjoyed this book, especially learning of their childhood years at 813 Greenway Drive. That era of their lives was recalled with fondness and I got a laugh out of some of the events that included an alligator, an army tank and explosives (not all at the one time).Being a mahoosive fan of Carrie Fisher I'd have loved to hear more stories about her. She did come across as a minor character but that may have been due to her distancing herself from Debbie when she was in her 20s. Todd was, and still is no doubt, a Mammy's boy so the majority of the stories are about himself and Debbie sticking it to the man every time the man was being a derrière. Can you swear on this website? Anyway, Todd did tell us about Carrie's struggles with drugs and mental health, but he also only very briefly mentioned about the time he actually lived with her. He says they had fun but I need more elaboration! And thank you Todd for confirming that story about Paul Simon. I'd only heard a rumour about it but now I know for sure he was a derrière at that moment in time. All in all I found this book quite insightful and revealing while all the while retaining the utmost respect for his girl's privacy. Much like the tale of the Titanic you all know how this one ends and the last chapter was one hell of an emotional read. The line "I love-ally you, bay-bay" left a warmth in my heart knowing how much Todd loved his girls, and again left me yearning for more. Once I finished the book I put on my headphones and played Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells from beginning to end. With Todd's memoir fresh in my mind it actually worked as a "f*cking genius" soundtrack.
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  • Gretchen
    January 1, 1970
    I really did enjoy this book. It is not in the strict sense a biography on Debbie and Carrie. It is however, a retelling of life from their, son/brother. The experiences they shared, memories, ups and downs. Overall you are left with a better understanding of Debbie and Carrie's relationship. Above all you are left with the knowledge of how much Debbie Reynolds loved her children. My only criticism is the sugar coating of who Todd was. I don't think we are given a completely honest reality, as h I really did enjoy this book. It is not in the strict sense a biography on Debbie and Carrie. It is however, a retelling of life from their, son/brother. The experiences they shared, memories, ups and downs. Overall you are left with a better understanding of Debbie and Carrie's relationship. Above all you are left with the knowledge of how much Debbie Reynolds loved her children. My only criticism is the sugar coating of who Todd was. I don't think we are given a completely honest reality, as he is the author, he gets the last word and his mother and sister are not here to refute his opinion. He comes off a bit too much like the hero son/brother managing not only his mother and sister but his three wives, father and two step fathers who all seemed to have a host of personal issues and addictions of which he himself is not afflicted. I felt this did give a slight undertone of self righteousness. However, the book still had genuine heart and kept the reader invested.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    So the family trait of having a wry, self-deprecating sense of humor did not escape Todd! I absolutely adored this book and so far have recommended it to at least 4 people in the 24 hours since I've finished it. The stories of growing up in Hollywood were pretty funny, how Todd didn't get arrested before he turned 12 is baffling. And the bond between him, Carrie and Debbie was so tightly knit. They really were a great team.I read it on a plane and there were times I just burst out laughing and g So the family trait of having a wry, self-deprecating sense of humor did not escape Todd! I absolutely adored this book and so far have recommended it to at least 4 people in the 24 hours since I've finished it. The stories of growing up in Hollywood were pretty funny, how Todd didn't get arrested before he turned 12 is baffling. And the bond between him, Carrie and Debbie was so tightly knit. They really were a great team.I read it on a plane and there were times I just burst out laughing and got kind of odd looks from my seatmate. And then the ending. Well, my seatmate handed me a Kleenex because tears were running down my face. I wonder if knowing that so many people around the world miss Debbie and Carrie is comforting to him? I'd like to think so.And if you haven't seen the documentary film "Bright Lights" do so, and before reading the book. It will make the ending all the more poignant.
