Marquesses at the Masquerade
An unmarried marquess is a sorry creature. Hounded by matchmakers, waltzed off his handsome feet by debutantes, importuned by impoverished relations and impecunious friends... How he wishes he could be somebody else, if only for one night. Grace Burrowes, Susanna Ives, and Emily Greenwood team up to present three novellas, each of which features a marquess who attends a masquerade ball for all the wrong reasons, and finds that true love can see through any disguise.

Marquesses at the Masquerade Details

TitleMarquesses at the Masquerade
Author
ReleaseApr 17th, 2018
PublisherGrace Burrowes Publishing
Rating
GenreRomance, Historical Romance, Historical, Regency Romance, Short Stories, Anthologies, Regency, Historical Fiction

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Marquesses at the Masquerade Review

  • Phoenix77
    January 1, 1970
    Susanna Ives's story was the best of the bunch.
  • Ritu Pandulla
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book because I love everything Grace Burrowes pens. And once again Grace does not disappoint. Her story The Governess and the Norse God has all the elements that I love about her plots - entirely realistic characters, gentle humor, sparkling dialogue and a love story that evolves along an entirely natural path.So, I read her story first and then swung back to the start. After reading a charming novella, Once Upon a Ball by Emily Greenwood, I arrived at Only Unto Him which I realize I bought this book because I love everything Grace Burrowes pens. And once again Grace does not disappoint. Her story The Governess and the Norse God has all the elements that I love about her plots - entirely realistic characters, gentle humor, sparkling dialogue and a love story that evolves along an entirely natural path.So, I read her story first and then swung back to the start. After reading a charming novella, Once Upon a Ball by Emily Greenwood, I arrived at Only Unto Him which I realized was the most perfect little gem of a story by Susanna Ives. Two souls damaged by unrequited love and abandonment meet and form a friendship of sorts. They do not recognize love when it creeps up on them. Exmoor and Annalise are human in a way that is surprisingly rare in romance books. They do not pretend to be anything other than what they are - souls in pain. There is no haughty marquess here - although he does throw an aristocratic tantrum every now then. He is a man who believes he has found safety in his 'friend' Annalise's arms. And Annalise is just fatigued by loss.The brilliance of Susanna Ives writing is such that not a word, not a scene is superfluous. The emotions of the two main characters come forth with such incisive clarity that I at times thought myself in Exmoor's head and at times in Annalise's.What an achingly beautiful portrayal of love!
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  • Tina Whittle
    January 1, 1970
    I read romance for the escapism, which is why I prefer historicals to contemporaries—they’re the closest thing I can get to time travel. Marquesses at the Masquerade was doubly appealing because all the novellas took place at a masquerade ball, that most magical and liminal of spaces, where tricks of the light often provoke tricks of the heart. I loved the mythic connotations of all the stories, especially the appearance of Ariadne’s story in the second novella, “Only Unto Him,” which deftly pla I read romance for the escapism, which is why I prefer historicals to contemporaries—they’re the closest thing I can get to time travel. Marquesses at the Masquerade was doubly appealing because all the novellas took place at a masquerade ball, that most magical and liminal of spaces, where tricks of the light often provoke tricks of the heart. I loved the mythic connotations of all the stories, especially the appearance of Ariadne’s story in the second novella, “Only Unto Him,” which deftly played up the theme of young immature infatuation versus deep abiding true love (appropriate since both those stories share themes of grief and obsession, dissolution and rebirth, and ultimately passion and joy). A sweetly seductive collection.
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  • N.W. Moors
    January 1, 1970
    Three Marquess attend a masquerade ball with varying results. This book is three separate stories by three different authors.Grace Burrowes is on my must-buy list, and I loved her story here of the widower Marquess of Tyne who dresses as Thor (complete with sledgehammer) for the masquerade and finds his own Valkyrie. I also loved Susanna Ives story of the Marquess of Exmore and Annalise Van Der Keer who both find that love is best the second time around. I enjoyed Emily Greenwood's retelling of Three Marquess attend a masquerade ball with varying results. This book is three separate stories by three different authors.Grace Burrowes is on my must-buy list, and I loved her story here of the widower Marquess of Tyne who dresses as Thor (complete with sledgehammer) for the masquerade and finds his own Valkyrie. I also loved Susanna Ives story of the Marquess of Exmore and Annalise Van Der Keer who both find that love is best the second time around. I enjoyed Emily Greenwood's retelling of Cinderella though I found the plot somewhat improbable for Regency times. All in all, another very fine collection from these ladies.
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  • Jennie
    January 1, 1970
    This is another fantastic book. I love the novels Grace does with other authors & this did not disappoint. I hope these type of books continue. Each couple are fantastic in their own right & although they have the same premise the authors make them individual to be great in their own right but follow enough to make an amazing set. I can’t wait for the next one.
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  • Donna Foster
    January 1, 1970
    All are exceptional stories!All three of theses stories are very good. Fast paced very enjoyable. Racy and good fun. Makes me order the next books they are writing!
  • Sadia
    January 1, 1970
    Anything by Grace Burrowes is guaranteed to be enjoyable. The other two novellas were good also but dragged a bit. Grace's was short, funny and thoroughly satisfying.
  • Sarah Webber
    January 1, 1970
    Each collection of stories by these three authors is better than the last. The second story is especially good.
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