The Revolution of Birdie Randolph
Perfect for fans of Nina LaCour and Nicola Yoon comes a novel about first love and family secrets from Stonewall Book Award winner Brandy Colbert.Dove "Birdie" Randolph works hard to be the perfect daughter and follow the path her parents have laid out for her: She quit playing her beloved soccer, she keeps her nose buried in textbooks, and she's on track to finish high school at the top of her class. But then Birdie falls hard for Booker, a sweet boy with a troubled past...whom she knows her parents will never approve of.When her estranged aunt Carlene returns to Chicago and moves into the family's apartment above their hair salon, Birdie notices the tension building at home. Carlene is sweet, friendly, and open-minded--she's also spent decades in and out of treatment facilities for addiction. As Birdie becomes closer to both Booker and Carlene, she yearns to spread her wings. But when long-buried secrets rise to the surface, everything she's known to be true is turned upside down.

The Revolution of Birdie Randolph Details

TitleThe Revolution of Birdie Randolph
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 20th, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316448567
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, Fiction

The Revolution of Birdie Randolph Review

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    Im going to keep reading Brandy Colbert, especially when they have gorgeous covers like this, and someday, she’s going to write something I love even more than I love Pointe
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Brandy Colbert stays very, very, very good at what she does.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think Brandy Colbert needs a comparison to stand out, as she's proven herself a voice in YA. But the ARC compares her to Nicola Yoon and Nina LaCour and I'd absolutely agree: this is a quieter book (a la Nina LaCour) that takes on family and relationships in realistic teen ways (both LaCour and Yoon!). The romance in this one definitely has the Yoon effect to it. This is a book about following the rules and breaking them, but even more than that, it's a book about the family we're born i I don't think Brandy Colbert needs a comparison to stand out, as she's proven herself a voice in YA. But the ARC compares her to Nicola Yoon and Nina LaCour and I'd absolutely agree: this is a quieter book (a la Nina LaCour) that takes on family and relationships in realistic teen ways (both LaCour and Yoon!). The romance in this one definitely has the Yoon effect to it. This is a book about following the rules and breaking them, but even more than that, it's a book about the family we're born into and the families that we make along the way. Birdie's aunt shows up at their apartment right before the summer begins, and that's when everything changes; it's at this same time Birdie is secretly dating a boy she knows her very strict, proper parents wouldn't like. Despite never pushing boundaries before, these two new people in her life encourage her to take some chances and learn some lessons she never would have on her own. Colbert depicts Carlene's alcoholism with tenderness and offers up the whole range of emotions people experience both as those who are addicts and those who are friends and family of addicts. There is support, but there is also caution exercised around Carlene that showcase hope for her to find recovery but also experience in knowing that this is a disease that is challenging to manage. The Chicago setting is, no surprise, spot on. I started reading this in a hotel just a block from the Civic Opera House, which plays a tiny role in the story. Other Chicagonalia include Portillo's, Montrose Beach, the L (including above and below ground talk), the way Chicagoans live for those four perfect days a year, and more. It's vibrant and real, and isn't also afraid to highlight the racial challenges within the city, in terms of violence, racism, and bigotry, and the places and spaces where those do and don't overlap. Also handled really fabulously is anger and anger management, recovery from trauma and what that does and doesn't look like, and it offers such a refreshing perspective on teens, especially teens of color, who've been in the juvenile justice system. Birdie's best friend is half black and half Latinx, while her ex-boyfriend (view spoiler)[ this is just a spoiler because it's so pre-pub -- is asexual (hide spoiler)]. I'm never sad when I read a Brandy Colbert book, except when I am finished and know I'll be waiting another year for her next.
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  • Sarah ✨Proud Ravenclaw✨
    January 1, 1970
    Me: *sees cover* I think I should add to TBR Brain: why? Me: pretty cover Brain: good idea
  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    Brandy Colbert has become one of my must-buy authors and this book is an example of why. Her novels are incredibly specific (their respective neighborhoods are as much a character in the books than the people in them) but at the same time, they feel universal.Everything about this book was perfection for me. It's so clever and so heartbreaking and I just wanted everything to be OK for Birdie.I hope there's a companion novel. I would very much like to spend more time with them.Highly recommended.
