The Salt Path
Just days after Raynor learns that Moth, her husband of 32 years is terminally ill, their home and livelihood is taken away. With nothing left and little time, they make the brave and impulsive decision to walk the 630 miles of the sea-swept South West Coast Path, from Somerset to Dorset, via Devon and Cornwall.They have almost no money for food or shelter and must carry only the essentials for survival on their backs as they live wild in the ancient, weathered landscape of cliffs, sea and sky. Yet through every step, every encounter, and every test along the way, their walk becomes a remarkable journey.The Salt Path is an honest and life-affirming true story of coming to terms with grief and the healing power of the natural world. Ultimately, it is a portrayal of home, and how it can be lost, rebuilt, and rediscovered in the most unexpected ways.

The Salt Path Details

TitleThe Salt Path
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 22nd, 2018
PublisherMichael Joseph
ISBN-139780241349649
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Travel, European Literature, British Literature, Biography

The Salt Path Review

  • Bookread2day
    January 1, 1970
    This is my favourite non fiction novel because it's about a mid age couple who tell a true story. It made me cry for them loosing everything that they had worked for all their lives. It also made me cry of how little money they had to buy something to eat on their journey walking to Cornwall. Raynor and Moth had lost their home and their business. The bailiffs came in and took everything that they owned. They have almost no money for food or shelter. With little money they did have they buy a te This is my favourite non fiction novel because it's about a mid age couple who tell a true story. It made me cry for them loosing everything that they had worked for all their lives. It also made me cry of how little money they had to buy something to eat on their journey walking to Cornwall. Raynor and Moth had lost their home and their business. The bailiffs came in and took everything that they owned. They have almost no money for food or shelter. With little money they did have they buy a tent and walk the salt path to Cornwall. Sometimes they have to choose to either eat or use a little money for a ferry. The one thing that went through my mind while reading this true story is how lucky I am to have a roof over my head and food to eat. With all my heart I definitely recommend reading The Salt Path, to every reader in the world.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a memoir, following a middle aged couple, Ray and Moth, as they lose their family home in a complex legal battle and Moth receives the devastating diagnosis of a terminal illness. With not much left to lose, they embark upon a 630 mile backpacking adventure along the South West Coast Path, with only the barest of essentials and minimal money. This book was absolutely stunning, deeply personal and highly emotional. I was in tears from the first couple of pages. The author's writing is sub This is a memoir, following a middle aged couple, Ray and Moth, as they lose their family home in a complex legal battle and Moth receives the devastating diagnosis of a terminal illness. With not much left to lose, they embark upon a 630 mile backpacking adventure along the South West Coast Path, with only the barest of essentials and minimal money. This book was absolutely stunning, deeply personal and highly emotional. I was in tears from the first couple of pages. The author's writing is sublime, her depictions of the scenery, weather, the nature and people they meet along the way are beautiful and realistic and so different every time. It's almost like being there with them.Despite the reasons for Ray and Moth undertaking this 'escape', this book is anything but melancholic or mournful; rather it is completely uplifting and inspirational. I fell in love with them both and would love to sit with them, enjoying a cone of chips or a pasty, out of the view of the seagulls!I highly recommend this book.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    The bad news came fast, Raynor Winn's husband had just been diagnosed with a terminal illness, they had just lost a court case even though they had the evidence that they were not liable for debts and now the bailiffs were hammering on the door to take their farm and livelihood away. Their only income would be £48 per week. It is at times like these that some people would have a breakdown or consider a more permanent end to the problems, they didn't; inspired by the book 500 Mile Walkies by Mark The bad news came fast, Raynor Winn's husband had just been diagnosed with a terminal illness, they had just lost a court case even though they had the evidence that they were not liable for debts and now the bailiffs were hammering on the door to take their farm and livelihood away. Their only income would be £48 per week. It is at times like these that some people would have a breakdown or consider a more permanent end to the problems, they didn't; inspired by the book 500 Mile Walkies by Mark Wallington they decided that as they were homeless anyway they may as well walk the south coast path. With the precious little money they have, they buy a new lightweight tent, a couple of sleeping bags and new rucksacks and drive the van to Minehead in Somerset as that is where all the guidebooks begin. Moth's condition of corticobasal degeneration or CBD, meant that the doctor had advised him to take it easy and not