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  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    Forgive me if I sound jaded, but I was worried this was just a book to capitalize on the loss of his family, I couldn't have been more incorrect! I have read debbie and Carrie's books, it was just a natural progression to see what the last Fisher had to say. I was locked it instantly, I listen and read my books, my audio battery died when I was in the garden, I raced in for an early lunch and read while my ears recharged, I didn't want to stop the momentum, when I love a book I ride it to the en Forgive me if I sound jaded, but I was worried this was just a book to capitalize on the loss of his family, I couldn't have been more incorrect! I have read debbie and Carrie's books, it was just a natural progression to see what the last Fisher had to say. I was locked it instantly, I listen and read my books, my audio battery died when I was in the garden, I raced in for an early lunch and read while my ears recharged, I didn't want to stop the momentum, when I love a book I ride it to the end non-stop! I loved all the photos, by the time I finished I felt honored that he had shared so many intimate stories of his family with the public. They all lived memorable lives, I loved my last peek into their lives, he wrote a very touching candid story of his girls and their love for one another was palpable. I thank him for sharing his story.
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  • Flewts
    January 1, 1970
    I can't say this was the very best biography I've ever read, but Todd tells the stories of his mother, Debbie Reynolds, and his sister, Carrie Fisher, with love without holding back on the rough edges. Particularly helpful was his descriptions of what Carrie went through with her bipolar episodes, how she tried to self-medicate, and how that probably made things worse.Debbie Reynolds, perhaps "America's Sweetheart," was unlucky in love, falling three times for me who took advantage of her, took I can't say this was the very best biography I've ever read, but Todd tells the stories of his mother, Debbie Reynolds, and his sister, Carrie Fisher, with love without holding back on the rough edges. Particularly helpful was his descriptions of what Carrie went through with her bipolar episodes, how she tried to self-medicate, and how that probably made things worse.Debbie Reynolds, perhaps "America's Sweetheart," was unlucky in love, falling three times for me who took advantage of her, took her to the cleaners, and pretty much bankrupted her. So much of her life, she HAD to work. Fortunately she loved her audiences and it was a commitment she was willing to make.We think of movie stars as rich people with the world as their oyster, not understanding that fame is not easy, and riches can be fleeting if you trust the wrong people.
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  • Bonnie J. Yoman
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. Todd Fisher has the same gift for writing as did his sister. He writes as if he's sitting across from you on the sofa, remembering and sharing. The smiles come easily, but so do the tears and the lump in your throat when he recounts, with poignant bravery the days when he lost his beloved sister and mom. You can almost hear his anger and frustration in his voice as he tells us about all the times his mom was taken advantage of and when the deals fell through to buil I absolutely loved this book. Todd Fisher has the same gift for writing as did his sister. He writes as if he's sitting across from you on the sofa, remembering and sharing. The smiles come easily, but so do the tears and the lump in your throat when he recounts, with poignant bravery the days when he lost his beloved sister and mom. You can almost hear his anger and frustration in his voice as he tells us about all the times his mom was taken advantage of and when the deals fell through to build Debbie Reynolds dream museum for her extraordinary collection of movie memorabilia. Along with the HBO documentary "Bright Lights", this book honors two incredible performers who had problems in life as we all do. He has given us a gift by sharing his memories both good and bad.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. What a love story to his mother and sister!I have read Debbie Reynolds' autobiography and decided to read this one to get a different point of view.It is easy to read, honest, and funny. You get a clear picture of what it was like growing up in a famous family, the good and the bad. He writes about his mother and sister's weaknesses openly, yet in a loving way. They were close and each others' strongest allies. His protectiveness of them both shines through every page.I enjoyed the whole bo Wow. What a love story to his mother and sister!I have read Debbie Reynolds' autobiography and decided to read this one to get a different point of view.It is easy to read, honest, and funny. You get a clear picture of what it was like growing up in a famous family, the good and the bad. He writes about his mother and sister's weaknesses openly, yet in a loving way. They were close and each others' strongest allies. His protectiveness of them both shines through every page.I enjoyed the whole book and was sad when it ended, both because of what happened, and because it was so touchingly written.
