Rabbit & Robot
Cager has been transported to the Tennessee, a giant lunar-cruise ship orbiting the moon that his dad owns, by Billy and Rowan to help him shake his Woz addiction. Meanwhile, Earth, in the midst of thirty simultaneous wars, burns to ash beneath them. And as the robots on board become increasingly insane and cannibalistic, and the Earth becomes a toxic wasteland, the boys have to wonder if they’ll be stranded alone in space forever.

Rabbit & Robot Details

TitleRabbit & Robot
Author
ReleaseSep 25th, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction

Rabbit & Robot Review

  • Shaun Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    There are so many things going on in this book that I I'm going to need some time to think about them before I can write a coherent review. This book is more than inappropriate erections and day-of-the-week underwear and cannibal robots. It is, to me, an indictment of the single-mindedness of our social media culture, a discussion about the future, and a peek into who we are and who we might become. I'm not sure I agree with R&R's worldview, but I absolutely see it's point of view, and think There are so many things going on in this book that I I'm going to need some time to think about them before I can write a coherent review. This book is more than inappropriate erections and day-of-the-week underwear and cannibal robots. It is, to me, an indictment of the single-mindedness of our social media culture, a discussion about the future, and a peek into who we are and who we might become. I'm not sure I agree with R&R's worldview, but I absolutely see it's point of view, and think there's some really great and thoughtful insight here, as well as a fun story. It's Andrew Smith at his Andrew Smithiest, and I'm always here for it.
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  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Simon & Schuster Canada for this DRC!This book was absolutely ridiculous.It was like breeding the space opera genre with Beavis and Butt-Head to make some weird and funny book baby. Somehow that strange mashup worked extremely well.P.S."Tigers are dicks."
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    Last weekend we were in New Orleans to celebrate my husband’s dad’s birthday. Coincidentally, ALA was also going on at the same time and I kept thinking maybe I’d run into some of my library people while about town, but I never did. THANKFULLY, however, my husband did happen to run into Andrew Smith in the airport as we were waiting to fly home, and, being approximately a billion times less socially awkward than I am, he apparently actually managed to say coherent words in Smith’s presence and a Last weekend we were in New Orleans to celebrate my husband’s dad’s birthday. Coincidentally, ALA was also going on at the same time and I kept thinking maybe I’d run into some of my library people while about town, but I never did. THANKFULLY, however, my husband did happen to run into Andrew Smith in the airport as we were waiting to fly home, and, being approximately a billion times less socially awkward than I am, he apparently actually managed to say coherent words in Smith’s presence and also received the last arc of this book that Smith had brought with him. Then he came back to where I was sitting and said, "you’re gonna be mad, but...as I was coming out of the bathroom I ran into Andrew Smith..." and I was like, "WHAT." Anyway, I very much was mad. And jealous. And was like, "but...you’re gonna let me read this first, right???" And then Andrew Smith walked by where we were sitting and came over to say hi since my husband had told him I’d be mad. And he asked my name and said, "nice to meet you," and I almost started to remind him that I’ve met him before and that I’m that weirdo whose friends had him take a photo with a dorky picture of me on their phone that one time (haha, Ramarie and Ashley, you’re still the best!), and then the next year at Texas Teen Book Festival I made him take a picture with me holding up my phone with that photo of him with the picture of me on the screen (he was like, "Um. This is a new one..."), but I stopped myself and just did the regular socially awkward thing instead and basically just blacked out.Blah blah blah, I’ve just been basking in the glow of our very fortunate timing (our flight got cancelled like five minutes later) and my husband’s superior talking-to-people abilities and how amazingly nice Andrew Smith is all week. While I read this book first. And...and...and...um...okay, so, I’m definitely still processing it. Like in all of Smith’s books, the characters are wonderful—sad and funny and flawed and beautiful—and a lot is being said without ever exactly being spelled out. And it’s weird and wacky and dark and...so very human. And the story behind Billy Hinman! Ha!I really do love Shaun David Hutchinson’s statement that it’s “Andrew Smith at his Andrew Smithiest.” If you’re familiar with Grasshopper Jungle and The Marbury Lens and The Alex Crow, you maybe know a little what to expect.I’m planning to listen to the audio as soon as that’s available (arghhhhh, months from now!!!), and in the meantime will probably reread this copy again because it’s been too long between Andrew Smith books and the withdrawal has been hard. Very, very hard!I guess I’d better let my husband read it before I do that though, since it’s his book and all! Sighhhhhh...
