Dark Sacred Night (Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch, #21; Harry Bosch Universe, #31)
LAPD Detective Renée Ballard teams up with Harry Bosch in the new thriller from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael Connelly.Renée Ballard is working the night beat again, and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours only to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin. Ballard kicks him out, but then checks into the case herself and it brings a deep tug of empathy and anger.Bosch is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally murdered and her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now, Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy and finally bring her killer to justice.

Dark Sacred Night (Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch, #21; Harry Bosch Universe, #31) Details

TitleDark Sacred Night (Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch, #21; Harry Bosch Universe, #31)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 30th, 2018
PublisherLittle, Brown & Company
ISBN-139781549142314
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Crime, Thriller

Dark Sacred Night (Renée Ballard, #2; Harry Bosch, #21; Harry Bosch Universe, #31) Review

  • Susanne Strong
    January 1, 1970
    5 Spectacular Stars.Have you ever been scared to crack open a book? Nerves jangled? Stomach in knots? Desperate to find out what happens to your favorite character, yet frightened of what’s inside? Yep… that’s me. I had an ARC of “Dark Sacred Night” by Michael Connelly in my hands, a copy of which I was lucky enough to score and I was scared straight. Dying to open it and start reading, yet terrified. What if it doesn’t measure up? With each passing year, my anxiety has reached greater heights w 5 Spectacular Stars.Have you ever been scared to crack open a book? Nerves jangled? Stomach in knots? Desperate to find out what happens to your favorite character, yet frightened of what’s inside? Yep… that’s me. I had an ARC of “Dark Sacred Night” by Michael Connelly in my hands, a copy of which I was lucky enough to score and I was scared straight. Dying to open it and start reading, yet terrified. What if it doesn’t measure up? With each passing year, my anxiety has reached greater heights when it comes to a new Harry Bosch novel. Can Michael Connelly deliver? The answer to that question, is yes. Time and again, a resounding YES. Some authors, fail and just kind of follow a formula, if you know what I mean. Not Michael Connelly. Whatever it is, he has it. That said, well, I couldn’t help but worry. About Harry Bosch. If you all know anything about me, you know I LOVE MY HARRY BOSCH. He has my heart. And so it goes. This time around, Harry Bosch partners with Renee Ballard on a case near and dear to his heart. Daisy Clayton. Renee Ballard works the Late Show – we met her for the first time last year. She is tenacious, smart and she loves her job. The cops in Hollywood Division don’t care for her very much because she has made lots of trouble for them, standing up for what she believes in, herself. In that way, she’s a lot like Bosch. Harry still works as a reserve cop in San Fernando Valley, however, one cold case still eats away at him and it is that of Daisy Clayton, who was brutally murdered years ago. He knows evidence still exists at Hollywood Station, so he goes looking for it and Ballard catches him. Once she looks into it, she too, is intrigued and she can’t help but want to work it. Bosch and Ballard, Partners? Yep. It happens and it happens here. Can two people who are alike in some ways and different in others figure out a way to work together? Bosch is a grumpy old man (at least compared to Ballard) yet he’s a darn good cop – but then so is Ballard. Though she’s young, she’s got great instincts. I admit that I had my doubts about these two partnering up (but perhaps that’s because I want Bosch all to myself?! Lol!). From that moment on, once their investigations kicked off, my breath caught in my throat and my heart was in my sleeve. These two detectives think like no others. This case, it gets to both of them for different reasons and their investigation never stops and the risks don’t matter. Not to them. Where it leads, I cannot say. Their path is not an easy one. But I’m sure you knew that. Are you holding your breath? I bet you are. Is your chest tight tight tight? Once you start reading “Dark Sacred Night” I have a feeling it will be, just like mine was. The ride is wild and terrifying. I can’t wait for you to give it a spin. Bosch and Ballard are characters that stay with you. Renee Ballard tries her best to follow the rules, yet the cases she works, they own her. The only thing she needs are her surf board, her dog Lola and her Grams. As for Bosch, well, you know him: his daughter Maddie and solving cases are the only things he cares about in this life. He is tried and true and in case it isn’t obvious, he is still my favorite detective. As for these two together? Well, I think they are kindred spirits. I hope you'll agree. Kudos to Michael Connelly for a continuing to write such incredible mystery / suspense novels year after year. Thank you also for staying true to one of my favorite characters: Harry Bosch. Thank you also to Little Brown and Company for an ARC of this novel. I was thrilled to receive a complimentary copy. All thoughts are my own. Published on 8.9.18 on Goodreads, Twitter and Instagram.**Will be published on Amazon on 10.30.18.
