All That's Good
“And God saw that it was good…”Look out over the world today, it seems a far cry from God’s original declaration. Pain, conflict, and uncertainty dominate the headlines. Our daily lives are noisy and chaotic—filled with too much information and too little wisdom. No wonder we often find it easier to retreat into safe spaces, hunker down in likeminded tribes, and just do our best to survive life. But what if God wants you to do more than simply survive? What if he wants you to thrive in this world, and be part of its redemption? What if you could rediscover the beauty and goodness God established in the beginning?By learning the lost art of discernment, you can. Discernment is more than simply avoiding bad things; discernment actually frees you to navigate the world with confidence and joy by teaching you how to recognize and choose good things. When you learn discernment and develop a taste for all that’s good, you will encounter God in remarkable new ways. Come, discover the God who not only made all things, but who will also make all things good once again.

All That's Good Details

TitleAll That's Good
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherMoody Publishers
ISBN-139780802418555
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Religion, Theology, Christian, Christian Living

All That's Good Review

  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    In her latest book All That’s Good, Hannah Anderson stirs our appetite for goodness. There is a satisfying simplicity to her thesis that we ought to train ourselves in discernment by taking up Paul’s charge to the Philippians and seeking out “whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable” in the world around us. But, as with all of Anderson’s books, her thesis has hidden depths.Anderson reminds us that in order to seek go In her latest book All That’s Good, Hannah Anderson stirs our appetite for goodness. There is a satisfying simplicity to her thesis that we ought to train ourselves in discernment by taking up Paul’s charge to the Philippians and seeking out “whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable” in the world around us. But, as with all of Anderson’s books, her thesis has hidden depths.Anderson reminds us that in order to seek good, we must first believe that goodness exists in the world around us. The daily onslaught of news and information can overwhelm us and tempt us to “opt out of the struggle, to retreat into our safe spaces, hunker down, and stay in our comfort zones” (40). Developing discernment, however, gives us the courage to “see the world for what it was meant to be and believe that God is powerful enough to restore it to its intended purpose” (49).Each chapter begins with a personal anecdote about where Anderson has seen goodness in the world, in everything from baking blackberry pies to the history of tea to the experience of shopping at thrift stores. Readers who enjoyed her last book, Humble Roots, already know that Anderson chooses her metaphors masterfully, bringing rich truths to life through vivid illustrations. For example, she describes a family trip to Paris where they saw a statue in the Louvre that was beautiful even though it showed signs that it had been “manhandled.” Anderson uses this image to illustrate how we can develop a discerning eye that sees beauty even in broken things. We can recognize the masterful work of the artist even after damage has been done. And such appreciation can renew our longing for the creator of all good things to come and renew his creation.One of the important distinctions Anderson makes is that goodness is something we pursue, not something we preserve. In her chapter “Whatever is Pure”, Anderson makes clear that purity is not simply a matter of avoiding evil. If it were, we might be right to simply avoid the world, with its mixed bag of good and evil. Instead, Anderson suggests that although discernment takes courage, the alternative is a fearful naivete. Thus, “the best way to preserve someone’s innocence is to show them the difference between good and evil and teach them how to pursue whatever is pure” (128). I’ve always loved Rosaria Butterfield’s reminder that “Sin isn’t something other people track in our front door” because her words remind me that my primary job as a Christian isn’t to avoid being contaminated by sin, but to remember that the temptation to sin already lives in me. Discernment offers us a courageous freedom. With it, I can venture out into the world (and let the things of this world into my heart and mind).What I appreciated most about this book was that it reminded me to enjoy the world. We were meant to respond to goodness, and the world is full of beautiful things that not only “draw us to themselves” but also “draw us beyond themselves to a greater reality than either of us” (136). Anderson’s book teaches us to go back to our own lives and look for those things which draw us out of ourselves so that we can see how all our desires point back to the creator of all good things. “We find his goodness binding our hearts to Him, drawing us on, ever pursuing, ever seeking, ever searching until that glorious day when the beauty of the Lord finally rests upon us” (145).For those who tend to overthink everything (like me!) and for those who tend to follow their emotions, All That’s Good illustrates how discernment trains us to join our desire with our intellect. Discernment helps us distinguish “right and almost right” (borrowing Spurgeon’s definition), so that we can learn to desire good things.“There are many who say, ‘Who will show us some good?” says the Psalmist. All That’s Good reminds us there is plenty of good for those who have eyes to see it.
