The Voice in My Head
From the author of Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now comes an unforgettable novel about facing the impossible, dealing with family chaos—and making sense of everything you are.For Indigo Phillips, life has always been her and her identical twin—Violet. The perfectly dressed, gentle, popular sister. But now Violet is terminally ill and, in a few hours, plans to die on her own terms via medically assisted suicide. Even though she and Violet have drifted apart lately, Indigo doesn’t know how to face life without the only person who really understands her. Until suddenly she hears a mysterious voice claiming to be God, insisting that if she takes Violet to a remote rock formation in the Arizona desert, her sister will live.Indigo is sure she’s losing it. But Violet agrees to go—if their incredibly dysfunctional family accompanies them on their trek from Seattle to Arizona. Indigo can barely be in the same zip code as her distant mother and controlling big sister, much less keep the peace on a road trip. Speaking her mind is the only way she can deal. But between facing senseless mishaps and strange lodgings, and meeting even stranger folks along the way, Indigo will learn shocking things about those she thought she knew too well. When a sequence of wrenching secrets detonates, Indigo must figure out how to come to terms with her sister, her family…and the voice in her head.

The Voice in My Head Details

TitleThe Voice in My Head
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

The Voice in My Head Review

  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of THE VOICE IN MY HEAD by Dana L Davis in exchange for my honest review.***Indigo prepares to jump from a building when she hears a voice in her head claiming to be god. Not wanting to live without her terminally ill twin Violet, god tells Indigo her sister will live if they visit The Wave. Instead of swallowing pills to die with dignity, Violet agrees to take a road trip with her family.Depending on the reader’s perspective, Indigo’s ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of THE VOICE IN MY HEAD by Dana L Davis in exchange for my honest review.***Indigo prepares to jump from a building when she hears a voice in her head claiming to be god. Not wanting to live without her terminally ill twin Violet, god tells Indigo her sister will live if they visit The Wave. Instead of swallowing pills to die with dignity, Violet agrees to take a road trip with her family.Depending on the reader’s perspective, Indigo’s Voice can be seen as an auditory hallucination, that of god or something else. As a psychologist who interned in a state hospital, I’ve known a number of people whose brain synapses misfired as delusions and hallucinations, I went with the mental illness. I’m also atheist, which contributed to my perspective.Indigo clearly saw herself as the lesser twin, the least favorite sibling, second best. The chip on her shoulder was a product of her environment as well as her curious personality. I enjoyed her narration. Dana L Davis gave her a smart, witty voice. Davis created a unique cast of secondary characters, family members to the twins and an unconventional preacher wise without being religious. Like most families, some annoying and difficult to tolerate members drove Indigo, and me the reader, nuts, namely her older sister Michelle.What THE VOICE IN MY HEAD lacked in plot, Davis made up for in writing and dialogue. The ending, while predictable, was fitting. YA readers love stories about twins and with such smart writing, THE VOICE IN MY HEAD will certainly please most readers.
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  • Erika
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for the chance to read early for an honest review.This book.From the beginning of the story, I was laughing out-loud. Indigo's family is crazy in the best possible way. They were hilarious and the way they interacted felt authentic. There were so many good lines that I wanted to stop and remember.This book deals with some pretty heavy issues - a suicide attempt and euthanasia. The humor is in no way downplaying these. And I think the discussion questions at the end are a good Thanks to Netgalley for the chance to read early for an honest review.This book.From the beginning of the story, I was laughing out-loud. Indigo's family is crazy in the best possible way. They were hilarious and the way they interacted felt authentic. There were so many good lines that I wanted to stop and remember.This book deals with some pretty heavy issues - a suicide attempt and euthanasia. The humor is in no way downplaying these. And I think the discussion questions at the end are a good inclusion for impressionable readers.Indigo ends up with a concussion and a Voice in her head that says it's God. It tells her to take Violet to the Wave in Arizona for a miracle, and the entire family is packed up into a bus with eyes on it (nicknamed "Eye of the Tiger"), and driven by their happy, new-agey Pastor.I'm definitely buying this one when it's released.