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    **4.5 STARS**Night shift detective Renée Ballard is writing a report in the wee small hours of the morning concerning a woman found dead in the bathtub, when she notices a stranger going through the filing cabinets across the other side of the office. The man appears intent on finding something, and in his eagerness to discover whatever it is he’s looking for, he clearly hasn’t seen Renée watching him! After throwing him out, she discovers that it’s detective Harry Bosch who you used to work out **4.5 STARS**Night shift detective Renée Ballard is writing a report in the wee small hours of the morning concerning a woman found dead in the bathtub, when she notices a stranger going through the filing cabinets across the other side of the office. The man appears intent on finding something, and in his eagerness to discover whatever it is he’s looking for, he clearly hasn’t seen Renée watching him! After throwing him out, she discovers that it’s detective Harry Bosch who you used to work out of that very station. Bosch lies about what he was searching for but Renée is onto him and soon finds out what he was really up to, and she wants in on it, so the two of them join forces to investigate the murder some years previously of teenager Daisy Clayton.In a brilliantly understated introduction, Michael Connelly brings together two seriously good detectives. Ballard still has her own cases to work though, and these run alongside another cold case of Bosch’s - the assassination of a Latino gang leader over a decade ago. There’s no question that there’s a master storyteller at work here, the cases under examination exhibit just how intense and knowledgeable the police procedural aspect of Connelly’s books are - the pace is relentless, breathtakingly so at times, and the characters are so well defined that it’s not difficult to imagine that you know them personally. I would love to see this partnership continue into the next book and hope that Mr Connelly is thinking along the same lines! Highly recommended.* Thank you to Netgalley and Orion Publishing for my ARC. I have given an honest unbiased review in exchange *
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  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly brings us the second in the LAPD detective Renee Ballard series and he brings in Harry Bosch, a man Renee knows nothing about. Renee has been shunted onto The Late Show, the Hollywood nightshift, after an injustice earlier, but oddly enough she has settled in there and somehow it suits her. Her partner is on bereavement leave and she is on her own when she is called to a home where a woman's body, heavily decomposing, is discovered. It is assumed to be murder but it does not tak Michael Connelly brings us the second in the LAPD detective Renee Ballard series and he brings in Harry Bosch, a man Renee knows nothing about. Renee has been shunted onto The Late Show, the Hollywood nightshift, after an injustice earlier, but oddly enough she has settled in there and somehow it suits her. Her partner is on bereavement leave and she is on her own when she is called to a home where a woman's body, heavily decomposing, is discovered. It is assumed to be murder but it does not take Renee long to ascertain that it was an accident, with a starved cat feeding on the corpse. On returning to write up her report, she finds Harry rifling through a file cabinet of a colleague, and throws him out. However, her curiosity is aroused, she cannot help herself as she tries to find out who Harry is and what he was doing there. Harry has the traumatised Elizabeth Clayton, a recovering drug addict, temporarily living with him, someone he met on his last case. Nine years ago, Elizabeth's 15 year old daughter, Daisy, was brutally murdered, her body bleached and discarded like trash in an alley. This spurs Harry to look into the cold case, as he witnesses Elizabeth's unrelieved grief destroying her. Having Elizabeth staying with him is not ideal, as his daughter, Maddie, is refusing to visit him while Elizabeth is there. Once Renee learns of Harry's investigations into finding Daisy's killer, she wants in. It soon becomes transparent that there is much the pair have in common, a dogged determination to work cases that borders on obsession and a penchant to bend the rules. In the meantime, both have other demands on their time. Harry as a reserve at SFD is looking into a cold case murder of the 52 year old gang member of the Varrio San Fer 13, Cristobel Vega, gaining insight into what happened after locating a witness, only to find the case exploding out of his control. Renee finds herself with the horrifying task of searching for the dismembered body parts of a murder victim at a refuse dump. As Renee and Harry plough through the mountains of information looking for a lead on Daisy's killer, the truth proves to be elusive. Will they succeed in finding the killer?I did not expect Renee and Harry to be working together so soon, but after an initial awkwardness the two, unsurprisingly, mesh well, something they will sorely need as each finds themselves in life threatening and dangerous scenarios. Harry's future with SFD is uncertain, but what is clear is that this is not going to stop him doing what he does best, and it looks like we will see him pairing up with Renee again in the future. Connelly once again displays his attention to detail in police procedures, showing us that his research is demonstrably impressive. I loved this addition to the Renee and Harry series, but there is a strong part of me that wished I could have seen far more of Renee prior to her working with Harry. As usual, Connelly gives us a superb crime thriller with his trademark aplomb. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Harry Bosch series and enjoyed the first Renee Ballard novel. So, I was excited to see the two detectives join forces. And I was not disappointed. One thing I love about Connelly’s mysteries is that he doesn’t sugarcoat the workload of a Detective. No one has the luxury of working a single case, especially a cold one. Both Renee and Harry have their hands full. There’s lots of action here. This is one of those books that called to me and kept me reading well passed when I should have I love the Harry Bosch series and enjoyed the first Renee Ballard novel. So, I was excited to see the two detectives join forces. And I was not disappointed. One thing I love about Connelly’s mysteries is that he doesn’t sugarcoat the workload of a Detective. No one has the luxury of working a single case, especially a cold one. Both Renee and Harry have their hands full. There’s lots of action here. This is one of those books that called to me and kept me reading well passed when I should have put the book down. Both characters are well defined and fleshed out. Whether you’ve read every book in the series or are just starting out, you’ll feel like you know these two. The partnership grows slowly, with both learning to trust the other. But by the end, they’re a good team. I look forward to seeing more books with them together, although I also hope Connelly will continue to write stories for each individually. I was given a copy of this book through a GoodReads giveaway in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Most of the books I pick up are fiction. I have one of those jobs that introduces me to life’s less glamorous realities on a daily basis so I read for escape. But as with non-fiction, I learn something from every story. Of all the lessons I will take away from this book, the most important may be this. Feed your cat. Faithfully, continuously & in large quantities. In fact, just cut a hole in the bottom of a 50 kg bag & leave it out on the kitchen floor, ok? You might thank me later.Renée Most of the books I pick up are fiction. I have one of those jobs that introduces me to life’s less glamorous realities on a daily basis so I read for escape. But as with non-fiction, I learn something from every story. Of all the lessons I will take away from this book, the most important may be this. Feed your cat. Faithfully, continuously & in large quantities. In fact, just cut a hole in the bottom of a 50 kg bag & leave it out on the kitchen floor, ok? You might thank me later.Renée Ballard knows what I’m talking about. So after dealing with a particularly eewww-inducing crime scene one night, she looks forward to some solo down time back at the station. Except she’s not alone. There appears to be a strange man trying to break into the file cabinets. Ballard, meet Bosch. Harry Bosch.You could say it’s the start of a beautiful friendship but that would gloss over a few bumps in the road. Harry is working on his hobby case. In a previous instalment, he met a woman grieving the death of her teenage daughter. It’s been 9 yr. since Daisy Clayton was violently murdered & Harry has decided it’s gone unsolved long enough. Ballard has her own issues. She used to be part of an elite crime squad. Her fall from grace began after a superior officer got a little handsy & she dared to report him. Of course the department stepped up & dealt with it. Sort of. He kept his job & she found herself back on the street working the late show. Renée now works alone & it’s not bad. Some nights are quiet & she begins to look into Harry’s pet project. Before she knows it, they’ve formed a partnership of sorts. They’re an interesting pair & part of the fun is watching Renée try to rein Harry in as he sidesteps the rules in trademark fashion. It’s a slow, painstaking process, frequently interrupted by the demands of more pressing cases. To be honest, it took me a bit to get into the story. But I found Renée much more fleshed out here than she was in the previous book. As she & Harry settled into their relationship, I found it easy to sit back & enjoy the ride. I really enjoyed the story lines that emerged from current investigations. It maintained the pace & provided plenty of tension that balanced out the slower grind of the cold case, making its progress more realistic.By the end, it’s clear Harry’s days as a reserve officer with the San Fernando P.D. may be numbered. But it might be the start of a new chapter for the old cop which is great news for Bosch fans. So if he & Renée find another cold case to tackle, I’m in. As long as he doesn’t get a cat.