to overdo it; probably not attempt a 630-mile walk around the spectacular coastline of the south-west. The first part of the footpath is probably the toughest section with the high cliffs and steep paths and it is a struggle for both, but Moth in particular. They have no money for official campsites, so wild camping was the way to go, ensuring that they found a place out of sight, and were packed up before they could be discovered in the morning. They met all sorts of people of the walk, but telling those that they met that they were homeless would a lot of the time cause a lot of prejudice and they would be shunned, called tramps or worse. Sitting eating a shared pack of budget noodles when other are stuffing pasties and ice creams in, is quite soul destroying. However, there were others who would be prepared to help, providing hot drinks, paying for food, and even a millionaire wine importer who wined and dined them for an evening. One man they met on a cliff path told them about salted blackberries, picked right at the very end of the season just before they turned when the flavour was most intense and dusted with the salt from the sea they gorged on them whenever they could find them. They had completed a fair chunk of the route, before stopping and staying with a friend, earning a little money and starting to plan a future once again. Rather than head back to where they had stopped, they came to Poole and started from the other end walking through the Jurassic Coast back to the place that they had stopped a few months previously. This is a heartwarming and inspiring story of a couples fight back against a life-changing legal decision that left them totally penniless. Winn writes with an honesty that is quite moving, she is open with her feelings and her thoughts about the people she meets on their walk and the events that led to them walking. There are some moments in here that may make you cry as well as some amusing anecdotes that will have you chuckling. What does come across throughout the book is the inner strength of Raynor and Moth, to overcome a financial situation that most could not recover from, the way that Moth manages to use the walk to improve his health and that being in the right place at the right time can offer an opportunity that can be life-changing. If there is one thing that can be taken from this, it is that there is nothing that human optimism can't overcome. 4.5 stars
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  • Rebecca Foster
    January 1, 1970
    It was the worst of times. Just after Winn learned that her husband Moth had CBD, a rare degenerative brain disease, they lost a court case pertaining to their investment in a friend’s failed business; bailiffs seized their house to pay off the debt. They’d relied on renting out their barn as a holiday cottage, so in one fell swoop their home and livelihood were gone. For two fifty-somethings, one of them terminally ill, the decision to buy minimal supplies and walk England’s South West Coast Pa It was the worst of times. Just after Winn learned that her husband Moth had CBD, a rare degenerative brain disease, they lost a court case pertaining to their investment in a friend’s failed business; bailiffs seized their house to pay off the debt. They’d relied on renting out their barn as a holiday cottage, so in one fell swoop their home and livelihood were gone. For two fifty-somethings, one of them terminally ill, the decision to buy minimal supplies and walk England’s South West Coast Path from Minehead to Poole might seem rash, but they had nothing to lose and nowhere else to go; “we really didn’t have anything better to do at half past three on a Thursday afternoon than to start a 630-mile walk,” Winn wryly observes.Camping wild and living off a £48-a-week government tax credit, which just about kept them in noodles, tins of tuna, rationed tea bags and sweets, Ray and Moth cover mile by grueling mile, but they are always bone-weary, hungry and weather-beaten. As long as they keep moving, Moth’s health seems okay and they can forget that they are effectively homeless. Indeed, Winn is deeply concerned about the plight of the homeless, especially after seeing the change in people’s faces and demeanor on the rare occasions when she and Moth admit that the designation applies to them too. She’s learned that “civilization exists only for those that can afford to inhabit it,” and that middle-class life is a lot more precarious than we assume.The details of walking the long-distance path in 2013–14 reminded me of Simon Armitage’s Walking Away – and in fact, in a running gag, Moth keeps being mistaken for Armitage along the way and asked for impromptu poetry readings.Winn writes beautifully about the natural world and the internal, emotional landscape, blending the two with her use of imagery from the salt path. I do hope she’ll write more books. This was a worthy entry on the Wainwright Prize shortlist this past year. [Just a shame about all the dangling modifiers and other minor errors; one hopes these will be fixed for the paperback edition.]Favorite lines:“Things we thought we would never be able to bear were becoming less jagged, turned into round river stones by the movement of the path.”“The scrub hedge and dusty arable land carried on, flat and easy, our legs falling into a metronome of motion without thought.”“The path had given us certainty, a sense of security that came with knowing that tomorrow and the next day and the next we would pack up the tent, put one foot in front of the other and walk.”