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  • Marisa Gonzalez
    January 1, 1970
    Todd Fisher tells about his life with "my girls"- mother Debbie Reynold and sister Carrie Fisher. I loved this book. Debbie and Carrie were two strong women who dealt with a lot of serious issues in their lives but they always tackled them with resilience and humor. There were so many emotions in this book and you can really feel the love he had for them and for each other. It also gives an insight to other Hollywood stars too. There is a great story of the kindness of Fred Astaire. The story ab Todd Fisher tells about his life with "my girls"- mother Debbie Reynold and sister Carrie Fisher. I loved this book. Debbie and Carrie were two strong women who dealt with a lot of serious issues in their lives but they always tackled them with resilience and humor. There were so many emotions in this book and you can really feel the love he had for them and for each other. It also gives an insight to other Hollywood stars too. There is a great story of the kindness of Fred Astaire. The story about Bette Davis was hilarious and Gene Kelly was just a jerk. I highly recommend this book.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    The story of the "privileged" is usually interesting to read, although also usually depressing--they are fallible :) Todd Fisher pushed the publishing date up for this memoir because of the deaths of his "2 girls". He seems to have been a stable factor in his family--although, Debbie was to a degreea stable influence. They all made some bad choices in their lives, but they always clung to each other and loved each other. One thing that I found interesting in the story was that Todd gave his li The story of the "privileged" is usually interesting to read, although also usually depressing--they are fallible :) Todd Fisher pushed the publishing date up for this memoir because of the deaths of his "2 girls". He seems to have been a stable factor in his family--although, Debbie was to a degreea stable influence. They all made some bad choices in their lives, but they always clung to each other and loved each other. One thing that I found interesting in the story was that Todd gave his life to Jesus and seemed to have lived accordingly. He ran into some hypocrites in the churches, but he also met some lifelong friends and confidants.
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  • Katee
    January 1, 1970
    This was a surprise. I've read Carrie Fisher's books, seen her shows, etc, so expected this to be a cash-in on Carrie and Debbie's fame. Instead it was very honest and touching. While this was a family with great talent and access to a world few of us see, but it was also shocking to see the amount of betrayal they all experienced. The enormity of dealing with addiction and mental illness is well described. Carrie and Debbie made light of their struggles, but this book gives a much more honest p This was a surprise. I've read Carrie Fisher's books, seen her shows, etc, so expected this to be a cash-in on Carrie and Debbie's fame. Instead it was very honest and touching. While this was a family with great talent and access to a world few of us see, but it was also shocking to see the amount of betrayal they all experienced. The enormity of dealing with addiction and mental illness is well described. Carrie and Debbie made light of their struggles, but this book gives a much more honest perspective.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Heartfelt and riveting. This book is written in a way as if Todd is casually telling you about his life and his girls. I have read Carrie’s memoirs, but haven’t had a chance to read Debbie’s, but it was still interesting to hear some of the stories and events I was familiar with from Todd’s point of view. Debbie truly was like the unsinkable Molly Brown, she kept fighting through whatever came at her. And Carrie had her own issues and yet was a truly brilliant and talented woman. Thank you Todd Heartfelt and riveting. This book is written in a way as if Todd is casually telling you about his life and his girls. I have read Carrie’s memoirs, but haven’t had a chance to read Debbie’s, but it was still interesting to hear some of the stories and events I was familiar with from Todd’s point of view. Debbie truly was like the unsinkable Molly Brown, she kept fighting through whatever came at her. And Carrie had her own issues and yet was a truly brilliant and talented woman. Thank you Todd for sharing this book with the world
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  • Monica Ross
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. The writing style is like a friend is talking to you. I learned a bit about Todd’s growing up years and life with his famous family.He seems quite down to earth in spite of his many advantages growing up.It was interesting to learn about Debbie and Carrie’s relationship as seen from his perspective. This was a very touching and lovingly written memoir. Thank you for sharing “your girls” with the world!
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  • Lynda
    January 1, 1970
    Todd Fisher shares quite a bit of his life story while sharing his love, heartache and adventures with his mother, Debbie Reynolds and sister, Carrie Fisher. I worried that this would have some “Mommie Dearest” moments but it is a loving and revealing personal narrative of the 50+ years with his girls. As a fan of both women, I enjoyed this memoir.
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