Slay In Your Lane
The long-awaited guide to life for a generation of black British women inspired to make lemonade out of lemons, and find success in every area of their lives.Observer’s 18 for 2018: the talent and trends tipped for the topElle’s 12 addictive books you have to read to get through in 2018Metro’s best new books you have to get through in 2018BBC’s hotly anticipated debut authors for 2018Black women in 2018 are well past making waves – we’re currently creating something of a tsunami. From authors to politicians, to entrepreneurs to artists, black women in the UK continue to thrive against all odds and well outside of the world’s expectations. Women who look like us, grew up in similar places to us, talk like us, are shaping almost every societal sector, from the bottom and, finally, from all the way up at the top.Black women today are facing uniquely challenging experiences in all aspects of their lives. Yet when best friends Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené’s searched for a book that addressed these challenges they realised none existed. So Slay in Your Lane – the lovechild of exasperation and optimism – was born.From education, to work, to dating, to representation, money and health, this inspirational, honest and provocative Black Girl Bible explores the ways in which being black and female affects each of these areas – and offers advice and encouragement on how to navigate them.Illustrated with stories from Elizabeth and Yomi’s own lives, and from interviews with dozens of the most successful black women in Britain – including Amma Asante, Charlene White, Jamelia, Denise Lewis, Malorie Blackman and Dawn Butler MP – Slay in Your Lane recognizes and celebrates the strides black women have already made, whilst providing practical advice and inspiration for those who want to do the same and forge a better, visible future.

Slay In Your Lane Details

TitleSlay In Your Lane
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 12th, 2018
PublisherFourth Estate
ISBN-139780008235628
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Race, Politics, Sociology

Slay In Your Lane Review

  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    3/5 is a good middle ground. Part of me wants to give it 2/5 and the other part wants to give it 4/5One thing that I feel I need to state: I am a Black British Woman. In fact I am roughly the same age as the authors of this book. I am who this book is supposed to be marketed towards, and yet - I don't think this book is actually for me.Without a shadow of a doubt, I am 100% here for the importance, necessity and the information highlighted in this book. However I am in two minds about my review. 3/5 is a good middle ground. Part of me wants to give it 2/5 and the other part wants to give it 4/5One thing that I feel I need to state: I am a Black British Woman. In fact I am roughly the same age as the authors of this book. I am who this book is supposed to be marketed towards, and yet - I don't think this book is actually for me.Without a shadow of a doubt, I am 100% here for the importance, necessity and the information highlighted in this book. However I am in two minds about my review. The book does a great job of taking the reader thorough a range of milestones in a Black British female's life. From the shared experience of having immigrant parents, being over looked in high school, finding yourself at university, and battling to stay yourself in the working world. For me however. None of the information I read was new. For the first few pages it was great to see my experience's so clearly reflected on the page but that got old very quickly. It was pages and pages, anecdote after anecdote and chapter after chapter of me thinking. "Yeah yeah yeah, tell me something I don't know" The book didn't give any answers or solutions to the numerous highlighted unfairness's that is the black female experience - and I didn't expect it too, how could it? But after a while it just became a tad depressing.Though there were a few nuggets of wisdom I will squirrel away and apply to my day to day life. It felt like reading an article - or a dissertation - one with a point, quote comment system, chocked full of statistics, that ended with a conclusion whose aim is never provide solution.Personally I would say this book was best read by 15-21 year olds. Those currently living - or about to live a lot of the issues this book raises. To arm and prepare them for the unfairness of life just because they were born black and female. Another thought that kept cropping up as I was reading is; "man I wish I had read this while I was doing my GCSE's - my whole educational outlook would have been more focused" I would also say this should be read by pretty much every other race. The book brings together a range of smart, successful and inspiring women - who have all been subjected to racism, and discrimination in some form or another. Hearing their stories, their views, their feelings. It's a rare insight into Black British Women, one that could help debunk a range of stigmas. I will be championing this book and recommending it to those who would benefit from the anecdotes, experiences and words of wisdom, but to be honest it won't be me or my friends.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I know what you're thinking. 'Girl, you are white? This book isn't for you' - and you would be correct. But, here's the thing. Black women do not need to read this to be educated. They are already living these experiences, and facing these struggles on the daily. Black women should (and will) read this for the affirmation and validation it will provide their experiences, for the sense of inclusive solidarity it provides, and for the practical advice shared throughout by an array of successful, i I know what you're thinking. 