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    For me this is another 'H is for Hawk': a profoundly moving, deeply personal account of a year and a bit in the life of Raynor Winn as she and her terminally ill husband walk the South West Coast Path after losing their home and most of their money.As someone who used to love taking long walks, but now cannot because of an inoperable knee injury, I took great pleasure in reading this book. It made me laugh and made me cry, but it also gave me hope.I received an e-ARC of this book from Net Galley For me this is another 'H is for Hawk': a profoundly moving, deeply personal account of a year and a bit in the life of Raynor Winn as she and her terminally ill husband walk the South West Coast Path after losing their home and most of their money.As someone who used to love taking long walks, but now cannot because of an inoperable knee injury, I took great pleasure in reading this book. It made me laugh and made me cry, but it also gave me hope.I received an e-ARC of this book from Net Galley in return for an honest review
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  • Fondantsurprise
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to love this book. I’d heard so many amazing things about it. But I struggled. I don’t want to leave an unkind review so I’ll say — some of the nature writing is beautiful. I just didn’t get on at all with the internal commentary.
  • J.A. Ironside
    January 1, 1970
    After a 3.5 yr court battle, Ray and ger husband, Moth, lose their farm, their home, their livelihood and a lot of their confodence and self respect. Two days later they find put that Moth is slowly dying of a degenerative brain disease. So they decide to buy a tent and walk the 636 miles of the South West Coastal path. It sounds like it should be a bleak book. It's not. It has to be one if the most uplifting hopeful memoirs I've ever read. And it is a journey if healing too, learning to rely on After a 3.5 yr court battle, Ray and ger husband, Moth, lose their farm, their home, their livelihood and a lot of their confodence and self respect. Two days later they find put that Moth is slowly dying of a degenerative brain disease. So they decide to buy a tent and walk the 636 miles of the South West Coastal path. It sounds like it should be a bleak book. It's not. It has to be one if the most uplifting hopeful memoirs I've ever read. And it is a journey if healing too, learning to rely on yourself and your partner again when the world has really shafted you. Winn doesn't mince words or sugar coat the attitudes to homelessness they faced but the story is rife with sharp and gentle humour, funny adventures, almost ecstatic moments in nature and ultimately seeing the best of humanity too. We can all manage with so much less than we think we can and in many ways we'd be richer for it. An amzingly good book. Highly recommend.
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  • Zoe Hall
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Where do you even start with this book? I picked this book up because the theme for this month’s Penguin Read the Year challenge is about travelling (anywhere!). I absolutely love camping. I abolsutely love the South West. I absolutely love walking. This book seemed like a win-win. I wasn’t expecting to love this book as much as I have. A heartwarming, life-affirming and honest story about love, life and nature. A beautiful book, beautifully written, set in a beautiful environment. I would Wow! Where do you even start with this book? I picked this book up because the theme for this month’s Penguin Read the Year challenge is about travelling (anywhere!). I absolutely love camping. I abolsutely love the South West. I absolutely love walking. This book seemed like a win-win. I wasn’t expecting to love this book as much as I have. A heartwarming, life-affirming and honest story about love, life and nature. A beautiful book, beautifully written, set in a beautiful environment. I would highly recommend this book. I now want to drop everything and wild camp around the country with just the basics needed to survive. What a life-affirming and inspirational accomplishment that could be...
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  • Brigid Gallagher
    January 1, 1970
    Ray and her husband Moth have unexpectedly lost their home after a lengthy legal battle. Moth is then diagnosed with a rare terminal illness called corticobasal degeneration or CBD, and their income is reduced to £48 per week.Instead of giving up on life, the couple decide to walk the 630 miles of the South West Coastal Path. They purchase a tent and cheap sleeping bags, and pack a minimum of clothing and necessities for the journey. Despite the challenges of wild camping, a meagre diet and toug Ray and her husband Moth have unexpectedly lost their home after a lengthy legal battle. Moth is then diagnosed with a rare terminal illness called corticobasal degeneration or CBD, and their income is reduced to £48 per week.Instead of giving up on life, the couple decide to walk the 630 miles of the South West Coastal Path. They purchase a tent and cheap sleeping bags, and pack a minimum of clothing and necessities for the journey. Despite the challenges of wild camping, a meagre diet and tough walks, Moth's symptoms start to improve. The couple undergo both a physical and spiritual transformation as their journey continues amidst tourists enjoying an abundance of food but perhaps lacking in gratitude. The Salt Path reminds one of the important things in life.
