Eats of Eden
Eats of Eden is a trip into the memory, into the stomach, and into the heart of every woman. These essays of tasty bites, writing, coming-of-age, family, sex, self-esteem—and above all, overcoming personal odds to live your best life—are complete with mouth-watering recipes and memories that will change your relationship with food forever. From self-identity to love affairs with the sinking of the Titanic to cheese snobbery to reconciling the unanswered questions of a lost friendship, the home-loving socialite at the heart of this memoir dishes and dines on fashion, feminism, fabulousness, and food.Eats of Eden follows a year of attempting to write a novel, and the daily life, occasional revelations and passions that feed, distract, complicate, and enrich that process—in the author’s case, constant detours into the kitchen. It’s a book about writing, eating, and surviving in the modern west, from literary hustling at the Doug Fir Lounge, to waiting for life-altering emails around a stew-cooking campfire at Crater Lake.

Eats of Eden Details

TitleEats of Eden
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 6th, 2018
PublisherAlternating Current Press
ISBN-139781946580023
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Food and Drink, Food, Nonfiction, Writing, Essays, Feminism

Eats of Eden Review

  • Leesa
    January 1, 1970
    LOVED IT! BLURBED IT! “Eats of Eden is truly a delicious treat! Blankenbiller is a confident essay writer, making it look easy as she lets us into her hungry heart in this bright, satisfying collection. She waxes on food and being a writer and wrestles with rejection, ambition, and cheese-lust. Peppered with recipes, pop culture, sugar-sweetness, and plenty of nostalgia, this book is a unique, honest, funny, glittery, high-energy explosion of a sparkly cupcake—easily and greedily devoured.”
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Read it. And blurbed it, yo.“Is there anything more important than feeling good, eating well, and living passionately? Blankenbiller’s essays would suggest there is not, and I would suggest that with Eats of Eden, there may be no one writing more urgently, humorously, or touchingly about these topics than Blankenbiller herself.”
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to get in on the ground floor with this book, and I can happily say that it delivers. Blankenbiller writes her life raw. Her defeats and victories are palpable, her day-to-day life is yours. It's rare to meet an author that can transport you so fully--not into an imaginary world, but one that you know exists, that you could find. Blankenbiller does this. Her writing is full of personal insight, full of punches that others might pull, and all directed inward. It's a daring, vul I was lucky enough to get in on the ground floor with this book, and I can happily say that it delivers. Blankenbiller writes her life raw. Her defeats and victories are palpable, her day-to-day life is yours. It's rare to meet an author that can transport you so fully--not into an imaginary world, but one that you know exists, that you could find. Blankenbiller does this. Her writing is full of personal insight, full of punches that others might pull, and all directed inward. It's a daring, vulnerable, lovely book for that. It's a better book still for the recipes (content alone), and especially for the wry distance and reflection the author is able to pull off by using this format. There are layers here, and the technical skill with which the author peels them is remarkable.
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    A feast of the senses and the writerly sensibilities, Blankenbiller’s foodoir cuts to the heart of the things that elude us—success, ex-friends, the perfect lemon meringue pie. A debut to savor!(...ALSO THE PATATAS BRAVAS RECIPE COMPLETELY SLAYS.)
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  • James Yates
    January 1, 1970
    There's often (sometimes rightful) discussion about biases in today's literary community. Most of us are friends (IRL or via social media), so how can we be objective about book reviews? Screw that noise. Yes, I consider Tabitha a dear friend. And yes, this is a wonderful, necessary collection. Tabitha's sentences are a great mix of beauty and biting humor. The linked recipes are an unexpected touch. I expected them to be included at the end, not so much as afterthoughts, but as pleasant bonuse There's often (sometimes rightful) discussion about biases in today's literary community. Most of us are friends (IRL or via social media), so how can we be objective about book reviews? Screw that noise. Yes, I consider Tabitha a dear friend. And yes, this is a wonderful, necessary collection. Tabitha's sentences are a great mix of beauty and biting humor. The linked recipes are an unexpected touch. I expected them to be included at the end, not so much as afterthoughts, but as pleasant bonuses. But my biggest takeaway from these essays is confrontation: we have to confront our fears, our creativity, and the paths our lives take us on. Through her own narratives, Tabitha has done such a service to readers: she examines her past and present mistakes and developments as pieces of her own life, but, between the lines, reaches out to let readers know they're not alone, that if they see themselves in her sometimes unique, sometimes universal experiences, so much the better. It's okay to be frustrated, it's okay to not know where your life is going, and we're all in this together, even from afar.