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  • Jypsy
    January 1, 1970
    The Voice In My Head is a sad story. Twins Indigo and Violet have lost the closeness they once shared but for a good reason. At eighteen years old, one of the twins, Violet, is terminal. Dying. The grief of the surviving sister is a palpable thing. Indigo begins to hear the voice of God telling her things to do to save her sister. The story is far fetched for me. It's proof that people will believe what they want to believe even though it's ridiculous. It's a sad story about a family in the midd The Voice In My Head is a sad story. Twins Indigo and Violet have lost the closeness they once shared but for a good reason. At eighteen years old, one of the twins, Violet, is terminal. Dying. The grief of the surviving sister is a palpable thing. Indigo begins to hear the voice of God telling her things to do to save her sister. The story is far fetched for me. It's proof that people will believe what they want to believe even though it's ridiculous. It's a sad story about a family in the middle of tragedy and doing the best they can. I read this fairly quickly and ended up sad. Overall it's a good read about love and loss. Thanks to NetGalley and Harlequin TEEN for an arc in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    Ok.. this book was just sad!!! Ugh... super heart breaking :(. The book follows the story of two 18 year old twin sisters Indigo and Violet who have lost their connection along the way of growing up. Indigo and Violet are the polar opposite of one another. Violet is suffering from an intense illness that will ultimately take her life. Violet is given a choice to end her life with dignity. This changes when Indigo hears the word of God in her head. This mysterious god voice is telling Indigo that Ok.. this book was just sad!!! Ugh... super heart breaking :(. The book follows the story of two 18 year old twin sisters Indigo and Violet who have lost their connection along the way of growing up. Indigo and Violet are the polar opposite of one another. Violet is suffering from an intense illness that will ultimately take her life. Violet is given a choice to end her life with dignity. This changes when Indigo hears the word of God in her head. This mysterious god voice is telling Indigo that Violet will live if they make it to the Wave in Arizona.This begins the journey for a family to save Violet's life. This book is an emotional roller coaster and you become invested in this family rooting to save beautiful Violet's life. I really enjoyed how Dana Davis left the "voice of god" up to the interpretation to the reader. My only issues with this one was in the beginning of the story there was a lot going on and it was a bit all over the place... hard to follow with introducing so many characters.I also felt the ending didn't live up to my expectations and was disappointed. Overall, this was a sweet YA novel but a tad on the sad side :).3 starsThank you to Netgalley and Inkyard Press for the arc in exchange for an honest review.Publication date: 5/28/19Published to Goodreads: 4/9/19
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an e-arc of this title in exchange for an honest review! TW for suicide, medical assisted suicide, terminal illness/medical stuff.Indigo's twin sister Violet has been diagnosed with a terminal illness. Indigo, unable to fathom life without her twin sister decides to jump from a building. But before she does, she calls to God to help. Then, just as Indigo decides not to jump, God answers back and she's so surprised that she falls off the building. But Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an e-arc of this title in exchange for an honest review! TW for suicide, medical assisted suicide, terminal illness/medical stuff.Indigo's twin sister Violet has been diagnosed with a terminal illness. Indigo, unable to fathom life without her twin sister decides to jump from a building. But before she does, she calls to God to help. Then, just as Indigo decides not to jump, God answers back and she's so surprised that she falls off the building. But she's fine! And God, aka the Voice in her head, has some news. If she can convince Violet, who is planning on dying with dignity that very day, to make this dangerous and epic hike, she'll live. Violet shockingly agrees, but only if their whole family comes along for the journey. Meaning Indigo and Violet, their parents, their younger brother, their older sister and her husband, and their two kids. And, of course, the pastor who was about to help Violet die with dignity. Indigo knows immediately that this trip is sure to be something. I think that overall this was a solid read, definitely 4/5 stars. There are some parts of the novel that will have you feeling feels, and parts that will make you laugh! Definitely recommend, as long as you're someone who won't be upset by the subject matter.
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  • Mona AlvaradoFrazier
    January 1, 1970
    I selected this book based on an interesting premise: Twin sisters, 18-year-old Indigo and Violet, are not close. Indigo lives in the shadow of her popular sister, Violet who becomes terminally ill. When she plans to die on her own terms via medically assisted death, Indigo spirals into desperation in her efforts to cope. That’s when she begins to hear a mysterious voice—a voice claiming to be God. The voice insists that if she takes Violet to a remote rock formation in the Arizona desert, her s I selected this book based on an interesting premise: Twin sisters, 18-year-old Indigo and Violet, are not close. Indigo lives in the shadow of her popular sister, Violet who becomes terminally ill. When she plans to die on her own terms via medically assisted death, Indigo spirals into desperation in her efforts to cope. That’s when she begins to hear a mysterious voice—a voice claiming to be God. The voice insists that if she takes Violet to a remote rock formation in the Arizona desert, her sister will live. The story is in first-person POV via Indigo. There's a lot going on in the first 20% of the book (heavy in dialogue and introduction of several characters) which made the read somewhat confusing. I wanted to know more about Violet, Indigo and their mother's relationship before finding out Violet's dilemma and the voice entering the picture. The main character's voice sounded much younger than 18 yrs. old and the 'voice' wavered between a jokester and sage. I did enjoy the humor, the diverse cast of characters and family relationships. I didn't like the resolution. NetGalley provided this e-book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Seema Rao
    January 1, 1970
    Davis’ second book is about twins, one of whom is terminally ill. Interestingly enough, the plot is less well-done than Davis’ first book. But, the writing and character development are better. This book is a total tear-jerker. I am impressed at how Davis engages YA audiences in faith and death while maintaining moments of levity. As Davis says in her author’s note, this is a book about family. The relationship between the two sisters is very well done. 3.5Thanks to Edelweiss+ for the ARC in exc Davis’ second book is about twins, one of whom is terminally ill. Interestingly enough, the plot is less well-done than Davis’ first book. But, the writing and character development are better. This book is a total tear-jerker. I am impressed at how Davis engages YA audiences in faith and death while maintaining moments of levity. As Davis says in her author’s note, this is a book about family. The relationship between the two sisters is very well done. 3.5Thanks to Edelweiss+ for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. Seema Rao Write : Instagram| Blog| Twitter|
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  • Divena
    January 1, 1970