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  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! What a book. A real life affirming tale. I read it in three and a half days. I just couldn't put it down. I am Cornish born and bred and come not far from where Raynor Winn has eventually found herself living! So I loved reading about the intoxicating South West Coast, especially the o-so-familiar Cornish sections, having walked a lot of the Cornish coast path myself in my younger years and also felt the pain of long distance walking having done a few routes across the UK.I too read 500 Mil Wow! What a book. A real life affirming tale. I read it in three and a half days. I just couldn't put it down. I am Cornish born and bred and come not far from where Raynor Winn has eventually found herself living! So I loved reading about the intoxicating South West Coast, especially the o-so-familiar Cornish sections, having walked a lot of the Cornish coast path myself in my younger years and also felt the pain of long distance walking having done a few routes across the UK.I too read 500 Mile Walkies when I was in my late teens/early twenties (I am now 46). I too have always wanted to walk the entire South West Coast path, it's definitely on my bucket list. But as my husband keeps telling me, it's all about the "time" to do it. I love this book for the fact it didn't matter one jot about the time and yet in a strange way it did, because of Moth's (Raynor's husband's) life threatening illness, but then even that defied the odds and time didn't really matter at all. One of my favourite quotes is from Mahatma Ghandi "There's more to life than trying to speed it up". which is so true of the world we live in today. Ray and Moth stepped off that rat race, through no fault of their own and had the adventure of a lifetime!There are so many things to love about this book. I love the sense of humour that pervades throughout. The wonderful descriptions of the sea, nature and other-worldliness of the South West Coast path. But also the compelling love story that also shines through. It was this, the real sense of hope, that all is not lost, that had me in tears at the end.A wonderfully inspirational read, that shows, against all the odds, life can still go on with a sense of adventure, hope and above all love. Material things really do not matter...I fully recommend this book, my read of the year so far.
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  • Sarah Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I had seen The Salt Path by Raynor Winn in a bookshop in St Ives. It appeared to be a book about her and her husband Moth's journey along the South West Coast Path. This book is so much more than a guidebook or travel log though. Their journey begins when they discover that Moth is terminally ill and then their home is taken away from them. They find themselves penniless and homeless. With no real options before them, they make the brave decision to walk the 630 miles along the South West Coast I had seen The Salt Path by Raynor Winn in a bookshop in St Ives. It appeared to be a book about her and her husband Moth's journey along the South West Coast Path. This book is so much more than a guidebook or travel log though. Their journey begins when they discover that Moth is terminally ill and then their home is taken away from them. They find themselves penniless and homeless. With no real options before them, they make the brave decision to walk the 630 miles along the South West Coast Path. They buy tents, sleeping bags and set off with the bare minimum they need to live with, as they have to carry everything. They live day to day, struggling with Moth's illness, the weather, having no money, no plan and to all intents and purposes no future. Wild camping in some of the most beautiful and spectacular scenery in Britain, their trip becomes not just a physical one but a spiritual one. One of discovery, of how much they can succeed in the face of adversity, and of how strong they really are. It also questions how we view homelessness in this country. It is all to easy to look at a homeless person and say, oh, yes, its because of drink or drugs, but there are many reasons why someone becomes homeless. I do have some knowledge of this, as I did work in the local authorities homeless section for a time. Anyone can become homeless, it can easily happen to anyone. I loved how Raynor and Moth were met with such kindness from some people.I really warmed to both Raynor and Moth, I hope that they are both doing well and do hope that Raynor thinks about writing another book. This is not a sad book, although in parts it did make me cry but it is an uplifting read, inspirational and makes you question what you would do if faced in their situation. This book is a joy to read, Raynor's writing is wonderful. From descriptions of the weather, scenery, wildlife, observations on society, nature, other people and their relationship. This is a wonderful story of coming to terms with grief (premature grieving, something I know about unfortunately) and about finding yourself and what is really important when it seems that everything is lost.
