Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite
The frontman of one of the greatest bands of all time tells the story of his rise from nothing to rock 'n' roll megastar, and his wild journey as the voice of The Who.“It’s taken me three years to unpack the events of my life, to remember who did what when and why, to separate the myths from the reality, to unravel what really happened at the Holiday Inn on Keith Moon’s 21st birthday,” says Roger Daltrey, the powerhouse vocalist of The Who. The result of this introspection is a remarkable memoir, instantly captivating, funny and frank, chock-full of well-earned wisdom and one-of-kind anecdotes from a raucous life that spans a tumultuous time of change in Britain and America. Born during the air bombing of London in 1944, Daltrey fought his way (literally) through school and poverty and began to assemble the band that would become The Who while working at a sheet metal factory in 1961. In Daltrey’s voice, the familiar stories—how they got into smashing up their kit, the infighting, Keith Moon’s antics—take on a new, intimate life. Also here is the creative journey through the unforgettable hits including My Generation, Substitute, Pinball Wizard, and the great albums, Who’s Next, Tommy, and Quadrophenia. Amidst all the music and mayhem, the drugs, the premature deaths, the ruined hotel rooms, Roger is our perfect narrator, remaining sober (relatively) and observant and determined to make The Who bigger and bigger. Not only his personal story, this is the definitive biography of The Who.

Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite Details

TitleThanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite
Author
ReleaseOct 23rd, 2018
PublisherHenry Holt & Company
ISBN-139781250296030
Rating
GenreMusic, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography, Nonfiction

Thanks a Lot, Mr. Kibblewhite Review

  • Alan M
    January 1, 1970
    In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life.To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty In a 2016 Rolling Stone interview Daltrey mentioned he was working on his biography. He said there was no publishing deal, so he could take as long as he liked, and only publish if he liked it. Pretty much sums up how he likes to live life.To me Daltrey has always seemed edgy, a bit of a hard nut and most definitely not one to mince his words. Generally, the book doesn’t disappoint. A few scores are settled, some stories put straight and we get Rog’s worldview as he sees it. There’s also plenty of humour – a story about a “cut and shut” Aston Martin had me laughing out loud. Some of Daltrey’s perspectives aren’t that surprising – like many others in their senior years (he’s now 75) he looks back longingly at the simpler times gone by, professing not to understand the modern world demands for instant gratification, although his nostalgia seems undiminished by the poverty of his upbringing. Content and comfortable with his lot now, it’s done little to take the edge off him. Witness his description of Kenney Jones drumming – and he regards Kenney as a mate!Daltrey is driven and uncompromising. Generally, not a recipe for longevity in a rock band. And yet he made it work. He was smart enough to see that Townshend was the creative genius that the band needed to take them to the very top, and as undesirable as some of their personal qualities were, Entwistle and Moon were the other elements needed to make it happen. He says more than once that he was all in – he had nothing else going.He doesn’t shy from describing the downsides of working with such dysfunctional band mates – Townsend’s lack of focus, cushioned by his publishing income, Moon’s desperate need for attention. Few surprises here although Daltrey’s reference to Entwistle’s “nasty” nature were new to me. Overall, it reads as if Daltrey put up with it all because he knew it was better than the alternative – something that it’s far from clear that the others understood.In many respects Daltrey sees himself as the outsider. Bright enough to pass the 11 plus, but alienated from his new “posh” schoolmates, he saw education as a punishment and only grasps later in life it was something he could have taken much more from. He also becomes exile in the band – fired and then grudgingly re-admitted – on probation - after laying Moon out to finish an argument about drugs. Two years of niggling windups follow, Daltrey determined not to give them the satisfaction of resolving it with his fists. All of that said looking back Daltrey sums it up “something that gets missed in all the war stories about The Who …. we respected each other”.A few things remain unremarked upon; his CBE award in 2005, The Who’s induction to the Rock’n’Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, his album with Wilko Johnson. But beyond these details, it’s a comprehensive story, told with energy and humour.Still, a bit surprised at the book title though – “I Can Explain” surely?
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    some highlights from the AMAZING live talks la discussion about this book:•roger and judd apatow agreed that john entwistle had big dick energy 🤘🍆•apatow: "was pete popular in school?" roger: " pete? " 😂😂😂•roger said that keith moon attacked him with a tambourine - "with the bells, not the flat side" - for flushing his uppers down the toilet after a show (wow the thanks you get for being the mom friend!)•he also said that keith once stripped naked and (while upside down, of course) put his balls some highlights from the AMAZING live talks la discussion about this book:•roger and judd apatow agreed that john entwistle had big dick energy 🤘🍆•apatow: "was pete popular in school?" roger: " pete? " 😂😂😂•roger said that keith moon attacked him with a tambourine - "with the bells, not the flat side" - for flushing his uppers down the toilet after a show (wow the thanks you get for being the mom friend!)•he also said that keith once stripped naked and (while upside down, of course) put his balls on their accountant's table to fuck with him, which is the most keith moon thing i have ever heard in my life•he was never into the idea that there was a competition between the who and the stones (judd: "because you won.")•i got distracted when this picture came up and missed a good thirty seconds of conversation just staring at it, which i probably shouldn't admit•they never actually talked about who mr. kibblewhite was 😂😂😂
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  • Ron S
    January 1, 1970
    The front man for The Who tells his side of the story, in a calm and simple way as though you're hearing your grand da reminisce with a cuppa tea by the fire. Moonie and The Ox certainly led wilder lives, but then they're no longer with us, are they?
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  • Ann Cooper
    January 1, 1970
    No ghostwriter here!I loved this honest account of Daltrey’s life with and without The Who. I’m a long time fan and learning the background to his life with the band was illuminating. Just one thing, though, Roger. When you and your band performed Tommy at the RAH, Pete DID turn up for Acid Queen!
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  • Georgette
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it. As much as I enjoyed Pete Townsend's memoir, Daltrey's is more down to earth and less ego than Pete's. A quick and fun read.
  • Linda Edmonds cerullo
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage o A wonderful, humorous account of the life of Roger. I finished this book in just a couple days as it was riveting, comical and at times very moving. It's sometimes hard to believe that Roger has lived as long as he has. Having grown up with the music of The Who and having read Pete Townshend's autobiography, I was anxious to read Roger's take on his years with this phenomenal band. It certainly was well worth it. From his early years in a post-war Britain filled with shortages and the wreckage of years of bombing to his rise to stardom, this is a very engaging and eye-opening memoir of a life well-lived and a man who rose to maturity in style. He is honest, frank and at times filled with regret over some of his experiences. In other words, despite the fact that he is a rock star and a very wealthy man, he is just like the rest of us. Lots to learn here, lots of laughs (especially when he recounts "Keith Moon moments") and lots of hope as well. If you come away with only one thing, that would be that you need to just "keep on keeping on".
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Roger is the best. Parts of it made my laugh, some made me cry......
  • Martin
    January 1, 1970
    excellent. a great memoir of the lie and times of one of the greatest singers ever
  • Kevin
    January 1, 1970
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