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  • Andrew Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed the first Ballard book, The Late Show, in which the young female cop showed some of the vim and vigor we’d seen from Harry Bosch back when he too was an LAPD detective. Banished to the night shift after calling out her boss for sexual harassment, Ballard consequently nursed a chip on her shoulder as she remorselessly chased down her quarry. I thought it was a great book and seemed to promise a even money chance that at some point in the future she’d share some page space with Bo I really enjoyed the first Ballard book, The Late Show, in which the young female cop showed some of the vim and vigor we’d seen from Harry Bosch back when he too was an LAPD detective. Banished to the night shift after calling out her boss for sexual harassment, Ballard consequently nursed a chip on her shoulder as she remorselessly chased down her quarry. I thought it was a great book and seemed to promise a even money chance that at some point in the future she’d share some page space with Bosch. Harry Bosch was last spotted in Two Kinds of Truth where he teamed up with his half brother, lawyer Mickey Haller. He continued to tread a precarious line between playing it straight and bending the rules, working now as a detective for the San Fernando PD. It's well known that Connelly likes to link up his various players in his books and here he does it again in bringing Ballard and Bosch together. Surely this is a marriage that can't possibly fail, can it? It's a simple question and a there’s equally simple answer: no it can't!I won't spoil the fun for future readers by giving too much away, suffice to say there are a number of cases covered here: some investigated individually by the two cops and one taken on as a joint venture. The various elements of the cases paint a broad picture of the darker side of modern day Los Angeles and some of the lessons learned prove to be of wider value along the way. Bosch is on top form, showing his determined one-track mind approach to solving his cases with his forthright (OK, let's just call it what it is – rude) approach to all, constantly shaking the tree loose of just enough debris to give himself a chance of closure. Ballard shows that she can also bend a rule or two as she adopts a similarly dogged plan of attack.The chemistry between the two feels just right: some mutual respect but mixed in with a little nervousness, a smidgen of suspicion too. They're both feeling their way in this new professional relationship. We're in the hands of the master as Connelly seamlessly allows the action to flow whilst keeping a captain’s eye on the tiller. At no point does he allow the reader to lose track of the multiple plot lines or feel any tinge of disbelief that things should play out in such a way; it’s brilliantly done.At the end there’s a nice teaser suggesting that there's more to come from this pair. Thank goodness for that! I'm already in withdrawal - having finished this latest offering I seriously hope I don't have to wait too for the next instalment.My sincere thanks to Orion Publishing Group and NetGalley for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    " I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship ". If you have seen the movie Casablanca, then you know this classic line. And, it's such a perfect way to describe the paring of Renée Ballard and Harry Bosch.DARK SACRED NIGHT is the second Ballard book and the 29th Bosch. And, I was thrilled to get a copy of the book. Bosch was mentioned in The Late Show, the first Ballard book, but I never thought that we would get a crossover so early. I thought perhaps a cameo or something in the tw " I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship ". If you have seen the movie Casablanca, then you know this classic line. And, it's such a perfect way to describe the paring of Renée Ballard and Harry Bosch.DARK SACRED NIGHT is the second Ballard book and the 29th Bosch. And, I was thrilled to get a copy of the book. Bosch was mentioned in The Late Show, the first Ballard book, but I never thought that we would get a crossover so early. I thought perhaps a cameo or something in the two series, or just mentions. However, to my surprise, a dream come true!Ballard first encounter with Bosch is hardly a friendly one. He's looking through files he has no right to go through and Ballard almost read him his rights, but then she gets curious. Well, after he's gone and she notices what he was looking for. She can't help herself, and soon she teams up with Bosch to work a cold case. And, as they work together, the more of a team they become.DARK SACRED NIGHT is a great book. I'm a big fan of cold cases and I love the teaming of Ballard of Bosch. The older cop and the younger one that both can learn from each other, not to mention saving each other's lives. The ending gave hope that there will be more crossovers and I can't wait to find out what B&B will do next!I want to thank Orion for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
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  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly is an great crime thriller writer with the excellent character Harry Bosch, but he doesn't stop there. He has created other enjoyable lead characters like Mickey Haller (The Lincoln Lawyer) and now Renee Ballard who comes into her own in this 2nd book where she teams up with retired detective Harry Bosch.Detective Renee Ballard works the late shift and teams up with Bosch who is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a drug addicted runaway who was brutally Michael Connelly is an great crime thriller writer with the excellent character Harry Bosch, but he doesn't stop there. He has created other enjoyable lead characters like Mickey Haller (The Lincoln Lawyer) and now Renee Ballard who comes into her own in this 2nd book where she teams up with retired detective Harry Bosch.Detective Renee Ballard works the late shift and teams up with Bosch who is investigating the death of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a drug addicted runaway who was brutally murdered 9 years ago. The pair share similar attitudes and are both prepared to bend the rules to get justice where necessary and make enjoyable reading. The character of Renee is further developed throughout the novel following on from 'The Late Show' where she was introduced by the skilful Connelly who looks to have another winner with this one. His books are so well thought out and show an inner knowledge of police procedural's and an eye for detail, supplying the reader with realistic entertaining books that rarely fail. I finished the book wanting to read another one straight away. I would like to