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  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    A wild ride!
  • Catie
    January 1, 1970
    I kept waiting for some deeper meaning to appear underneath the drug haze, gallons of robot mucus, erections, and mood swings, and I was ultimately disappointed. Certainly there are messages here about consumerism and the sort of "us vs. them" closed-minded ignorance that humans seem to specialize in, but it wasn't enough for me. I wanted the ending to reveal its cards with a punch to the gut, but instead I was left confused and muttering..."Well, DUH." Where Grasshopper Jungle felt weird in an I kept waiting for some deeper meaning to appear underneath the drug haze, gallons of robot mucus, erections, and mood swings, and I was ultimately disappointed. Certainly there are messages here about consumerism and the sort of "us vs. them" closed-minded ignorance that humans seem to specialize in, but it wasn't enough for me. I wanted the ending to reveal its cards with a punch to the gut, but instead I was left confused and muttering..."Well, DUH." Where Grasshopper Jungle felt weird in an interesting and unique way, this felt repetitive and kind of silly. It's absolutely possible that I missed something here.A more meaningful (even fifteen years later) read-alike is Feed by M.T. Anderson.
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  • O.R.
    January 1, 1970
    I like Andrew's crazy so count me in. And that's a badass cover.
  • The Bookish Austin
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, a friend won this as a Goodreads Giveaway. I'm providing an honest review of it. Secondly, that's some pretty BA cover art. Third, I'm going to say that this book is just Andrew Smith. It's wacky, it's full of teenagers being teenagers, has a talking giraffe, and even has some deep ideas about what makes humans human. :) Check out a more in-depth review here: https://thebookishaustin.tumblr.com/p...
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    It's been three years or thereabouts since The Alex Crow and it feels longer because I am not patient when it comes to books. So, as soon as I knew ARCs were available for this one, I let the begging commence. Okay, i sent one e-mail to my sales rep, but it was really, really pathetically beg-y.Was it worth the wait? Very much yes.It's...ridiculous, but please don't imagine that I mean that as a dig. It is, after all, a book about cannibalistic robots and talking giraffes and blue aliens and sex It's been three years or thereabouts since The Alex Crow and it feels longer because I am not patient when it comes to books. So, as soon as I knew ARCs were available for this one, I let the begging commence. Okay, i sent one e-mail to my sales rep, but it was really, really pathetically beg-y.Was it worth the wait? Very much yes.It's...ridiculous, but please don't imagine that I mean that as a dig. It is, after all, a book about cannibalistic robots and talking giraffes and blue aliens and sex and drugs and the kind of kids TV that only makes sens when the viewer is high. It's over-the-top and out-of-control. It has elements that could have been drawn from everything from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy to the new(er) Battlestar Galactica to late-night oddity Lexx. It is smart and snarky and...sneaky.Yes, sneaky. Because behind all of the madcap, cannibalistic insanity are serious questions about privilege and what it means to be human and even the nature and origin of humanity itself. It takes our current level of technology and the current state of world affairs and ramps them up to the nth degree to encourage the reader to ask "Just because we can, does that mean we should?"But, mostly, it's cannibalistic robots run amok on a luxury spaceship orbiting the moon and four human teens trying to survive and get back home. Plus aliens and tacos.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Andrew Smith's realistic fiction books are among some of my favorites...Winger and Stand-Off, 100 Sideways Miles, Stick. I haven't read much of his science-fiction--other than Grasshopper Jungle, which was raunchy and hilarious and brilliant...reminiscent of Vonnegut, but with more horny teenagers--but I know it's usually out-there and not for everyone.Rabbit & Robot is definitely out-there and not for everyone...but i Edelweiss provided me a DRC of this book in exchange for an honest review.Andrew Smith's realistic fiction books are among some of my favorites...Winger and Stand-Off, 100 Sideways Miles, Stick. I haven't read much of his science-fiction--other than Grasshopper Jungle, which was raunchy and hilarious and brilliant...reminiscent of Vonnegut, but with more horny teenagers--but I know it's usually out-there and not for everyone.Rabbit & Robot is definitely out-there and not for everyone...but it's also raunchy and hilarious and brilliant. In a world where machines are as lifelike as humans and the Earth is burning in the midst of multiple wars, two spoiled rich boys and their caretaker end up trapped on a spaceship filled with machines-gone-wild. There's a French giraffe, a horny valet, two girls who may or may not be robots, blue aliens...and that's just the tip of the iceberg. Cager (like all of Smith's narrators) is funny and honest and a little bit broken. He's addicted to drugs, loves his best friend Billy, and desperately wants to be normal. His story--even when surrounded by the craziness of cannibal robots and talking zoo animals--is emotional and engaging and full of heart.