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  • Adam Shields
    January 1, 1970
    Short Review: I so much appreciate that Hannah Anderson starts All That's Good with an exploration of a vision for goodness, “...in trying to keep myself safe, in obsessing over making the “right” choices, I found myself making a whole lot of wrong ones. Because I lacked a vision for goodness, I also lacked discernment.” (Page 12)The main section of All That's Good (pages 63 to 154) is an extended meditation on Philippians 4:8, "whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is Short Review: I so much appreciate that Hannah Anderson starts All That's Good with an exploration of a vision for goodness, “...in trying to keep myself safe, in obsessing over making the “right” choices, I found myself making a whole lot of wrong ones. Because I lacked a vision for goodness, I also lacked discernment.” (Page 12)The main section of All That's Good (pages 63 to 154) is an extended meditation on Philippians 4:8, "whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.” (NIV). In many ways (all good) this feels like the type of meditation on scripture that Eugene Peterson writes. It isn’t a word for word bible study, it is a practical exploration, not just the biblical concepts of the passage, but also of what that means to how we live our lives.The practice of discernment as it is explored is not primarily thought of as a spiritual gift given to some (although that is one aspect of discernment for some people), but a skill that is develop over time. That skill, along with necessary components of humility, wisdom, virtue, the right understanding of goodness, not just the avoidance of evil but the knowledge of good, and a touch of shrewdness, allows us to rightly see the world around us.My full review is on my blog at http://bookwi.se/all-thats-good/
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  • Amber Stokes
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite nonfiction books is Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson (which I read in 2017); its style and topic really resonated with me. So her next release was definitely on my radar!All That's Good is another great, thought-provoking read, this time on the topic of discernment. While the theme didn't affect me quite as much or feel quite as cohesive as in Humble Roots, I still found a lot to relate to and to challenge me in these fresh pages.I enjoy the way the author tells a story. In thi One of my favorite nonfiction books is Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson (which I read in 2017); its style and topic really resonated with me. So her next release was definitely on my radar!All That's Good is another great, thought-provoking read, this time on the topic of discernment. While the theme didn't affect me quite as much or feel quite as cohesive as in Humble Roots, I still found a lot to relate to and to challenge me in these fresh pages.I enjoy the way the author tells a story. In this book, she uses each seemingly random story of something from her life (be it something she loves or something she's observed) to illustrate a different facet of discernment—a daunting word that she breaks down into helpful life lessons. The bulk of the book is based on Philippians 4:8, reminding us of the things we should be thinking about and looking for in our lives.This is a book that calls believers to see and participate in God's work in the world, rather than hiding from the evil and hardships around us. It shows us that characteristics like "pure" and "honorable" aren't as simple (or as easy to pursue) as we tend to think. The author's challenge is to engage—to learn how to recognize God's goodness around us and to embrace it, share it, and let Him shine through us. This isn't a hunt for an earthy (impossible) utopia; this is growth in this life and pursuit of Christ now and forevermore.All That's Good is a starting place, an encouraging resource to stretch our perspectives and help us dwell on and live out God's goodness in ways we might not have realized we could or should...or in ways we often choose to ignore. For readers like me who are more introverted, some of the challenges and reminders in this book might be a bit painful, but still important to ponder.*With thanks to Moody Publishers and the author for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are my own.*
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  • Rachel Ollivant
    January 1, 1970
    In the Christian community, discernment is a tricky topic to write about because the author, simply by putting her name on the cover, is implying that she has discerned something special about discernment. We all may have seen a situation where someone claimed some wild revelation in the name of discernment - that they have figured out the truth, or the right way to do something, or why someone else is clearly wrong, and will be gracious enough to share this special knowledge with the world. Thi In the Christian community, discernment is a tricky topic to write about because the author, simply by putting her name on the cover, is implying that she has discerned something special about discernment. We all may have seen a situation where someone claimed some wild revelation in the name of discernment - that they have figured out the truth, or the right way to do something, or why someone else is clearly wrong, and will be gracious enough to share this special knowledge with the world. This is not the approach Hannah Anderson takes in All That's Good: Recovering The Lost Art of Discernment.As she explains in her introduction, "We'll start by clarifying what discernment is, and more importantly, what it is not. Then, after laying a foundation for God's good work in the world, we'll explore how fear, pride, and a scarcity mindset can hinder our ability to experience his goodness. This, in turn, will lead to understanding why discernment cannot be separated from virtue - why making good choices goes hand in hand with becoming good people." Anderson lays a framework for understanding discernment and helping the readers to refine it as a skill in their own personal walks and decision making, especially in an age where we are constantly bombarded with information to sort through. As she explains, "You develop discernment by becoming a person who how, not simply what, to think." The book is structured around Philippians 4:7-8: "And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any moral excellence and if there is anything praiseworthy - dwell on those things. Do what you have learned and received and heard from me, and seen in me, and the peace of God will be with you." This proactive angle encourages the reader to use discernment to learn how to embrace "all that's good" in the world around them, rather than just telling them "bad" things they ought to avoid. By seeking good things in the world and focusing on virtue and truth, we're naturally drawn away from the false and ignoble things around us. For example, in the chapter called "Whatever Is Lovely," she discusses seeing loveliness and beauty in other people as a good thing that is God given. When discussing the danger of the appreciation of human beauty being twisted into objectification, rather than lecturing on avoid lust or "adverting your eyes," she writes that we ought to develop discernment to understand a brother or sister's beauty as something that "is not ours to possess; it is not ours to consume. It is ours to protect." Anderson's book is timely, practical, fun to read, and bursting with wisdom on how to navigate the world around us. I could write another book with all my thoughts in response to this book, but instead, I'll encourage you to read it for yourself! I was first acquainted with Hannah Anderson on the Persuasion Podcast, and then learned she was an author and read her book Made For More. So when I got the opportunity to volunteer to read an advance copy of All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment, uh, yeah, sign me up!