    When I first read the description of this book I passed it over unsure of what to expect. The words terminally ill jumped out at me and I assumed this would just be another one of those sad stories about the journey towards someone's death. But while Violet was very sick this story instead chose to focus on her being alive. The family goes on a journey based off the hope that she will be cured. And we follow them along for this crazy road trip. There were characters who I didn't enjoy but we get When I first read the description of this book I passed it over unsure of what to expect. The words terminally ill jumped out at me and I assumed this would just be another one of those sad stories about the journey towards someone's death. But while Violet was very sick this story instead chose to focus on her being alive. The family goes on a journey based off the hope that she will be cured. And we follow them along for this crazy road trip. There were characters who I didn't enjoy but we get to see growth and the reasons for their actions which helps you come to an understanding about why they are the way they are. And that ending was not the ending I expected but it was powerful and fitting.I received an ARC from Harlequin Teen via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kibbenza
    January 1, 1970
    (ARC provided by Netgalley in return for my honest opinion.)Indigo's sister is dying. As in, she's terminal. As in she's going to die by doctor assisted suicide. As in Indigo is about to be one half of a set. Overwhelmed at the prospect of living without her twin, Indigo climbs a building, prepared to die, too. But before she can leap, she hears a voice telling her that if she takes her sister to Arizona, she'll live. Always a believer, her sister Violet agrees, and the whole family takes off on (ARC provided by Netgalley in return for my honest opinion.)Indigo's sister is dying. As in, she's terminal. As in she's going to die by doctor assisted suicide. As in Indigo is about to be one half of a set. Overwhelmed at the prospect of living without her twin, Indigo climbs a building, prepared to die, too. But before she can leap, she hears a voice telling her that if she takes her sister to Arizona, she'll live. Always a believer, her sister Violet agrees, and the whole family takes off on road trip to prolong what seems inevitable.This book sounded so good from the get go. I'm not super into religious fiction, but I approached this with the hope that it was super creative, and not preachy. While there is a lot of praying and such, it didn't have the usual religious fiction feel. I really enjoyed the story of Indigo and her sister, and eventually I even got into the rest of the family. If I had one criticism, it would be that it felt like Indigo believed the voice she was hearing way, way too easily. (Although, I suppose if you're actually hearing a voice, it would be hard to be skeptical?) Likewise, I felt her family bought into it way too easily, although this could be explained later in the book. (view spoiler)[Violet tells her family she's going to follow through with her plan to take a fatal dose of medicine after the trip, so it could easily be seen as a 'one last hurrah' type of thing. (hide spoiler)]There were bits that felt a little forced, like the scene with Willy May, but I did forget about that in my rush to see what would happen at the end. When I got to the end, I was kind of disappointed. (view spoiler)[I admit, I wanted the voice to be right, and that violet would be healed. But then, the voice never actually said she'd be healed. It said she'd *live*. It just felt kind of hokey that after all that, all said voice meant was that she'd have an adventure. I wanted her to live!! (hide spoiler)]In the end, it was a pretty compelling read, that I raced through. And isn't that really all you can ask from a book?
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  • Gregory Schwartz
    January 1, 1970
    What an engrossing book! I love Dana Davis' books because she does the heavy lifting for me by crafting excellent, gripping, approachable stories and she allows my critical mind to disengage. So I can just read, get lost in the narrative, and enjoy. This is what a book is supposed to be -- an escape, and also a nourishing experience for your mind and soul. I'm so glad I got ahold of an advanced copy!
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  • Lynne Lambdin
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes a reader can get into a rut. When you read heavily, stories become predictable, sound alike and content begins to lack originality. I went into The Voice in My Head expecting the issues described. But what I got was a story that had me hooked and compulsively reading as if Voilet's life depended on it. And what a life experience it was.Voilet and Indigo are eighteen year old identical twins. While they have the same DNA, their personalities could not be more different. Which is quite Sometimes a reader can get into a rut. When you read heavily, stories become predictable, sound alike and content begins to lack originality. I went into The Voice in My Head expecting the issues described. But what I got was a story that had me hooked and compulsively reading as if Voilet's life depended on it. And what a life experience it was.Voilet and Indigo are eighteen year old identical twins. While they have the same DNA, their personalities could not be more different. Which is quite normal for siblings, but their situation is anything but normal. Violet is suffering from an illness that will take her life. But Violet has a choice to end her life with dignity. But plans are put on hold when Indigo hears the word of God in her head. This voice insists that if Voilet makes it to the Wave in Arizona, she will live. Thus begins a family journey unlike anything other with the goal to save Voilet's life. This books is obviously an emotional journey. You get to intertwine in the family dynamics. And with some heavy hearts, times can be a bit tough. And this story really does portray different views and feelings on some heavy subject matter such as mental health and assisted suicide. Also, when the family is already suffering quite deeply, its hard to have your own life happenings. Its not a time when you want to share ways in which your life is progressing or stalling in some cases. It is just an interesting insight into the life of a family with a terminal teenager. Even though the family's world is crashing, the world doesn't stop. And it's a cruel and tragic truth. My favorite part of the book was the Voice. The banter was entertaining, but the most impressive aspect of the Voice was that as a reader, I wanted the Voice to be God so incredibly bad. I wanted to believe and at times truly believe the Voice was God speaking to Indigo. There are certain situations where you can't question the Voice being authentic. Other times, you have the biggest skeptics believing so in that scene you give in and believe too. I love the way Davis incorporated the Voice and how she left the Voice up to the reader. I had one very minor issue with this story. When the family was communicating, they talked so incredibly proper that it wasn't really believable. Which if that was how every character in the story talked, it wouldn't be an issue. But when the Voice is talking more casual with a bit of youthful slang, it makes the younger members of the family's strict and proper English stick out a bit. Overall, I would give this story a 4.5 stars (rounding to 5). I can't wait to see how big of hit this story is for 2019. Thank you NetGalley and HARLEQUIN Teen Inkyard Press for this advance copy.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Inkyard Press for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review.At it's core, this book is about two sisters who lost their close connection along the way. Indigo and Violet together are such a sweet combination and once they finally talk about their life, it's nice to see their bond grow closer again and open up to each other. Unfortunately, this doesnt happen until late in the book and truthfully I would've liked mor My full review can be found on the Epilie Aspie Chick blog! Thank you to Inkyard Press for providing the ARC in exchange for an honest review.At it's core, this book is about two sisters who lost their close connection along the way. Indigo and Violet together are such a sweet combination and once they finally talk about their life, it's nice to see their bond grow closer again and open up to each other. Unfortunately, this doesnt happen until late in the book and truthfully I would've liked more interaction between them from the start.