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  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    This cover is enough for me to give the book five starts already.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    ARC ReviewI'm definitely one to judge a book by it's cover, so I'm hoping this one doesn't see any changes prior to publication. The style and coloring is beautiful, and one of the main reasons I grabbed this ARC over several others.If you were a fan of The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo, you will most likely enjoy this book as well. The main characters follow a similar plot arc - overbearing and rigid mothers who love them deeply but can't seem to let them just be who they are, while rebellion, fi ARC ReviewI'm definitely one to judge a book by it's cover, so I'm hoping this one doesn't see any changes prior to publication. The style and coloring is beautiful, and one of the main reasons I grabbed this ARC over several others.If you were a fan of The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo, you will most likely enjoy this book as well. The main characters follow a similar plot arc - overbearing and rigid mothers who love them deeply but can't seem to let them just be who they are, while rebellion, first (forbidden) love, and trouble ensue. Dove "Birdie" Randolph is a nearly perfect child, giving up the sport she loves and devoting all of her time to studying so she can make her parents proud and follow in her sister's footsteps. And while she has ambitious plans for herself, she also just wants to be a teenager and find a balance between where she's going and what she is right now. Every little mistake sets her mother off, and drives Birdie to confide instead in her aunt who has recently shown up sober after struggling for decades with alcohol and drug abuse.The plot is not necessarily original. I was able to guess the big family secret after reading only a few chapters, but I liked Birdie's voice and felt like she was a dynamic enough character that I wanted to see how SHE would deal with the twists that came her way.Through various events and supporting characters, the book also touches on LGBTQIA issues, racial profiling of young black men, and the persistence of past mistakes.On the Young Adult spectrum, this book is probably better suited to high school readers, as there are several sexual encounters that struck me as slightly more graphic than other YA titles I've read.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Birdie's aunt Carlene has moved in with them temporarily after she gets out of rehab. Birdie (real name Dove) struggles to be the perfect daughter: SAT prep, certain type of boyfriend, curfew, etc. and actually relates quite well to Carlene as Carlene had her own struggles with her sister Kitty, Dove's mom, about those same sorts of situations within their own sibling relationship. As Birdie explores a new relationship with Booker, who has a past that Dove's parents won't approve of, Carlene is Birdie's aunt Carlene has moved in with them temporarily after she gets out of rehab. Birdie (real name Dove) struggles to be the perfect daughter: SAT prep, certain type of boyfriend, curfew, etc. and actually relates quite well to Carlene as Carlene had her own struggles with her sister Kitty, Dove's mom, about those same sorts of situations within their own sibling relationship. As Birdie explores a new relationship with Booker, who has a past that Dove's parents won't approve of, Carlene is the one that Birdie turns to. Same thing when Birdie goes to a party where there is alcohol, and when Birdie and Booker start having sex... I love Colbert's writing. This is a lovely book about family and relationships. This one particularly looks at substance abuse within a family and how it affects trust within relationships both familial and other. There are several LGBT relationships and one ace situation and they are just part of the narrative not *a big deal*. Lists may put it at 9th and up because of teen drinking and sexual content but there is much here that I can see that will open up important conversations with middle school students. Also good representation of diversity both in race and sexual orientation.Sex is not graphically described. Openly talks about use of condoms, getting on the pill and safe sex, etc.