thank Net Galley and Orion Publishing for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    All the stars and more for my favourite detective Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard teaming up in Dark Sacred Night. Michael Connelly was one of the first "grown up " authors that my Dad got me hooked on when I was a teenager and all these years later he is still going strong. I was so very excited to be approved for an early copy of this book and writing a review for it terrifies me! I hope that I can do this book and the author justice. When you have a character like Harry Bosch who bends the rule All the stars and more for my favourite detective Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard teaming up in Dark Sacred Night. Michael Connelly was one of the first "grown up " authors that my Dad got me hooked on when I was a teenager and all these years later he is still going strong. I was so very excited to be approved for an early copy of this book and writing a review for it terrifies me! I hope that I can do this book and the author justice. When you have a character like Harry Bosch who bends the rules, is stubborn and does things his way how do you team him up? With a female detective working the late show in Hollywood who livestream out of a van at the beach, does things her way and never gives up. Renee Ballard was introduced to readers in The Late Show and to have her working with a fan favourite in Harry Bosch was just brilliant. The banter between these 2 characters who have a very similar work ethic was fun. Michael Connelly is so good at the detail... I love jos he describes LA and Hollywood and makes you feel like you are there with them. At first Renee is wary of Harry, when she catches him trying to get into an old filing cabinet in the Hollywood Precinct. The pair start to get to know each other and between call out some on the late show she starts to work on her hobby case with Harry - a case that has gotten under his skin and he is determined to solve. The case is a 9 year old cold case of the murder of 15 year old Daisy Clayton. Working together the over long hidden secrets while they continue their everyday work. In short... I loved this book and feel honoured to be able to share my views on it. I can't wait til the audio releases at the end of October so that I can listen it all over again read by Titus Welliver. Highly recommend this book and anything else that Michael Connelly has written.A very big thank you to Orion Publishing and NetGalley for my advanced copy of this book to. All opinions are my own and are in no way biased
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    The Late Show introduced Renée Ballard and in Dark Sacred Night Ballard we meet Bosch. This is really the book that establishes the premise for the rest of the series. I think I am going to enjoy this partnership. Both Ballard and Bosch are lone characters, both are very experienced and very good detectives, very dedicated and willing to bend the rules. I have always been ambivalent about whether to start the Bosch series and I thought this new series would be a good way to dip my toe in the Bos The Late Show introduced Renée Ballard and in Dark Sacred Night Ballard we meet Bosch. This is really the book that establishes the premise for the rest of the series. I think I am going to enjoy this partnership. Both Ballard and Bosch are lone characters, both are very experienced and very good detectives, very dedicated and willing to bend the rules. I have always been ambivalent about whether to start the Bosch series and I thought this new series would be a good way to dip my toe in the Bosch waters. I very much enjoyed this book but still don’t have the urge to ‘go back to the beginning’ as it were. It did however make me feel slightly paranoid that I might be missing references from previous books, which spoiled my enjoyment just a little. (I am one of those people who needs to start a series at the beginning and work through in strict order!) well, because I enjoyed both of the first two books in the series, I am planning to get to know Bosch at the same pace as Reneee Ballard.Thanks to Netgalley for an arc of this book.
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  • Elaine Tomasso
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Orion for an advance copy of Dark Sacred Night, the first novel to feature an investigative collaboration between Detective Renée Ballard of LAPD and Detective Harry Bosch, currently a part timer with the San Fernando PD.Ballard works night shift or the late show as it's known in LAPD, a solitary job with its slow times so she's immediately curious when she finds Bosch rummaging in the department's filing cabinets. He explains about his "hobby case", looking f I would like to thank Netgalley and Orion for an advance copy of Dark Sacred Night, the first novel to feature an investigative collaboration between Detective Renée Ballard of LAPD and Detective Harry Bosch, currently a part timer with the San Fernando PD.Ballard works night shift or the late show as it's known in LAPD, a solitary job with its slow times so she's immediately curious when she finds Bosch rummaging in the department's filing cabinets. He explains about his "hobby case", looking for the killer of teenage runaway Daisy Clayton back in 2009 and soon she's as involved as he is.I thoroughly enjoyed Dark Sacred Night with its mixture of procedure, or in Bosch's case non-procedure, mystery, thrills, tension and character. Mr Connelly is currently peerless in his ability to weave so many disparate elements together seamlessly into a very readable novel. While Daisy Clayton's killer is very much at the forefront of their minds the investigation has to take a backseat to their regular jobs so the reader is treated not just to that investigation but Bosch's efforts to solve the cold case murder of Uncle Murda, a San Fernando gangbanger killed 10 years previously, and a series of vignettes as Ballard responds as and when required. All of it has something to say about Los Angeles, its denizens and lifestyle with some of it amusing, some of it sad but all of it hugely enjoyable. It's like a massive tableau of life with the reader being offered glimpses.I said it about The Late Show and I'll say it again here. I love the tone of the narrative with its dry recounting of facts and the cops' acceptance of whatever is thrown at them. That's not to say they don't care, more that it's often just another obstacle they can't change to overcome in their dogged pursuit of justice. The arrival of Harry Bosch, however, brings a more emotionally charged atmosphere to the novel as he identifies with the victims and survivors. Dark Sacred Night is a great read which I have no hesitation in recommending.