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  • Sally Boocock
    January 1, 1970
    A really inspirational memoir of a middle aged couple who lose everything and then discover Moth, the husband is terminally ill. With very little and I mean little money they decide to set off and walk the Salt path from Minehead to Poole. The determination against the greatest odds is unwavering and admirable. Living some days on tea and fudge there are humerous moments and heart breaking one's. This is Gaynor Winn's first book and a complete credit to her. No one could help but be moved by the A really inspirational memoir of a middle aged couple who lose everything and then discover Moth, the husband is terminally ill. With very little and I mean little money they decide to set off and walk the Salt path from Minehead to Poole. The determination against the greatest odds is unwavering and admirable. Living some days on tea and fudge there are humerous moments and heart breaking one's. This is Gaynor Winn's first book and a complete credit to her. No one could help but be moved by their story.
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  • Sue Frances
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't believe what Ray and Moth went through. My heart ached for them. They seem strong people and their love for each other shone . I hope they are ok and happy still.
  • Spurnlad
    January 1, 1970
    Disappointing. Too much self-pity for my liking. A great idea and a good choice for the situation, but i just couldn't identify with the people.
  • Anna Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    Cannot stop thinking about this book. Beautifully written. Stunning. Deep. Funny. Honest and profoundly makes you think about where your values are. I think I want to walk this path even though it sounds so challenging! Hats off to Raynor for writing this memoir. I could not recommend it highly enough.
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free digital copy of this book from the publishers/author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Salt Path is a non-fiction novel about how Raynor Winn and her husband Moth lose their home and pretty much the entirety of their income and with nowhere to go, decide to start walking the South West Coast Path. This should have been a refreshing but emotional read for me but unfortunately it just completely fell flat for me. I’m not sure if it was that I was just not in the I received a free digital copy of this book from the publishers/author via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.The Salt Path is a non-fiction novel about how Raynor Winn and her husband Moth lose their home and pretty much the entirety of their income and with nowhere to go, decide to start walking the South West Coast Path. This should have been a refreshing but emotional read for me but unfortunately it just completely fell flat for me. I’m not sure if it was that I was just not in the right frame of mind when reading this but I definitely felt like I would have a stronger emotional connection to the story and I just didn’t.I did like the parts in this story that really struck me, normally when Raynor and Mort were treated differently when people realised they were actually homeless and not people who had sold their home to go out on the road. The attitudes they met really made me think about how maybe I would act in the same situation and how I would treat people. I also really felt for Raynor and Mort in the way they really had to count every penny - they were surviving on nothing and even thinking about being in that situation is terrifying.Unfortunately by the time I reached halfway through this book, my interest and concentration in the story just completely panned out and I ended up skim reading the last chunk of it because I just wanted it to be over. It may have been some of the over descriptive passages about the coast trail they were following, and some of the historical bits that I don’t think we needed to know but none of that was particularly gripping unless the reader is someone planning to make the same trip/has made that trip.A great one for people who love walking, especially those walking the English and Welsh coastlines.
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  • Marcus Case
    January 1, 1970
    Raynor Winn certainly knows how to bring it all to the page and her memoir The Salt Path is the unforgettable tale of her remarkable trek along England's South West Coast Path. That's more than six hundred miles of scenic but at times harsh terrain, at best undulating and often positively mountainous, and frequently interrupted by estuaries and rivers. The Atlantic Ocean can hurl the worst of its weather against this exposed coastline and gives no quarter to exhausted walkers in search of elusiv Raynor Winn certainly knows how to bring it all to the page and her memoir The Salt Path is the unforgettable tale of her remarkable trek along England's South West Coast Path. That's more than six hundred miles of scenic but at times harsh terrain, at best undulating and often positively mountainous, and frequently interrupted by estuaries and rivers. The Atlantic Ocean can hurl the worst of its weather against this exposed coastline and gives no quarter to exhausted walkers in search of elusive shelter. But no doubt everything's relative when you've fought a lengthy legal battle to hang on to the farm that for years has been your family home; and then you've lost it.Winn was accompanied on this walk by her husband whose terminal neurological condition had only recently been diagnosed. It seems that in no time at all the physical demands of the walk began to take their toll and his health markedly deteriorated. Undeterred, the couple battled on, and Winn's ongoing reflections about her relationship with the man she had loved since her teenage years formed a poignant backdrop to what had become the most personal of stories. Virtually day by day, page by page, his frailty was taking over. I was moved by their plight and at times found Winn's romantic memories of carefree times and their contrast with her acknowledgement of her husband's decline quite agonising. But their love was undaunted and, perhaps unusual in a memoir, I think the subject of her husband's prognosis brings tension and suspense into the mix (readers who wish to enjoy this aspect of her writing could usefully steer clear of the inevitable spoilers in some reviews and social media posts). But there's also a strong sense of balance in the writing and for me The Salt Path had more than a few surprises in store. I really liked Winn's detailed statistical analysis in her 'brief note on homelessness' which nicely set the scene for her subsequent encounters along with way with people for whom the word homeless apparently held particular resonance (rarely positive). Also, and with great candour, at various points in the story Winn makes some unexpected and frank disclosures that certainly caught my attention. But perhaps the greatest surprise comes towards the end of the book when a startling coincidence occurs that in a work of fiction would probably cause any editor to reach for the nearest red pen in apoplectic fury. Truth, as they say, is stranger than fiction.Beautifully descriptive, The Salt Path will stay with me for a very long time. I loved it.