'Girl, you are white? This book isn't for you' - and you would be correct. But, here's the thing. Black women do not need to read this to be educated. They are already living these experiences, and facing these struggles on the daily. Black women should (and will) read this for the affirmation and validation it will provide their experiences, for the sense of inclusive solidarity it provides, and for the practical advice shared throughout by an array of successful, inspirational black women.White people on the other hand, should read this to be educated. In the same way I'd urge every male who questions the prevalence of sexism in our society to read Laura Bates' Everyday Sexism, I would encourage all white people who still question the scale of racism to read Slay In Your Lane. Even though this is not written for us, we can still learn from it, and anyone who considers themselves an intersectional feminist needs to be aware of the specific challenges black women face throughout all facets of life, and the extent to which sexism and racism will always be interlinked.I expected this book to be a collection of essays by a variety of different women, much like how The Good Immigrant is laid out. In actuality, it's written purely by Adegoke and Uviebinené themselves, and they weave the real life experiences of several dynamic black women into their discussion in the form of quotes and interview excerpts. It's packed full of practical advice from real women, sometimes even providing real resources that can be accessed, such as websites to visit and support groups available. This book looks at several areas of modern life and discusses how black women can excel in education, get ahead in business and navigate the complex dating scene. It also delves into the honestly depressing lack of representation (and misrepresentation) they still face in all aspects of the media, the apparent oxymoron in identifying as both Black and British, and the sheer frustration in the lack of suitable beauty products and clothing, despite such a huge market calling for it. Further still, this book looks at the unique stigma that black women in particular face when it comes to seeking help for physical and mental health concerns and just generally documents how institutional racism still plagues the majority of public bodies.What I feel was especially admirable about this book, was the fact that at no point do the authors appear to be straight forward complaining about the oppression they face - although they would have absolutely every right to. They are careful not to victimise their readers, and instead seek to provide constructive advice, and to inspire. Of course they are annoyed, and angered, and rightly so, but this book feels like them saying 'Look, the odds are stacked against you, the system is rigged, but here's why you can do it anyway' This book is a proud celebration of black excellence. My hope is that the strength, unity and support that young black women will feel in reading this will be priceless in itself, and I'm very happy this book got published.Thank you to HarperCollins for providing me with an eBook of this via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Didi
    January 1, 1970
    This book is thorough but unfortunately there isn't much new information. With the title Slay In Your Lane: The Black Girl Bible I had the impression to know exactly who the audience of this book is. The only section that gave some new information was the section on mental health. Even though I didn't learn much new information in this book, I still feel it was an interesting attempt. I hope Adegoke wiill eventually take an even bigger step forward to go even deeper into these subjects.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week:Two friends explore what it means to be young, black and female in the UK today.Young black women are facing uniquely challenging experiences in all aspects of their lives. And these experiences are not necessarily the same in the UK as they are in the US. So, when best friends Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené searched for a book that addressed these challenges they realised there was nothing that specifically addressed being black, British, young and fem From BBC radio 4 - Book of the week:Two friends explore what it means to be young, black and female in the UK today.Young black women are facing uniquely challenging experiences in all aspects of their lives. And these experiences are not necessarily the same in the UK as they are in the US. So, when best friends Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené searched for a book that addressed these challenges they realised there was nothing that specifically addressed being black, British, young and female - and you could add to that smart, ambitious and mostly invisible.Slay in Your Lane is the love child of exasperation and optimism - part guide, part history, part snapshot of the state of the nation. Examining aspects of life including education, work, health, and everyday racism, it's an honest and provocative book offering advice alongside some startling statistics, as well as stories and anecdotes from interviewees including some of the most successful black women in Britain today.Written and read by Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené with additional recorded interviews.Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel CreedProduced by Jill WatersA Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b9...