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  • Zoe Ford
    January 1, 1970
    thank you to yallwest and little, brown for the advanced reader copy! okay, so as you may or may not know, i adore brandy colbert. i have read both finding yvonne and little and lion and have enjoyed both, but i do think that i enjoyed TRBR a little less. basically, this was a wonderful, beautiful character-driven novel that paints a picture of a chicago that teems with love between family and friends. (i have to get on over to the midwest to see if for myself!)but, that is all to say that i was thank you to yallwest and little, brown for the advanced reader copy! okay, so as you may or may not know, i adore brandy colbert. i have read both finding yvonne and little and lion and have enjoyed both, but i do think that i enjoyed TRBR a little less. basically, this was a wonderful, beautiful character-driven novel that paints a picture of a chicago that teems with love between family and friends. (i have to get on over to the midwest to see if for myself!)but, that is all to say that i was disappointed with some of the tokenizing that i felt went on in TRBR. initially, that wasn't what i thought was the case, but after a second look, it definitely seemed a bit tokenized. the novel had the trademark amazing brandy colbert writing and the typical character that follows the rules that her parents lay down and has a good relationship with a sibling. brandy colbert has a great formula that always leads to a great book. the good news is that she is reliable with great writing; however, the bad news is that the characters feel as though they are representing an entire race/sexuality/gender. and, simply that is not the way it is. not one person is indicative of an entire group. so, it was a great book. but, i could do without the tokenizing.
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  • Chari
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Birdie Randolph is the perfect daughter, good grades, great behavior, does what her parents tells her to do. But after meeting a new guy and falling hard for him, Birdie starts to rebel against her parents and their wishes. She lies a number of times to her parents in an effort to see her new boyfriend, who she doesn't introduce to her parents nor tell them about him because he had once been in juvie. Birdie's decisions I was given an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Birdie Randolph is the perfect daughter, good grades, great behavior, does what her parents tells her to do. But after meeting a new guy and falling hard for him, Birdie starts to rebel against her parents and their wishes. She lies a number of times to her parents in an effort to see her new boyfriend, who she doesn't introduce to her parents nor tell them about him because he had once been in juvie. Birdie's decisions reflect a lot of teenage behavior, however, it bothered me that she took no responsibility for her actions. Complicated family relationships enter near the end. Seemed like the author was trying too hard to include numerous hot issues into the book. The book left me disappointed. #netgalley #substance abuse #juvie #teenagesex #revolutionofbirdierandolph #brandycolbert
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  • ItsNasB
    January 1, 1970
    Dove "Birdie" Randolph has quite the summer in this book. She goes through a lot over the course of a few months, much of it unexpected, which is ironic, given how planned out her life had been up to that point. It's a realistic story about growing up and experiencing your first love and realizing just how imperfect family can be.It touches on addiction, racial profiling and racial disparity, different sexual orientations, anxiety and the pressure so many young people face in the name of succeed Dove "Birdie" Randolph has quite the summer in this book. She goes through a lot over the course of a few months, much of it unexpected, which is ironic, given how planned out her life had been up to that point. It's a realistic story about growing up and experiencing your first love and realizing just how imperfect family can be.It touches on addiction, racial profiling and racial disparity, different sexual orientations, anxiety and the pressure so many young people face in the name of succeeding.I have to mention that this cover is stunning and it added excitement to the experience of reading the book.
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this from @lbschool! My #highschool #bookclub received free ARC copies to read and review.•This comes out in August and I will definitely be purchasing it for my #library! @brandycolbert does a phenomenal job developing Birdie and her #Chicago teen life, complete with boys and family drama! Loved the hairstylist momma too!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    5 star read! It made me cry. RTC
  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    The cover is beautiful.... The story totally did not go as I had expected!
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Surprised about the sexual content. Storyline was pretty predictable, but I still liked it.
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story I think many teens will relate to. There is so much pressure to achieve and succeed now for kids. And it starts so early. On top of that, every family has secrets and challenges. One in three Americans are personally effected by addiction. And then you think about how much harder it is to achieve when you start life as a person of color in an incredibly prejudiced and segregated society. This is a complex story but when you boil it down, it's a perfectly normal story of a present This is a story I think many teens will relate to. There is so much pressure to achieve and succeed now for kids. And it starts so early. On top of that, every family has secrets and challenges. One in three Americans are personally effected by addiction. And then you think about how much harder it is to achieve when you start life as a person of color in an incredibly prejudiced and segregated society. This is a complex story but when you boil it down, it's a perfectly normal story of a present day girl trying to grow up in America.
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