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  • Hanan Muzaffar
    January 1, 1970
    Renoir Win's first book, an autobiography telling us about her trip with her husband Moth after they lost everything they owned, and after discovering that Moth suffers from a degenerative disease that will gradually kill him. The couple decide to take a walk on the southwest coast of England. So their journey is a haven away from thinking about the husband's illness or physical condition. Despite the difficulty of the journey, especially for the husband who suffers from continuous pain restrict Renoir Win's first book, an autobiography telling us about her trip with her husband Moth after they lost everything they owned, and after discovering that Moth suffers from a degenerative disease that will gradually kill him. The couple decide to take a walk on the southwest coast of England. So their journey is a haven away from thinking about the husband's illness or physical condition. Despite the difficulty of the journey, especially for the husband who suffers from continuous pain restricting him and his body, but also for the wife who feels the responsibility placed on her, the journey relaxes them and allows them a level of tranquility in the end. In the beginning, the book appears to be a dark tale of extraordinary suffering. Yet through that, the writer paints beautiful images of the nature around them, and also presents a case for homeless people across England. During their journey, the couple encounter many types of people, giving the novel a beautiful character, making it not only a description of the nature of the earth, but also of human nature. I’m not specially fond of travel literature, but this one manages to add a rather special humane value to that genre, making it a pleasure to read
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  • Sarah Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a beautifully honest and moving account of a couple's journey along the South West Coast Path after they lost their home, health and income following a court case. This was a story of love, hope and strength over adversity and so much more than a story of walking 630 miles along the coast path and camping along the way. Raynor Winn addresses the stigma of homelessness, poverty and social exclusion and includes some hard hitting statistics interspersed with the most hauntingly evocative This was a beautifully honest and moving account of a couple's journey along the South West Coast Path after they lost their home, health and income following a court case. This was a story of love, hope and strength over adversity and so much more than a story of walking 630 miles along the coast path and camping along the way. Raynor Winn addresses the stigma of homelessness, poverty and social exclusion and includes some hard hitting statistics interspersed with the most hauntingly evocative descriptions of the wildlife and people encountered along the way. I felt I was right there on the path with Raynor and her husband Moth, I felt the weight of their rucksacks, the mud on their boots, the wind lashing them, the driving rain dripping down the necks of their waterproof coats and the fear of where they would end up when they had finished walking the path.This book didn't finish with a happy ending but an inspiring sense of hope for the future. I have read many books about the SWCP - I live a two minute walk from the path and have walked many sections of the Cornwall path - this book was special and I will be thinking about Raynor and Moth and their journey for a while. Thanks to the publishers Michael Joseph and NetGalley for a copy of this eBook.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Ray and Moth Winn suffered a run of extremely bad luck - Moth was diagnosed with a life-shortening illness days after the Winns lost their home and livelihood as the outcome of a legal battle which they lost. Finding themselves homeless and with very little money, they decided to walk the South West Coast Path, taking along only the bare essentials, including a tent in which they would camp wild, as they did not have enough money to pay for the use of campsites.At first they found it such hard g Ray and Moth Winn suffered a run of extremely bad luck - Moth was diagnosed with a life-shortening illness days after the Winns lost their home and livelihood as the outcome of a legal battle which they lost. Finding themselves homeless and with very little money, they decided to walk the South West Coast Path, taking along only the bare essentials, including a tent in which they would camp wild, as they did not have enough money to pay for the use of campsites.At first they found it such hard going that they were afraid that they would not be able to continue, but as the days went by, they gained in fitness and came to enjoy the challenge. Hunger and cold continued to be a challenge, but they found a lot of enjoyment in the walk, and Moth's health took an unexpected turn for the better. Ray does her best to share their enjoyment with the reader.This is an interesting story of overcoming adversity, well-written and absorbing. It would have benefitted from the inclusion of a map or two, but I was reading an advanced reading copy, and it may well be that the final version will include these.I would like to thank Netgalley, the author and the publisher for providing an advance reader's copy in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.