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  • B220
    January 1, 1970
    This book is ridiculously hilarious on so many levels. The premise, Cager and Billy get on the spaceship the Tennessee as 30+ concurrent wars are occurring involving the United States. Along with the caretaker Rowan, they believe they are the only humans on the ship until Cager's extra-sensitive nose detects other humans-females!The ship is manned by Cogs, humanoid machines that each have one dominating emotion (extreme elation, outrage, horniness, depression, etc). Cager's personal attendant is This book is ridiculously hilarious on so many levels. The premise, Cager and Billy get on the spaceship the Tennessee as 30+ concurrent wars are occurring involving the United States. Along with the caretaker Rowan, they believe they are the only humans on the ship until Cager's extra-sensitive nose detects other humans-females!The ship is manned by Cogs, humanoid machines that each have one dominating emotion (extreme elation, outrage, horniness, depression, etc). Cager's personal attendant is Parker, a cog who is excessively horny. Though the planet Earth may or may not exist anymore, Billy and Cager are left with a decision: do they try to stay on the ship as the cogs start to act very oddly, or do they attempt to return to Earth...and how will the two girls on the ship play into their choice?This book is funny. If you have never read any Andrew Smith books, you are missing out and you need to pick this book up! I can just picture Mr. Smith laughing out loud as he composed most of these sentences! I know I laughed so loud a couple times my wife asked me what the heck I was reading! Thank you to Netgalley for the ARC!
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  • KristynRene The Hype Queen of Books
    January 1, 1970
    Edelweiss granted me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. And honest is what I shall offer you.Count em up, 19 “fucks” in the first 2 Chapters. Are you trying to be Andy Weir? Because if you are, you are coming off as FUCKING ANNOYING. Use profanity when it is necessary. Not because you want to sound ironic, cynical, and relatable. Ew. Absolute failure. I never read Winger because it didn’t interest me in the slightest. Now I will officially avoid any work of Mr. Smith’s. “Forever and ever Edelweiss granted me this ARC in exchange for an honest review. And honest is what I shall offer you.Count em up, 19 “fucks” in the first 2 Chapters. Are you trying to be Andy Weir? Because if you are, you are coming off as FUCKING ANNOYING. Use profanity when it is necessary. Not because you want to sound ironic, cynical, and relatable. Ew. Absolute failure. I never read Winger because it didn’t interest me in the slightest. Now I will officially avoid any work of Mr. Smith’s. “Forever and ever.” This book belongs on the carcass covered moon where it will never be read because the only people on that moon will be dead. Never been so triggered at a book before. I am so not trash for this TRASH. The whole beginning is a mess. This book is a mess and once other critical readers get ahold of it, the world will see this book for what it is:TRASH.
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  • Sya
    January 1, 1970
    Insane, exhilarating, and moving, Smith's latest jar upon a hill maintains the standard set by his previous titles and is a must read for anyone looking for a truly unique take on what makes us human and whether it matters.