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  • Imi
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the abridged extracts from this book as broadcast on BBC Radio 4's 'Book of the Week.' These were five 15 minute episodes, read by the authors themselves. After the first absolutely brilliant first episode, I found myself thinking that if the rest of episodes were this good, I'd probably have to buy the book and read it in full!The first episode was created, apparently, from extracts from the essays 'It's Always a Race Thing with Her', and 'Lawyer, Doctor, Engineer'. This episode b I listened to the abridged extracts from this book as broadcast on BBC Radio 4's 'Book of the Week.' These were five 15 minute episodes, read by the authors themselves. After the first absolutely brilliant first episode, I found myself thinking that if the rest of episodes were this good, I'd probably have to buy the book and read it in full!The first episode was created, apparently, from extracts from the essays 'It's Always a Race Thing with Her', and 'Lawyer, Doctor, Engineer'. This episode begins with a discussion on the double standards black women face today. They are told to "work twice as hard to be considered half as good." The rest of this episode goes into more detail on how this manifests in education, and includes an interview with a researcher on the topic, as well as an account from Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock (a science TV presenter, for those who don't know), who I absolutely LOVE, so I have to admit I squealed with delight that she was included.The next two episodes discuss the racist and discriminatory cultures that exists at universities, in the workplace, and in the media and popular culture. One example given is the discrimination and abuse faced by the first black female MP in the UK, Dianne Abbott, who anyone who follows British politics will know has been treated appallingly by the British media and beyond. Episode 4 explains how the internet has been a mixed blessing to minorities. On the one hand, the internet has made it easier find information and others like you, helping many to realise they are less alone than they grew up believing. However, the internet also allows racism and discrimination to flourish, largely unchallenged. In episode 5, Yomi Adegoke shares her own story of mental illness. She talks about the links between racism and sexism with mental illness due to the shame that is often left unspoken and internalised.What I heard here was fantastic, and I am now convinced I need to track the book down and read it in full. I will leave it unrated and marked as DNF until then. Although, it appears the book has been written with a mainly black, British and female audience in mind, I (as a white, British woman) feel that this book should be read by many others than just this one group. If we want change, then we all need to take responsibility for it.
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  • Lucy H
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a white woman who lives in an almost overwhelmingly white part of the UK. I read Slay In Your Lane with the wish to understand the challenges experienced and documented by the authors. This is a clear-eyed unflinching look at the exhausting, demoralising, seemingly endless challenges facing black women in their daily lives, simply because they are black women. From school and family, through University then out into the working world, the weight of expectation - both good and bad - is huge. I'm a white woman who lives in an almost overwhelmingly white part of the UK. I read Slay In Your Lane with the wish to understand the challenges experienced and documented by the authors. This is a clear-eyed unflinching look at the exhausting, demoralising, seemingly endless challenges facing black women in their daily lives, simply because they are black women. From school and family, through University then out into the working world, the weight of expectation - both good and bad - is huge. There are coping strategies, humour, irritation, resignation and some anger in every chapter, but I never felt that the authors strayed into pathos or self-pity. The writing is effective and engaging, drawing the reader in immediately. There are plentiful anecdotes, quotes and interviews from a range of women which add to the chatty readability of the book. At no point did I feel harangued or lectured, even when picking up on one or two "microaggressions" I have carried out in the past: unthinkingly commenting on a black colleague's new hairstyle where I wouldn't have mentioned a white colleagues, for example. I will not do so again, and was left feeling retrospectively mortified for my own ignorance.A minor irritation - the authors refer back and forth to other chapters and sections as if they are presenting a lecture, or writing a dissertation, which I found distracting. It felt rather self-conscious and forced, and interrupted the flow of the narrative for me. That aside, it is a well-written book which provides insight into a set of experiences I have never shared, and given me a lot to think about for the future.Anyone who is remotely interested in feminism, society and race (ie pretty much anyone, I hope!) ought to read this. Note: I have not read the entire book from cover to cover, but the writing style is so accessible and interesting that I could have done so easily.
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  • Ailsa
    January 1, 1970
    This book is brilliant and so timely - but don’t listen to me, I’m just some random white girl. Listen to Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené and all the amazing women interviewed for this book about growing up as a black girl in Britain today. Incredibly well researched, covering topics from education to dating, this really is a bible. I’m honoured to have been able to read it and be thoroughly educated on issues I don’t know enough about. It should be a handbook in every high school classroo This book is brilliant and so timely - but don’t listen to me, I’m just some random white girl. Listen to Yomi Adegoke and Elizabeth Uviebinené and all the amazing women interviewed for this book about growing up as a black girl in Britain today. Incredibly well researched, covering topics from education to dating, this really is a bible. I’m honoured to have been able to read it and be thoroughly educated on issues I don’t know enough about. It should be a handbook in every high school classroom. (I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review)
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  • Paulette
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent! Well researched examination of bigotry and racism in the UK towards black University students and young workers. Their experiences are not unlike the experiences of young POC at many majority white institutions here in the US. Definitely reminded me of my time at the University of Florida in the early 80's and seeking out and belonging to groups like the Caribbean Students' association and gospel choir. There were so few black students that most either pledged or joined a group. I lis Excellent! Well researched examination of bigotry and racism in the UK towards black University students and young workers. Their experiences are not unlike the experiences of young POC at many majority white institutions here in the US. Definitely reminded me of my time at the University of Florida in the early 80's and seeking out and belonging to groups like the Caribbean Students' association and gospel choir. There were so few black students that most either pledged or joined a group. I listened to the abridged version on BBC-4 because I just couldn't find the audiobook online in the US.