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Eats of Eden is a collection of personal essays, each ending with a recipe. But it’s so much more than that. It’s a coming-of-age story, charting the author’s parallel development as writer, cook, and human. We follow her ambitions and dreams of perfection—at her desk, in the kitchen, and in the realm of friendship and marriage. We cheer her on as if she were our best friend. Because it feels like she is. But it’s the writing that makes the work so distinctive. The style is a pop-culture-infused Eats of Eden is a collection of personal essays, each ending with a recipe. But it’s so much more than that. It’s a coming-of-age story, charting the author’s parallel development as writer, cook, and human. We follow her ambitions and dreams of perfection—at her desk, in the kitchen, and in the realm of friendship and marriage. We cheer her on as if she were our best friend. Because it feels like she is. But it’s the writing that makes the work so distinctive. The style is a pop-culture-infused tour de force, bubbling over with effervescence and longing. It is breathless, over-the-top, and achingly open hearted.
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  • Anna Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    I inhaled this book like a bowl of rich, creamy risotto - licking the bowl when I was done and checking the pot to see if there was any left. I read many books of essays last year and many of them were good, but most of them were so-so. Not this book. I read (and liked) every single essay in this book and, like risotto, found it to be extremely satisfying. The essays, plus the recipes in each chapter made me hungry and wanting more. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is trying to find th I inhaled this book like a bowl of rich, creamy risotto - licking the bowl when I was done and checking the pot to see if there was any left. I read many books of essays last year and many of them were good, but most of them were so-so. Not this book. I read (and liked) every single essay in this book and, like risotto, found it to be extremely satisfying. The essays, plus the recipes in each chapter made me hungry and wanting more. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is trying to find their creative voice beyond the walls of the corporate office building and the boundaries of wherever they live.
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  • Summer
    January 1, 1970
    I *loved* this book and was so sad when I reached the last page. Reading Tabitha's book is like sitting down for coffee with a close friend whom you haven't seen in a while and thus have a lot of catching up to do. If you're not normally an essay person, please do not be put off by the essayed nature of Eats of Eden—each piece really flows so beautifully together, I never felt as though one specific story had ended completely and something brand new and unrelated was up next. An extremely fun, d I *loved* this book and was so sad when I reached the last page. Reading Tabitha's book is like sitting down for coffee with a close friend whom you haven't seen in a while and thus have a lot of catching up to do. If you're not normally an essay person, please do not be put off by the essayed nature of Eats of Eden—each piece really flows so beautifully together, I never felt as though one specific story had ended completely and something brand new and unrelated was up next. An extremely fun, delicious, and motivating read!
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  • Leah Angstman
    January 1, 1970
    I'm the editor for this book, and I completely love it. It's tender and heartfelt, while remaining self-aware and universal. I cried through some parts of it, and laughed out loud at other parts. Through it all, the author combines wit, intelligent writing, humor, recipes, and heart-to-heart time into the perfect balance of essay + story. You'll find a kindred spirit here, and the recipes are delicious.
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  • Alternating Current Press
    January 1, 1970
    We are the editors and publisher of this book, so, we're biased, yes! But we adore this foodoir because it is so heartfelt and real. It will make you laugh out loud, and it will make you tear up at the loving friend, mentor, wife, lover-of-life, and foody behind the cover. It is enjoyable from cover to cover, complete with recipes, and it will make you want to live your best life.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    Tabitha Blankenbiller's foodoir is a delight. I love the idea of this book and I love the actual book. Rich tasty essays and recipes as well. The essays take you on a ride of self exploration and discovery and the food that goes with it.
  • Tabitha Blankenbiller
    January 1, 1970
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