  • Ricky
    January 1, 1970
    It's been a bit since I read an Andrew Smith novel, and after picking up this ARC at work (luckily a second one came; someone else took the first one before I could), I'm pretty glad I took another chance on his latest.The story here is more cohesive than The Alex Crow and the Marbury Lens duology, and it feels more meta-humorous than Grasshopper Jungle. That same meta-humor might get the book in trouble with certain online types because Smith has stated that a lot of the cannibalistic chaos of It's been a bit since I read an Andrew Smith novel, and after picking up this ARC at work (luckily a second one came; someone else took the first one before I could), I'm pretty glad I took another chance on his latest.The story here is more cohesive than The Alex Crow and the Marbury Lens duology, and it feels more meta-humorous than Grasshopper Jungle. That same meta-humor might get the book in trouble with certain online types because Smith has stated that a lot of the cannibalistic chaos of the robots on this doomed space cruiser was inspired, somewhat, by people who came down on him for problematic behavior at times in the last couple of years. Hell, in the very first chapter, "spirit animal" gets appropriated in dialogue, which is sure to rile up a lot of people - even if Billy, the appropriator in question, goes and takes it back upon seeing that the animal he liked so much is an incongruously carnivorous giraffe. Then there's Smith's usual incorporation of queer male sexuality, which, as always, comes off as more than a bit weird. As well as you can expect given that Smith is literally the original "Keep YA Weird" guy, though over the years, as Smith's books have actually helped me accept my own bisexuality, I've felt that he's not had as great a handle on the subject as he thinks he does. I still think Passenger's m/m ship was awkwardly done and would have worked much better platonically; Winger, of course, pulled a Bury Your Gays; Grasshopper Jungle was perhaps the closest Smith came to creating a character who reflected my sexuality with Austin Szerba, but even then he kinda relied too much on the Cheating Bisexual trope. (Incidentally, I've put one of my #ownvoices bi manuscripts on hold precisely because I fell into the same tropey hole.) I'm at least glad that Smith makes it clear that we're in a future where sexuality is pretty much fluid by default, though I do still think it'd have been nice to have Billy not feel afraid to say he himself was bi (which is how I headcanon him, tbh.) But then again, after the opening chapter's incident with Maurice the bisexual carnivorous French giraffe, I'm not surprised he doesn't want to have a label in common with that creepy-ass cog.Like a lot of Andrew Smith's past works, Rabbit & Robot is weird and immature and downright disgusting. Sperm and piss and fart jokes abound, and now we get recreational drugs for good measure. And tons of F-bombs. And Parker. I'm so over the current trend of casting Timothée Chalamet in everything, and especially of typecasting him as a horny-ass teenager, but Parker is the perfect role for him. Though I bet Chalamet would probably only be able to endure maybe a hundred repetitions of "I have an erection" before he can no longer say it without laughing. Or, worse, making the entire rest of the cast corpse.That repetition is one of many that shows up throughout the book, largely because, again, most of the cast are robots. They keep repeating their programmed lines - or are they programmed? Perhaps by the Worm that infects them all. In any case, these repetitions make the book a little dull at times, though at times I admit I laughed a little more than I should have. Especially since a lot of those repetitions parrot not only fundamentalist Christians (who, because they're characters in an Andrew Smith novel, have mouths as foul as everyone else's), but also the sort of endlessly self-victimizing discourse endemic to social-justice Tumblr.As always, Smith gives us a book that takes me, in particular, to a certain dark side of mine. In this case, as I'm telling one of my best bros (to whom I'm sending this book later this week), the side that sees everyone else submitting to vice like it's a game, and totally wants to join in anyway. Because, gorrammit, that's way too much me and I need to be a better human than that. Which character am I most like? Parker? Milo? Lourdes? Billy? Juan? Rowan? Meg? Jeffrie? Cager Messer?Maybe they're all me.And I bet my buddy will feel the same whenever he reads the book himself. (Though obviously he's Billy.)
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  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to get an ARC of Rabbit & Robot and I will just say... WOW. I was just blown away by the story, the characters, the humor, the messaging, the philosophy, etc. The whole concept is pretty genius and the way that Smith creates a plot, conflict, and tension, well, the dude's a masterful writer, a genius of YA lit and lit just in general. I know that Smith has been compared to Vonnegut previously and I am always looking for those connections in his writing and being a huge I was fortunate enough to get an ARC of Rabbit & Robot and I will just say... WOW. I was just blown away by the story, the characters, the humor, the messaging, the philosophy, etc. The whole concept is pretty genius and the way that Smith creates a plot, conflict, and tension, well, the dude's a masterful writer, a genius of YA lit and lit just in general. I know that Smith has been compared to Vonnegut previously and I am always looking for those connections in his writing and being a huge Vonnegut fan I can say that this book is probably his most Vonnegut-y so far. Moreso than Grasshopper Jungle and The Alex Crow and those were pretty Vonnegut-y. The big questions of who we are, what are we doing here, and why, and trying to figure all those things out, well, I don't think that Cager and Billy are every going to figure those things out when they're 16, but they have a pretty solid hold on it by the end of Rabbit & Robot. I love the way that they end up on The Tennessee and I love the conflict that they continue to face being rich kids who don't know anything about being social, and I love that they try and figure out how to make sense of it all. I would certainly teach this book to my 8th graders but there is a ton of potentially offensive language within these pages. But, I've always been a fan and protector of the NCTE right to read, so if there was a problem, I would trust the kid and their parents to make the right decision. The language pales in comparison to the potential conversations one can have with a classroom of engaged students (and make no mistake, students will be engaged). The difference between coders and bonks, humans and robots, and of course, what does it all mean and why the hell are we all here, are all pieces of the puzzles and Smith gives us a treasure trove of potential talking and writing points. "Love and hope are what make us what we are." A perfect ideology for all humanity. Sadly, and I wonder if this is what Smith was getting at, we're pretty far away from love and hope is really all we have left (for now at least). Needless to say, I loved this book and plan on purchasing a copy of it when it comes out (and hopefully getting it signed by the man himself).Such good stuff!