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  • ExpatLibrary
    January 1, 1970
    This is a 'coming of age' story about African-American twins who diverge in mind and heart when one decides to end her life with dignity after a severe, incurable lung illness and the other starts to hear the voice of "God" in her head. I am not a big fan of grief reading. I enjoy the occasional Jodi Picoult novel but it isn't my first choice. So I when I picked up The Voice, I did it to resolve the 'problem' I had in needing to find out what actually WAS the voice in Indigo's head (spiritual, r This is a 'coming of age' story about African-American twins who diverge in mind and heart when one decides to end her life with dignity after a severe, incurable lung illness and the other starts to hear the voice of "God" in her head. I am not a big fan of grief reading. I enjoy the occasional Jodi Picoult novel but it isn't my first choice. So I when I picked up The Voice, I did it to resolve the 'problem' I had in needing to find out what actually WAS the voice in Indigo's head (spiritual, religious, insanity, alien?) While I won't spoil this answer, I will say that this is definitely one of those books where the journey is the gift. While I went in just to find out this one answer, I left feeling like I had met and shared with Violet and Indigo and their complex and fierce family. The characters here are so realistic in their flaws, so true to their creation and so distinctly individual that I believe they could exist. It is rare that an author can hit the right combination of plot intrigue and character development and beautiful writing to support the story fully but Dana Davis has managed it in spades. I fully expect to see this novel on awards lists next year and frankly, I will question our industry if this book does not receive the accolades it deserves!
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  • Sally Maxwell
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Harlequin TEEN for the arc of this book.Such a heartbreakingly good read, I loved this book, it made me full on ugly cry, and touched my heart. Anyone with siblings will understand how Indigo feels, and her struggles with her parents.It was lovely how they all came together, even though it was such a sad story, but very well written.
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  • Michele Amedee
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Net Galley to give an honest review and I couldn’t even get past the first chapter. Once she started thinking she was hearing voices and God was speaking directly to her, I was done.
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the publisher at ALA Midwinter.CW: terminal illness, assisted suicide, suicide attempts, suicidal ideationThis book starts out heavy, and doesn't get much lighter, but Davis manages to make it work. It opens on Indigo Phillips, climbing as high as she can, wishing she was the one with the terminal illness instead of her perfect sister and other half, Violet. Violet is the twin everyone loves-- kind, patient, smart, easygoing, while Indigo is stubborn, prickly, and often fe I received an ARC from the publisher at ALA Midwinter.CW: terminal illness, assisted suicide, suicide attempts, suicidal ideationThis book starts out heavy, and doesn't get much lighter, but Davis manages to make it work. It opens on Indigo Phillips, climbing as high as she can, wishing she was the one with the terminal illness instead of her perfect sister and other half, Violet. Violet is the twin everyone loves-- kind, patient, smart, easygoing, while Indigo is stubborn, prickly, and often feels like the black sheep of the family (a situation not helped by her older sister Michelle, who constantly rides Indigo for the tiniest of infractions). Violet's dying of pulmonary fibrosis, and it's throwing Indigo's entire life into a tailspin. When she falls from the building she climbed (suicide attempt? Accident?) she hears a voice. A voice that sounds like Dave Chappelle. The voice of... God? The Voice (as they perfer to be called) comes to Indigo in the hospital, telling her that her sister will live if the whole family goes to the Wave, a landmark in Arizona, and if Indi and Violet can make it to the Wave. Indi is desperate for anything now, and when she comes home to see that her sister has acquired the drugs needed to end her life on her terms, Indi does something rash-- she dumps them out the window into the yard. In the middle of the uproar, she explains her vision, and surprisingly, the family (Mom, Dad, older sister Michelle, her husband and two kids, younger brother Alfred, and the twins) as well as their pastor (a white guy named Jedediah Barnabas) agree to it. The next morning, the motley crew sets out in the pastor's church bus, covered in psychedelic paintings, hauling themselves from Seattle to Arizona. As they drive, they're racing Violet's body, their family traumas, and the pastor's kidney stones. But when Indigo ignores The Voice in order to meet their goal, The Voice goes silent, leaving her to navigate an unthinkable situation on her own.I have to point out that I was extremely disturbed by Indigo dumping out Violet's AS medicine-- others have no right to try to control what people take to ease their pain or suffering. it's not done out of some religious moralizing on Indigo's part, it's purely selfish. While I understand that being a teenager means your brain isn't fully formed yet, I can see this being a triggering issue for readers. Beyond that, the suicide attempt and Indigo's suicidal ideation may be issues for readers, but they're very clearly presented as her thinking about herself, and her family reflects back their pain and horror that she might do such a thing.On the surface, this is a road trip novel-- characters forced by proximity to examine themselves and their relationships to those around them. What I'd like to see this used as is a jumping-off point as a discussion about assisted suicide, grief, and hope.(Note: as a Seattle resident, Columbia City is like two neighborhoods away from Skyway, and Skyway Water and Power is not a thing. Retired black working-class parents who have a home in Columbia City is entirely possible, one that may not be up to the maintenance standards of others on the block, but one that is owned and that the residents take pride in. But Skyway? That's not even in Seattle city limits, it's a majority-minority neighborhood south of Seattle limits. Stg we need geography readers in fiction, starting with some retroactive looks at 50SOG.)Overall, 3.5 stars, rounding up to 4.