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I’d say more like 3.75 stars...I’ve read her first two books, Made for More and Humble Roots. I think Humble Roots is my favorite of the three, if I should have a fave.passage from my favorite chapter of the book...“Somehow in the doing is the becoming. Somehow in the teaching is the learning. Somehow innthr seeking is the finding. So too, it is by the practice of discernment that we actually become discerning people. You’ll never learn discernment until you start to apply it. You’ll never begin I’d say more like 3.75 stars...I’ve read her first two books, Made for More and Humble Roots. I think Humble Roots is my favorite of the three, if I should have a fave.passage from my favorite chapter of the book...“Somehow in the doing is the becoming. Somehow in the teaching is the learning. Somehow innthr seeking is the finding. So too, it is by the practice of discernment that we actually become discerning people. You’ll never learn discernment until you start to apply it. You’ll never begin to understand the difference between the good and bad and good and better until you do it. But as you do, as you seek all that true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, and commendable, you’ll move from a place of not knowing what goodness looks like to finding it almost effortlessly. And soon you’ll see it everywhere.”Really enjoyed this book and her take on discernment. I did have some questions as I read through it, though, and think she could’ve given more specific treatment to practicing discernment in tandem with studying Scripture. If a new or young Christian reads this book, there’s not a complete picture of the gospel of grace laid out in showing just why we should even seek goodness or why we are unable to seek goodness in a fallen state. Because of our sin against a Holy God, we are in need of forgiveness and rescue and regeneration, and that happens only through Jesus. In Him, we can then seek true goodness and get to know true goodness. And as we read His word and see goodness in Him and in what He has said and had done and provides, we will grow in discernment. Yes, it must be practiced, but it can also be known through the authority of God’s Word, the Bible. She does make mention of His sacrifice at one point, and this book is good in helping Christians understand more how to think based on principles rather than just what to think based on rules - but I just felt like there was something missing tying it all together. Maybe a 2nd read will help.
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  • Debra Southern
    January 1, 1970
    With chapters labeled: Good and Taste, The Good Earth, Worldly Wise, Whatever is True, Honorable, Just, Pure, Lovely, Commendable, Every Good Gift, and Our Common Good, we learn through Hannah Anderson’s stories and Biblical perspectives, the art of discernment. Whether your knew at learning discernment or have know the art for years, this book lends one to new discoveries. Hannah writes, “In broader usage, discernment simply means developing a taste for what’s good. It’s developing an instinct With chapters labeled: Good and Taste, The Good Earth, Worldly Wise, Whatever is True, Honorable, Just, Pure, Lovely, Commendable, Every Good Gift, and Our Common Good, we learn through Hannah Anderson’s stories and Biblical perspectives, the art of discernment. Whether your knew at learning discernment or have know the art for years, this book lends one to new discoveries. Hannah writes, “In broader usage, discernment simply means developing a taste for what’s good. It’s developing an instinct for quality, a refined sensibility, an eye for value—to know the difference between what’s good and what’s not in order to partake of the good.” I think this is something we all need in order to have a good life.
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  • Dorothy Greco
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think my words/review could do this book justice. Anderson is not only a beautiful writer but a superb theologian and teacher. I finished the book feeling encouraged and better equipped to "embrace discernment as part of God's work of redemption." In this age of ultra-biased news, double speak, and lazy hermeneutics, we all need to be able to discern truth from fiction and Anderson helps us do that with grace and love.
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  • Christa Threlfall
    January 1, 1970
    a helpful read for thinking critically and entertaining thoughtful questions without defensiveness.
  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah Anderson has written another good book, though this new book is my favorite of hers, as it relates to discernment, a topic that we should all be concerned about, especially us Christians. This has become important to me the past couple years, as I see so much false information out there, bad theology being shared and taught by people whom some of us look to for wisdom. We must become like the Bereans and use Scripture to teach and guide us. Hannah uses Philippians 4:8 (Finally, brothers, Hannah Anderson has written another good book, though this new book is my favorite of hers, as it relates to discernment, a topic that we should all be concerned about, especially us Christians. This has become important to me the past couple years, as I see so much false information out there, bad theology being shared and taught by people whom some of us look to for wisdom. We must become like the Bereans and use Scripture to teach and guide us. Hannah uses Philippians 4:8 (Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.) as her main focus in writing this book, All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment. Hannah asks some great questions in the introduction of her book: What if we could see the world as God sees it- in all its brokenness and beauty- and in seeing, be able to do more than endure this life? How can we, imperfect as we are, develop an instinct for recognizing and embracing the good? She tackles these questions and so much more in her book. She helps us to see the importance of being discerning, how to be discerning, what to taste and see. She shows us through her experiences and through Scripture of how to focus on what is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, and commendable, where and what are good gifts, and what we should do for the common good.I have lots of notes and highlights throughout the book, so I will share a few: Discernment does not change the challenges we face; it changes our ability to face them. The difficult truth; there are no shortcuts to skill and expertise...there are no hacks to discernment. Manhandled. What a perfect word to describe what has happened to God's good world. If goodness didn't exist, there would be no struggle...Discernment helps us see the world for what it was made to be and believe that God is powerful enough to restore it. In order to find lasting happiness, we must invest in things that last, we must store up "treasures in heaven." Because what ultimately makes something good is not whether it brings us momentary pleasure but whether it brings us eternal pleasure, whether it satisfies both our bodies and our souls. You develop discernment by becoming a person who knows how, not simply what, to think. If we don't have a strong commitment to reality outside our own feelings and opinions, we can end up living in a false reality. In this reality, whatever we feel or believe to be true becomes truth for us. Simply carrying the title of "Christian" is not enough to ensure that we are truthful people. Because finding truth depends on both fact and virtue. Every human being deserves honor simply because they are made in God's image. In order for "things to be the way they are supposed to be" we must conduct ourselves in a way that is consistent with His nature- we must act like He acts and do what He does. As much as beauty draws us to things beyond ourselves and teaches us that good things are worth sacrificing for, it also turns our understanding of sacrifice on its head by teaching us that what the world considers "sensible" isn't necessarily wise. If, however, we spend our days talking about good, worthy, glorious things, there is a strong likelihood that our lives will be filled with good, worthy, glorious things. In a world that begs for us to be constantly posting, constantly tweeting, and constantly adding information to our communal knowledge base... we must develop the discernment that recognizes that not every shared idea is a good idea, nor is every idea that we have worth sharing. False news travels six times faster than true news and that human beings are mostly to blame for this. Remember that discernment is not concerned primarily with our social comfort. It is concerned with goodness. And sometimes pursuing goodness will lead us outside the boundaries of polite conversation. What we choose to speak about and how we speak about it are part of the message we send to each other and the larger culture we create. To embrace "whatever" and "if...anything", we must learn how to make choices in a broken context. We must learn the difference between unprincipled pragmatism and principled pragmatism. So who is this book for, I recommend it to everyone!! How should you read it, individually and/or in a group. Good news, there is a good study guide and review at the end of the book for each chapter, that includes: review points, reflection questions, Scripture reading, and focus to remember.