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  • Brandie
    January 1, 1970
    ***Received from a Goodreads Giveaway***And, Billy, if you’re out there, text me.A silly story with not much meat on it. I could see this being turned into a regular show for Adult Swim on The Cartoon Network with all the erections, farting robots, drug use/abuse, and the suspension of belief in a spaceship not having some type of way to communicate with each other aboard ship, no spacesuits, and with all people of earth being either coders or bonks (besides Cager’s family and Billy’s family) wh ***Received from a Goodreads Giveaway***And, Billy, if you’re out there, text me.A silly story with not much meat on it. I could see this being turned into a regular show for Adult Swim on The Cartoon Network with all the erections, farting robots, drug use/abuse, and the suspension of belief in a spaceship not having some type of way to communicate with each other aboard ship, no spacesuits, and with all people of earth being either coders or bonks (besides Cager’s family and Billy’s family) who would even spend time there? Maybe other 1 percenters? If so, then why the schools for bonks and coders? There again, for adult swim the logic would work fine. Sooooo, not my personal cup of tea but I could see the appeal to others. But, I was interested enough to push on and finish it. *sigh* And then a disappointing ending. There needed to be a little more. Or is there a book 2? (view spoiler)[what about the appearance of all the blue worms? The appearance of Mooney and Rabbit? What remains of earth? They are going into the unknown without knowing if there is even breathable air on earth. :/ Like I said, not for me. And that’s fine. :D (hide spoiler)]
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Having read previous Andrew Smith books, I knew that sometimes it takes a while to get into the world (eg, Grasshopper Jungle) but this? Trying to fgure out when and where things were, who Rabbit and Robot and Billy were, why there were so many wars on Earth and what Woz was took far too long for me and at 25%, I just gave up.eARC provided by publisher.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. There is always so much happening in Smith's books that I never really know where to begin. Cager is kidnapped by his best friend Billy and caretaker Rowan to his father's spaceship in an attempt to get him clean off of a drug called Woz. Just in time, too, as Earth has destroyed itself with its thirtieth world war. The Tennessee is full of robots of both humanoid and animal protoypes, & there's only a human count of five in the solar system. This absurdly uproarious space adventu 4.5 stars. There is always so much happening in Smith's books that I never really know where to begin. Cager is kidnapped by his best friend Billy and caretaker Rowan to his father's spaceship in an attempt to get him clean off of a drug called Woz. Just in time, too, as Earth has destroyed itself with its thirtieth world war. The Tennessee is full of robots of both humanoid and animal protoypes, & there's only a human count of five in the solar system. This absurdly uproarious space adventure will not fail to astound you throughout the trip. Cheepa Yeep!I also feel the need to give thanks to Smith for how he portrayed a character that comes in a bit into the book, Jeffrie. I don't want to give too much away to spoil it though, either. All I will say at this time is we need more characters like her, written like her, and treated like her, both from the author and her fellow space-travelers. Huge gratitude from me for this.