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  • Savanna Waddle
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me a complimentary arc of The Voice in My Head by Dana L. Davis in exchange for my honest review.*tw for suicidal ideation and attempt, terminal illness, death, brief racists couple, being held at gunpoint, and physician-assisted suicideOKAY FIRST OFF THE COVER IS SO BEAUTIFUL. I really love it, and it captures the two sisters.There were a lot of things I loved about this book, and a few things that I thought could have been handled better. *Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me a complimentary arc of The Voice in My Head by Dana L. Davis in exchange for my honest review.*tw for suicidal ideation and attempt, terminal illness, death, brief racists couple, being held at gunpoint, and physician-assisted suicideOKAY FIRST OFF THE COVER IS SO BEAUTIFUL. I really love it, and it captures the two sisters.There were a lot of things I loved about this book, and a few things that I thought could have been handled better. I'll start with what I liked.The Voice (or God) is probably my favorite character, so funny and enjoyable. I loved the moments between the Voice and Indigo, the humor was nice.I super enjoyed that this was a story about a big family going through losing a member, and the way that family secrets were slipping out and it felt authentic. The good and the bad of a family road trip (and a megachurch pastor who I thought I would hate but enjoyed. also the megachurch vibe was accurate).ALFRED’S LETTER HAD ME CRYING, A SWEET BROTHER.The ending to me made a lot of sense, and the way it went down and the sprinkles of the future was a nice touch.Now moving on to some of the things I didn't really like.The number one thing was that Indigo's suicide attempt (ideation) was not treated in the manner it should have been. Starting off you know that she doesn't seem like she has plans to go through with it, but that doesn't matter. She had a plan, she was in action, and she lied about it to her parents and family to cover it up. However, her nurse sister didn't believe her and knew what happened. As a nurse AND a sister, Michelle did not treat it right. She would make quips about it and didn't tell their parents, and as someone who loves the person in that position and being in the medical field, it should have been handled wayyyy more sensitively. (along with the aftermath of a robbery situation.) And for most of it Indigo doesn't seem to have any big reaction to almost taking her own life. It made it confusing that Indigo contemplates suicide but then doesn’t seem to understand why her sister who is physically dying would choose physician assisted suicide?This leads to that sometimes you don’t really know why Indigo does things, she tells more than shows the whys or her feelings, however I did majorly approve of the forking of the tires.Indigo's brother-in-law and nephews are Native (which I loved), it was nice to see that representation added, but there was a racist couple who make a racist quip towards Natives, and while I understand a lot of people use it, I'm not sure that it was the author's place to use it, if she herself is not Native.CHAPTER FUCKING 18, this chapter was so good. It pulled the story together and it was a really good moment.I do believe the final chapter could have showed a little more of the aftermath with the entire family.Overall, I liked this story, I had fun and I enjoyed the family and the plot and the idea. There was just some things that could have used handled a little differently.
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  • Brooke
    January 1, 1970
    TRIGGER WARNING: suicide/attempted suicide/medically assisted suicide/terminal illnessI am trying to piece my heart back together after this book. The story grabbed me from the first sentence and held me until the very end, but there were so many heartbreaking moments along the way. Indigo and Violet are identical twins. Indigo has always felt like the lesser of the two, always striving to be perfect like her sister. Violet suffers from an incurable lung disease and wants to end her suffering by TRIGGER WARNING: suicide/attempted suicide/medically assisted suicide/terminal illnessI am trying to piece my heart back together after this book. The story grabbed me from the first sentence and held me until the very end, but there were so many heartbreaking moments along the way. Indigo and Violet are identical twins. Indigo has always felt like the lesser of the two, always striving to be perfect like her sister. Violet suffers from an incurable lung disease and wants to end her suffering by "dying with dignity," or what is commonly referred to as medically assisted death/suicide. Indigo is struggling to deal with the fact that she is soon going to lose her sister; her other half. Indigo plans to jump from a building and end her own life when she hears a voice in her head, claiming to be God, and claiming to let Violet live if Indigo can convince her to go on a hike to a remote rock formation in the Arizona desert. The entire family takes off on a road trip to the Arizona desert, following the voice in Indigo's head, hoping for a miracle to save Violet. Along the way, the family encounters many different mishaps, but finally make it to the trail head of the Wave. Now, they just have to get Violet out there so she can live...I am not typically a person who reads books about God, or a higher power, or the after life. I don't always agree with how those things are perceived, or the controversy that goes along with it. That aside, this book was fantastic. I enjoyed the voice of God sounding like Dave Chappelle, and talking like a 15 year old boy. I found it humorous and light-hearted, despite the rest of the story being so heavy. I easily connected with the characters, having been a teenager a long time ago. Their emotions and drama were tangible and reminded me what it was like to be in high school. As a parent, I understood the thought processes and decisions the parents were making in regards to Violet's health and what was best for all of the children/family. This was a very well written, emotionally charged, at times funny story. I loved this book so much that I read it within 24 hours. This book felt complete to me (not something I often say) and all of the loose ends were tied together at the end. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys YA, family dramas, and emotional reads. I would again like to remind anyone reading this review that this story revolves around attempted suicide/suicide/medically assisted suicide/terminal illness. It was a fantastic read, but reader discretion advised.