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  • R.J.
    January 1, 1970
    Last year Hannah Anderson's MADE FOR MORE impressed me with its clear, insightful thoughts on what it means for all of us to be made in the image of God. Her latest, ALL THAT'S GOOD, is an equally excellent treatise on the subject of discernment -- a much needed quality in a divided, information-glutted, and frequently bewildering modern world. Anderson writes in her first chapter that "...the goal of discernment is not simply to avoid the evil in this life; it is to learn what is good so that w Last year Hannah Anderson's MADE FOR MORE impressed me with its clear, insightful thoughts on what it means for all of us to be made in the image of God. Her latest, ALL THAT'S GOOD, is an equally excellent treatise on the subject of discernment -- a much needed quality in a divided, information-glutted, and frequently bewildering modern world. Anderson writes in her first chapter that "...the goal of discernment is not simply to avoid the evil in this life; it is to learn what is good so that we may embrace and enjoy it." And a little later on she remarks that "...you develop discernment by becoming a person who knows how, not simply what, to think." With these goals in mind, Hannah Anderson goes on to explain how to cultivate positive discernment in our own lives and the lives of others. She uses vivid and relatable illustrations from her own life to bookend each chapter, but she also consistently underlines and elaborates on her points using Scripture, not her own thoughts or feelings. The result is a book which is not merely a devotional study for women of a similar cultural background or stage of life, but which all believers regardless of age or background can (and should!) appreciate.I have only one quibble with Anderson's otherwise well-crafted arguments, and it's in her chapter entitled "Whatever is Lovely". Having established that loveliness is a quality of beauty or desirability that draws us toward something of value, she mentions Christ's parable about the merchant who sells all his possessions in order to buy a pearl of great price. She acknowledges (I believe rightly) that it's an illustration of "the level of commitment and sacrifice necessary to possess the kingdom of heaven," but then she takes it in an odd direction by suggesting that the pearl also represents those for whom Christ sacrificed everything -- that is, human beings -- because he was "drawn to" us and because God "looked at the world and declared it worth loving." If loveliness is an inherent quality that reveals the innate worth of an object, as Anderson argues in the rest of the chapter, that's like claiming that God couldn't resist saving us, and Christ couldn't bear not to die for us, because we were so lovely even in our fallen and rebellious state. But I think it's clear from other passages in Scripture (particularly Rom. 5:6-8) that this isn't the case. God chose to love us out of His own supremely loving and merciful character, not because we deserved or "drew out" His love in any way whatsoever. We only become capable of love or loveliness because He first loved us (1 John 4:10), not the other way around. God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, not because the world was so lovely, but because He is Love. To suggest anything else diminishes the sufficiency of God, and makes him dependent on us for His ultimate fulfillment and satisfaction -- which Scripture tells us repeatedly is not the case.Apart from that caveat, however, I thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated everything that Hannah Anderson had to say. ALL THAT'S GOOD is a solid, thought-provoking and edifying book, well suited for both private meditation and group study -- a book not only worth reading once, but returning to again and again.
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  • Lauren DuPrez
    January 1, 1970
    All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment is the third book from blogger, author, and podcaster Hannah Anderson. When I learned that Hannah was releasing a book that focused on discernment I was very excited. Discernment is a topic that's really piqued my interest as of late and I was interested to learn what Hannah had to say about it. In the Introduction of the book, Hannah states, ". . . discernment simply means developing a taste for what is good," (pg. 13). Rather than just in All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment is the third book from blogger, author, and podcaster Hannah Anderson. When I learned that Hannah was releasing a book that focused on discernment I was very excited. Discernment is a topic that's really piqued my interest as of late and I was interested to learn what Hannah had to say about it. In the Introduction of the book, Hannah states, ". . . discernment simply means developing a taste for what is good," (pg. 13). Rather than just informing readers with her thoughts on what it looks like to pursue what is good, Hannah takes readers on a journey through the virtues listed in Philippians 4:8. There is a chapter devoted to each virtue which I really appreciate because it creates a unique lens for exploring the concept of goodness. I enjoyed the personal anecdotes she included at the beginning of each chapter which served as parallels to the virtue she was deliberating on. Prior to reading All That's Good, I had thought of discernment as possessing wisdom when it comes to knowing when something is not true. Hannah argues, however, that this is only one aspect of discernment. My favorite chapter is the one on truth in which Hannah wrote, "Our fear might be able to tell us something is wrong, but it cannot tell us what is wrong, how or why it happened, or who even is to blame," (pg. 71). This idea really struck me because it is very true. As one who vacillates between fear and faith, I found this thought to be very poignant and helpful. As I continued to read this chapter, my heart was convicted when I read, "As much as we want other people's sins exposed, we must be willing to have ours exposed too," (76). Because of wrestling occurring in my own heart, I was instantly humbled upon reading this. My favorite aspect of All That's Good is that Hannah looks to God as the definition of goodness and challenges readers to think about how decisions they make will bring Him glory. One of the most beautiful quotes in the book is found on page 97, where Hannah said, ". . . when God calls us to righteousness, He appeals to His own, 'Be holy for I am holy.'" She also said a few pages later, "In order to become discerning people, we must embrace Jesus," (pg. 101). The way Hannah writes is intelligent, wise, and overall, refreshing. It is evident in reading Hannah's books (and even in listening to her podcast) that she doesn't desire to tell readers what to think but rather, how. This makes her a great fit for writing on the topic of discernment. I really enjoyed the refreshing perspective offered in All That's Good. If you're looking to learn more about what it means to practice discernment biblically or simply desire a good read, I highly recommend All That's Good. I received All That's Good compliments of Moody Publishers in exchange for my honest review. 