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  • James Wilcox
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate enough to acquire an advance copy of Rabbit & Robot by Andrew Smith thanks to Edelweiss and the fine people at Simon & Schuster.A brief, non-spoiler review: The book is funny, crass, inventive, and a little bit insane. Pretty much par for the course for Smith. But the point of this brief opening paragraph is: if you've read Smith's other works (particularly Grasshopper Jungle or The Alex Crow) and weren't absolutely in love with them... you won't find much to change your I was fortunate enough to acquire an advance copy of Rabbit & Robot by Andrew Smith thanks to Edelweiss and the fine people at Simon & Schuster.A brief, non-spoiler review: The book is funny, crass, inventive, and a little bit insane. Pretty much par for the course for Smith. But the point of this brief opening paragraph is: if you've read Smith's other works (particularly Grasshopper Jungle or The Alex Crow) and weren't absolutely in love with them... you won't find much to change your mind here.If you were a fan of his more down to earth books like Winger and 100 Sideways Miles, you may still like Rabbit & Robot, but it's definitely got a lot of the weird YA elements that Smith is quite fond of, so tread lightly if you've not big into genre YA.But if you're a fan of Grasshopper Jungle (or Smith in general), there's a lot to like in his newest novel. I say check out the excerpt that was featured in Entertainment Weekly. If that's too weird, then the rest of the book is going to be too weird for you as well.Since I've managed to read it several months ahead of time, I'm hiding the entire review to avoid spoilers, but just the same...THERE ARE SPOILERS AHEAD! IF YOU DON'T WANT TO KNOW PLOT DETAILS FOR THE BOOK PLEASE STOP HERE.So the short plot is: Cager and Billy are two teenaged boys stuck on a giant cruise ship called The Tennessee that's orbiting the moon.While they're on this ship, mechanized people, called cogs, are going mad around them. Of course, it's difficult to tell because the cogs often exhibit emotional echoes of their coders, ergo why we have a VERY French giraffe cog, or why Cager's loyal teenaged footman-cog Parker is consistently talking about wanting to sleep with Cager and drawing attention to his erection.Like I said, classic Smith.What Smith has done very well in the past (and continues to do well in Rabbit & Robot) is to give his characters an authentic and distinct voice. Cager shares some similar traits to Grasshopper Jungle's Austin, but Austin's narration was focused on the miniscule connections between things, as well as making an accurate and honest history of the world of Grasshopper Jungle as he saw it while Cager is a drug addict coming down off of a high of Woz and seems to miss... well, quite a bit.There's a lot going on that Cager notes and observes, but doesn't seem to understand fully. As a reader, it's actually fairly easy to pick up on things and enjoy a bit of the dramatic irony as Cager and Billy remain ignorant (especially the true identity of their caretaker Rowan).What this also means is that there's a lot happening that we just don't get to know about. While Austin was more focused on gaining more knowledge to fill in the blanks of his history, Cager doesn't have the same means of information gathering, so we're left with a lot of unknowns at the end of the story: Is the earth completely destroyed? What is the true goal of the cogs at the end of the story? Will the Queen be back at some point? What happens with Cager and Billy after the novel ends?!?!?There's also hints that the novel connects to other Smith novels, so... what are we to make of that? Is it a throw-away line, or does this occur within the same world? Regardless, we'll probably have to wait until Smith's follow-up to Grasshopper Jungle arrives in the far-too-distant future.I could go on, but I won't. However, I'll swing back in a few weeks and probably poke at this some more after I've had time to re-read the book. Remember to keep YA weird!
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  • Kate Schreffler
    January 1, 1970
    Incredibly strange as only Andrew Smith can be. I'll be thinking about it for a long time, and I'm sure I'll have more of an opinion on it once I figure out exactly what I just read.
  • Erin Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Andrew Smith takes us on another wild ride through a futuristic version of humanity, where anthropomorphic robots called cogs do most jobs considered beneath humans. Two jobs are available to humans: soldier, to fight in the 30 world wars that have taken over Earth, or coder, to make more cogs. Unfortunately, both these two things have gotten rather out of hand, with the 30th world war destroying the planet, and a superior race of blue aliens feeling threatened by the cogs who have begun to gain Andrew Smith takes us on another wild ride through a futuristic version of humanity, where anthropomorphic robots called cogs do most jobs considered beneath humans. Two jobs are available to humans: soldier, to fight in the 30 world wars that have taken over Earth, or coder, to make more cogs. Unfortunately, both these two things have gotten rather out of hand, with the 30th world war destroying the planet, and a superior race of blue aliens feeling threatened by the cogs who have begun to gain the capacity to reproduce themselves. In the midst of all this, our main character Cager, who's addicted to a drug called Woz that coders use to be able to be hyper-focused enough to do the mind-numbing coding, and his best friend Billy, as they escape earth to the space cruise liner the Tennessee. Cager and Billy try to survive as the cogs aboard the Tennessee mysteriously begin to cannibalize each other. Their time aboard the Tennessee is a hilarious and absurd