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  • Wendy Greenberg
    January 1, 1970
    Part memoir/part travelogue...and a triumph of optimism. Raynor & her husband "Moth" fall off the edge where so many of us teeter. They become homeless, unemployed & face a degenerative health diagnosis in one fell swoop.The low key way in which this couple take this on is told in a laconic fashion as they take on the South West Coast Path, over 600 miles, relying on less than £40 per week arriving in their bank account. Their experience of using nature as a positive way of dealing with Part memoir/part travelogue...and a triumph of optimism. Raynor & her husband "Moth" fall off the edge where so many of us teeter. They become homeless, unemployed & face a degenerative health diagnosis in one fell swoop.The low key way in which this couple take this on is told in a laconic fashion as they take on the South West Coast Path, over 600 miles, relying on less than £40 per week arriving in their bank account. Their experience of using nature as a positive way of dealing with the hand they have been dealt shows endurance, hunger, pain alongside delight in the scenery, wildlife and each other.A fabulous read, highlighting rural homelessness and the human/inhuman attitudes towards them as they become "tramps"
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    this book has a beautiful cover. I vaguely rememberd somebody mentioning the story of this couple, but I didn't know it was a book. I began reading it in the dentist waiting room yesterday, straight after buying it, and this evening I finished it. I should have savoured it but I just kept reading. this true story says so much about humanity and homelessness in the UK. we see The Coastal path from another perspective. I was also heartened by the help the "old" couple receive from young people and this book has a beautiful cover. I vaguely rememberd somebody mentioning the story of this couple, but I didn't know it was a book. I began reading it in the dentist waiting room yesterday, straight after buying it, and this evening I finished it. I should have savoured it but I just kept reading. this true story says so much about humanity and homelessness in the UK. we see The Coastal path from another perspective. I was also heartened by the help the "old" couple receive from young people and shamed by the sometimes snobby unkind treatment from people of their own generation. yep there are tourists with all the fancy gear and agendas, and there are others. worth reading.
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  • Susan Harpur
    January 1, 1970
    This is a life affirming, charming book. Ray and Moth lose their home, their farm and the life they knew and loved. At the same time Moth is give a terminal diagnosis. Against all odds they start to walk the South West coastal path. Raynor Winn describes in detail the pain and difficulties experienced during their trek. They literally survived on £48 per week. What I found so shocking was the way many people related to them when they discovered that Ray and Moth were 'homeless'. They were often This is a life affirming, charming book. Ray and Moth lose their home, their farm and the life they knew and loved. At the same time Moth is give a terminal diagnosis. Against all odds they start to walk the South West coastal path. Raynor Winn describes in detail the pain and difficulties experienced during their trek. They literally survived on £48 per week. What I found so shocking was the way many people related to them when they discovered that Ray and Moth were 'homeless'. They were often excluded and avoided. They did however meet some wonderful inspiring fellow walkers.This journey was life changing for them. The biography ends on a note of hope. Good luck Ray and Moth :)
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  • Marie (UK)
    January 1, 1970
    This book brings back some fabulous memories. We currently have done just over half of the path - not wild camping i hasten to add. Ray's account feels very true to what we have experienced. However, the book is more than the walk there is the struggle with an incurable disease and homelessness, together it makes for a great read that should appeal to a wide variety of people - it doesn't matter whether they have set foot on the path or not. I loved the bits around mistaken identity, Hartland po This book brings back some fabulous memories. We currently have done just over half of the path - not wild camping i hasten to add. Ray's account feels very true to what we have experienced. However, the book is more than the walk there is the struggle with an incurable disease and homelessness, together it makes for a great read that should appeal to a wide variety of people - it doesn't matter whether they have set foot on the path or not. I loved the bits around mistaken identity, Hartland point brought back memories of a walk in a force 8 gale and the whole was beautifully portrayed
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  • chlorinda naish
    January 1, 1970
    Given lifeTwo, not actually pensioners, but getting on in age , lost their home through no fault of theirs, they had a tent and sleeping bags and decided to walk through Devon and Cornwall, despite Moth ,the husband being seriously ill, he struggled on ,well they both did, geeing each other on, they made it with a lot of kindness from people, some people thought they were tramps, as they had got so thin on what little food they managed to eat, saving most of their money for camp sites.