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  • Joan
    January 1, 1970
    Discernment, seeing clearly and knowing what is good, seems to be missing today. I really value the enlightening teaching about discernment contained in this book. I appreciate Anderson exploring what discernment is and is not. I like her teaching that making good choices necessitates becoming good people, evidencing virtues. She spends some time exploring Philippians 4:8-9, helping us to understand the virtues and their expression in our lives. When we pursue the things listed there, she writes Discernment, seeing clearly and knowing what is good, seems to be missing today. I really value the enlightening teaching about discernment contained in this book. I appreciate Anderson exploring what discernment is and is not. I like her teaching that making good choices necessitates becoming good people, evidencing virtues. She spends some time exploring Philippians 4:8-9, helping us to understand the virtues and their expression in our lives. When we pursue the things listed there, she writes, we pursue the character of God. (Loc 563/2301)I like that Anderson spends time teaching on right thinking. “You develop discernment by becoming a person who knows how, not simply what, to think.” (Loc 544/2301) We can develop habits helping us to become discerning people, people who know how think.I like her teaching on “stuff.” God wants us to embrace and enjoy the good stuff. What surprised me was her insight that stuff is designed to lead us to God, to draw us closer to Him. Our enjoyment of stuff is not to be an end in itself, for our own pleasure. We are to see God as the source.Those are just a few of the teachings in this book. There is a great deal of thought provoking and stimulating teaching included. I found a level of wisdom and insight from Anderson that is rare.Her writing style took me a while to get used to. She tells a story or shares an experience and then draws lessons in discernment from it. I had to practice a little patience waiting for the teaching. I appreciated it more once I got the rhythm of her writing.I think this is a very timely and necessary book. Discernment is a heart issue, Anderson says. Our hearts need some work done on them and this book is a good place to help stimulate that process.An added feature in this book is at its end. Anderson provides a short review of the major points of the book and some Scripture references and then has questions for reflection. That would make this book a good one for personal or group study.Food for thought: “...cultivating discernment prepares us to face whatever life may bring.” (Loc 1627/2301)I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah approaches discernment from an unexpected angle. I tend to think of discernment as deciphering a sort of secret code, or the ability to see through a problem, behind it, to determine the proper course of action or belief. Hannah asserts that simply seeking out the good will illuminate the evil and keep you on the path of truth. She uses Philippians 4:8 as her template for developing an eye for what's good (whatever is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, commendable...think on these thing Hannah approaches discernment from an unexpected angle. I tend to think of discernment as deciphering a sort of secret code, or the ability to see through a problem, behind it, to determine the proper course of action or belief. Hannah asserts that simply seeking out the good will illuminate the evil and keep you on the path of truth. She uses Philippians 4:8 as her template for developing an eye for what's good (whatever is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, commendable...think on these things), and beautifully weaves object lessons through each chapter. For example, when discussing truth, she talks about her love of detective stories. Her chapter on justice revolves around board games and fair play. And beloved pearl earrings from Japan take center stage in the chapter on loveliness. These stories are so masterfully crafted and naturally suited to each virtue that I will forever link them with their lesson. I will not be able to think about honorableness without calling to mind the priceless painting that hangs proudly on Hannah's wall, rescued from the trash.Beyond the stories and examples, Hannah deals with serious cultural issues such as seeking truth in a world saturated by bias and propaganda, pursuing justice for oppressed people even when it requires great courage to do so, and being careful to honor the image of God in one another no matter our differences. She calls Christians to return to a communal, rather than individual pursuit of discernment, and to use our voices and hands to engage a broken world, rather than pull away from it. "What if we could see the world as God sees it - in all its brokenness and beauty - and in seeing, be able to do more than endure this life?"Please, please read this book. Study it together with your friends (there are questions to guide small group discussion in the back). Read it slowly and let it sink down deep. You will be challenged and encouraged.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I have often thought that discernment meant knowing all you needed to keep yourself away from what's toxic and bad around you. In "All That's Good", Hannah Anderson draws attention to discernment as not only knowing what to avoid but more than that knowing what is good so that you can enjoy the goodness of God in the good around us. She walks through Philippians 4:8 defining ways we can pursue the goodness of God displayed here and now in the world around us through setting our attention on what I have often thought that discernment meant knowing all you needed to keep yourself away from what's toxic and bad around you. In "All That's Good", Hannah Anderson draws attention to discernment as not only knowing what to avoid but more than that knowing what is good so that you can enjoy the goodness of God in the good around us. She walks through Philippians 4:8 defining ways we can pursue the goodness of God displayed here and now in the world around us through setting our attention on what is true, honest, just, pure, lovely, and commendable. My favorite chapters were the chapter on truth as I was challenged greatly about what is truth and how to pursue it. The last chapter on "The Common Good", really has me thinking and praying about how to pursue discernment in the context of the community of believers. As one with the gift of discernment, I find I am often fearful and anxious when it comes to speaking of the things I see and discern around me. I was challenged by the thought that the body of Christ misses out on the goodness of God displayed when I am afraid to use my gift to build up His people. This book has given me a lot to consider and a lot to chew on as I think of how best to pursue discernment. I love Hannah's writing style (this isn't the first book of hers that I've read) and appreciate her encouragement to learn to taste and see the goodness of God around me.I received a copy of this book as part of her launch team and was requested to give my honest opinion. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    This is the 3rd book that I've read by Hannah Anderson and it is the best by far! You know it's a good book when you keep underlining! The subtitle is "Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment". The structure of the book uses Philippians 4:8 to go through the various traits of how we determine what is good. Looking at what is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, and commendable, the author guides us through each of these characteristics in learning how to determine what is good. The final chapter This is the 3rd book that I've read by Hannah Anderson and it is the best by far! You know it's a good book when you keep underlining! The subtitle is "Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment". The structure of the book uses Philippians 4:8 to go through the various traits of how we determine what is good. Looking at what is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, and commendable, the author guides us through each of these characteristics in learning how to determine what is good. The final chapter deals with the importance of using discernment in community. We alone don't have all the answers or the ability to determine what is good on our own. That is why God designed us to be in community, where we can work together in discerning what is good and better. In the introduction, she highlights the central question of the book: "How can we, imperfect as we are, develop an instinct for recognizing and embracing the good?" She then unpacks this by using the characteristics from Philippians 4:8 to help us in determining the good. I underlined a lot! There is a lot to digest from this book and it will be going on my re-read pile. The back of the book also has questions to review and discuss the book, preferably with a group. It is ideal for using in a book club/group setting. I highly recommend grabbing a copy of this book and finding some friends to go through it together.*I received a copy of this book free from Moody Publishers in exchange for my review.
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  • Samantha Kurtz
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a copy of this book from Moody Publishers. No compensation was given for a review. All thoughts are my own.*It’s easy in today’s world to quickly retreat to simpler times, similar mindsets and stay in a comfortable, like-minded bubble. I mean does anyone else purposely avoid watching the news? I do. It’s full of hate, death, and ugliness. But, “and God saw that it was good..” applies to now. Today. All That's Good focuses on discernment, not just simply avoiding bad things; but how d *I received a copy of this book from Moody Publishers. No compensation was given for a review. All thoughts are my own.*It’s easy in today’s world to quickly retreat to simpler times, similar mindsets and stay in a comfortable, like-minded bubble. I mean does anyone else purposely avoid watching the news? I do. It’s full of hate, death, and ugliness. But, “and God saw that it was good..” applies to now. Today. All That's Good focuses on discernment, not just simply avoiding bad things; but how discernment actually frees us to navigate the world with confidence and joy by teaching us how to recognize and choose good things. Anderson breaks down Philippians 4:8, "...whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable..." into easily digestible, but at the same time extremely thought-provoking chapters.I love how Anderson writes, she weaves everyday things (coffee shops, board games, mystery novels) perfectly into the theme of her chapters backing up her points with scripture. It is so authentic and down-to-earth, and I find that so appealing about her writing. I eagerly await her books, quickly devour them, and then am bummed to be finished with them. Time to reread her books ASAP.Highly recommend this book (really ANY of her books) to all Christain readers.
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  • Susanna
    January 1, 1970
    This book will steady the heart of one who is on the edge of abandoning good, yet frustrating relationships, beneficial, yet deeply flawed social structures, fulfilling, yet exhausting endeavors. It will speak truth to the one whose hands are thrown up in the air in resignation, and say, “Don’t give up. Good is worth pursuing. Good is worth sorting through brokenness. Good is worth uncovering, even if peeling back the layers is painful and uncomfortable. Good is worth discovering and sacrificing This book will steady the heart of one who is on the edge of abandoning good, yet frustrating relationships, beneficial, yet deeply flawed social structures, fulfilling, yet exhausting endeavors. It will speak truth to the one whose hands are thrown up in the air in resignation, and say, “Don’t give up. Good is worth pursuing. Good is worth sorting through brokenness. Good is worth uncovering, even if peeling back the layers is painful and uncomfortable. Good is worth discovering and sacrificing for.” And not only that, this book will reorient the heart to what is ultimately good, to Who is ultimately the source and embodiment of all goodness. It will explore everyday moments and activities and materials that testify of all that is good and use them to illustrate how discernment is sharpened and exercised in the enjoyment of them. The analogies are skillful and memorable. Hannah Anderson goes right for the heart and artistically models and educates readers in how to develop a sense of discernment for what is good, to cultivate a spirit of generosity and understanding when our conclusions differ from someone else’s, and to appreciate all the ways in which we get to share the good and perfect gifts together as communities.