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  • Blackgirlsreadtoo
    January 1, 1970
    Hey friends,.Depending on your level of tolerance for political books, you may or may not like it.“Slay in your lane” was a wonderful gift from 4th estate. Out in July. Here is my mini review.Wholehearted advice for practical application. This little book (as ratchet as it might sound) is a total gem. I’d place it in the same category as “why I am no longer talking to white people about race”. If I wasn’t discovering TED videos in 2012, I might just have missed Chimamanda’s powerful talk. My rea Hey friends,.Depending on your level of tolerance for political books, you may or may not like it.“Slay in your lane” was a wonderful gift from 4th estate. Out in July. Here is my mini review.Wholehearted advice for practical application. This little book (as ratchet as it might sound) is a total gem. I’d place it in the same category as “why I am no longer talking to white people about race”. If I wasn’t discovering TED videos in 2012, I might just have missed Chimamanda’s powerful talk. My reading life too may have taken off in a different trajectory. It is that serious. Representation matters & some of us are playing catch up..These authors both in their 20’s shell out candid advice & anecdotes on the struggles of working, plus, dating in the UK. I found myself nodding in agreement to a great deal of it. For example: dealing with micro-aggressions. Tbh, the struggle is sooo real. Equally, I often have conversations with people who openly admit to only looking for interracial relationships. Such conversations don’t interest me. But, that doesn’t mean I am not listening or reading about it so I can understand how others view dating.The book carries on treading between didactic and friendly prose. Easy to read. Clear, nuanced & jam packed with helpful aphorisms like:“Setting boundaries is important. It’s a healthy part of being a human being. You don’t have to feel dragged in, disrespected & abused. Or forced into accepting an apology which doesn’t sit well with you”An ideal read for anyone who is both unaware or unsure. Or if you are a teenager hoping to understand why all the 20-something-year-olds don’t seem to have their shit together. Instead of the “life is tough” advice. This is the book for that, just like there is a book for everything else. What a powerful reminder to #slayinyourlane?
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  • Saba
    January 1, 1970
    My top three thoughts on 'Slay in Your Lane':1. There's so much I can identify with in this book even though I'm Indian - The microaggressions, racial profiling, prejudices, and the misrepresentation of my culture. I too, like Uviebinené was accused in school of cheating by a racist teacher who assumed the color of my skin determined my intellect. I too have had friends being overlooked for jobs because of a 'difficult' name or where they were asked to shorten it for the convenience of others. I My top three thoughts on 'Slay in Your Lane':1. There's so much I can identify with in this book even though I'm Indian - The microaggressions, racial profiling, prejudices, and the misrepresentation of my culture. I too, like Uviebinené was accused in school of cheating by a racist teacher who assumed the color of my skin determined my intellect. I too have had friends being overlooked for jobs because of a 'difficult' name or where they were asked to shorten it for the convenience of others. I too have been dismissed as being sensitive when I get offended by anything that depicts my religion, race or gender in a negative light.2. The parts I enjoyed reading the most were the inspiring stories and challenges of the strong, intelligent, successful black women from all the different industries. 3. It says on the cover that this is 'The Black Girl Bible' yet, it felt like a majority of the book was spent on educating non-black people on what it is to be black. I felt this platform could have been better used by providing a more insightful, concrete and powerful message for young girls (black or not); to prepare them for the unfair and arduous path ahead.