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    9/10*slow claps*Surprise surprise, another quality book by Michael Connelly. Doesn’t he get bored of knocking them out of the park every time? This one is up there with some of his best work and to say it’s the 21st book in the Bosch series, that’s no mean feat. This outing has a combination of the perennially awesome Bosch and the newcomer Ballard from his previous book, The Late Show (unsurprisingly, really good). I’ve been a bit on the fence with these combo novels before due to the forced na 9/10*slow claps*Surprise surprise, another quality book by Michael Connelly. Doesn’t he get bored of knocking them out of the park every time? This one is up there with some of his best work and to say it’s the 21st book in the Bosch series, that’s no mean feat. This outing has a combination of the perennially awesome Bosch and the newcomer Ballard from his previous book, The Late Show (unsurprisingly, really good). I’ve been a bit on the fence with these combo novels before due to the forced nature of the narrative changes between characters. This didn’t happen here and things flowed smoother than silk between the two leads, both looking into their own missions and a joint effort combining their skills. I liked how both were wary about the other, neither have histories of working well with authority so naturally cautious, but once they have worn some rubber together they develop a firm bond. I liked all the plot lines here and I didn’t see how things were going to weave together and finish up which is always a bonus. The characters are great, Bosch is a firm favourite of mine and Ballard is like a female version of him so what’s not to like? The massive downside of finishing this novel, having to wait for the next one!Thanks to NetGalley for a copy for review, this was it!
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  • RachelW (BamaGal)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m still not sure how I feel about the whole crossover thing. As it is, this book was pretty much dominated by Harry Bosch. I found Ballard’s various cases interesting; but once she was pulled into Bosch’s orbit, he pretty much eclipsed her character. Pity, because as a character she has quite the story. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like Connelly is going to deeply mine her, he’s still all about Bosch. I’ve been with Harry since 1994, grown old with him, and love him; but this was supposed to I’m still not sure how I feel about the whole crossover thing. As it is, this book was pretty much dominated by Harry Bosch. I found Ballard’s various cases interesting; but once she was pulled into Bosch’s orbit, he pretty much eclipsed her character. Pity, because as a character she has quite the story. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like Connelly is going to deeply mine her, he’s still all about Bosch. I’ve been with Harry since 1994, grown old with him, and love him; but this was supposed to be about Renee Ballard. The ending left it open for them to work together again; but I really hope that is way on down the road and this series gets back to focusing on her.———————-I love Harry dearly, but I'm not sure how I feel about a crossover this early in Renee's series...
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  • Rob Twinem
    January 1, 1970
    Bosch and Ballard together solving crimes in downtown LA, sounds a recipe for success, unfortunately my original enthusiasm was not realized. Ballard is the new kid on the block, first introduced last year in the excellent "The Late Show". She has a lot to prove, riding the night shift, surfing in the morning accompanied by her faithful dog Lola. It's tough working as a female detective always open to criticism and ridicule and constantly under the watchful eye of her male colleagues just waitin Bosch and Ballard together solving crimes in downtown LA, sounds a recipe for success, unfortunately my original enthusiasm was not realized. Ballard is the new kid on the block, first introduced last year in the excellent "The Late Show". She has a lot to prove, riding the night shift, surfing in the morning accompanied by her faithful dog Lola. It's tough working as a female detective always open to criticism and ridicule and constantly under the watchful eye of her male colleagues just waiting for disaster to strike.Bosch of course is the grizzled vet, working out of the San Fernando police dept on "cold cases" that still remain unsolved after a number of years. Daisy Clayton was murdered nine years ago, her body found naked and bleached clean to hide all trace of DNA. Ballard discovers Bosch working on this unsolved murder and she decides to help him in her downtime. So up to a point this story is full of potential and hope. However this is not the only case the detectives are involved in and that's where the narrative comes undone. When I read a detective story I want the author to concentrate and build the storyline one theme or murder (or numerous murders as in the case of a serial killer) This gives the reader time to become acquainted with the various issues raised and characters introduced. By running a number of sub plots/storylines the main theme, which in this case is the killing of Daisy Clayton, becomes diluted and loses its impact and effectiveness. Harry at the same time is involved in a crime case with gangland connections that goes terribly wrong. Ballard has her own heavy work load including a potential rape case that becomes something different entirely.Having said that a Michael Connelly novel always contains some great moments with Harry Bosch at the centre. He is a maverick investigator refusing to admit that he could ever be a target, but on this occasion he is wrong. In addition he is harbouring an unexpected house guest and the fallout from this has a tragic outcome. So "Dark Sacred Night" is not a bad novel it is simply that I expect such high standards from the author. The partnership of Ballard and Bosch works to an extent but the Daisy Clayton killing seems to lose its impact as it becomes lost amongst the ever increasing workload that forms the agenda of our two hard working detectives. The conclusion of the story indicates the possibility of future adventures/assignments and I hope that will not happen. Bosch is a loner, a detective who shirks instructions, and this is the very quality that makes him so attractive to his many adoring readers. Yes lets develop the career of Renee Ballard.....but not on Harry's watch!
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connolly is one of those authors that you can trust to create a compelling tale that is taut and paced to perfection, and Dark Sacred Night is another stunning success and is book number twenty one in the captivating and critically-acclaimed Harry Bosch series. The need for a new Detective has certainly been evident over the last few novels with Bosch becoming increasingly frustrated by his job as a part-timer at San Fernando PD. Renée Ballard seems to fit the bill. She actually reminds Michael Connolly is one of those authors that you can trust to create a compelling tale that is taut and paced to perfection, and Dark Sacred Night is another stunning success and is book number twenty one in the captivating and critically-acclaimed Harry Bosch series. The need for a new Detective has certainly been evident over the last few novels with Bosch becoming increasingly frustrated by his job as a part-timer at San Fernando PD. Renée Ballard seems to fit the bill. She actually reminds me a lot of the energy and vim Bosch used to have, but we all know that when two people are so much alike there can be issues with keeping that relationship ticking over. So, will Ballard and Bosch be able to overlook each other's flaws in order to focus on the cases at hand, or will their relationship end up fraught with disagreements and awkward moments?Detective Renée Ballard from the LAPD, introduced to us in The Late Show, is a formidable character and the dynamic between Bosch & Ballard is unstoppable (for now). After all, with two fantastic brains working on the cases that come in from around Los Angeles, the criminals will need to be extra crafty. As always, the plot is a heart-in-your-mouth affair with action and excitement aplenty. All too regularly I come across thrillers that are so lacking in terms of realism that the whole book feels jaded because of that. Luckily, here, Connolly's descriptions of police procedure, forensics and settings, all come across as authentic and well-researched. I tore through this in record time as putting it down was simply not an option. Whenever I tried, it was back in my hands within five minutes as I was intrigued to discover what happened in the end. With masterful characterisation, an exhilarating plot and writing that draws you into the story from the first few pages, this was one of my favourite reads of 2018. I hope there will be many more additions to this series, and I look forward to seeing both Bosch and Ballard developing and evolving personally but also as an investigative duo!Many thanks to Orion for an ARC. I was not required to write a review, and all thought and opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to be reviewing this one for Mystery Scene magazine and will update this review with the link when it goes online.But suffice to say, I loved this book!