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  • Olivia Farr
    January 1, 1970
    Find my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti...THE VOICE IN MY HEAD begins with Indigo standing on a building, praying to God for her sister to live and trying to bargain. When she hears a voice, she slips and falls. Later, at the hospital, she had some severe injuries but still hears the voice. Her much older sister, Michelle, is a nurse practitioner and checks her out against medical advice so that they can go home. Indigo’s twin sister, Violet, is terminally ill with a resp Find my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti...THE VOICE IN MY HEAD begins with Indigo standing on a building, praying to God for her sister to live and trying to bargain. When she hears a voice, she slips and falls. Later, at the hospital, she had some severe injuries but still hears the voice. Her much older sister, Michelle, is a nurse practitioner and checks her out against medical advice so that they can go home. Indigo’s twin sister, Violet, is terminally ill with a respiratory disease for which there is no treatment or cure. Violet has elected to choose medically-assisted suicide or euthanasia. The voice Indigo is hearing tells her that if she brings Violet to a park in Arizona and has her hike to the Wave (2.5 miles), Violet will live. Indigo gives this message to Violet when she is supposed to be saying goodbye and dumps the medication out the window. Violet ends up deciding to go on the trip and make the hike- but only if the whole family goes too.There’s a lot to unpack in the story. At the forefront, it deals with some really big issues, such as grief, loss, terminal illness, and euthanasia. Secondarily, there are some smaller issues that come up such as racism and what it is like to be black in this country. Despite the overwhelmingly sad story, the author has managed to infuse some humor and healing into the book, and it ends up being quite entertaining- from the priest with his colorful bus and new-age good nature, the Voice which may be God, and the family dynamics. The characters were all really well constructed, and there’s a lot to be said about the family and how they come together and build new understanding on the long trip. Whereas often in stories about death, the grieving and healing occurs after, in this book, it happens along with the trip. We see the characters (particularly Indigo) growing throughout the book.Overall, this is an engaging contemporary YA about family, (familial) love, and healing. With a charming cast of characters and appropriately infused humor, this story is chock full of heart. I would highly recommend for anyone looking for a thoughtful book that presents a lot of topics for further discussion/consideration.
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  • Nikol
    January 1, 1970
    **I received a digital ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.**Beware: slight spoilers aheadThe Voice in My Head is not only well-written, it also propels the young readers towards reflection on life and the importance of living and loving to the fullest. I have been especially intrigued by the fun, yet deep writing style and the relationships between the Phillips family members – Dana L. Davis certainly knows how to flesh characters via dialogue. Although the main theme of the stor **I received a digital ARC via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.**Beware: slight spoilers aheadThe Voice in My Head is not only well-written, it also propels the young readers towards reflection on life and the importance of living and loving to the fullest. I have been especially intrigued by the fun, yet deep writing style and the relationships between the Phillips family members – Dana L. Davis certainly knows how to flesh characters via dialogue. Although the main theme of the story is Violet’s terminal illness and the constant terror that it represents for all the characters, the book has so much more to offer than “just” that. It explores all of the shades of family relationships and issues, while focusing on the struggles of Indigo – the heroine who feels like the fifth wheel compared to her twin sister, Violet. Since almost every child at some point in their life feels like a failure, or the black sheep of the family, Indigo’s story speaks volumes. She feels like the less important one, the less loved one, the less clever one. And as she is the narrator of the story, we are lead to believe exactly that. It is through the clever use of a limited narrator that Davis makes us stumble through the darkness alongside Indigo, only slowly letting us discover that Indigo is, in fact, just as clever and just as loved as Violet. I must say that I especially loved how the relationship between Indigo and her mother has been fleshed out, since I’ve never before read such an honest depiction of a love-fear parent-kid relationship. Atop all of this, add a complete absence of romance and a fun voice of God (if you will) – what you get is a stunning contemporary novel that should definitely have a spot in your library.
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  • Story Eater
    January 1, 1970
    Not as poignant as The Fault in our Stars and not as serious as My Sister’s Keeper, The Voice in My Head manages to address issues young people may encounter today and brings levity to the situations at the same time. In addition to the terminal illness of one twin and grief-stricken suicide attempt of the other, Violet and Indigo also have to tolerate serious familial issues while navigating the transition from underage adolescence to legal adulthood. As a result of “the Voice of God’s” encoura Not as poignant as The Fault in our Stars and not as serious as My Sister’s Keeper, The Voice in My Head manages to address issues young people may encounter today and brings levity to the situations at the same time. In addition to the terminal illness of one twin and grief-stricken suicide attempt of the other, Violet and Indigo also have to tolerate serious familial issues while navigating the transition from underage adolescence to legal adulthood. As a result of “the Voice of God’s” encouraging, the twins, along with their whole family—and an ecumenical spiritual leader the family calls Pastor Jedidiah—make their way to a place called the Wave, where this voice promises Violet will live if she will just make it there. While on the trip to the Wave, Indigo, in true bildungsroman fashion, finds out much about herself and grows into her own person who relies less on the input from others about herself and more on the experience of her own accomplishments. I knew what I was getting into when I read the synopsis for The Voice in My Head, though it still did not prepare me for what I felt when I read it. If it were not for my own policy of not DNF’ing any book I request, I would have quit reading it. However, I know this book and its writer will be read by young people, particularly young people I teach, and I need to have read it in order to be able to engage my students who have also read it. With that said, there are many issues I have with some of the characterizations in the book, but I won't give details so as not to spoil it for others.My thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, for which I give my own opinion.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC.A kooky family road trip story with major illness and a Joan of Arc element. The development of the relationships between main character Indigo and her mother and sister are probably the highlight of the book. However, the emotional core (and especially the ending) is compromised by the lack of a well-drawn relationship between Indigo and her terminally ill twin sister Violet, a character whose comparative perfection is meant to contrast to Indigo but in Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC.A kooky family road trip story with major illness and a Joan of Arc element. The development of the relationships between main character Indigo and her mother and sister are probably the highlight of the book. However, the emotional core (and especially the ending) is compromised by the lack of a well-drawn relationship between Indigo and her terminally ill twin sister Violet, a character whose comparative perfection is meant to contrast to Indigo but in the end only makes her seem one dimensional and hard to relate to. There also seems to be quite a lot going on, and the story suffers especially at the beginning from a lack of focus - for example, while Indigo's feelings toward her sister come up early on, it takes more than half the book for her feelings of inadequacy in regards to her mother to even come up, which somewhat robs their eventual reconciliation of power.I really appreciated that Indigo and her family are identifiably, on-the-page black/Native/mixed race which brings some much needed color to YA. However, I’m not entirely certain how I’m feeling about the idea of the divine voice guiding the action - that element didn't seem overly well-rounded or in any way explicable either, and it also makes the book thorny to categorize. If you put it in fantasy, that feels insulting to people of faith, but it doesn’t slot neatly into realistic fiction either, and YA sections typically don't have Christian fiction subgenres. And interesting YA option which might appeal to those who enjoyed Going Bovine and want a similar story with parents, siblings, and a pastor along for the ride.