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  • Rachel Menke
    January 1, 1970
    Pearls, Detective Novels, German Board Games, Wood Fires, and small-town community church - these are a few of my favorite things and a few of Hannah Anderson’s too! Even if these don’t make the list of your favorite things, “All That’s Good” will still be a book that deserves your thought and consideration! Anderson uses Philippians 4:8 to point us to what is truly good and help us to discover how our misinterpretations of Truth, honor, Justice, purity, loveliness, and commendability have led t Pearls, Detective Novels, German Board Games, Wood Fires, and small-town community church - these are a few of my favorite things and a few of Hannah Anderson’s too! Even if these don’t make the list of your favorite things, “All That’s Good” will still be a book that deserves your thought and consideration! Anderson uses Philippians 4:8 to point us to what is truly good and help us to discover how our misinterpretations of Truth, honor, Justice, purity, loveliness, and commendability have led to our lack of true discernment. How do you grow in discernment? You practice it! How do you practice it? You learn what is truly good! How do you learn what is truly good? You seek the One who is truly good!Anderson has said that her desire for this book is for it to spark many conversations and it is sure to do that! Many times I found myself writing question marks and feeling puzzled at the beginning of a chapter only to be scribbling hearts and “Yes!” at the end of it as I saw what she was saying and her illustration come together.This book wasn’t what I expected but it was better! Anderson won’t teach you what to think but she’ll help you begin to understand how to truly think in a way that is pleasing to God!
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    "What discernment does is equip us to see the true nature of the world and of ourselves, both the good and the bad," says Hannah Anderson in this book. Anderson unpacks the art of discernment as a call to seek, become, and follow a God who embodies the qualities of a portion of Philippians 4:8: "whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable" (ESV).This book is far bigger than "Think this, don't think that. Do this, don't "What discernment does is equip us to see the true nature of the world and of ourselves, both the good and the bad," says Hannah Anderson in this book. Anderson unpacks the art of discernment as a call to seek, become, and follow a God who embodies the qualities of a portion of Philippians 4:8: "whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable" (ESV).This book is far bigger than "Think this, don't think that. Do this, don't do that." This book is about the pursuing and the becoming of good, all because of a good, good God. This book is about who we are more than it is about what we do or what we think, though it includes those things. As usual, Anderson cuts to the heart of our problems with discernment and points us to the cure in Christ's finished work for us."We miss a world of good, beautiful things because we are so worried about making ourselves good and beautiful that we don’t have time to see that God has already made us good and beautiful through His Son. And we miss His good gifts because we are too busy trying to earn them."Thank you to Moody Publishers for an eARC of this excellent book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Angela Dechambeau
    January 1, 1970
    My review on All That's Good/Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment by Hannah Anderson. I was curious about the name of this book. Many books I have read on the subject of discernment in my many years as a Child of the King have all be different on discernment. Hannah has been given a different view on it and the book is very well written. I recommend it to all Believers as you will see the world we live in with a totally different perspective--a Heavenly one. We are admonished to look with God' My review on All That's Good/Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment by Hannah Anderson. I was curious about the name of this book. Many books I have read on the subject of discernment in my many years as a Child of the King have all be different on discernment. Hannah has been given a different view on it and the book is very well written. I recommend it to all Believers as you will see the world we live in with a totally different perspective--a Heavenly one. We are admonished to look with God's eyes so we always see Him. The world has gotten off track from God's perfect design. The garbage in the world is over whelming to most people including Believers. Believers are to think differently and always keep the goodness of the Lord before them. Hannah addresses how we are to think when the world is at odds. The one who walks with the wise will become wise, but a companion of fools will suffer harm. Proverbs 13:20. Your lens in which you view the world you live in will be drastically changed and your view for the world will be seen from God's perspective. It is a book along with the Bible that will change you if you let it. ☺
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve had the opportunity to read an e-ARC of All Thats Good. The book begins with a question: How can we, imperfect as we are, develop an instinct for recognizing and embracing the good? How does discernment equip us to navigate a broken, complicated world with confidence and joy?Hannah Anderson tells us that first, we need to acknowledge what we don't know. In order to make good decisions, we just become a discerning person skilled in wisdom and goodness. To be this person, we must be humble an I’ve had the opportunity to read an e-ARC of All Thats Good. The book begins with a question: How can we, imperfect as we are, develop an instinct for recognizing and embracing the good? How does discernment equip us to navigate a broken, complicated world with confidence and joy?Hannah Anderson tells us that first, we need to acknowledge what we don't know. In order to make good decisions, we just become a discerning person skilled in wisdom and goodness. To be this person, we must be humble and willing to learn, since people who refuse to be humble before God, will never be wise.Hannah Anderson then uses chapters 4-9 cover Philippians 4:8-9."Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you."For example, Paul begins Philippians 4:8 by calling us to seek what is true. Emotions alone cannot guide us to truth, so chapter four talks about that. Chapter five is about whatever is honorable, so Hannah Anderson talks about how when we're left to our own desires, we can't recognize what deserves our respect and attention. Six is on whatever is just, seven is on purity, eight is on whatever is lovely, and nine is on whatever is commendable. Each chapter, she points back to Christ for the truth.Overall, it was a good book on how we should trust in God and his Word, and test all things according to what he's given and revealed to us. And of course, always go back to Christ.
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  • Megan Byrd
    January 1, 1970
    This book talks about how to grow in discernment to learn what is good in this world. It walks through Philippians 4:8-9 which talks about the types of things that are worthy of our attention, things that are true, honorable, pure, lovely, just, and commendable. It reminds us of how God has shown us through Jesus how to grow in our ability to discern these things. At the end of the book there is a study guide to go deeper into learning the concepts and developing the skills for improved discernm This book talks about how to grow in discernment to learn what is good in this world. It walks through Philippians 4:8-9 which talks about the types of things that are worthy of our attention, things that are true, honorable, pure, lovely, just, and commendable. It reminds us of how God has shown us through Jesus how to grow in our ability to discern these things. At the end of the book there is a study guide to go deeper into learning the concepts and developing the skills for improved discernment. I really enjoyed the way the material was presented and the reassurance that in following Jesus, God will help to increase our discernment. She talks a little about why we may be afraid to speak up when we discern things that might not be well-received because it upsets the status quo but how important it is to be that voice in the world and in our churches. An encouraging and challenging read.