  • Judie
    January 1, 1970
    Dark Sacred Night brings Ballard and Bosch together in an outstanding page turner. It kept me up late, not being able to put it down, yet wanting it to go on and on. So much has been written about this book - all I can add is - read it.Thank you Goodreads and the publisher Little,Brown and Company for an ARC for my honest review.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    There will be some justice and vengeance, guilt and grief.Their relation formed together by a case, a nine year old case personal to Bosch, he knows victims mother, she was a runaway that worked the street, Daisy Clayton was aged fifteen.Ballard and Bosch seem to have a possible promising future together.Bosch a reserve now for San Fernando Police Department, more or less retired.Some guys just can’t give it up homicide team business.He does go after a cold case of his own, a murder that as a ga There will be some justice and vengeance, guilt and grief.Their relation formed together by a case, a nine year old case personal to Bosch, he knows victims mother, she was a runaway that worked the street, Daisy Clayton was aged fifteen.Ballard and Bosch seem to have a possible promising future together.Bosch a reserve now for San Fernando Police Department, more or less retired.Some guys just can’t give it up homicide team business.He does go after a cold case of his own, a murder that as a gang-on-gang killing and tracks down a witness and so putting himself in some possible dangers.Ballard is still the coolest of the heart of darkness of the late show now in Hollywood Station moonlighting with tough Bosch of the Big Bad City.Well crafted formidable and flawed characters, brevity that hits with potency, the right words that moved the pace forward, scene to emotion, to gripping finalisation of the case. This is where they formally meet and make a pact, with Ballard starting the conversation.“You forgot that.”Bosch looked up. The woman-the detective-from the night before at Hollywood Station was straddling the old bench that ran between the free-standing shelves full of case files. She had been out of his line of sight as he came into the cell. He looked over at the open door where the padlock dangled from its chain.“Ballard, right?” He said .”Good to know I’m not going crazy. I thought I had locked up.”“I let myself in,” Ballard said.” Lock Picking 101.”“It’s a good skill to have. Meantime, I’m kind of busy here. Just got a search warrant I need to figure out how to execute without my suspect finding out. What do you want, Detective Ballard?”“I want in.”“In?”“On the Daisy Clayton.”Bosch considered her for a moment. She was attractive, maybe mid-thirties, with brown, sun-streaked hair cut at the shoulders and a slim, athletic build. She was wearing off-duty clothes. The night before, she had been in work clothes that made her seem more formidable-a must in the LAPD, where Bosch knew female detectives were often treated like office secretaries.Ballard also had a deep tan, which to Bosch was at odds with the idea of someone who worked the graveyard shift. Most of all he was impressed that it had been only twelve hours since she had surprised him at the file cabinets in the Hollywood detective bureau and she already appeared to have caught up to him and what he was doing.
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  • The Real Book Spy
    January 1, 1970
    We’ve seen it before with Mickey Haller, who was first introduced in his own novel and then, after a few more books of his own, eventually teamed up with Bosch. So when Michael Connelly introduced readers to Renee Ballard in last year’s The Late Show, it seemed inevitable that she would eventually cross paths with Harry Bosch, though fans might not have expected their worlds to collide quite this soon. Early on, it’s obvious that Connelly put the detectives together for a reason. They have unden We’ve seen it before with Mickey Haller, who was first introduced in his own novel and then, after a few more books of his own, eventually teamed up with Bosch. So when Michael Connelly introduced readers to Renee Ballard in last year’s The Late Show, it seemed inevitable that she would eventually cross paths with Harry Bosch, though fans might not have expected their worlds to collide quite this soon. Early on, it’s obvious that Connelly put the detectives together for a reason. They have undeniable chemistry. Though they’re far apart in age–Ballard’s the smart, young detective and Bosch is the seasoned veteran who’s seen it all–the two have a lot in common, most notably their desire for justice. Neither is the type to leave a case behind when their shift is done, which, in some ways, is exactly how they cross paths. After returning back from a scene containing a bloated, ripe, decomposing body on Hollywood Boulevard, Ballard, who is still working the late show (a shift she was assigned t0 after filing complaints against her former superior for making unwanted sexual advances, only to see them shot down when her then-partner refused to back up her story even though he knew it was true), begins writing up her report when she hears the familiar sound of metal clanking coming from somewhere in the detective bureau. Realizing that someone is opening and closing filing cabinets, she confronts the man, who turns out to be Bosch, though he leaves before she can question what he was doing. Following the strange encounter, Ballard flips through the . . . Continue reading this review here: https://therealbookspy.com/2018/08/26...