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  • Fugado De La Casita
    January 1, 1970
    I bought it because I saw it recommended at a Waterstone's and I was going to travel to Cornwall. I did not have great expectations because I never before read a book about wandering. But I found it very entertaining, touching in several episodes. It's an adventure. I for some reason expected endless descriptions of the landscape but it's more about life, how to face the approaching death of a loved one, homelessness, the effects of tourism in Southern England... very interesting! I finished it I bought it because I saw it recommended at a Waterstone's and I was going to travel to Cornwall. I did not have great expectations because I never before read a book about wandering. But I found it very entertaining, touching in several episodes. It's an adventure. I for some reason expected endless descriptions of the landscape but it's more about life, how to face the approaching death of a loved one, homelessness, the effects of tourism in Southern England... very interesting! I finished it before the 5-day tour ended.
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  • El
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this book. The story has the potential to be a life-affirming, heart-warming work and I love walking but I just couldn't get on with the style which, for me, was flat and monotonous and the tale itself was repetitive and overlong in many areas. I felt it needed harsher editing to pare what is a fascinating story down to its core but there was so much repetition that I lost interest. It did pick up a little towards the end but by then I was just waiting for the book to end I really wanted to like this book. The story has the potential to be a life-affirming, heart-warming work and I love walking but I just couldn't get on with the style which, for me, was flat and monotonous and the tale itself was repetitive and overlong in many areas. I felt it needed harsher editing to pare what is a fascinating story down to its core but there was so much repetition that I lost interest. It did pick up a little towards the end but by then I was just waiting for the book to end. I realise I'm in a tiny minority here so please read it for yourself to make up your own mind.
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  • Nic Compton
    January 1, 1970
    I should declare an interest here as my daughter works at Penguin and I've met Raynor and Moth at one of her talks. Despite this, I didn't have great expectations for this book, given that Ray claims the only writing she's ever done before is filling in forms. Bit by bit, though, the book got under my skin. I loved its combination of lightly evocative nature writing and gentle world wisdom. It's also incredibly poignant, but you'll have to read it to find out why.. A great, slow-burning read.
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  • AT
    January 1, 1970
    I don't normally respond to a 'hard sell' in shops but something about the sincerity of the Waterstones Newry bookseller made me buy this book, a hard back, harder on my pocket (We normally find our books second hand, borrow them from the library or swap with friends.) Anyhow it is beautiful writing and a book which I am happily passing around my kith and kin. Read it - it could be life changing.
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    This is the inspirational, and moving, true story of a couple's determination to stay positive in the face of adversity. Faced with homelessness, through what appears to be no real fault of their own, they decide to walk the South West Coastal Path. Raynor, the author, and Moth, her husband, have little money but still manage to find happiness in the little things that happen along the way. They meet a whole array of people, with mixed reactions to their plight but carry on regardless. They face This is the inspirational, and moving, true story of a couple's determination to stay positive in the face of adversity. Faced with homelessness, through what appears to be no real fault of their own, they decide to walk the South West Coastal Path. Raynor, the author, and Moth, her husband, have little money but still manage to find happiness in the little things that happen along the way. They meet a whole array of people, with mixed reactions to their plight but carry on regardless. They face many difficulties, the weather being a regular problem and seem to see each obstacle and setback as a challenge. They refuse to be beaten. I really enjoyed this book, not just for the resilience of the couple but also the fabulous descriptions of the coastal path they walked. Highly recommended.Thank you to NetGalley for providing this ebook for review.
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