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  • Adrienne Servis
    January 1, 1970
    Hannah Anderson has done a great job of causing us to redefine and look at discernment different. She says, "Discernment does not change the challenges we face, it changes our ability to face them." She goes on to state, "There are no hacks to discernment. No three easy steps to follow, no lists or tricks or tips to ensure that you'll be able to make good decisions when you need to. In order to make good decisions, you must become a discerning person, a person skilled in wisdom and goodness itse Hannah Anderson has done a great job of causing us to redefine and look at discernment different. She says, "Discernment does not change the challenges we face, it changes our ability to face them." She goes on to state, "There are no hacks to discernment. No three easy steps to follow, no lists or tricks or tips to ensure that you'll be able to make good decisions when you need to. In order to make good decisions, you must become a discerning person, a person skilled in wisdom and goodness itself." People who do not think they have anything to learn, won't. This is all great to hear. We as a society need to better ourselves so we can make wise decisions and be more proficient at what we do. If we are going to be great at discerning, we need to get more wisdom and skills to do so. "We do not develop discernment simply by reading labels, restricting yourself to certain contexts, or following lifestyle rules. " Let's take what she has shared and become a discerning society.
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  • Nancy Boyd
    January 1, 1970
    Anderson is a gifted writer, whose words enlighten our understanding and ignite our imagination. Her many analogies will help us remember the concepts she shares about what discernment really is, and what it is not. "How we spend our words is, of course, how we spend our lives. If we spend our days sharing trivialities, life will be trivial. If we spend our days focused on what we fear, life will be filled with anxiety. If, however, we spend our days talking about good, worthy, glorious things, Anderson is a gifted writer, whose words enlighten our understanding and ignite our imagination. Her many analogies will help us remember the concepts she shares about what discernment really is, and what it is not. "How we spend our words is, of course, how we spend our lives. If we spend our days sharing trivialities, life will be trivial. If we spend our days focused on what we fear, life will be filled with anxiety. If, however, we spend our days talking about good, worthy, glorious things, there is the strong likelihood that our lives will be filled with good, worthy, glorious things". (Hannah Anderson; All That's Good)pg. 142
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  • Zacarias Rivera, Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment is a wonderful book on what true discernment is. Hannah Anderson clearly exegetes scripture to manifest what discernment really entails. With personal, raw anecdotes, metaphors, and humor, she interprets what is good and what is better.I love the way she is able to show how we need to seek what's good, shun what is evil, and pursue what is best. I have learned and been reminded that discernment is not just knowing right from wrong, or good All That's Good: Recovering the Lost Art of Discernment is a wonderful book on what true discernment is. Hannah Anderson clearly exegetes scripture to manifest what discernment really entails. With personal, raw anecdotes, metaphors, and humor, she interprets what is good and what is better.I love the way she is able to show how we need to seek what's good, shun what is evil, and pursue what is best. I have learned and been reminded that discernment is not just knowing right from wrong, or good from evil, but what's good and what's better. This book is a welcome addition to the study of how crucial discernment is in our day. I highly recommend it.
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  • Jo Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved everything about this book. Hannah takes Philippians 4:8 and dives into all the things we should be seeking and thinking about. While there is brokenness in the world, discernment isn't only looking at what is wrong or evil, but also searching for and seeking the good - even in the darkness. The chapter on whatsoever is true spoke volumes to me. In our jaded, divided world, this was a breath of fresh air, a challenge, confirmation and a nudge to keep searching for all the good I absolutely loved everything about this book. Hannah takes Philippians 4:8 and dives into all the things we should be seeking and thinking about. While there is brokenness in the world, discernment isn't only looking at what is wrong or evil, but also searching for and seeking the good - even in the darkness. The chapter on whatsoever is true spoke volumes to me. In our jaded, divided world, this was a breath of fresh air, a challenge, confirmation and a nudge to keep searching for all the good!
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  • Marian Jacobs
    January 1, 1970
    It's a rare event when I listen to a book on Hoopla and then go buy it in paperback. This is something I need in my physical library. Another of Hannah Anderson's books, Humble Roots, was the best book I've read on humility so I had to pick up this one too! It took longer to get into All That's Good since I found the metaphors in the beginning to be confusing rather than enlightening. But as I got further along, it was well worth it. I especially enjoyed the last chapter on the spiritual gift of It's a rare event when I listen to a book on Hoopla and then go buy it in paperback. This is something I need in my physical library. Another of Hannah Anderson's books, Humble Roots, was the best book I've read on humility so I had to pick up this one too! It took longer to get into All That's Good since I found the metaphors in the beginning to be confusing rather than enlightening. But as I got further along, it was well worth it. I especially enjoyed the last chapter on the spiritual gift of discernment. I will highly recommend this book for a long, long time!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book particularly chapter 10 where Hannah beautifully describes the tension people have who have the spiritual gift of discernment. I could finally out words to that tension in my own life and have a better understanding of the purpose of this gift. I highly recommend this book!
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  • Constance Collins
    January 1, 1970
    I learned so much about discernment from this book! I love Hannah Anderson and this book did not disappoint. She is always pointing to Christ and seeking all that’s good in everything she writes. Great Read!!
  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    I heard the author discussing this book on the "Women's Hope" podcast. I think this would be a good book for group discussion. It's not "deep," but it is thoughtful while at the same time relatable. This was a christianaudio production and was well done.
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