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  • David Gooch
    January 1, 1970
    This book with Bosch sees him sort of semi retired and helping out with old cold cases. He has one that he is into and wants to sort as it's personal and involves a young dead girl, Daisy. Bosch has Daisy's mother staying at his place...I think he might becoming and old softie. This means he is always reminded of the case and the need to find Daisy's killer. Then we get a Detective, Renee Ballard, on the late night shift who gets drawn into this case and starts working with Bosch to try and reso This book with Bosch sees him sort of semi retired and helping out with old cold cases. He has one that he is into and wants to sort as it's personal and involves a young dead girl, Daisy. Bosch has Daisy's mother staying at his place...I think he might becoming and old softie. This means he is always reminded of the case and the need to find Daisy's killer. Then we get a Detective, Renee Ballard, on the late night shift who gets drawn into this case and starts working with Bosch to try and resolve it. It is obvious that Bosch needs Ballard's help as she is a current detective and get her hands on current files, old files etc a lot easier than Bosch and so the friendship or mutual respect to work together begins .Connelly as ever delivers a really good read and with all good authors he has numerous things happening in the book. What we get then is to see normal (if there is normal) life for a late shift cop as she attends crimes while trying to fit in helping Bosch and resolve an old cold case. The same happens with Bosch as still other things going on he needs to sort on other cases etc. The book delivers all these various stories, crimes, happenings and their work together in such a manner that you read along happily watching it all unfold. We even get a spell with Bosch suspended. The beauty of the book is the police procedures are spot on and the writing are such that you feel yourself inside the station with them or on the call as you read. It also delivers crime, mystery and thrills as you ride along to the book's conclusion. It is well worth the read and not a book to be missed. I do hope the Ballard/Bosch combo is going to bring more books as their working relationship grows further. If it does I'll be there to read them as you know it will be good just as this one was.
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  • Marc Bougharios
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsA first by Connelly but it don’t be the last. This was a great detective story with not only one amazing detective, but two. I’m a huge fan of detective stories and I love reading different ones from different authors. It’s very interesting because no two detectives are the same. Every author creates their own detective with their little flaws and strengths it’s very distinct in the best way possible. I loved both Bosch and Ballard. They are both great detectives, no question. Each of t 3.5 starsA first by Connelly but it don’t be the last. This was a great detective story with not only one amazing detective, but two. I’m a huge fan of detective stories and I love reading different ones from different authors. It’s very interesting because no two detectives are the same. Every author creates their own detective with their little flaws and strengths it’s very distinct in the best way possible. I loved both Bosch and Ballard. They are both great detectives, no question. Each of them in their own different ways. The thing I loved most about this novel was the fact that although they are both trying to discover what happened to young Daisy Clayton many years ago, it doesn’t stop them from working on other cases. I found that very interesting to read because novels like this mostly focus on the one case but this one had other cases going on as well and it flowed very well with the novel and did not take away focus from the main case at all. I did find the sorry to be a little dragged on and it could’ve been a lot shorter, but that being said, a lot happened in between the story so it somehow made up for it. There were some suspenseful moments at times and they really went well with the novel. A thriller? Not really. But a mystery for sure. It has such a great ending to it and I would not mind if they team together again and try to crack another case open! Such a great duo! Many thanks to Hachette Book Group Canada and Little, Brown and Company for providing me with an advanced copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
    I have a feeling that this could be an interesting crossover.
  • George P.
    January 1, 1970
    Michael Connelly’s Dark Sacred Night picks up where his two previous novels, The Late Show  and Two Kinds of Truth , left off. Renée Ballard continues to work the late shift for Los Angeles Police Department’s Hollywood Division. Harry Bosch continues to work cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department.They meet by happenstance when Ballard finds Bosch snooping through Hollywood’s case files in search of information about the murder of Daisy Clayton, whose mother, Elizabeth, Bosch rescue Michael Connelly’s Dark Sacred Night picks up where his two previous novels, The Late Show  and Two Kinds of Truth , left off. Renée Ballard continues to work the late shift for Los Angeles Police Department’s Hollywood Division. Harry Bosch continues to work cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department.They meet by happenstance when Ballard finds Bosch snooping through Hollywood’s case files in search of information about the murder of Daisy Clayton, whose mother, Elizabeth, Bosch rescued at the end of Two Kinds of Truth. They strike a bargain and investigate the case together. Along the way, Ballard and Bosch investigate other cases on the side, but it’s the Daisy Clayton murder that drives the plot forward.As per usual with Connelly’s novels, this one is a page-turner. I started reading it after dinner and finished it before I went to bed. It held my interest throughout. Even the side plots kept my interest. What I love about Connelly’s novels is the way he moves the plot forward by means of good detective work, rather than an investigator’s flashes of insight. You see Ballard and Bosch working the evidence, piecing the story together bit by bit. This approach keeps you hooked, because you want to follow the evidence wherever it leads.Additionally, I love the fact that unlike other serial novelists that I love to read—I’m looking at you, Lee Child and Craig Johnson—Michael Connelly is smart enough to realize that Bosch is getting older and simply can’t sustain the pace, the intensity, or the beatings he endured (or gave out) in previous novels. With this novel, Connelly seems to be moving his focus toward Ballard and transitioning Bosch into a lesser role. That’s great, as far as I’m concerned, both because Ballard is an intriguing character and because I still enjoy Bosch.I’m not giving Dark Sacred Night a five-star review, however. I thoroughly enjoyed it and recommend reading it, but it’s not at the top of Connelly heap. I have two reasons for this: First, the side cases. One of the side cases is designed solely to introduce a character. Ballard’s side cases (an accidental death, an art theft, and a gruesome murder) are solved too perfunctorily. Bosch’s main side case is more interesting, but it’s difficult to tell whether how it ends is designed to set up a transition in Bosch’s life or to introduce a problem for a future novel. Second, a moment of intimacy between Bosch and another character seems way out of character for him. You’ll know what I mean when you read the novel.Despite this, I’m happy with Dark Sacred Night, and I look forward to whatever Connelly cooks up next year. My guess is that Renée Ballard will play the leading role and Harry Bosch a supporting one. And that’s okay with me. They’re both great characters.Book ReviewedMichael Connelly, Dark Sacred Night: A Ballard and Bosch Novel (New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2018).P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Helpful” on my Amazon.com review page.