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  • Shanna Miles
    January 1, 1970
    Indigo and Violet are sisters. Twins, with a bond that's so essential to both of them that when Violet is diagnosed with a terminal illness, Indigo can't imagine what it would be like to live without her. She decides she's going to kill herself the night before her sister is scheduled to end her own life using medication. She wants to die with dignity, but Indigo can't abide it. When Indigo slips and falls instead of leaping from the building that's supposed to kill her she wakes up with a notic Indigo and Violet are sisters. Twins, with a bond that's so essential to both of them that when Violet is diagnosed with a terminal illness, Indigo can't imagine what it would be like to live without her. She decides she's going to kill herself the night before her sister is scheduled to end her own life using medication. She wants to die with dignity, but Indigo can't abide it. When Indigo slips and falls instead of leaping from the building that's supposed to kill her she wakes up with a noticeable breaks, bruises and a voice in her head. God. And God, tells her her sister can live, if only she can convince her and the family to postpone the euthanasia and make it to The Wave, a national park.At it's heart, "The Voice In My Head" is a classic road-trip novel. The family packs into a handicap accessible van with the their pastor and head from Seattle to the Southwest. Hijinks ensue. It's heatbreaking at times and unbelievably funny at others. There is a strong, deep and undeniable Christian throughline, which I dig. There are lots of things we talk about in books, but God isn't one of them. Death, sometimes. Extreme violence, sure.I can't say you won't be able to predict what's coming because you will, but that doesn't make it any less impactful. If you've read Jodi Piccoult's The Other Sister then you'll love it. If you haven't then definitely pick it up after you've finished this one. Also, anyone who liked any of John Green's sick-kid lit will be into this one too.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a DRC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Indigo and Violet. Identical twins. However, one has a terminal illness. The other does not. Violet has pulmonary fibrosis and, having recently turned 18, has made the choice to die with dignity. On the day before Violet is scheduled to take the pills to die before her illness completely takes over, Indigo finds herself on the roof of a building under construction. She doesn’t know how to live without Violet, and she’s Disclaimer: I received a DRC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.Indigo and Violet. Identical twins. However, one has a terminal illness. The other does not. Violet has pulmonary fibrosis and, having recently turned 18, has made the choice to die with dignity. On the day before Violet is scheduled to take the pills to die before her illness completely takes over, Indigo finds herself on the roof of a building under construction. She doesn’t know how to live without Violet, and she’s come here to make sure that she won’t have to.But there’s a flaw in her plan. She actually wants to live. She cries out to God, and to her surprise, she hears a voice which leads to a fall.Once in the hospital room, Indigo learns that Violet’s condition is worsening and that it’s time to say good bye. She checks out against medical advice.But there’s a problem. That voice? It’s back. And communicating with her. And that voice claims to be God and is telling her that if she can get her sister to the Wave, her sister will live.What follows is such a charming, often funny while bittersweet story of the lengths that families will go to save their loved ones.I laughed several times throughout this story. The cast of characters that Davis created fly off of the page and are so unique.This is story is so full of heart and charm, and it deals with sensitive situations very well.I highly enjoyed this read, and I strongly recommend this.
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  • Castille
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the description of The Voice in My Head, I was extremely intrigued and excited to read this book. It seemed to offer a YA story with deep roots, exploring multiple levels of mental illness, from depression, to delusions, and possibly schizophrenia. However, this didn't work at all for me. There's a strong religious theme here, and, I would say, an obvious religious agenda. I can't tell if the author merely intended for the characters to possess a sometimes-wavering faith, but it comes a Based on the description of The Voice in My Head, I was extremely intrigued and excited to read this book. It seemed to offer a YA story with deep roots, exploring multiple levels of mental illness, from depression, to delusions, and possibly schizophrenia. However, this didn't work at all for me. There's a strong religious theme here, and, I would say, an obvious religious agenda. I can't tell if the author merely intended for the characters to possess a sometimes-wavering faith, but it comes across as preachy to me. I think the book would've been more successful had the Voice not been attributed to God specifically, or had it not been so dogmatic. I tried to overlook the religious element, but the Voice itself also bothered me in his/her painfully colloquial language, that felt like the author was trying way too hard to be relevant and hip. I think this book may skew younger than most YA, but with the assisted suicide element, I don't know that it's appropriate for the age demographic for which it might be most suited in terms of the maturity. Despite my unwillingness to finish this book, I'm going to give this 3 stars, as I do think it's important in terms of young African American females in fiction, and wouldn't want to compromise the rating of a book that speaks to an underrepresented group of people.