romp, reminiscent of the Fifth Element, where cogs have personalities influenced by the people who coded them. We have Parker, Cager's valet, who is perpetually horny and walks around with his hand down his pants and hopefully propositions Cager at any opportunity. My favourite, though, is Lourdes, the cruise director, who is happy to the extreme, breaking into joyous, wild dance moves, and farting to express her happiness.If you loved Grasshopper Jungle, you'll love this one. If you hated it, you'll hate Rabbit & Robot. I happen to fall in the "loved" category, even though this genre of book isn't one I typically am drawn to. Absurd to the extreme, Andrew Smith has a way of weaving a crazy tale that is just enough rooted in the probable and the possible to make it both scary and enjoyable all at once. Thank you to NetGalley and Simon & Schuster for the eARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Matt Miller
    January 1, 1970
    Teenager Cager (rich, spoiled, virgin) and his best friend Billy (rich, spoiled, not a virgin), along with Cager’s caretaker, become marooned on a giant space cruise ship while the apocalypse takes place on earth. With no other humans on board, their only company are cogs (mechanical humans and animals), including Parker, Cager’s robotic valet, who sports a near constant erection that he feels compelled to announce to the world whenever it occurs. He also persistently tries to persuade Cager to Teenager Cager (rich, spoiled, virgin) and his best friend Billy (rich, spoiled, not a virgin), along with Cager’s caretaker, become marooned on a giant space cruise ship while the apocalypse takes place on earth. With no other humans on board, their only company are cogs (mechanical humans and animals), including Parker, Cager’s robotic valet, who sports a near constant erection that he feels compelled to announce to the world whenever it occurs. He also persistently tries to persuade Cager to have sex with him. Among the other hilarious mechanized characters is Milo, a depressed busboy with no reason to live, Lourdes, an overexcited dancing, farting cruise director, and Maurice, a bisexual giraffe with a French accent. As Cager and Billy deal with a virus on-board the ship which causes all of the robotic beings to eat each other, they discover two human stowaways, teen girls Meg and Jeffrie. While his story unfolds, Cager must deal with drug addiction, long-kept secrets and love, while simultaneously learning to see himself as a real person. As with all of Smith’s novels, Cager’s journey is at times exciting, heart-tugging, tear-jerking and downright hilarious. While not my favorite of his books, I enjoyed it, as I think most of his fans will. If you are new to Andrew Smith, Rabbit & Robot will be a nice introduction to his zany mind.
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really not sure how to rate this. I read it all the way to the end, but I'm not sure I can really say I enjoyed it. I didn't hate it either, though. Maybe 'bemused' is the right term. If you like fart jokes and robots screaming at each other, this book is definitely for you. But nothing else really happens on it. Everyone gets trapped on a space station when Earth is destroyed, they wander around avoiding cannibalistic robots for a while, then it ends. There's lots of fart jokes, talk about I'm really not sure how to rate this. I read it all the way to the end, but I'm not sure I can really say I enjoyed it. I didn't hate it either, though. Maybe 'bemused' is the right term. If you like fart jokes and robots screaming at each other, this book is definitely for you. But nothing else really happens on it. Everyone gets trapped on a space station when Earth is destroyed, they wander around avoiding cannibalistic robots for a while, then it ends. There's lots of fart jokes, talk about erections and robots complaining of being victimized by other robots' suffering. The science didn't make much sense to me either. Why build an entire race of robots if they're all, without exception, constantly horny, constantly throwing tantrums, constantly manically happy or constantly talking? The characters even talk about how annoying they are.A strange one. I'll try Andrew Smith again, but he won't be top of my list, sadly.Receiving an ARC did not affect my review in any way.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I have a love-meh relationship with Andrew Smith. Love the man; he is so smart, funny, and insightful at book festivals. I love Winger; it is a smart, funny, poignant look at teen life. I love the premise of Grasshopper Jungle; I didn't love the execution. It was too much praying mantis sex. I really liked 100 Sideways Miles. And this brings us to Rabbit & Robot. Like Grasshopper Jungle, I really like the premise: boy stranded on a giant lunar cruise ship with insane robots. What's not love, I have a love-meh relationship with Andrew Smith. Love the man; he is so smart, funny, and insightful at book festivals. I love Winger; it is a smart, funny, poignant look at teen life. I love the premise of Grasshopper Jungle; I didn't love the execution. It was too much praying mantis sex. I really liked 100 Sideways Miles. And this brings us to Rabbit & Robot. Like Grasshopper Jungle, I really like the premise: boy stranded on a giant lunar cruise ship with insane robots. What's not love, right? Robot mucus, erections, and moody robots peeing, pooping and farting. Too much of all. I will say, the book grew on me as I got closer to the end and started likening some of the robot behavior to humans and thinking about what it means to be a good example of a human being. It has its moments. I think Shaun Hutchinson said it best in his review: "It's Andrew Smith at his Andrew Smithiest." Recommend to fans of Grasshopper Jungle and readers who enjoy gross and inane antics. This book will find it's niche. I am not the niche audience.