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  • Victoria Sadler
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to read Slay in Your Lane by Elizabeth Uviebinené and Yomi Adegoke as the book had been the subject of a bidding war between publishers. Its sub-title, The Black Girl Bible, would probably indicate that, as a white woman, I may well not be its targeted demographic but if intersectionality is going to mean anything then white women like myself need to listen more when black women speak – and this book is a great read.The book is pitched more as a self-help book, a series of reassuri I was excited to read Slay in Your Lane by Elizabeth Uviebinené and Yomi Adegoke as the book had been the subject of a bidding war between publishers. Its sub-title, The Black Girl Bible, would probably indicate that, as a white woman, I may well not be its targeted demographic but if intersectionality is going to mean anything then white women like myself need to listen more when black women speak – and this book is a great read.The book is pitched more as a self-help book, a series of reassuring and supportive articles from a big sister, rather than as an academic insight. Nevertheless, it excellently highlights the issues and challenges for black women trying to survive and thrive in white spaces in UK society. Covering areas from graduate life to business, from cosmetics to mental health, Yoki and Elizabeth explain the microaggressions that black girls and women have to overcome, interspersed with excerpts from interviews with high-profile black British women who bring these points to life through their own experiences. A revealing and insightful book, and it’s great to see black British women on the bookshelf as usually such inspirational guides come from American writers.
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  • Verity W
    January 1, 1970
    *****Copy from NetGalley in return for an honest review*****I should say at the outset that I am absolutely not the target market for this. But I read it because I want to get more of an understanding of the challenges that black young women face and get some perspective on it - not only because I find it really important to understand other people's experiences, but because I manage a team with several young black women in it and I want to be the best manager to them that I can be.And this gave *****Copy from NetGalley in return for an honest review*****I should say at the outset that I am absolutely not the target market for this. But I read it because I want to get more of an understanding of the challenges that black young women face and get some perspective on it - not only because I find it really important to understand other people's experiences, but because I manage a team with several young black women in it and I want to be the best manager to them that I can be.And this gave me so much to think about - I can't make any judgement on how it works for young Black British women, but I can say that I think it is important reading for people who are *not* young Black British women so that they can get some sort of insight into the challenges and prejudices they face.Really good - and the authors are so young and talented!
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Highly recommend to all. However, I doubt as many other reviewers have expressed in writing that young black women need not a retelling on how society treats them poorly but more importantly in depth discussions, wisdom and truths that focus on societal reformation and talks on multiculturalism as some examples. There’s a whole lot to be explored. I actually listened to the audiobook rather than reading the book and let me tell you from what I’ve gathered is that all discussed is insightful and Highly recommend to all. However, I doubt as many other reviewers have expressed in writing that young black women need not a retelling on how society treats them poorly but more importantly in depth discussions, wisdom and truths that focus on societal reformation and talks on multiculturalism as some examples. There’s a whole lot to be explored. I actually listened to the audiobook rather than reading the book and let me tell you from what I’ve gathered is that all discussed is insightful and most interesting. There was more bonus content from what I presume is not what’s originally in the book. Definitely interested in a follow up of the book.
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  • Angie-Leonie
    January 1, 1970
    10's all round. An excellent book to grace any womens library, but for the Black Brits this is our section at last.
  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars
  • Synthia Salomon, Ed.S.
    January 1, 1970
    Read this book with my hubby to help him apply concepts to me and our daughter. Good read! He enjoyed it and learned more examples about how fetishized features are damaging and not complimentary.
  • Jelmer
    January 1, 1970
    It was interesting to get the perspective from their side
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Yomi Adegoke & Elizabeth Uviebinené the authors in their 20s share their own stories and interviewed nearly 40 prominent Black and Minority Ethnic women on a range of topics. Dubbed the “Black girl’s Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In” this proves a useful addition to the conversation. As someone who experiences a lot of what is discussed, it is refreshing to have so many voices re-affirm and discuss racial microaggressions (comments and actions that subtly and often unconsciously unintentionally exp Yomi Adegoke & Elizabeth Uviebinené the authors in their 20s share their own stories and interviewed nearly 40 prominent Black and Minority Ethnic women on a range of topics. Dubbed the “Black girl’s Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In” this proves a useful addition to the conversation. As someone who experiences a lot of what is discussed, it is refreshing to have so many voices re-affirm and discuss racial microaggressions (comments and actions that subtly and often unconsciously unintentionally express prejudiced attitudes towards a member of a marginalised group) and experiences. Sub-chapters #FiftyShadesofBeige, #RepresentationMatters, #BlackGirlsDontCry, #BlackFacesinWhiteSpaces and more chapters about education, work, getting ahead, health and representation are insightful and thoughtfully written for readers of all cultures. Great Audiobook too.
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