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  • Linda's World of Books
    January 1, 1970
    I won a goodreads giveaway and this book was an extra in the box. This book is about a girl named Indigo who has a twin that is terminally ill. Indigo starts hearing a voice in her head that she believes is God. This voice tells her that her and her family need to go on a journey to The Wave so that her twin can survive her illness.I had a difficult time trying to wrap my head around how I felt about this book. I enjoyed the overall premise of the book. A family going on a road trip to help a te I won a goodreads giveaway and this book was an extra in the box. This book is about a girl named Indigo who has a twin that is terminally ill. Indigo starts hearing a voice in her head that she believes is God. This voice tells her that her and her family need to go on a journey to The Wave so that her twin can survive her illness.I had a difficult time trying to wrap my head around how I felt about this book. I enjoyed the overall premise of the book. A family going on a road trip to help a terminally ill member can be intriguing. There are so many things that could happen. Unfortunately, this book fell short on the story and most of the characters. Had the story been focused on the immediate family it may have made the story more admirable. There were two many extended family members that need their own story that took away for the main story of the twins. These side characters were also annoying and some not important to the overall story.The voice in her head, that was to be God, spoke in a way that took away from the story in ways that could not bring it back. I think it was meant to be used as a method of humour that did not work. It actually took away from the story for me.However, the story is definitely one that needs to be talked about. There are a lot of discussions that can happen from this book.
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  • Athena Stephenson
    January 1, 1970
    A powerful story about family, love and faith and death. I was laughing out loud at the crazy, hilarious family antics! The characters in this family are so realistic and easy to relate to. It was nice balance between the somber nature of the story and the funny and sometimes crazy actions of the family. It was deeply heartbreaking to read about Violet’s terminal illness and the way she was suffering, as much as it was to read about the bond between her and her twin sister Indigo. As indigo trie A powerful story about family, love and faith and death. I was laughing out loud at the crazy, hilarious family antics! The characters in this family are so realistic and easy to relate to. It was nice balance between the somber nature of the story and the funny and sometimes crazy actions of the family. It was deeply heartbreaking to read about Violet’s terminal illness and the way she was suffering, as much as it was to read about the bond between her and her twin sister Indigo. As indigo tries to fight against her sisters desire for assisted suicide, she ends up believing she can speak with God. It was really endearing to see the lengths she would go to, to try and help her sister live and the realizations she made along the way. I think this book was really well written, heartfelt and eye opening. I really really enjoyed!
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  • Tianna Peterson
    January 1, 1970
    I want to start off by saying I received an ARC version of the book for winning a twitter contest. I recently had read Dana’s first book Tiffany Sly lives here now and I was beyond excited to read her next book.And let me tell you this book did not disappoint. At first I didn’t know how to feel about God talking to Indigo but after reading this book I think it was more of herself then a God. I think it was done very tastefully.I loved the family dynamic of the story. Even though Michelle was get I want to start off by saying I received an ARC version of the book for winning a twitter contest. I recently had read Dana’s first book Tiffany Sly lives here now and I was beyond excited to read her next book.And let me tell you this book did not disappoint. At first I didn’t know how to feel about God talking to Indigo but after reading this book I think it was more of herself then a God. I think it was done very tastefully.I loved the family dynamic of the story. Even though Michelle was getting on my nerves a little bit lol. I feel as though each character added to story in their own special way.The end of the story took me for a loop I didn’t expect that to happen but I’m glad it did end the way it did I think it was a perfect way to end the story. Great job Dana
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  • Kimberly (kimberly_reads)
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Harlequin Teen for allowing me to have access to The Voice in my Head in exchange for a honest review! I will be posting a more full review for this story on my blog soon (I will update this review once the post is up!) but I want to say now, as I just finished reading this book, that this story surprised me in a really good way. The family dynamics were well done and I really enjoyed how Violet and Indigo’s relationship as twins was written. Overall, this was the kind Thank you to NetGalley and Harlequin Teen for allowing me to have access to The Voice in my Head in exchange for a honest review! I will be posting a more full review for this story on my blog soon (I will update this review once the post is up!) but I want to say now, as I just finished reading this book, that this story surprised me in a really good way. The family dynamics were well done and I really enjoyed how Violet and Indigo’s relationship as twins was written. Overall, this was the kind of book that was really bittersweet and as much as I am a sucker for a pure, happy ending, I appreciated how this book ended.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    Indigo is distraught at the coming death of her twin Violet and then a voice tells her to take her sister to Arizona. This is a tough one to review, given the hard issues of suicide, terminal illness, euthanasia, and mental illness but it's also got interesting strands of faith, love, and family. What sort of faith is up to you to decide but it is faith in the power of a family's love. This family is both funny and obnoxious- like all of us. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. This is sad but there Indigo is distraught at the coming death of her twin Violet and then a voice tells her to take her sister to Arizona. This is a tough one to review, given the hard issues of suicide, terminal illness, euthanasia, and mental illness but it's also got interesting strands of faith, love, and family. What sort of faith is up to you to decide but it is faith in the power of a family's love. This family is both funny and obnoxious- like all of us. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. This is sad but there are smiles along the way.
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