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  • Gordon Jack
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get an ARC of this and devoured it in a few days. Andrew Smith has advocated to Keep YA Weird, and he definitely succeeded with Rabbit & Robot. This book is bonkers in the best sense. I loved being on this crazy journey with Cager and Billy as they witness the world's destruction and encounter cannibalistic robots, bisexual French speaking giraffes, gelatinous aliens, and more. Throughout the mayhem, Smith is his usual funny and profane self, making me laugh and helping I was lucky enough to get an ARC of this and devoured it in a few days. Andrew Smith has advocated to Keep YA Weird, and he definitely succeeded with Rabbit & Robot. This book is bonkers in the best sense. I loved being on this crazy journey with Cager and Billy as they witness the world's destruction and encounter cannibalistic robots, bisexual French speaking giraffes, gelatinous aliens, and more. Throughout the mayhem, Smith is his usual funny and profane self, making me laugh and helping me see the humanity of his teenage characters. I will be recommending this wholeheartedly to students come the fall.
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  • Adna
    January 1, 1970
    I was really excited to read this, but I just don’t think it was the book for me. I didn’t really understand the point of it, as there was really no plot and too much dialogue, most of which was repetitive. The biggest issue I had was the cogs having penises. In this world, which seems very advanced, I’m surprised that these robots would be built with such realistic human anatomy. I would think the point of robots is to not be human, to be better than humans. I didn’t really care for the one cog I was really excited to read this, but I just don’t think it was the book for me. I didn’t really understand the point of it, as there was really no plot and too much dialogue, most of which was repetitive. The biggest issue I had was the cogs having penises. In this world, which seems very advanced, I’m surprised that these robots would be built with such realistic human anatomy. I would think the point of robots is to not be human, to be better than humans. I didn’t really care for the one cog telling everyone he had an erection every three seconds. The world seemed interesting, but there wasn’t enough of it. Received this as a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Of all the books to get an ARC for, this is the one I was waiting for. And let me tell you - all of my hopes and dreams were answered! This book is weird and wonderful and so Andrew Smith it made me realize just how much I missed him! Fans of "Grasshopper Jungle" are going to devour this one, because it certainly has a similar vibe, while also being completely different at the same time (if that makes any sense). Additionally, after reading this, I also remember what I love most about Andrew Smi Of all the books to get an ARC for, this is the one I was waiting for. And let me tell you - all of my hopes and dreams were answered! This book is weird and wonderful and so Andrew Smith it made me realize just how much I missed him! Fans of "Grasshopper Jungle" are going to devour this one, because it certainly has a similar vibe, while also being completely different at the same time (if that makes any sense). Additionally, after reading this, I also remember what I love most about Andrew Smith - and that is the fact that through all the weird and the silly and the just plain crazy, his characters are always, ALWAYS, thoughtful and compelling and layered. ALL the stars!
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  • Rece Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I read an ARC of this and being the first novel by Andrew Smith I read I was not disappointed. Previously the only work by him I had read was his short story within the Because You Love to Hate Me anthology and bought as many of his books I could find based of that story. However I didn't immediately read any of them when I received them, but after finishing Rabbit and Robot and experiencing more of his writing style has relit that want to read everything by him. One thing I saw myself thinking I read an ARC of this and being the first novel by Andrew Smith I read I was not disappointed. Previously the only work by him I had read was his short story within the Because You Love to Hate Me anthology and bought as many of his books I could find based of that story. However I didn't immediately read any of them when I received them, but after finishing Rabbit and Robot and experiencing more of his writing style has relit that want to read everything by him. One thing I saw myself thinking while reading this was that potentially Earth would turn out like that in the book because of lack of communication. There are many laughable moments throughout this book.
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Cager is taken aboard a nearly unmanned spaceship by his best friend to help rehabilitate him from his drug addiction. I love how Cager approaches problems with his rich boy naïveté while also being open minded. Insane cogs (robots) run the ship and make the humans uncomfortable with their lack of tact. This one isn’t for everyone with its strong language and crude humor. However, the world building is unique, with Smith’s signature humor and heart.**Read via NetGalley
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  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    *** I received an ARC of this book from NYC BookCon 2018!***What a very odd and unique little book. Full review to come, but I enjoyed all of it! It was very confusing in the beginning but once you really get into the story it all makes sense, and even what doesn't make sense at first is thrilling and a wild ride from start to finish.
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  • Samantha Beard
    January 1, 1970
    This one was just not for me. The language was too much, the jargon was forced, and the constant mentions of sex and other bodily functions were not entertaining to me. I think there are some interesting metaphorical points made here about the nature of humanity, but I wasn't a fan of the execution.
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