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  • Liz Mistry
    January 1, 1970
    Dark Sacred Night is every crime readers dream - Two of Michael Connolly's best characters - and they're both in the same book!. In Dark Sacred Night we see Harry Bosch returning in his 21st offering as the much beleagured detective and this time he's joined by the wonderful Renee Ballard, the surfing cop from the late shift. Bosch may be showing signs of his age by now, but Connolly's writing shows no sign of slowing down. I think the combination of Ballard and bosch worked really well. Bosch's Dark Sacred Night is every crime readers dream - Two of Michael Connolly's best characters - and they're both in the same book!. In Dark Sacred Night we see Harry Bosch returning in his 21st offering as the much beleagured detective and this time he's joined by the wonderful Renee Ballard, the surfing cop from the late shift. Bosch may be showing signs of his age by now, but Connolly's writing shows no sign of slowing down. I think the combination of Ballard and bosch worked really well. Bosch's experience tempered by Ballard's tough, relentless determination are a powerful mix.My ThoughtsWhat I loved most about Dark Sacred Night was the synergy between the two characters. Bosch, his quest for truth never diminishing as he seeks to conclude a cold case that has become very dear to his heart and Renee, starting her career with a similar fire in her belly, if less inclined to bend the rules. Both characters have been subjected to indignities over their careers and despite this they rise above it and still place their foculs on representing the vulnerable in society. The contrasting snapshots of LA life is beautifully constructed. From the meandering Mulholland Drive in the Santa Monica hills to the glitzy facade of Hollywood and all that it hides.This is a chilling serial killer novel that, I must admit, kept me guessing right till the end. The idea that a killer could be so prolific, yet still go undetected over a period of years is quite galling. Connolly's biggest coup for me though is the way he humaniss his characters. Every character is well drawn - Connolly breathes life into even minor characters andthis pushes the narrative along at a rate of knots whilst making us invest in each character whether it's a lifeguard, a grieving parent or a porn star. Fantastic writing - very envious!
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    Review of the Audiobook Edition narrated by Christine Lakin and Titus Welliver.This is a solid return of Connelly's latest character Renee Ballard who was introduced in "The Late Show" as a go forward detective working the night shift. She is partnered here on a cold case with Connelly's veteran detective Harry Bosch in what is hopefully a continuing future partnership. The bond is perhaps made too quickly at first but instinctive good investigators may be able to make that leap of faith and of Review of the Audiobook Edition narrated by Christine Lakin and Titus Welliver.This is a solid return of Connelly's latest character Renee Ballard who was introduced in "The Late Show" as a go forward detective working the night shift. She is partnered here on a cold case with Connelly's veteran detective Harry Bosch in what is hopefully a continuing future partnership. The bond is perhaps made too quickly at first but instinctive good investigators may be able to make that leap of faith and of course Bosch would have somewhat of a legendary status that precedes him. The ending was perhaps a bit too quick and neat with an uncharacteristic brief sidestep by Bosch that felt off, but that is a small complaint about a solid investigative thriller from the ever reliable Michael Connelly.In terms of the narration, the large part of the book is narrated by Christine Lakin who voices both roles in her sections (except for one brief duo dialogue passage) with Titus Welliver only voicing those sections where Bosch is solo and not being partnered by Ballard. In that sense, this is more of a Ballard book with Bosch in a large cameo role.
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  • Julie Lacey
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first book of Michael Connellys that I have read and I really enjoyed it. This book has both Harry Bosch, who bends the rules, and Renee Ballard who works the ‘late show.’There is great banter between the two characters which made the book more enjoyable. Renee comes across Harry one night when she catches him trying to get into an old filing cabinet in the office. They start to get to know each other and Ballard is intrigued by the case that Bosch was looking in to, which is a nine This is the first book of Michael Connellys that I have read and I really enjoyed it. This book has both Harry Bosch, who bends the rules, and Renee Ballard who works the ‘late show.’There is great banter between the two characters which made the book more enjoyable. Renee comes across Harry one night when she catches him trying to get into an old filing cabinet in the office. They start to get to know each other and Ballard is intrigued by the case that Bosch was looking in to, which is a nine year old cold case of the murder of 15 year Daisy. Ballard and Bosch have to work on the case as well as doing their regular jobs but pull together when it counts. This is a great crime thriller. Thanks to Orion Books and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    Harry Bosch has been sidelined, suspended, retired, and outright fired multiple times and, eventually, one of those is going to have to stick. Smart, then, of Michael Connelly to continue to introduce new characters who can help fill the gap when that inevitable day finally comes. Putting Bosch and Ballard together on the page should convince faithful readers that Renee Ballard is a worthy successor to Harry Bosch when the beloved character eventually takes his final curtain call.
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  • Brad
    January 1, 1970
    Dark Sacred Night is the new book from Michael Connelly. “Detective Renee Ballard works the Late Show. One night she catches Bosch looking through some old files for info on a cold case. She and Bosch get involved in looking for a killer that’s stayed undiscovered for nine years.” Connelly does it again. A fantastic page turner. Some Late Show cases and Bosch gang cases thrown in and a surprise ending to the cold case. Book releases in October. If you’re a crime fiction fan you should add it to Dark Sacred Night is the new book from Michael Connelly. “Detective Renee Ballard works the Late Show. One night she catches Bosch looking through some old files for info on a cold case. She and Bosch get involved in looking for a killer that’s stayed undiscovered for nine years.” Connelly does it again. A fantastic page turner. Some Late Show cases and Bosch gang cases thrown in and a surprise ending to the cold case. Book releases in October. If you’re a crime fiction fan you should add it to your list.
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  • Laura Rash
    January 1, 1970
    Ohhhh I liked this one! Bosch & Ballard make an excellent team despite their many differences and it makes for a new partnership that could go on with so many good stories. I’ve always been a Bosch fan but this Bosch is a lil older, rougher around the edges & maybe a bit Jack Reacher style now. A really good one from MC. Many thanks to Little Brown for this early copy!
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  • Suzze Tiernan
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful! Renee Ballard from The Late Show and Harry Bosch team together to solve a cold case. They are a great pair and I hope they work together often. 5 Stars all the way! Thanks to Kim for the ARC.
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